Logistics and Supply Chain Management

The units of study listed in the following table are those available for the current year. Students may also include any units of study, which are additional to those currently listed, which appear under these subject areas in the Business School handbook/website in subsequent years (subject to any prerequisite or prohibition rules).

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The Prerequisites and Corequisites have changed for the following unit. They now read:

ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design
Prerequisites: (ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001) and (ITLS5050 or ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and (ITLS6201 or ITLS6101) and (ITLS6202 or ITLS6003)
Corequisites: ITLS6010 or ITLS6008

1/2/2021

Table A for the Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Students must complete 60 credit points in units of study, comprising:
(i) 36 credit points in core units of study
(ii) 18 credit points in elective units of study; and
(iii) a 6 credit point capstone unit of study.
Units of study for this degree are as follows:

Core units of study

The core unit, ITLS5020, must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
Full-time students must complete the core units ITLS5020 Production and Operations Management, ITLS5050 Introductory Supply Chain Analysis, ITLS6202 Sustainable Logistics and Procurement, and ITLS6201 Global Distribution Strategy in their first semester of study. Full-time students must complete ITLS6010 Logistics and Supply Chain Management Systems and ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design in their second semester of study.
ITLS5020 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5000 or ITLS6008 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
An understanding of the role of production and operations management within the context of logistics and supply chain management is essential for business managers to better respond to market opportunities and to manage risks to supply chain sustainability and resilience. The role of the production and operations management team within a supply chain is the design, operation and improvement of the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. The success of a firm's logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Students undertaking this unit are equipped with a solid foundation in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management and how successful production and operations management practices have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a logistics and supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations and sourcing decisions.
ITLS5050 Introductory Supply Chain Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 or ITLS5200 or ITLS6203 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The amount of data generated within organisations is growing rapidly and the ability of supply chains to harness emerging opportunities and respond to issues of sustainability and resilience relies on the ability of managers to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Through this unit students develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis for logistics and supply chain management and develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis and students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making. This unit emphasises how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis for logistics and supply chain management. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and distribution using linear programming, simulation and quantitative performance management. The unit also introduces basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001) and (ITLS5050 or ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and (ITLS6201 or ITLS6101) and ITLS6202 Corequisites: ITLS6010 Prohibitions: TPTM6190 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful supply chain management relies upon informed decision making, which aligns with overall business and supply chain strategies. This unit explores a range of important decisions and equips students with a toolkit of models and analytical methods that can assist in making informed decisions. The first set of decisions concern supply chain design and strategy and includes network design and facility location. These decisions provide structure to the supply chain, set the boundaries within which planning decisions are made, and impact on supply chain performance over the long term. In contrast, planning and operational decisions provide value over the medium and short term. Here, this unit covers production planning and scheduling, including aggregate planning, master production scheduling and material requirements planning. Families of models are introduced to support inventory control decision making, with a focus on appropriate model selection, handling uncertainty in supply and demand, and extending the models to handle multiple echelons.
ITLS6010 Logistics and Supply Chain Management Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001) and (ITLS5050 or ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and (ITLS6201 or ITLS6101) and (ITLS6202 or ITLS6003) Corequisites: ITLS6002 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Modern supply chain tools such as the internet of things and sensors linked with Enterprise Resource Planning and Warehouse Management Systems are strengthening Information Technology systems as the backbone of supply chains. This is facilitating communication between systems and organisations throughout the length of the supply chain. However, many companies are struggling to manage the large and growing flow of data which is needed to generate meaningful insights. This requires enterprises to develop consistent data standards that allow integration of systems within and between organisations. A unified treatment of supply chain systems helps achieve sustainable profitability for both enterprises and the entire supply chain. It also facilitates compliance and drives strategy for Corporate Social Responsibility, environmental sustainability and resilient supply chains. The improved supply chain visibility enables the optimisation of all functions simultaneously, including sourcing, manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, retail and reverse logistics, and allows the tracking of key performance indicators in supply chain operations. This unit develops highly marketable skills in managing and analysing data to generate meaningful key performance indicators and insights for nimble and agile decision making. Students gain experience with enterprise resource planning systems and tools needed for system integration.
ITLS6201 Global Distribution Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 Prohibitions: ITLS6101 or TPTM6440 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with an understanding of global distribution strategy and the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different distribution channels and freight transportation modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment, customs and global market participation strategies. Building on this background, the unit equips students with strategic tools for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning, entrepreneurship, business model and value chain analysis, revenue and cost management, as well as competitive strategy and negotiation in the B2B and B2C contexts. The material covered in the unit considers recent developments in global and regional economic activity, technological and environmental advancements and discusses implications for the various sectors and stakeholders in global distribution chains. This unit involves case studies, industry presentations and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, airlines, wholesalers, retailers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6202 Sustainable Logistics and Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Procurement of goods and services is an essential business task that has traditionally targeted short-term supply cost reduction. Globalisation and outsourcing creates opportunities for enterprises to better align procurement with longer term corporate strategies. However, this requires collaboration and negotiation within and between organisations, rethinking the role of procurement teams and reconsidering the impacts of sourcing decisions. Stakeholder demands for greater corporate social responsibility require procurement teams to take a strategic approach to spend, category management and sourcing decisions, moving beyond regulatory compliance to facilitate environmentally and socially sustainable outcomes. Ethical and sustainable procurement and logistics creates value for organisations by protecting brand integrity and improving communication, productivity, performance measurement, innovation and supplier diversity. This unit takes a strategic view of procurement, looking beyond the up-front costs and showing how purchasing decisions that consider resilience, entire life cycle costs, environmental and social risks and benefits provide better value. This requires rethinking the involvement of the procurement teams in the design, manufacture, selling and recycling of products and transformation of logistics management practice. Students practice negotiation in realistic industry workshops and gain new insights into effective and persuasive communication for global logistics and supply chain management.

