English

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

English

Major

A major in English requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 18 credit points of 3000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level Interdisciplinary Project units

Minor

A minor in English requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

1000-level units of study

Selective
ENGL1002 Narratives of Romance and Adventure

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Assignment (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the art of narrative from Greek and Roman antiquity to the present. What makes Homer's Odyssey and Ovid's Metamorphoses defining texts for the history of narrative? Why are the early masters of English narrative so compelling? How does a film like O Brother, Where Art Thou? fit in? Issues of particular relevance include: genre, epic and myth; the unfolding of adventure and gender relations; intertextuality and the nature of humankind.
ENGL1007 Englishes: Language Society Text Time

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x500wd assignments (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x1.5-hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study equips students with some general tools for the close analysis of literary language. Grammatical concepts will be introduced and applied to the description of prose, poetry and drama, and students will explore the changing relations between form and meaning in English from the earliest times up to the present. A number of key strands in contemporary language study will also be presented, including semiotic theory, rhetoric and discourse studies and theorizations of the relationship between texts and subjectivity.
ENGL1012 The Gothic Imagination

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x500wd close reading exercise (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the Gothic, a transgressive literary mode that imagines haunted or hostile social worlds. Beginning with the early Gothic craze and ending with its popular on-screen renewal, we consider the aesthetics of horror and terror, and investigate the questions these texts raise about identity, place, and the imagination.
ENGL1013 Global Literatures in English

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr online activity/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd close reading (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), weekly online response / participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Global Literatures in English is a transnational and cross-period unit that examines how literary and cultural works from different periods from across the world engage with world historical events and social political structures operating on a global scale, with a particular emphasis on the representation of Empire and its legacies.
ENGL1014 Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd reading response task (20%), 1x1000wd creative writing draft (20%), 1x 2500wd creative writing portfolio (50%), workshop participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Creative writing, reading and thinking are core skills. This unit offers a practical and critical introduction to the development of a reflective creative writing practice across a range of different literary forms. Students will be guided through the process of generating ideas, drafting, workshopping, editing and revision to produce a portfolio of creative writing. The unit will emphasise creative writing as a dynamic mode of engaging with forms and ideas.
ENGL1016 Imagining the Black Atlantic

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week, 1x 2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd Close-reading exercise (40%), 1x500wd Reflection on feedback (15%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From the 16th through the 19th centuries, the Transatlantic slave trade meant roughly two-thirds of those who crossed the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas were African. This unit introduces students to the complexities of race and representation by examining the responses to and expressive forms arising from the social, political and cultural interactions of African, Caribbean, American and European peoples that together produced what Paul Gilroy termed the Black Atlantic. We examine a range of literary and film texts from Britain and the Americas from the 18th century to the present to consider slavery and its legacies, plantation cultures, and the cultural and historical work of 'blackness. '
ENGL1017 The Idea of the Classic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x750wd Close reading exercise (15%), 1x750wd Close reading exercise (20%), 1x750wd Classic Covers exercise (20%), 1x2250wd Final Essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Why are some books considered classics while others are hardly read at all? How is the idea of the classic linked to debates about history, representation, excellence, and taste? This unit answers these questions through in-depth, guided readings of a small number of major texts that have, at one time or another, been celebrated for their classic status. We consider whether literary classics must be difficult, innovative, representative, or popular; how they shape our judgements about literary tradition and value; and why they remain implicated in debates about sexuality, race, national identity, and class.
ENGL1018 The Medieval Imaginary

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ENGL2657 Assessment: 1x1000wd Close Reading Task (20%), 1x1500wd Research Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-Home Exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the literatures of the peoples who lived in the British Isles in the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500). We will focus on the transformations of myth and legend in this period and study different medieval approaches to storytelling. In particular, we will explore how medieval writers imagined and re-imagined their societies in different cultural contexts. Starting with the Old English heroic poem Beowulf, students will read translations of early and late medieval poetry and prose. We will analyse medieval literature in society, intersections between history and the imagination, the treatment of gender roles and relations, and Christian influences on 'pagan' stories, among other issues.
ENGL1019 Jane Austen, Then and Now

