Political Economy

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Political Economy

Master of Political Economy

Students complete 72 credit points, including:
(a) a minimum of 18 credit points from core units of study; and
(b) a minimum of 18 credit points from selective units of study; and
(c) a maximum of 24 credit points from elective units of study; and
(d) a minimum of 6 credit points of capstone units of study; or
(e) an optional specialisation in:
(i) Social Research; or
(ii) Country Risk Assessment

Graduate Diploma in Political Economy

Students complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) a minimum of 12 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) a minimum of 12 credit points from selective units of study; and
(c) a maximum of 18 credit points from elective units of study

Graduate Certificate in Political Economy

Students complete 24 credit points, including:
(a) a minimum of 6 credit points of core unit of study; and
(b) a maximum of 18 credit points from selective units of study.
Core units of study
ECOP6101 Core Concepts in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4x4x500wd seminar papers (40%), 1x4000wd essay (45%), seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores the core concepts of Political Economy through the lens of the principal schools of economic thought which comprise the social science discipline of economics. The historical origins of each school are identified along with their methodological approaches and analytical tools, policy prescriptions and insights. This examination illuminates the different views about the dynamics of the capitalist economy and lays the foundation for the application of political economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary issues.
ECOP6103 Strategic Debates on Economic Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%), 1xGroup presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the processes of socioeconomic change, and the forces involved in bringing about such change. It introduces several theoretical perspectives and - using a number of contemporary case studies - considers the interests, the relationships and the constraints involved in socioeconomic change. Students consider a range of issues and debates, and make a detailed study in one such area.
ECOP6031 Research in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x4000wd Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on conducting research in political economy. Weekly seminars examine a range of topics including research design, literature review, data collection and analysis, and writing a research proposal. The seminars provide an opportunity for critical discussion to identify, debate and reflect on the nature and challenge of undertaking research. The assessment is structured to assist the progressive development of a research proposal. Completion of this Unit of Study is a pre-requisite for a Masters dissertation.
Selective units of study
ECOP6010 International Trade Regulation

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (20%), 1x3000wd Essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (25%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to competing perspectives on business regulation, then to familiarise students with the main elements of governance and regulation as they affect international business and, in particular, international trade.
ECOP6011 USA-Europe-Japan: From Growth to Crisis

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3500wd Essay (60%) and 1500wd report (25%) and 1000wd equivalent Seminar presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the dynamics of capitalist growth and crisis from the end of the Second World War until the present. It will analyse the formation of a triad formed by the USA, Europe, and Japan, as well as the contradictions that beset this constellation from the 1980s. The unit will pay particular attention to the rise of new economic powers like China over the past decades, and it will explore the dynamics of the financial crisis of 2008 and its impact on the European Union.
ECOP6012 Country Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (25%), 1x3000wd project (40%), 1x1000wd Presentation (20%), Seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The impacts of volatility are an ever-present concern for policymakers, firms and households. This unit looks at a diverse range of methods and techniques for assessing country risk (e.g., economic risk, financial risk, sovereign (default) risk, socio-political risk, etc). This entails an overview of the (political) economic frameworks and connecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches to the current research on leading indicators and early warning systems.
ECOP6015 Global Employment and Migration

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1250wd short Essay (20%), 5x 250wd diary digests (20%), 1x1000wd Presentation and write-up (20%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the evolution of international employment opportunities as a feature of the globalisation of economies. Different approaches to the analysis of labour markets provide conceptual frameworks for examining the changing character and structure of global employment and international migration. Case studies examine the effects of state regulatory arrangements and international institutions governing cross-border labour migration and cross-border employment in multinational firms, including professionals, skilled and unskilled workers.
ECOP6016 China in the International Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd reading reflection (20%), 1x2500wd essay 1 (35%), 1x3000wd essay 2 (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses the contemporary Chinese economic system and its role in the international economy. The drivers of this evolution, the domestic and international implications of the Chinese growth model and its sustainability, China's relationships with the United States, European Union, Latin America and Africa, and China's role in global economic governance through international institutions like the World Trade Organisation, form the focus of this unit. Two key questions considered by this unit are: whether contemporary China is a market socialist economy, a form of capitalism or a transitioning economy; and China's possible future role in the international economy.
ECOP6017 Inequality in the Global Economy

