Education (Taronga Conservation Education)

Semester 2, 2020 unit of study availability

Some Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences units of study originally intended to run in Semester 2, 2020 are no longer available.

A full and up-to-date list of units of study available in Semester 2, 2020 from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, can be found on this webpage.
 

Taronga Conservation Education

Master of Education (Taronga Conservation Education)

Students must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) 18 credit points of core units of study developed and delivered at Taronga
(b) 6 credit points of core units of study developed and delivered at The University of Sydney
(c) a maximum of 12 credit points of capstone units of study; and
(d) a maximum of 12 credit points of postgraduate Education units of study which can be chosen from any Master of Education program.

Graduate Diploma in Educational Studies (Taronga Conservation Education)

Students must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) a minimum of 24 credit points of core units of study
(b) a maximum of 12 credit points of postgraduate Education units of study chosen from any Master of Education program.

Graduate Certificate in Educational Studies (Taronga Conservation Education)

Students must complete 24 credit points, including:
(a) 24 credit points of core units of study..

Core units

EDPT5002 Understanding Conservation Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: A total of 24 hours consisting of 2hr seminars and weekend workshops, all taking place at Taronga Zoo. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, students will use and critique current research to understand broad concepts of conservation science, the complexities of ecosystem structure and function, and issues in conservation. This unit includes examples of current conservation scenarios and programs that are being developed and implemented, and provides an opportunity to explore conservation science and education as practiced at Taronga Conservation Society Australia. It also explores approaches to addressing conservation and evaluating conservation programs. Students will critically assess different techniques used in conservation science through examination of the literature - both peer reviewed and unpublished reports.
EDPT5003 Environmental Education Programs

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Taronga Zoo, Sydney site: 2x6 hr weekend seminars, 6x2 hr evening seminars Prerequisites: Understanding Conservation Science (new proposal) EDPC5022 Design for Learning Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Education is an essential element in addressing the persistent environmental problems society is currently facing. This unit examines issues related to the declining opportunity for students and community to engage with outdoor learning and their lack of opportunity to make a positive impact on their local environment. Connecting people with nature has profound benefits on knowledge retention, and supports students to develop investigative skills, to acquire an attitude of care for the environment and to practise the principles of ecological sustainability. In this unit, participants will gain an advanced understanding of contemporary environmental education theory, research and practice. Using Taronga Conservation Society of Australia as a case study, current environmental education programs that demonstrate positive conservation outcomes will be investigated. This elective provides participants with the knowledge and skills to be effective environmental educators. Various teaching pedagogies will be explored which will help participants gain the expertise to move beyond the classroom with their practice. The major focus of this unit is to teach current and aspiring educators how to design authentic environmental education programs, for all academic levels, that will enable their students to participate actively as citizens in protecting the environment and contribute to the development of an enduring sustainable, environmentally sound society.
EDPC5022 Design for Learning

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This course provides a framework for considering many of the core problems facing those who carry out the work of educational design. It offers a model of the architecture of learning situations and focuses on three main design components that influence the character and outcomes of learning: the design of good learning tasks, the design of physical and digital resources and spaces for learning, and design intended to evoke convivial learning relationships. The course does not aim to teach specific design techniques - for example, the steps in Instructional Systems Design (ISD). Rather, it suggests ways of identifying which tools and techniques, from the many now available, are most likely to be appropriate for a specific design challenge. The course therefore offers an overview of selected, contemporary approaches, techniques and tools of relevance to designing for other people's learning. It also provides an opportunity to review empirical research on how designers design and what knowledge they draw upon in design work.
EDPT5004 Conservation Leadership and Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: A total of 24 hours consisting of 2hr seminars and weekend workshops, all taking place at Taronga Zoo. Prerequisites: Understanding Conservation Science (new proposal) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There has never been a more urgent and critical need to address the threats to biodiversity. Whilst humans are the main driver of these problems, they can also drive the solution. The contemporary understanding of conservation science reflects this, broadening the context from a focus on biology to people and the choices they make. To be effective, programs to conserve ecosystems must consider the human behaviour dimension. In the last decade, many zoos have begun to fully embrace social science and use behaviour change theories as a basis for their programs, experiences and exhibits. This has been a deliberate shift in order to move beyond merely awareness raising and onto facilitating the pro-wildlife and pro-environmental behaviours needed to address threats to biodiversity. Zoos also provide a unique opportunity to influence the next generation, as emotionally powerful childhood experiences of nature and wildlife have been shown to be an important factor behind environmentally responsible actions by adults. Combining many individual actions and changes in behaviour can assist in building towards a tipping point for legislative, regulatory, social and/or market changes. In this unit, students will explore Taronga Conservation Society Australia's campaigns and programs that lead the community to rethink the way we live and the impacts we have on our environment both at Taronga and in the community. The students in this course will learn how to apply models and methodologies to influence behaviour and create social impact to solve environmental problems and support healthy ecosystems for a sustainable future. They will also develop their capacity to lead and deliver education programs through a practical understanding of communication and environmental education strategies.