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ENGL2611 Assessment: 1x750wd Close Reading Task (20%), 1x1250wd Research Assignment (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd Tutorial Preparation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What does it mean to read literature historically? And what does it mean to relocate classic texts to contemporary contexts? This unit will address these questions by focusing on the example of Jane Austen, one of Britain's most celebrated novelists. We will analyse how these novels engage the literary, social and political debates of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Then, through consideration of recent adaptations, students will analyse the reading processes that allow some novelists to escape their history.
ENGL1026 Constructing the Fictive Self

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd Assignment (15%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x2hr Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What makes the subject of identity so compelling? How are we ourselves involved in the construction of such identity? This unit explores the topic of self in literary and cinematic texts. It will provide an opportunity for students to analyse and creatively explore the construction of self in a variety of social contexts by focusing on textual representations of sexuality, race and gender in ways that are relevant to being and living in today's world.

2000-level units of study

Core
ENGL2674 The Life of Texts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 5x1hr in-person lecture/semester, 12x30min online lecture/semester Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the English major Assessment: 3x500wd reflective posts (35%), 1x3000wd research project (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Literary texts are lively objects. They move not only through the hands of multiple readers and makers, but they also exist in dynamic relation to the past and the present as well as to the institutions that curate, preserve and produce knowledge about them. This unit aims to understand the interpretive and theoretical questions opened up by these complex lives. What happens to literary texts? Where do they come from? And where are they going? We examine the politics of literacy, readership and archival curation, questions of materiality and ephemerality, and the interpretive and creative possibilities opened up by the shift from print to digital forms.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Selective
ENGL2627 Screening Sexuality

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Film Studies Prohibitions: ENGL2027 Assessment: 1x1500wd word essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the relationship between cinema and sexuality in classic films through detailed, historicised readings. Questions to be investigated include the erotics of cinematic genre and form; the sexual politics of representation and spectatorship; stardom, scandal and cult appreciation; cinema and sexuality as technologies of modernity; cinema, sexuality and pedagogy.
ENGL2650 Reading Poetry

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Prohibitions: ENGL2050 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2000wd essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A range of poetry will be offered each year concentrating on an historical period, an individual poet, and a close study of a poetic form. Readings of individual poems will involve both intensive study of technical and linguistic characteristics, as well as of the broader historical, social, ideological and personal contexts and issues which they reflect. As well, there will be discussion of on-going literary-critical debate about poetry and its function.
ENGL2654 Novel Worlds

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Assessment: 3x750wd written exercises (60%), 1x2250wd take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the rise of novel reading in English as an educative, aesthetic and passionate practice from the 17th century to the present. The unit moves chronologically to examine how novels and the world came to be understood as mutually constitutive, how novels create and sustain attachments amongst their readers, how the genre of the novel became available for interrogations of national, gendered, "racial", sexual and class identity, of liberty and intellectual emancipation, and of pleasure.
ENGL2666 Creative Writing:Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1 x 2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Assessment: 1x1000wd creative writing draft (25%), 1x1000wd online writing task (25%), 1x2500wd portfolio and exegesis (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit fosters students' practice and knowledge of creative writing through interactive workshops, seminars and lectures led by established writers and academics. Exploring the theoretical and practical dimensions of developing a personal creative writing practice, the unit emphases writing as a mode of intellectual, historical and aesthetic engagement with the contemporary.
ENGL2672 Postcolonial Modernisms/Modernities

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Studies Assessment: 3 x 500wd Reader Response (30%), 1x 1000wd Interpretive Analysis (20%), 1x 2000wd Research Project (35%), 1x Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines literary and cultural expressions of modernism/modernity in sites that were or continue to be colonised. We will study how notions such as race, gender, class, sexuality, nation, and religion shape ideas of being modern, and how 20th and 21st century aesthetic works register the contradictory yet interconnected experiences of modernity.
ENGL2675 Literary and textual theories