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Short essay (20%), 1x15mins Seminar presentation (20%), 1x3000wd Research report (50%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The principle of equality is a widely held ideal, however, inequality is on the rise worldwide. This unit of study investigates the historical development of inequalities of wealth and income across the global economy. The course surveys strands of liberal, marxian, feminist, and postcolonial economic thought that seek to shed light on how global economic processes produce inequalities of different kinds. Students will learn how to apply these frameworks to contemporary issues and policy debates in affluent and developing nations.
ECOP6018 Economic Development: Growth and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x3000wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the processes and social dynamics underpinning economic development. Students engage critically with key themes informing the discourse of 'development economics' and reflect on alternative approaches to understanding the connections and tensions between economic development, growth and wellbeing. Key debates within this scholarship are considered in their historical context and contending theoretical approaches are surveyed in relation to global agricultural and extractive industries.
ECOP6108 Economic Management for Sustainability

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x10min seminar presentation (10%), 1x1000wd seminar paper 1 (20%), 1x1000wd seminar paper 2 (20%), 1x3000wd research essay (40%), participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to environmental economic theory, ecological economics, and other critical perspectives in order to develop an understanding of the parameters that define management of economy-environment interactions. Students will develop a critical appreciation of the systemic nature of the pressures imposed on environmental/ecological systems and the intractable problems this presents. The unit examines the different tendencies that inform environmental management and sustainable development; and the relative merits/weaknesses of the strategies and policies advanced.
ECOP6115 History of Australian Capitalism

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: Seminar Participation (10%), 1x3000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent Graph/table Essay (25%), 1x1500wd Historiographic debate presentat (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Introduction to the rich political-economic historiography of Australian capitalism. Themes include: colonisation and dispossession; long booms and great depressions; integration with world capitalism; making and remaking of class relations; embeddedness in the natural environment; financial change.
ECOP6130 Human Rights and International Development

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG6912 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1.5hr exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This unit links debates over social rights and democratic legitimacy to structural economic arguments. It introduces the competing arguments over social rights and the struggles that have created them, and promotes the use of evidence in these conceptual arguments. The approach of economic liberalism to rights is examined. Important global issues involving rights and economic argument - such as self-determination, land rights, food security, fair trade and economic governance - are examined.
ECOP6901 Finance and Economic Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (30%), 1x2500wd essay (30%), 1x1000wd presentation (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Foreign exchange, security and other derivative markets have expanded dramatically over the past 20 years. More recently they have been associated with the largest economic crisis in 80 years. This unit develops a political economy perspective on these markets, including their vulnerability to crisis and the intrusion of financial calculation into wider social and personal calculation. The unit also addresses the regulation of financial markets and institutions including key regulatory and monitoring agencies and arguments for new regulatory regimes.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Elective units of study
BETH5209 Medicines Policy, Economics and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Wendy Lipworth, Dr Narcyz Ghinea Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A degree in science, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, allied health, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, law, communications, public policy, business, economics, commerce, organisation studies, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Medicines save lives but they can be costly and can have serious adverse effects. Value-laden decisions are continuously being made at individual, institutional, national and international levels regarding the medicines we need, want and can afford. In this unit of study, we will explore and critique global and national policies and processes related to medicines, examining how research and development agendas are set; how medicines are assessed and evaluated; and how new technologies are translated into practice. We will also explore broader trends such as globalisation, commercialisation and changing consumer expectations. By the end of the course, students will understand the forces shaping the development, regulation, funding and uptake of medicines both nationally and internationally, and the political, ethical, legal and economic issues that are at stake. This course is designed to appeal to a wide range of students from ethics, law, public health, health care, policy, communications, economics, business, politics, administration, and biomedical science.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Issue brief (35%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Self-evaluation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
CISS6006 Intervention and 'Fragile' States

