Music

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Music

Honours

Honours in Music requires 48 credit points from the 4000-level units table below including:
(i) 12 credit points of 4000-level Honours seminar units
(ii) 36 credit points of 4000-level Honours Thesis units

Honours Seminar units of study

CMPN4666 Advanced Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gerard Brophy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hr seminar/lecture per week Assessment: Class presentation (1000 words) (15%), Composition analysis (20%), Weekly readings reports (15%), Research Project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to equip students with a working knowledge of current music theory and analysis practice, impart analytical skills that can be applied across a broad spectrum of activities and different musical genres and types, and develop an understanding of related concepts such as what analysis actually is, different types of analysis (functional, descriptive, surface, aural/perceptual vs. score based) and an understanding of working at different levels of abstraction.
MCGY5601 Music Through Ethnography

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Webb Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hrs per week Assessment: Written reports (30%); music transcriptions (10%); Analyses (15%); ethnographic interview (15%); Short field recording (10%); summary reflection/projection (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As an analytical method, ethnography concentrates on the experience of life as it is lived. Following the development of the fieldwork-based discipline of ethnomusicology, ethnographic approaches to music have come to examine: historical and archival data, objects and artefacts in collections, cyber networks, digital communications, and medical and therapeutic understandings of sound, among other aspects of everyday life. This unit of study engages ethnographic methodologies to examine the myriad ways music informs and enriches people's lives and contributes to defining how humans flourish in their natural, social and cultural environments.
MUSC4214 Musicology Workshop Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alan Maddox Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours/week including attendance at SCM Musicology Colloquium Series (1 hour/fortnight) Assessment: 1 x reflective journal (20%); 1 x 15-20min presentation (20%); 1 x 3000wd essay (50%); overall participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Musicology Workshop Advanced provides a forum for discussion of musicological work and provides experience in the presentation of ideas and research. It also provides a broadening of students' experience in the field through attendance at the Conservatorium's fortnightly Musicology Colloquium Series lectures, presented by SCM staff and visiting national and international scholars speaking on a wide range of topics, as well as through class activities exploring areas such as research and writing skills, music criticism, visits to local libraries or archives, and conference attendance and reporting. Honours students also have the opportunity to build skills in leadership and influence by mentoring undergraduates taking Musicology Workshop 1 and 2.
Textbooks
Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Edited by Wayne C. Booth et. al. 9th edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2018.

Honours Thesis units of study

MUSC4211 Arts Music Honours Thesis 1

Credit points: 18 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar/week; 7 x half hour supervision meetings/semester, on average Prerequisites: 48 credit points in 2000 or 3000 level MUSC units which must include MUSC3609 and MUSC3629 and MUSC3699 Assessment: 1 x thesis to the equivalent of 20000wds (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit you begin a substantial, independent research project in Music. Regular meetings with a supervisor approved by the Honours Coordinator will guide your progress. You will develop a plan for researching and writing the thesis, submit an ethics application if appropriate, familiarise yourself with disciplinary conventions and standards, engage with relevant literature, theories and methodologies and submit drafts at agreed times.
And one of the following
MUSC4212 Arts Music Honours Thesis 2a

Credit points: 18 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar/week; 7 x half hour supervision meetings/semester, on average Prerequisites: MUSC4211 Assessment: 1 x 18-20000wd thesis (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you complete and submit your substantial independent research project in Music. Regular meetings with a supervisor approved by the Honours Coordinator will guide your progress. You will continue to submit drafts at agreed times, and develop your expertise in relevant research methods and analytical skills as well as in the subject matter of your specialist topic.
MUSC4213 Arts Music Honours Thesis 2b

Credit points: 18 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar/week; 7 x half-hour supervision meetings/semester, on average Prerequisites: MUSC4211 Assessment: 1 x 12-14000wd thesis (70%), 1 x creative piece to the equivalent of 6000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you complete and submit your substantial independent research project in Music, with an embedded creative component. Regular meetings with a supervisor approved by the Honours Coordinator will guide your progress. You will continue to submit drafts at agreed times, and develop your expertise in relevant research methods and analytical skills as well as in the subject matter of your specialist topic.