Non-Degree Electives

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Non-Degree Electives

Check with your degree coordinator before requesting permission to enrol into the following units.

Celtic Studies

CLST6007 Old Irish 1

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Old Irish was the language spoken and written in Ireland in the early Middle Ages, and is preserved in a range of records, from Ogham stones to manuscripts. In this unit students will develop a knowledge of Old Irish grammar and vocabulary, and learn to read texts in Old Irish.
CLST6012 Middle Welsh 1

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Middle Welsh was the language spoken and written in Wales in the Middle Ages (from about the twelfth to the fourteenth century). The most famous text surviving in Middle Welsh is the Mabinogion, a compilation of mythical and legendary material often of much earlier date. In this unit students will develop a knowledge of Middle Welsh grammar and vocabulary, and learn to read texts in Middle Welsh.

Education and Social Work

EDPC5012 Evaluating Learning Tech. Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week evenings Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignment (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is intended to help students acquire the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate ICT-enhanced learning innovations. It provides an introduction to the theory and practice of evaluations, drawing principles and methods from best practice in program evaluation and the areas of ICT-enhanced learning. Attention is paid to a holistic approach to evaluation, stressing the need to plan, design and implement evaluation in context. It is suitable for those with an interest in formal education, corporate training and professional development.
EDPC5021 Foundations of Learning Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week- evening Assessment: 4x2000wd group projects (65%) and 1x2000wd short individual assignment (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit we build on work in the learning sciences (psychology, education, cognitive and neurosciences) as we look at psychological models of learning, cognition and motivation, especially as they relate to multimedia and computer-supported learning. Contemporary educational technology use will be analysed from a number of perspectives, including classical information theory, psychological media and communication theories, activity theory, socio-cultural learning theory, constructivist and models of distributed cognition.
EDPC5025 Learning Technology Research Frontiers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 1x3000wd weekly contributions to debates and learning technology forecasts (50%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is designed for students interested in the newest research developments in the area of learning technology, and those who want to gain a deeper understanding of research methods and techniques, appropriate to the fields of the learning sciences and technologies. It is ideal for those students who want to explore the newest topics of their interest and simultaneously learn about research design in a collaborative peer-supported learning environment. Students will learn to assess critically emergingdomains of learning technology innovation, understand different kinds of research methods and choose appropriate research methods for carrying out empirical studies. Students will participate in debates, research projects. The unit is student-led and involves proactive individual and collaborative exploration of topics.
EDPJ5022 Research Methods in Language Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1 x1000wd assignment 1 (25%); 1x2000wd assignment 2 (35%);1x3000wd assignment 3 (45%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces a range of approaches to research in the area of languate studies. The unit provides frameworks with which students can review and critique previous research as well as framework for writing a research proposal. This is a required unit of study for students who wish to include a Dissertation in their MEd TESOL degree.
Textbooks
Paltridge, B. and A. Phakiti (eds) (2015). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. London: Bloomsbury.
EDPK5001 Qualitative Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week x 13 weeks Assessment: observation and report (25%), interview and report (2 x 25%) and case study/focus group (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the major issues underlying qualitative research. It examines the relationship between research questions and appropriate study designs, as well as ethical considerations. Students will develop extensive skills in the use of interviewing, observation case study and focus group research techniques.
EDPK5002 Quantitative Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: portfolio of quantitative research methods (40%) and research analysis using SPSS (40%) and presentations (10%); and 2 multiple choice class tests (10%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the basic principles and procedures of quantitative research. Both experimental and survey research strategies are considered; starting with design and development of the research tools (measures, questionnaires, interviews, observation) and progressing to basic analytical statistical methods. The unit provides a thorough introduction to simple statistics and often looks at real research data examples. By the end of the semester students will have developed various research skills as well as a critical perspective on the appropriate application of those skills.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x4 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on developing skills for critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. Research strategies, sampling and design issues and various methods of data collection and analysis are examined. Students explore both quantitative and qualitative research approaches. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.
EDPZ6011 Assessment Literacy for School Teachers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: online delivery for 13 weeks Assessment: formative assessment and engagement (20%) and major project with 2 stages (total of 5500wds; 80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
In Australia, one of the standards within the domain of Professional Knowledge describes what teachers must know and be able to do to 'assess, provide feedback, and report on student learning' at the 4 career levels. This unit provides a basic introduction to what teachers need to know and do to meet the assessment requirements of the assessment standards for the Proficiency Career Level.
EDPZ6012 Data Literacy for School Teachers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hrs x13wks. Assessment: formative assessment and engagement 1000wds (20%) and major project with 3 assignments 5500 wds (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: All sessions will be delivered by Webinar
The pressures and incentives that are driving the need for data literacy for school teachers come from many directions: (a) the move to a standards referenced system, (b) the integration of international, national and statewide high stakes testing programs, and (c) the requirement in the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers that directly address data literacy. In this unit data literacy is broadly defined as the ability to understand and use data effectively to inform teaching and learning decisions.
SCWK6902 Social Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Offered either in block (1x4 hr seminar/week x 6 weeks) or normal semester 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd qualitative task (20%), 1x1500wd quantitative task (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent participation tasks (20%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study introduces students to a range of research methods and focus on quantitative and qualitative methods. Many other research issues in developing a research proposal will be addressed through the semester. It is intended that, at the conclusion of this unit, students will have developed a research project able to implement through either further study or in workplaces.
SRSU5100 Reimagining the Future of Learning Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: week 1, 2, 5-11 (2 hr seminar per week, week 2, 5-11 can be attended online via a web platform or face-to-face) week 3 and 12 (4 hr seminar per week, face-to-face) Assessment: contributions to discussions (50%), horizon scanning report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with a unique opportunity to gain research experience and deep insight into the future of learning. Students will conduct research on emerging trends in this area together with experts from a wide range of disciplines. Through a series of online discussions and face-to-face seminars, students will expand their understanding of how innovations from diverse disciplinary fields¿such as Information Technology, Psychology, Neuroscience, Architecture, Anthropology, and Economics¿contribute to new ways of learning across formal and informal educational settings as well as organisational contexts. The work produced will contribute to the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation's report on recent innovations and opportunities for improving teaching and learning titled 'Re-imagining the future of learning'.