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x500wd actor profile (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the notion of state fragility within the global system. It investigates the characteristics of so-called 'fragile' and 'failed' states, and the nature of international engagement with (and discourses about) these states. It explores various perspectives on state formation in both Western and post-colonial contexts, and emphasises the ways in which knowledge is produced about non-Western states. The unit expands upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.
CISS6013 Middle East Conflict and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Prohibitions: GOVT6154 Assessment: 1x2500wd briefing paper (45%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the drivers of conflict and insecurity in the contemporary Middle East, starting with a theoretical framework that investigates the processes of state-formation and external intervention in the region. The unit focuses on the interplay between domestic factors (such as rentierism and regime dynamics) and international factors (including geopolitics/geo-economics, and the military industrial complex), and uses several detailed case studies to explore the relationship from various angles.
DVST6901 Development: Civil Society and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SSCP6900 Assessment: Weekly online exercises 1000wd in total (15%),1x500wd Research essay proposal (10%), 1x3000wd Research essay (45%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The post-1949 era of 'development' has seen a philosophical and policy shift from nation-building projects of 'modernisation' to the local responsiveness of market forces and civil society. An anthropological emphasis on cultural and local difference and a sociological understanding of state and civil society provide a critical perspective on both this history and current debates. Case studies raise questions of health, gender and childhood, project success or failure, and of the hopes and skepticism development evokes.
DVST6902 Development: Communication and Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SSCP6901 Assessment: 5x600wd critical reviews (50%) and 3000wd research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Development is an international and intercultural process that seeks to both implement projects with specific objectives, and change the way people live and think. Language, as communication both enables such projects and is a source of incomprehension, misunderstanding and exclusion within them. Education as the longer term attempt to change the thinking and values of people and communities also has language at its heart. This unit examines the nature and politics of language and education and their relationship within development.
DVST6904 Rethinking Poverty

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x1hr Exam (15%), 1x1000wd Reading notes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Poverty reduction has always been a central development goal. Major international programs such as the UN's Millennium Goals place poverty at their centre. New explanatory concepts such as social exclusion, capability, social capital and sustainability have considerably expanded our thinking about its nature. Students will examine cases from many parts of the world of the way discourses, policies and development practices operate together, enabling an evaluation of contemporary approaches to poverty and their effects on those most vulnerable.
ECMT5001 Principles of Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 500wd (10%), 1xGroup assignment equivalent to 1000wd (15%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit develops the basic principles of data description and analysis, the idea of using the concept of probability to model data generation, and the statistical concepts of estimation and statistical inference, including hypothesis testing. It then develops these concepts and techniques in the context of the linear regression model to show how econometric models can be used to analyse data in a wide range of potential areas of application in economics, business and the social sciences. The unit combines theory and application. The emphasis is upon the interpretation of econometric estimation results and requires software for hands-on experience.
ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5040 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5003 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1500wd (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
ENVI5801 Social Science of Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides both a conceptual and an empirical foundation for the analysis of relationships between society, the environment and natural resources. In our recent past the rapid rate of global environmental change has necessitated a breakdown of traditional disciplinary boundaries in research and social scientists are increasingly called upon to work alongside natural scientists in unraveling the complexities of the human-environmental nexus. Students will examine a number of environmental issues and consider a variety of social science academic perspectives about environmental management.
ENVI5903 Sustainable Development

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Intensive July Classes: Two pre-departure lectures, 14-day field intensive. Assessment: Essay and presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study involves additional costs.
This unit of study constitutes an international field-based experience held in Southeast Asia during the July semester break. It explores the contested notions of sustainable development and sustainability through exposure to real world development dilemmas in Southeast Asia. We explore fundamental issues such as urbanization, sustainable livelihood, resource scarcity and economic globalization. The unit of study involves lectures, in-situ readings and discussion groups, introduction to field methods, stakeholder meetings and experiential learning. Students interested in this unit should confirm their interest to the Unit Coordinators by the end of March of the year the field school will be held. There will be additional costs associated with this unit to cover food, accommodation, local transport and field assistance of about $1,200. Students will also be required to arrange their own international travel to the starting point (either Vientiane or Jakarta depending on the specific location of the course).
GOVT6108 Democracy, Development and Rights in SE Asia

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Oral Presentation and written assessment (30%), 2500wd analytical Essay/report (30%), 1500wd exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Southeast Asia's economic experiences and socio-political challenges will be examined within an historical and comparative context in order to better appreciate the economic continuities, understand the major socio-political dilemmas and changing patterns of development. Themes such as the significance of colonialism on post-colonial economies and polities, role of the state in the national and global economy, causes of the region's high-speed growth in the 1980s and 1990s, subsequent economic downturn and future prospects, changing complexion of foreign investment, significance and operational dynamics of the Overseas Chinese Business Networks, salience of socio-economic and ethnic tensions, contradictions associated with the promotion of open economies within authoritarian political structures, the relationship between economic and political corruption, prominence of political Islam, rise of civil society actors, implications of the national and regional reserve army of labour, efficacy of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the region's economic and security links with Northeast Asia will be analysed.
GOVT6109 Political Regimes and Regime Transition