This unit of study does not have Data Audit Committee approval

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the English major Assessment: 10x50wd reading notes (10%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x2000wd take-home test (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces concepts and debates that been influential in theorizations of textuality and discursive production in English studies. How have the representational, affective, social and ideological capacities of literary and other texts been conceived? What relations have been posited with their historically-situated readers, writers and subjects? Students will be introduced to problems of identity, (un)reason, power and critique as they impinge on textuality and meaning, and consider the implications these might have for the humanities, including for the choice to adopt the theoretical stance itself, in a period of environmental crisis and mounting authoritarianism.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL2676 Climate Fiction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr online session/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the English major Assessment: 1x2000wd reading journal (40%), 1x2500wd research project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Climate change raises fundamental challenges for the reading, writing and study of literature. This unit investigates the ways in which 'climate' features in, or shapes, fictional texts across place and time, into the present era, attending also to the texts, knowledges and perspectives of First Nations peoples. Can climate fiction shape public debate? Are its forms implicated in fossil-fuel-driven capitalism? We will ask how novels, films among other types of texts engage cultural, popular and scientific discourses to represent and imagine the environmental, social justice, existential, intercultural and interspecies implications of climate change at regional, national and planetary levels.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

3000 level units of study

Selective
ENGL3607 Modern Irish Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x500wd annotated bibliography (12%), 1x1500wd Essay (38%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study charts the development of Irish literature from the late nineteenth century to the present day, in the form of drama, short fiction, novels, poetry, biography and autobiography. Prominent themes include: the emergence of the modern Irish nation through resistance, civil war, and independence from Britain; Northern Ireland and the Troubles; expatriation and exile; wit and verbal dexterity; the fate of specifically "Celtic" sensibilities; and the relation of writing to history (ancient, colonial, the Famine, Republicanism).
ENGL3608 Transpacific American Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2664 Assessment: 1x2000wd research essay (40%), seminar participation (10%), 1x1000wd textual commentary (20%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will apply advanced literary methods to address the broad ways in which American Literature in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries has engaged with the opening of transpacific space. Themes will include the nature of westward exploration, the emergence of planetary perspectives and how these have affected US culture. Students will build on their knowledge of literary study to consider the key methodological question of how relationships between nation and narrative should be defined.
ENGL3611 Issues in the Semiotics of Language

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL3915 Assessment: 1x2000wd (35%), 1x4000wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines some key historical and theoretical topics in the semiotics of language. We begin with an investigation into the structuralist legacy, concentrating on exegetical and theoretical questions raised by Saussurean "valeur" and "difference". We then discuss analyses of lexical polysemy and alternatives to the Saussurean paradigm provided in the Humboldtian and Soviet traditions and in Relevance Theory. The course ends by assessing the desirability and difficulties of accommodating emotion in theories of linguistic signification.
ENGL3623 The 18th Century: Scandal and Sociability

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2659 Assessment: 1x1500wd research report (40%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), 1x500wd discussion paper (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In eighteenth-century Britain, authors were brought into new relation with readers. Commercial publication, now central to literary production and dissemination, meant texts reached an anonymous and potentially limitless readership. How did awareness of this new public dimension shape literary texts? Students will evaluate the constitutive role of scandal and sociability in the period's most important texts. We will focus on the development of the novel as a sociable form, and assess recent theories addressing public engagement in eighteenth-century literature.
ENGL3633 Introduction to Old English

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 2x1hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Celtic Studies Prohibitions: ENGL3621 or ENGL3622 or ENGL3631 or ENGL3632 Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Old English was the language of England from the fifth century until the twelfth. This earliest phase of the English literary tradition evolved against a background of cultural encounters: as the Anglo-Saxons encountered the culture of Rome, as they adopted and adapted the Christian religion, and as they reflected on their origins on the European continent. This unit introduces students to the language spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons, and presents the opportunity to translate and read Old English texts.
ENGL3635 Old Norse