Languages and Cultures

SRSU5101 Language-Based Cultural Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd final essay (40%), 1x500wd classwork (10%), 2x500wd methodological exercise (30%), 2x1000wd presentations (20%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This seminar provides an overview of qualitative research methods for postgraduate students in the beginning stages of their research projects in languages and cultures. The unit will cover qualitative methods basics, including research question design, case selections, strategies for methods such as observation, interview, surveys, and focus groups. It will also introduce related writing strategies and structures as well as ethical dimensions. Throughout, the intercultural and cross-cultural aspects of students' projects will be critically engaged.

Studies in Religion

RLST6921 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester Assessment: Research and writing toward a dissertation of 12000-15000 words Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A dissertation of between 12000 and 15000 words may be an option for students. This is equivalent to two units of study and will usually be undertaken to complete the degree, that is, later rather than earlier in the student's candidature. This unit involves completing the writing of a dissertation on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic staff member commencing in RLST6921 Dissertation Part 1, and concluding in RLST6922 Dissertation Part 2. Students must consult the Chair of Department or the Postgraduate Coordinator before enrolling in the dissertation.
RLST6922 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester Prerequisites: RLST6921 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000 words (following RLST6921) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A dissertation of between 12000 and 15000 words may be an option for students. This is equivalent to two units of study and will usually be undertaken to complete the degree, that is, later rather than earlier in the student's candidature. This unit involves completing the writing of a dissertation on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic staff member commencing in RLST6921 Dissertation Part 1, and concluding in RLST6922 Dissertation Part 2. Students must consult the Chair of Department or the Postgraduate Coordinator before enrolling in the dissertation.
RLST6946 Academic Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay or research project (100%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit consists of an intensive 6 week overview of skills and techniques for the preparation and presentation of academic research, using such journals as the American Academy of Religion as a guide. Students will then be required to present their own preliminary research topics to the class, to explain issues that require consideration, alternative methodological approaches that might be employed, competing perspectives that must be balanced, and so on. Supervision by an academic member of staff will carry through to the submission of the project. Students must consult the postgraduate coordinator prior to enrolment.

Theatre and Performance Studies

PRFM5901 Critical Theory and Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd performance description (15%), 1x500wd essay plan (15%), 1x draft essay part 1 (5%), 1x draft essay part 2 (5%), 1x4500wd essay (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The discipline of Performance Studies has drawn upon a wide range of theoretical positions and resources, from semiotics to New Historicism, cultural studies, feminism, psychoanalysis, discourse theory, deconstruction, phenomenology and hermeneutics. This unit functions as an advanced reading seminar in which you will consider some key theoretical texts and examine how they have been applied to the analysis of performance.
PRFM5902 Rehearsal Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd journal (responses to readings) (40%), 1x2500wd essay (60%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The 'hidden world' of rehearsal is typically off-limits to outsiders but the exceptional creativity of performance-makers makes it a compelling focus for research. Approaching the study of rehearsal through ethnographic theory, we read and apply key texts on participant-observation fieldwork to rehearsal observation and workshop exercises.