Elective units of study

BUSS6500 Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points with a minimum average of 60% (WAM) Prohibitions: ECOF6500 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Further information and application process is outlined at https://sydney.edu.au/students/placement-internship-opportunities.html or contact the WIL Hub Placement team: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit is available to outstanding students completing the Master of Commerce, Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Professional Accounting programs. It involves a professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It includes preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and report writing. Assessment includes a reflective journal and professional report and presentation based on the internship placement. Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/industry_placement_program.
BUSS6514 Industry Self-Sourced Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points. Assumed knowledge: A sound understanding of business and strong written and oral communication skills Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Further information and application process is outlined at https://sydney.edu.au/students/placement-internship-opportunities.html or contact the WIL Hub Placement team: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit is available to outstanding students and involves a self-sourced professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It includes preparatory coursework in reflection learning, professional practice and report writing.
ITLS6015 Managing Supply Chain Disruption

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Supply chains are typically designed to handle minor risks in supply and demand. Increasingly complex supply chains leave businesses vulnerable to abnormal events and disruptions, including natural disasters, supplier failure, cyber security threats and wide scale threats such as pandemics and climate change. Despite this, supply chains are an essential service and play a crucial economic and humanitarian role in times of crises. Supply chains are also undergoing structural change due to evolving consumer demand and are being impacted by disruptive technologies such as manufacturing-as-a-service and autonomous distribution and delivery. Supply chains are differentiated by their resilience to abnormal events and disruptions and their ability to accommodate and exploit structural change and disruptive technologies. This unit explores each of these types of disruption and equips students with a variety of strategies for mitigating these risks. Students design resilient supply chains and plan responses to humanitarian crises. They critically assess the structural changes and technological disruption that are taking place in supply chains now or are anticipated to occur in the future. This unit makes extensive use of recent case studies, including the COVID-19 pandemic.
ITLS6016 Logistics and Future Cities