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3x1500wd analytical essay (75%), 1x1.5 hr final exam (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide an in-depth examination of theories of political regimes and regime transitions. Political scientists have developed a variety of theories to explain democratic breakdown and democratization, and formulated an expansive typology of regimes to describe the diverse forms of democracy, authoritarianism, and 'hybrid regimes.' This unit provides a broad overview of theories of political regimes and regime transitions, and introduces students to some of the major debates and controversies in this field of study.
GOVT6116 International Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive March Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 4000wd Essay (50%) and 2hr exam (30%) and Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to introduce students to how states and other actors in the international arena cooperate to build institutions as a response to common problems. After completing the unit students should be able to analyse contemporary international organisations to see how they work, whose interests they serve, and to what degree they attenuate or enhance the power of sovereign states.
GOVT6123 Globalisation and Governance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (40%), 3x 500wd Tutorial papers (30%), 1x1.5hr Examination (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is widely believed that we are entering a new era in which the transborder flows of capital, goods, ideas, and people are rapidly transforming human society. 'Globalisation', many claim, threatens the autonomy of nation-states and erodes the power of national governments to provide social protection and promote the nation's economic prosperity. This unit examines not only the causes and mechanisms of this process, but also assesses its social, economic, and political impacts. The views of radicals, transformationalists, skeptics, and institutionalists are compared and criticised. While globalisation is often viewed as a singular process, trending towards a global society, this unit offers a distinctive approach. Globalisation has uneven and highly differentiated impacts, whether harmful or beneficial, and this unevenness is closely associated with the nature of institutions of governance, at both the domestic and international levels.
GOVT6139 Research Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Proposal (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students with the fundamentals for constructing and conducting effective research projects in the social sciences. An overview of social science inquiry will be presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used in research. This will include a focus on both primary research, using interviews and questionnaires, and secondary research, using statistical databases, content analysis and textual analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be covered in the unit, as will an overview of ethical practices associated with research design. The assessment will be based around constructing practical research projects that can be utilised in both university and workplace-based research.
GOVT6304 Development and World Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Book review (20%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), 1x1500wd equivalent Class presentation (20%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine critical perspectives on international development. It will explore key questions concerning development, including: Have efforts to 'reduce poverty' been effective? What are the various meanings associated with development concepts like 'building capacity' and 'empowerment'? Is there any consensus about what development is and how to 'do' it? The unit will include an analysis of how much has been learned about development over the last fifty years. Finally, the unit will consider what role might individuals take.
PACS6911 Key Issues in Peace and Conflict Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive March Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent Prohibitions: SCWK6930 Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1x2500wd personal learning journal (30%), 1x3500wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Peace and Conflict Studies and the history, philosophy, economics and politics of peace. Students will learn about the causes of violence and the potential for nonviolence, peaceful conflict resolution and other means of achieving peace with justice in different conflict settings.
PACS6924 Democracy in the Developing World

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd final essay (60%), Online Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit offers a comparative consideration of different concepts of democratisation and development including the criteria for compiling country development indices and typologies of democracy. Experiences of implanting and/or imposing democracy are examined in Japan, Iraq and other nations. The pan-Pacific model of development, and the pros and cons of using authoritarian means to achieve it, is also considered, with examples including Indonesia under Suharto and Singapore under Lee Kuan Yew. Relationships between development, conflict and poverty are examined - do elections lead to more democracy? More development? Or do they allow authoritarian winners to institutionalise power? What about the coup in Thailand?
PACS6934 Conflict-Sensitive Development Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive May Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent Assessment: class and project participation (25%), 1x1500wd project report (25%), 1x3000wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
International development and humanitarian assistance are often delivered in a context affected by violent conflict. Aid and development operating in such complex situations risks feeding the conflict rather than alleviating it. A conflict-sensitive approach minimises the negative impact of aid and development ('do no harm') and maximises the positive impact on local capacities for peace. In this unit we take a skills-based approach to understanding and applying theories and methods of conflict analysis to designing conflictsensitive interventions that support more effective and accountable development practice in the field.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
SCLG6901 Citizenship Rights and Social Movements