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Linguistics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Celtic Studies Prohibitions: ENGL3631 or ENGL3632 or ENGL3622 or ENGL3621 Assessment: 2x1500wd essays (70%), 1x1hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Old Norse is the name given to the language of medieval Scandinavia which was spoken by the Viking invaders of Britain in the early Middle Ages. Old Norse literature presents a rich variety, from mythological and legendary poetry to Icelandic sagas. This unit extends students' understanding of the Germanic culture which the Anglo-Saxons brought to Britain by introducing them to the language of medieval Iceland, the literary centre of medieval Scandinavia, through texts written in Old Icelandic.
ENGL3642 Medieval Literature: Dreams and Visions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Celtic Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will study the literature of dreams and visions of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period against a range of literary and social backgrounds. The unit will begin with a survey of the classical and biblical background, to works which may be defined as dreams or visions as well as examining the relationship between the two genres and their transformations from the Middle Ages into the Renaissance.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL3655 The Literary in Theory

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2000wd Seminar presentation of research proposal (30%), 1x4000wd Research essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce students to significant movements in modern and contemporary literary theory to think about what it means to speak of the literary. The unit of study begins by examining the question of "literariness" through its exposition and defence by a number of scholars. We will pursue the applications of their arguments through a selection of theoretical models, including queer and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and race theory, to consider the cultural and ideological work imaginative literature undertakes.
ENGL3657 The Brontes

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 credit points at 2000-level from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2000wd assignment (40%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The novels of the Bronte Sisters are among the most enduringly popular Victorian texts, yet they have an ambiguous critical status. The perception that the Brontes are labile and cloistered writers, best interpreted psychoanalytically, raises questions about the relationship between biography and literature, and the ways in which notions of social and historical relevance play into judgments about literary value. We will think about canonical and popular literary status, biography and authorship, gender and writing, and Victorian society.
ENGL3695 Medieval Tales of Wonder

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points each in either (English or Australian Literature) or Celtic Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (25%), 1x3000wd research essay (60%), Class Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Medieval Romance includes narratives of adventure and ideals of courtly love within a context infused with wondrous potential. In this unit students will explore a selection of romance texts, exploring themes of gender, the fantastic and literary history. Students will analyse recent developments in theoretical approaches to Medieval romance, including monster theory and affect theory. Texts will be studied in Middle English with class support.
ENGL3696 Advanced Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL2666 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 1x1000wd outline of project (20%), 1x2000wd draft of project (30%), 1x3000wd final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on ENGL2666 Creative Writing: Theory and Practice, offering students the opportunity to complete a creative project. Student may complete projects in fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, writing for performance, or by combining any of the above.
ENGL3701 Major Australian Authors: Depth Study

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies Prohibitions: ASLT3608 Assessment: 1x 2000wd short essay (40%), 1x 4000wd long essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with the opportunity to undertake in-depth study of the life, work, career and reception of one or more major Australian writers such as Peter Carey, Helen Garner, Alex Miller, H.H. Richardson, Christina Stead, Patrick White, or Judith Wright. While focusing on close reading of texts that have come to be regarded as outstanding both nationally and internationally. students will also use methodologies that include career. biography. reception. history and analysis of key works of literary criticism and the economy of literary prestige.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL3705 Writing Country: Indigenous Ecopoetics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Indigenous Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd seminar presentation and paper (20%), 1x1000wd online writing task (30%), 1x4000wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit surveys Australian Indigenous representations of Country in poetry, fiction, art, and film. We consider Indigenous expressions of Country through comparative ecocritical transnational and trans-Indigenous frameworks and examine how Indigenous philosophies of Country can contribute to thinking about issues such as environmental crisis and climate change.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL3706 African American Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x 1000wd Close-reading exercise (30%), 1x 500wd Essay Plan (20%), 1x 3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We examine a range of African American-authored texts, including films, from the 18th century to the present to consider the relationship of race and writing, and the ways African American cultural expression contributes to and interrogates American cultural history. Issues covered include enslavement and freedom, and segregation and Civil Rights.
ENGL3707 Text, Action and Ideology

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies Assessment: 1x 2500wd Essay (40%), 1x 3500wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores text-production as a social and ideological act, with particular reference to English-speaking contexts. We will ask how competing social and political interests shape specific textual practices, and consider the ideological influences impinging on theoretical discourse about language and textuality.
ENGL3708 Love and Desire in Early Modern England