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ITLS6301 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city logistics, which accommodates the pickup, storage, transport and delivery of freight in urban areas. All aspects from planning, management and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact are covered. The relationships between land use, transport and city logistics are described. Traffic engineering concepts like 'link' and 'place' are outlined and their implications for city logistics are explored. The forms of urban freight consolidation centre are addressed along with the role of alternative transport modes, for example public transport (co-modality), cargo bikes, electric vehicles, droids and drones. This unit explores Ecommerce and fulfilment models, including omni-channel retail and analyses the implications for city logistics of new technologies, apps and the sharing economy. This unit also reviews strategies to improve the sustainability of city logistics and examines reverse logistics, the circular economy and urban farming along with the contribution of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) to urban freight mobility. Cyber and physical threats to city logistics are studied along with mitigation strategies. The lectures conclude with a look into the future for city logistics. Seminars by city logistics professionals complement the lectures. Students have an opportunity to develop city logistics solutions for themselves through a group design project.
ITLS6111 Spatial Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ITLS6107 or TPTM6180 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of Excel is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: This unit will use R programming language to perform statistical analyses and spatial analyses. No prior programming knowledge is required.
Enterprises can access increasing volumes of spatial data (associated with time and space) drawn from a variety of sources including the internet of things, sensors, mobile phone locations and other diverse and unlinked data sets. Managing these data to create useful management insights is a demanding task, and spatial data analysis presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities. Effective management and analysis of spatial data provides strategic value for organisations, across logistics, transport, marketing and other business functions, allowing enterprises to manage strategic challenges in sustainability and resilience. This unit uses real-world data and problem-based learning to develop hands-on experience with managing, processing and modelling spatial data and ultimately drawing insights for business decisions linked to both distribution and supply chain interactions. Students develop highly marketable skills in spatial data analytics that are transferable across a broad range of industries and sectors. These skills include the ability to generate a range of outputs, including decision support systems, maps and visualisations that effectively communicate complex information to support strategic, tactical and operational decision making. This unit utilises a widely-used spatial software package and introduces Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial databases and structured query language (SQL).
ITLS6300 Maritime Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5000 or ITLS5020 or ITLS5100 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6200 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second-hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
ITLS6410 Aviation Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ITLS6400 or ITLS6401 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, logistic providers, banks, consultancies and other players of the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain and analysis from the perspectives of consumers (passengers and cargo), producers, distributors, brokers and investors. Students develop industry skills and an understanding of the strategic management and economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including financial analysis, risk management, sustainability, logistics, innovations and implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and alliances both in the global and regional/remote context. The volatilities and disruptions in air traffic (i.e. due to COVID-19) create many management challenges but also opportunities (i.e. in the Asia/Pacific region) and thus the unit also covers data analytics, forecasting, entrepreneurship and the role of the private sector in airline/airport business development. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA and a number of airlines and airports, students have access to industry datasets, senior management guest lecturers, company information and aviation as well as logistics contacts/networks.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide students with practical skills for carrying out environmental footprinting calculations: for individuals, companies, organisations or nations. In particular, this unit will provide a comprehensive introduction to input-output analysis for identifying impacts embodied in regional, national and global supply chains. This unit focuses on contemporary environmental applications such as emissions, energy-use, water, land, loss of animal and plant species; and also social applications such as employment, poverty and child labour. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it presents cutting-edge techniques enabling the global analysis of environmental and social impacts of international trade. Third, it offers hands-on practical activities for mastering the input-output techniques conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provides a step-by-step recipe for undertaking boundary-free environmental and social footprinting for sectors and organisations. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with useful skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5034 for a sound understanding of the role of input-output analysis within the field of Life-Cycle Assessment.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study covers philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It introduces methods from engineering (Process Analysis) and economics (Input-Output Analysis), and discusses current popular LCA tools. The unit places importance on practical relevance by including real-world case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes -1, -2 and -3 emissions and ISO standards. The unit of study will culminate with practical exercises using software tools to provide students with hands-on experience of preparing a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of an application of their choice. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output analysis as the basis of hybrid LCA methods.

Capstone unit of study

The capstone unit must be completed in a student's final semester of study.
ITLS6090 Logistics and Supply Chain Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units . Prerequisites: completion of at least 30 credit points Corequisites: ITLS6002 and (ITLS6003 or ITLS6004 or ITLS6008 or ITLS6010) Prohibitions: TPTM6170 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This capstone unit consolidates and integrates the knowledge and skills that students have gained in the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program. Taken in the last semester of study, the unit provides students with the opportunity to explore real-world and/or scenario-based logistics and supply chain management problems and to reinforce competencies in the area of their interest and expertise. The projects are assigned to students based on their experience and professional needs in one or more of the following areas: design and planning of global supply chains, supply chain risk analysis and mitigation strategies, sustainable logistics and supply chains, performance measurement and management, warehouse and inventory management, production planning and control, strategic procurement, and supply chain challenges facing Australian businesses. Students manage the project investigation and carry it to completion within a specified time period and to a professional standard. Through the project, students identify the problems and existing bottlenecks, explore the potential solutions to these problems, critically analyse the situation, document their progress, communicate findings with their mentor and other students, reflect on their learning, and prepare a formal project report describing the work performed as well as the resulting conclusions and recommendations.