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCWK6901 Assessment: 1500wd reading journal (30%) and 2500wd research essay (50%) and 1000wd equivalent oral presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide an analysis of theories and practices of citizenship rights in Australia, other Anglophone countries and European countries in the 20th and 21st centuries. It will examine the relationships between different modes of citizenship, claims for rights and the formation of social movements with regard to the women's movement, Indigenous movements (where applicable) and movements concerned with migration, ethnic diversity and multiculturalism. Analyses will focus on the processes, content and outcomes of social movement advocacy.
SCLG6903 New Debates in Social Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x1200wd equivalent online presentations and discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores a series of issues of controversy and debate in social theory. These include debates over: the information age; new information and communication technologies; the new capitalism and changing work practices; the cultural sphere; new forms of power and surveillance; shifting claims to insight in knowledge societies; the role of education in social inequality; the bases of making knowledge claims; and globalisation. The unit involves both face-to-face seminars and online discussions.
SCLG6910 Comparative Welfare States

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCWK6909 Assessment: 4x30mins In-class quiz (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides a comparative analysis of welfare state development. It discusses how to meaningfully compare different welfare states and their social programmes. As a defining characteristic of welfare states, our primary focus is on the state's involvement in welfare services and benefits. Starting from there, we also explore various ways of `doing social policy' across different parts of the world and discuss the sort of socioeconomic outcomes they produce. Comparative research provides a useful venue to investigate the relationship between the institutional design of the welfare state and its size and how this relationship changes over time under the changing structural conditions.
SSPS6001 Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/lab per week Assessment: 1x2hr in-class exam (I) (35%), 1x2hr in-class exam (II)(35%), 3x660wd homework tasks (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Quantitative methods are vital to social science. This unit introduces students to commonly used techniques for collecting and analysing numerical data to answer empirical questions about social, cultural, and political phenomena. It addresses the description of data with graphs and tables, descriptive statistics, statistical models, hypothesis testing, and other topics. The unit is appropriate for beginners, who will gain perspective and confidence conducting their own quantitative research and critically understanding that of others. It is taught in a computer lab, giving students practical experience with statistical software.
SSPS6002 Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2hr in-class exam (35%), 1x2000wd analytical memo (35%), 2x1000wd homework tasks (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualitative research rests at the heart of social science. This unit introduces students to commonly used techniques for collecting and analyzing categorical data to answer empirical questions about social, cultural, and political phenomena. It examines case studies and comparative history; interviews, ethnography, and fieldwork; plus archives and content analysis, among other topics. Instruction is provided by a team of teachers with experience using these methods. Students therefore gain valuable insight into how to conduct and consume qualitative research.
WMST6903 Gender, Media and Consumer Societies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd group discussion/presentation (15%), 1x1000wd advertising analysis (25%), 1x500wd research essay proposal (10%), 1x2500wd research essay (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines theories of consumption in regards to cultural and media products and practices, with a specific focus on gender. Drawing upon a wide range of feminist media and cultural theories, we will critically analyse different forms of belonging and identity that are created through these practices. We will also pay close attention to the critiques of globalisation and consumption, theories of the 'citizen consumer' and the realities of geo-political and economic inequalities that underpin many forms of consumption.
WORK5002 Foundations of HRM and IR

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The unit provides an integrated overview of the social, legal, psychological, ethical and strategic dimensions of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations (IR). The learning content develops broad and deep knowledge in a select number of topical HR and IR issues and links these to a real-world context. As such the unit provides students with the essential preparatory knowledge and skills to build an intellectual foundation for the suite of subsequent core and elective units in HRM and IR available in the program.
WORK6018 International Industrial Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with insights into the debate about the effect of globalisation on employment relations by using comparative analysis to identify the range of factors that account for similarities and difference in national patterns of industrial relations. The unit focuses on providing an understanding of the nature of industrial relations patterns in developed and developing market economies and invites students to compare a range of developments across these countries.
FASS7001 Academic English for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (15%), 1x2500wd Reflection Journal (25%), 1xSeminar Presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Where students intend to complete both FASS7001 and FASS7002, they should undertake FASS7001 first then FASS7002. Do not enrol in both in one semester.
This elective is designed for international postgraduates who are new to study in an English language university. It supports the development of study, research, and critical thinking abilities, spoken English and academic language. Knowledge acquired in this unit will strengthen written and spoken English to help meet the standards necessary for successful completion of FASS Masters by coursework degrees. It is recommended that this elective be taken during your first semester.
FASS7002 Critical Thinking and Persuasive Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weeks 1-3: 2x1hr lecture/week, 2x2hr tutorial/week; Weeks 4-9:1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical review (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), seminar presentation (20%),1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective supports development of skills in critical analysis, writing in different genres, research, presentation, and developing individual scholarly 'voice'. While valuable for all commencing postgraduates, it is of particular benefit to those returning to academia after an extended break, or for International students wishing to orient themselves to local standards of practice for academic communication. This unit is structured to have additional seminars and lectures early in the semester and fewer later in the semester so students have the opportunity to apply new skills to all their coursework. The unit is ideally taken in the first semester of study.
Optional Specialisation