Elective units

EDPA5013 Program Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x logic model presentation (20%; 1x evaluation plan (30%) and 1x Evaluation logic critique (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Students undertaking the designated area of Educational Management and Leadership are expected to be able to implement policies and programs designed to bring about organisational change. There are numerous forms of program evaluation available to the evaluator. Selecting the appropriate form for the appropriate purpose is the key to success. This unit is designed to provide the necessary knowledge and skills to enable students to design, plan and implement an evaluation program and to provide an understanding of five major forms of program evaluation, their purposes, and their associated approaches.
Textbooks
Owen, J.M. (2006) Program evaluation: forms and approaches (3rd edition) Allen and Unwin
EDPB5002 Globalisation and Education

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Concepts of global integration and culture. Economic political and cultural dimensions of globalisation. Major interpretive approaches to globalisation. Major world trends in education assessed in light of globalisation. Globalisation of labour markets; marked forces in education; cross-cultural and trans-national trends in education provision; knowledge as a global construct; global organisations and agenda in education; emerging global and regional structures in education, students, educational professionals and knowledge workers in a globalising world. Investigation and report on a special study.
EDPB5016 Global Poverty, Social Policy and Ed

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review (10%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Investigation and analysis of: basic indicators of global poverty; key theories of poverty and development and their implications for social policy and education; western paradigms and their effects in non-western contexts; alternatives to westernisation; education as a form of foreign aid and development co-operation in multilateral, bilateral and non-government programs; multisectoral approaches to poverty alleviation strategies.
EDPD5001 Students with Special Educational Needs

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: Annotated Bibliography 1000wd equivalent (20%); Article Critique 1500wd (50%); Literature Review 3500wd (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is intended that this unit of study will examine the general and specific characteristics and learning requirements of children with intellectual, physical, language, sensory, learning, behavioural and/or emotional disabilities and an understanding of disability issues, legislation and policy. The unit of study follows a rights based approach. Through the study and discussion of theory and research related to such issues, students will be guided more explicitly to an understanding and critical evaluation of research literature in these fields, focusing particularly upon the cognitive, affective, social, and behavioural needs and characteristics of students with disability. This focus is intended to enable the reading of professional publications with understanding, and to develop skills of critical review and analysis necessary for the evaluation of research in the field using current disability models.
EDPE6011 Learning and Individual Differences

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd seminar essay (40%) and 1x3000wd seminar essay (40%) and 1x45 minute seminar presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examiners major areas of individual differences among learners and ways in which educational provision may be adapted to accommodate these differences in helping each student to achieve major learning outcomes. Consideration will be given to areas of cognitive and personality differences, learning styles, and gender differences. Particular attention will be given to implications of research which (a) explores aptitude-treatment interactions, (b) elucidates the mediating processes involved in adaptive provisions and (c) evaluates outcomes of major forms of provision for individual differences.
EDPE6013 Learning and Teaching Thinking Skills