Graduate Diploma in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Students must complete 36 credit points in units of study, comprising:
(i) 24 credit points in core units of study; and
(ii) 12 credit points in elective units of study.
Units of study for this course are as follows:

Core units of study

The core unit, ITLS5020, must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
Full-time students must complete the core units ITLS5020 Production and Operations Management, ITLS5050 Introductory Supply Chain Analysis, ITLS6202 Sustainable Logistics and Procurement, and ITLS6201 Global Distribution Strategy in their first semester of study.
ITLS5020 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5000 or ITLS6008 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
An understanding of the role of production and operations management within the context of logistics and supply chain management is essential for business managers to better respond to market opportunities and to manage risks to supply chain sustainability and resilience. The role of the production and operations management team within a supply chain is the design, operation and improvement of the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. The success of a firm's logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Students undertaking this unit are equipped with a solid foundation in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management and how successful production and operations management practices have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a logistics and supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations and sourcing decisions.
ITLS5050 Introductory Supply Chain Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 or ITLS5200 or ITLS6203 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The amount of data generated within organisations is growing rapidly and the ability of supply chains to harness emerging opportunities and respond to issues of sustainability and resilience relies on the ability of managers to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Through this unit students develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis for logistics and supply chain management and develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis and students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making. This unit emphasises how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis for logistics and supply chain management. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and distribution using linear programming, simulation and quantitative performance management. The unit also introduces basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6201 Global Distribution Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 Prohibitions: ITLS6101 or TPTM6440 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with an understanding of global distribution strategy and the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different distribution channels and freight transportation modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment, customs and global market participation strategies. Building on this background, the unit equips students with strategic tools for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning, entrepreneurship, business model and value chain analysis, revenue and cost management, as well as competitive strategy and negotiation in the B2B and B2C contexts. The material covered in the unit considers recent developments in global and regional economic activity, technological and environmental advancements and discusses implications for the various sectors and stakeholders in global distribution chains. This unit involves case studies, industry presentations and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, airlines, wholesalers, retailers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6202 Sustainable Logistics and Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Procurement of goods and services is an essential business task that has traditionally targeted short-term supply cost reduction. Globalisation and outsourcing creates opportunities for enterprises to better align procurement with longer term corporate strategies. However, this requires collaboration and negotiation within and between organisations, rethinking the role of procurement teams and reconsidering the impacts of sourcing decisions. Stakeholder demands for greater corporate social responsibility require procurement teams to take a strategic approach to spend, category management and sourcing decisions, moving beyond regulatory compliance to facilitate environmentally and socially sustainable outcomes. Ethical and sustainable procurement and logistics creates value for organisations by protecting brand integrity and improving communication, productivity, performance measurement, innovation and supplier diversity. This unit takes a strategic view of procurement, looking beyond the up-front costs and showing how purchasing decisions that consider resilience, entire life cycle costs, environmental and social risks and benefits provide better value. This requires rethinking the involvement of the procurement teams in the design, manufacture, selling and recycling of products and transformation of logistics management practice. Students practice negotiation in realistic industry workshops and gain new insights into effective and persuasive communication for global logistics and supply chain management.