Writing Studies

WRIT5001 Writing a thesis 1: Starting the thesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 9x1hr lectures, 8x1hr tutorials, 2x2hr workshops, 1x2hr Library skills session, 1x1hr forum with supervisors and students Assessment: 1x1500wd draft of chapter section (35%), 1x2500wd expanded chapter draft and revision (45%), 5x400wd short written tasks (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course aims to foster the writing and English language skills of postgraduate Arts and Social Sciences thesis writers. It will support students with their own thesis writing, specifically with the writing of the Research Proposal, Introduction chapter and Literature Review as well as sections of chapters. The course will be particularly useful for students who need to develop their English language proficiency and/or understanding of the requirements of thesis writing in English.
WRIT5002 Writing a Thesis 2: The Middle Chapters

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 9x1hr lectures, 8x1hr tutorials, 2x2hr workshops, 1x2hr library skills session, 1x1hr forum with supervisors and students Assessment: 1x1500wd draft of chapter section (35%), 1x2500wd draft of chapter (45%), 5x400wd short written tasks (20%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to foster the thesis writing and English language skills of Arts and Social Sciences students who are writing postgraduate theses. As the sequel to 'Writing a thesis chapter: Starting a thesis', it further supports students with their own writing by focusing on the middle chapters (or components) of the thesis, specifically theoretical frameworks, methodology, background chapters, main chapters and discussions. The course will be particularly useful for students who need to develop their English language proficiency and/or understanding of the requirements of thesis writing in English.
WRIT5003 Writing a Thesis 3: Completing a Thesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x2hr seminars, 6x2hr workshops/writing groups Assessment: 1x500wd table of contents (8%), 1x1500wd introduction chapter (25%), 1x250wd revise consistency of chapter arguments (9%), 1x250wd abstract (8%), 1x2000wd main chapter (25%), 1x1500wd conclusion chapter (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit aims to foster the thesis writing and English language skills of Arts and Social Sciences students who are writing postgraduate theses. As the sequel to 'Writing a thesis chapter 1: Starting a thesis' and 'Writing a thesis chapter 2: The Middle chapters', it further supports students with their own writing by focusing on the completion of the thesis, including the Introduction and Conclusion chapters, Front Matter (including abstracts), the argument of the thesis and proofreading and editing. The course will be particularly useful for students who need to develop their English language proficiency and/or understanding of the requirements of English thesis writing.
WRIT6000 Professional Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd analysis (20%), 1x2000wd case study (30%), 1x1000wd project (20%), 1x2000wd proposal (30%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces theories of professional writing with a specific focus on composing in the workplace. Students will develop abilities in analysing, writing, revising, and delivering workplace texts, both print and multimedia. By examining and discussing a range of actual workplace documents, from emails to websites, students will gain a broader understanding of the rhetorical principles and ethical responsibilities inherent in professional writing practice. They will improve their ability to negotiate the relationships, tensions, and politics that influence workplace writing contexts.
WRIT6001 Professional Editing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Individual Analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Group Analysis (30%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Essay (20%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces practical techniques for editing workplace documents for increased clarity and effectiveness. Applying theories and principles of visual rhetoric, students will learn how to improve the readability and reception of workplace texts according to audience conventions and expectations. By analysing actual workplace documents, students will develop their critical reading abilities and gain a better understanding of how to edit texts for word economy, improved design and layout, and inclusive language. Editing print texts for digital or oral presentation will also be emphasised.
FASS7001 Academic English for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (15%), 1x2500wd Reflection Journal (25%), 1xSeminar Presentation (25%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Where students intend to complete both FASS7001 and FASS7002, they should undertake FASS7001 first then FASS7002. Do not enrol in both in one semester.
This elective is designed for international postgraduates who are new to study in an English language university. It supports the development of study, research, and critical thinking abilities, spoken English and academic language. Knowledge acquired in this unit will strengthen written and spoken English to help meet the standards necessary for successful completion of FASS Masters by coursework degrees. It is recommended that this elective be taken during your first semester.
FASS7002 Critical Thinking and Persuasive Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weeks 1-3: 2x1hr lecture/week, 2x2hr tutorial/week; Weeks 4-9:1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical review (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), seminar presentation (20%),1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective supports development of skills in critical analysis, writing in different genres, research, presentation, and developing individual scholarly 'voice'. While valuable for all commencing postgraduates, it is of particular benefit to those returning to academia after an extended break, or for International students wishing to orient themselves to local standards of practice for academic communication. This unit is structured to have additional seminars and lectures early in the semester and fewer later in the semester so students have the opportunity to apply new skills to all their coursework. The unit is ideally taken in the first semester of study.