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2000wd Take-Home Paper (35%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Reading and Analysis (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, we learn, and discuss, the languages used to investigate love and desire in early modernity. We explore works, including drama and poetry, by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, discovering the relationships that they make between emotion, reason, language, politics and sexuality.
ENGL3709 Global Literature and Times of Perpetual War

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: Participation (15%), 1x3000wd research project (55%), 3x500wd reader responses (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores how literary and cultural works address the state of perpetual war of the historical present. Focusing on Third World decolonisation contexts, we will consider how writers and artists interrogate the gender, racial, and national ideologies that fuel violence, and how literary cultural analysis contributes towards understanding the global unevenly distributed effects of war.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL3710 Utopias and Dystopias: Literature; Films; TV

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 4x500wd response blog post (40%), 1x4000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically explores modern and contemporary utopias and dystopias in literature, tv, and cinema. It examines the history, aesthetics and politics of utopias and dystopias, focusing on questions of the development of new spaces and social orders, technology, the environment, surveillance, the posthuman and IT. It assesses different conceptions of the future in relation to the present and the past. The unit addresses questions about the representation of the future in different media and asks students to imagine the future as both dream and nightmare.
ENGL3711 Travellers' Tales

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the English major Prohibitions: ENGL2648 or ENGL2048 Assessment: 1x4000wd take home test (60%), 2x1000wd blog post (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores travel writing as both historical genre and creative practice. Ranging from Homer to contemporary travel blogs, it considers how the archetypal journey story is reshaped in particular cultural and political contexts. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their learning via both critical and creative assessment.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL3712 Television Fictions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the English major Prohibitions: ENGL2673 Assessment: 1x4000wd research paper (60%), 4x500wd response/blog posts (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will consider how systems of meaning have been generated in TV narratives. It will address theoretical questions regarding production and authorship, but most of this unit will focus on how particular aesthetic forms underwrite the construction of television fictions across factual narratives (news, sport), drama, comedy and serials.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ENGL3713 Shakespeare

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/semester, 9x45min online video lectures, 1x2hr seminars/week, 9x15min unassessed online writing task Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the English major Prohibitions: ENGL2640 Assessment: 1x1000wd close-reading task ('what means this metaphor?') (20%), 1x1500wd shorter essay (single play) (35%), 1x2000wd longer written piece (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Shakespeare is sometimes taken to be a writer with a particular capacity to represent human nature. In this unit, you will test the limits of this assumption by considering some of the following: Shakespearean inhumanity; Shakespeare's animals; Shakespeare and the natural world; Shakespearean scepticism. At the same time as considering and questioning Shakespeare's treatment of the "human", you will also discover new and productive ways to read his complex figurative language. Shakespeare writes for the stage, but he does so in a very particular way. This unit will allow you to engage with how, as well as what, he writes.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
JCTC3603 Representing the Holocaust

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/seminar Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Jewish Civilisation Thought and Culture major International and Comparative Literature Studies major English Studies major or European Studies major Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x1000wd textual analysis (20%), 2x250wd discussion post (10%), 1x1000wd research essay proposal (20%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Few historical events have inspired as many literary and artistic interpretations as the Holocaust. This unit will explore and critically assess how a broad range of forms, including but not limited to literature, film, fine arts, museums and memorials represent the Holocaust. In addition to a critical evaluation of these diverse artistic representations, the historical development of these forms will be considered as well as their national and transnational contexts.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

Interdisciplinary project unit of study

If you are completing two majors and both of your majors are from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, please select the Interdisciplinary Impact unit of study for your first major, and the Industry and Community Project unit of study for your second major.
If you are completing two majors but only one of your majors is from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, please select the Interdisciplinary Impact unit of study for that major.
If you are completing one major only and that major is from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, please select the Interdisciplinary Impact unit of study for your major.
ENGL3999 Interdisciplinary Impact

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive December,Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Completion of at least 90 credit points Prohibitions: Interdisciplinary Impact in another major Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Interdisciplinarity is a key skill in fostering agility in life and work. This unit provides learning experiences that build students' skills, knowledge and understanding of the application of their disciplinary background to interdisciplinary contexts. In this unit, students will work in teams and develop interdisciplinarity skills through problem-based learning projects responding to 'real world problems'.
ENGL3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real¿world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.