Social Research specialisation

12 credit points from the following
SSPS6001 Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/lab per week Assessment: 1x2hr in-class exam (I) (35%), 1x2hr in-class exam (II)(35%), 3x660wd homework tasks (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Quantitative methods are vital to social science. This unit introduces students to commonly used techniques for collecting and analysing numerical data to answer empirical questions about social, cultural, and political phenomena. It addresses the description of data with graphs and tables, descriptive statistics, statistical models, hypothesis testing, and other topics. The unit is appropriate for beginners, who will gain perspective and confidence conducting their own quantitative research and critically understanding that of others. It is taught in a computer lab, giving students practical experience with statistical software.
SSPS6002 Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2hr in-class exam (35%), 1x2000wd analytical memo (35%), 2x1000wd homework tasks (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualitative research rests at the heart of social science. This unit introduces students to commonly used techniques for collecting and analyzing categorical data to answer empirical questions about social, cultural, and political phenomena. It examines case studies and comparative history; interviews, ethnography, and fieldwork; plus archives and content analysis, among other topics. Instruction is provided by a team of teachers with experience using these methods. Students therefore gain valuable insight into how to conduct and consume qualitative research.
6 credit points from the following
ECOP6031 Research in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x4000wd Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on conducting research in political economy. Weekly seminars examine a range of topics including research design, literature review, data collection and analysis, and writing a research proposal. The seminars provide an opportunity for critical discussion to identify, debate and reflect on the nature and challenge of undertaking research. The assessment is structured to assist the progressive development of a research proposal. Completion of this Unit of Study is a pre-requisite for a Masters dissertation.
FASS6001 Dimensions of Inequality

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd literature review (30%), 1x1500wd data visualisation presentation (30%), 1x750wd peer review (20%), 3x250wd quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern life is marked by profound economic and social inequality. This unit guides students into their own research on the dimensions, causes, and consequences of inequality, with a special focus on Sydney. Students will learn in a hands-on way, combining quantitative and qualitative approaches to social reality. They will learn practical skills in data visualisation with state-of-the-art software, and be asked to think creatively about responses to the processes reproducing inequality.
GOVT6139 Research Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Proposal (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students with the fundamentals for constructing and conducting effective research projects in the social sciences. An overview of social science inquiry will be presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used in research. This will include a focus on both primary research, using interviews and questionnaires, and secondary research, using statistical databases, content analysis and textual analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be covered in the unit, as will an overview of ethical practices associated with research design. The assessment will be based around constructing practical research projects that can be utilised in both university and workplace-based research.
SSPS6004 Social Research Ethics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG6902 or SCLG3003 Assessment: 1x1500wd ethics response (30%), 1x1500wd reflective assignment (30%), 1x3000wd research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to key issues, debates and ethical questions in human research, enabling them to acquire knowledge and develop skills for research degrees and funding applications. It examines values and principles of research ethics, and encourages students to reflect on these in relation to research with human subjects. The unit offers practical support to higher degree research students developing, or planning to develop, a human research ethics application.
SSPS6005 Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 2x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd research proposal (30%), 1x1000wd presentation and submission (20%), 1x2500wd data analysis report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides training in applied qualitative data analysis using NVivo software. Students are able to apply a range of qualitative methods.
SSPS6006 Data Analytics for Social Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr lab/week Assessment: 5x50wd equivalent multiple choice quizzes (5%), 1x550wd data analysis exercise (15%), 1x700wd research proposal (15%), 1x3000wd research project (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Social science research abounds with data of different nature, sources, and forms. In many situations, available data can be summarised and analysed quantitatively to identify trends, uncover patterns, or test hypotheses. This unit presents fundamental ideas behind modern data analytics and provides students with hands-on experience of analysing social science data. First, we cover data manipulation, data cleaning, and basic visualisation. We will then move on to the methods of exploratory data analysis and finding patterns in data. The unit will conclude with an introduction to statistical inference, linear regression analysis and its limitations for causal analysis.
SSPS6007 Intro to Computational Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr lab/week Assessment: 5x50wd equivalent multiple choice quizzes (5%), 1x550wd data analysis exercise (15%), 1x700wd research proposal (15%), 1x3000wd research project (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The rise of big data, mobile phones, digital media, and other new ICT has not only affected the way we live and created new social phenomena worth of studying, but has also enabled social scientists to address a variety of important social science questions using new data, methods, and approaches. This unit serves as an introduction to the emerging field of the Computational Social Sciences. We are going to learn how to collect digital data via web scraping and how to analyse it using a variety of methods developed for computational text and network analysis.