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar paper (30%) and 1xseminar presentation (20%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit of study centres on examination and evaluation of a number of approaches to the development of higher order cognitive skills. Consideration will be given to the structuring of knowledge to facilitate explanation, problem-solving and creativity and to the use of internalised self-regulatory control strategies in fostering cognitive outcomes. Ways in which thinking and cognition can be supported and extended in educational contexts will be examined in some detail. Particular attention will be given to factors that influence thinking, the role of tools and technologies in facilitating thinking, and perspectives on thinking and cognition generated by contemporary research in cognitive science.
EDPL6002 Aboriginal Community Collaboration

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x6.5 hrs workshops, 13 hrs online Assessment: 1x1800wd community engagement evaluation (30%), 1x1800wd critical reflection and analysis (30%), 1x2400wd critical review of literature (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students develop a deep understanding of the theoretical and practical applications of collaborating with their local Aboriginal communities in order to better meet needs of their students, families and communities, and embed this into the structure and culture of their schools.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x4 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on developing skills for critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. Research strategies, sampling and design issues and various methods of data collection and analysis are examined. Students explore both quantitative and qualitative research approaches. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.
SCWK6048 Environmental Change for Social Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x5hr seminar/wk for 5 weeks Assessment: 3x500wd blog posts (30%), 1x3000wd reflective essay (40%), 1x individual presentation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Global warming is recognised as an outstanding threat for human societies (World Bank, 2012). The links between the environment, human rights and social justice are widely recognised. The International Federation of Social Work's 'Policy Statement on Globalisation and the Environment' and the AASW's Code of Ethics identify social work as a key player in efforts to address climate change. This unit recognises the importance of preparing students to: have an understanding of the impact of climate change; to develop skills to prevent further environmental degradation; and to respond to individuals and communities most impacted by climate change.
SCWK6023 Practice with Indigenous Australians

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1b Classes: 4x6hr sessions Assessment: 1x1500wd Critical Reflective Practice (30%), 1xGroup Work Presentation + Report 1000wd Cultural Safety Strategy (30%), 1x3500wd Integrated Literature Review (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an insight into and understanding of the application of social work practice within an Indigenous context. It will explore the multidimensional social and societal issues impacting on the lives of First Nations Australians and it will assist students in developing the mechanisms and skills necessary to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Individuals, Families and Communities. It will bring to the forefront Indigenous- specific Knowledge systems and social work practice

Capstone units

EDPZ6730 Special Project 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several sessions with supervisor Prerequisites: 24 credit points of units Assessment: 1x6000wd project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Special Project is a capstone unit, semester length independent investigation of a personally chosen topic in an educational context, the result of which is a 'product' of approximately 6,000 words such as a written report, review, account of the development of a resource, analysis of action research or critique of research. All 'products' should be demonstrably informed by relevant theory and research. The satisfactory completion of this unit provides an alternative to the regular face-to-face classroom unit of study for candidates enrolled in a graduate coursework award.
EDPZ6731 Special Project 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several sessions with supervisor Prerequisites: EDPZ6730 Assessment: 1x6000wd project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Special Project is a semester length independent investigation of a personally chosen topic in an educational context, the result of which is a 'product' of approximately 6,000 words such as a written report, review, account of the development of a resource, analysis of action research or critique of research All 'products' should be demonstrably informed by relevant theory and research. The satisfactory completion of this unit provides an alternative to the regular face-to-face classroom unit of study for candidates enrolled in a graduate coursework award. This unit is only available to students enrolled in a course which requires them to complete Special Project 1 and Special Project 2.
EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings/discussions with supervisor Assessment: satisfactory progress during semester; students then must enrol in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 the following semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part one of the Dissertation which runs over two semesters; therefore, students must also enroll in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 in the following semester.
EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings/discussions with supervisor Prerequisites: EDPZ6724 Assessment: 1x12000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part two of the Dissertation which runs over two semester; therefore, students must have also enrolled in EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1 in the previous semester.
EDPZ6720 Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings/discussions with supervisor Assessment: 1x12000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methodology unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development.