Country Risk Assessment specialisation

6 credit points from the following
ECOP6012 Country Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (25%), 1x3000wd project (40%), 1x1000wd Presentation (20%), Seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The impacts of volatility are an ever-present concern for policymakers, firms and households. This unit looks at a diverse range of methods and techniques for assessing country risk (e.g., economic risk, financial risk, sovereign (default) risk, socio-political risk, etc). This entails an overview of the (political) economic frameworks and connecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches to the current research on leading indicators and early warning systems.
6 credit points from the following
GOVT6109 Political Regimes and Regime Transition

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3x1500wd analytical essay (75%), 1x1.5 hr final exam (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide an in-depth examination of theories of political regimes and regime transitions. Political scientists have developed a variety of theories to explain democratic breakdown and democratization, and formulated an expansive typology of regimes to describe the diverse forms of democracy, authoritarianism, and 'hybrid regimes.' This unit provides a broad overview of theories of political regimes and regime transitions, and introduces students to some of the major debates and controversies in this field of study.
CISS6006 Intervention and 'Fragile' States

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x500wd actor profile (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the notion of state fragility within the global system. It investigates the characteristics of so-called 'fragile' and 'failed' states, and the nature of international engagement with (and discourses about) these states. It explores various perspectives on state formation in both Western and post-colonial contexts, and emphasises the ways in which knowledge is produced about non-Western states. The unit expands upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.
6 credit points from the following
SSPS6002 Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2hr in-class exam (35%), 1x2000wd analytical memo (35%), 2x1000wd homework tasks (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualitative research rests at the heart of social science. This unit introduces students to commonly used techniques for collecting and analyzing categorical data to answer empirical questions about social, cultural, and political phenomena. It examines case studies and comparative history; interviews, ethnography, and fieldwork; plus archives and content analysis, among other topics. Instruction is provided by a team of teachers with experience using these methods. Students therefore gain valuable insight into how to conduct and consume qualitative research.
SSPS6001 Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/lab per week Assessment: 1x2hr in-class exam (I) (35%), 1x2hr in-class exam (II)(35%), 3x660wd homework tasks (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Quantitative methods are vital to social science. This unit introduces students to commonly used techniques for collecting and analysing numerical data to answer empirical questions about social, cultural, and political phenomena. It addresses the description of data with graphs and tables, descriptive statistics, statistical models, hypothesis testing, and other topics. The unit is appropriate for beginners, who will gain perspective and confidence conducting their own quantitative research and critically understanding that of others. It is taught in a computer lab, giving students practical experience with statistical software.
Capstone units of study
ECOP6121 Dissertation Part A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised independent study Prerequisites: 24 credit points of units Corequisites: ECOP6031 Assessment: 10,000wd dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Together with 'Dissertation Part B', this unit involves the supervised writing of a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of the student's choosing as part of the Master of Political Economy.
ECOP6122 Dissertation Part B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised independent study Prerequisites: ECOP6121 Assessment: 10,000wd dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Together with 'Dissertation Part A', this unit involves the supervised writing of a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of the student's choosing as part of the Master of Political Economy.
ECOP6033 Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit involves a supervised writing project. It is supported by a designated unit co-ordinator who will supervise the projects, receive and comment on a project plan and first draft. This is combined with two in-class seminars in which all student are expected to present and discuss their work. Prerequisites: 24 Credit Points Assessment: 4500wd research project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit is offered as a capstone for the Master of Political Economy, as an alternative to the units Dissertation Parts A and B. It provides students with the opportunity to conduct a supervised research project of their own design, drawing on the theoretical perspectives in Political Economy introduced earlier in the course and exploring issues previously encountered in greater depth. Students will be given the opportunity to present and discuss the progress of their work during the semester.