Elective units of study

ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001) and (ITLS5050 or ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and (ITLS6201 or ITLS6101) and ITLS6202 Corequisites: ITLS6010 Prohibitions: TPTM6190 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful supply chain management relies upon informed decision making, which aligns with overall business and supply chain strategies. This unit explores a range of important decisions and equips students with a toolkit of models and analytical methods that can assist in making informed decisions. The first set of decisions concern supply chain design and strategy and includes network design and facility location. These decisions provide structure to the supply chain, set the boundaries within which planning decisions are made, and impact on supply chain performance over the long term. In contrast, planning and operational decisions provide value over the medium and short term. Here, this unit covers production planning and scheduling, including aggregate planning, master production scheduling and material requirements planning. Families of models are introduced to support inventory control decision making, with a focus on appropriate model selection, handling uncertainty in supply and demand, and extending the models to handle multiple echelons.
ITLS6010 Logistics and Supply Chain Management Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001) and (ITLS5050 or ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and (ITLS6201 or ITLS6101) and (ITLS6202 or ITLS6003) Corequisites: ITLS6002 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Modern supply chain tools such as the internet of things and sensors linked with Enterprise Resource Planning and Warehouse Management Systems are strengthening Information Technology systems as the backbone of supply chains. This is facilitating communication between systems and organisations throughout the length of the supply chain. However, many companies are struggling to manage the large and growing flow of data which is needed to generate meaningful insights. This requires enterprises to develop consistent data standards that allow integration of systems within and between organisations. A unified treatment of supply chain systems helps achieve sustainable profitability for both enterprises and the entire supply chain. It also facilitates compliance and drives strategy for Corporate Social Responsibility, environmental sustainability and resilient supply chains. The improved supply chain visibility enables the optimisation of all functions simultaneously, including sourcing, manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, retail and reverse logistics, and allows the tracking of key performance indicators in supply chain operations. This unit develops highly marketable skills in managing and analysing data to generate meaningful key performance indicators and insights for nimble and agile decision making. Students gain experience with enterprise resource planning systems and tools needed for system integration.
ITLS6015 Managing Supply Chain Disruption

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Supply chains are typically designed to handle minor risks in supply and demand. Increasingly complex supply chains leave businesses vulnerable to abnormal events and disruptions, including natural disasters, supplier failure, cyber security threats and wide scale threats such as pandemics and climate change. Despite this, supply chains are an essential service and play a crucial economic and humanitarian role in times of crises. Supply chains are also undergoing structural change due to evolving consumer demand and are being impacted by disruptive technologies such as manufacturing-as-a-service and autonomous distribution and delivery. Supply chains are differentiated by their resilience to abnormal events and disruptions and their ability to accommodate and exploit structural change and disruptive technologies. This unit explores each of these types of disruption and equips students with a variety of strategies for mitigating these risks. Students design resilient supply chains and plan responses to humanitarian crises. They critically assess the structural changes and technological disruption that are taking place in supply chains now or are anticipated to occur in the future. This unit makes extensive use of recent case studies, including the COVID-19 pandemic.
ITLS6016 Logistics and Future Cities

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ITLS6301 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city logistics, which accommodates the pickup, storage, transport and delivery of freight in urban areas. All aspects from planning, management and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact are covered. The relationships between land use, transport and city logistics are described. Traffic engineering concepts like 'link' and 'place' are outlined and their implications for city logistics are explored. The forms of urban freight consolidation centre are addressed along with the role of alternative transport modes, for example public transport (co-modality), cargo bikes, electric vehicles, droids and drones. This unit explores Ecommerce and fulfilment models, including omni-channel retail and analyses the implications for city logistics of new technologies, apps and the sharing economy. This unit also reviews strategies to improve the sustainability of city logistics and examines reverse logistics, the circular economy and urban farming along with the contribution of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) to urban freight mobility. Cyber and physical threats to city logistics are studied along with mitigation strategies. The lectures conclude with a look into the future for city logistics. Seminars by city logistics professionals complement the lectures. Students have an opportunity to develop city logistics solutions for themselves through a group design project.
ITLS6111 Spatial Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ITLS6107 or TPTM6180 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of Excel is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: This unit will use R programming language to perform statistical analyses and spatial analyses. No prior programming knowledge is required.
Enterprises can access increasing volumes of spatial data (associated with time and space) drawn from a variety of sources including the internet of things, sensors, mobile phone locations and other diverse and unlinked data sets. Managing these data to create useful management insights is a demanding task, and spatial data analysis presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities. Effective management and analysis of spatial data provides strategic value for organisations, across logistics, transport, marketing and other business functions, allowing enterprises to manage strategic challenges in sustainability and resilience. This unit uses real-world data and problem-based learning to develop hands-on experience with managing, processing and modelling spatial data and ultimately drawing insights for business decisions linked to both distribution and supply chain interactions. Students develop highly marketable skills in spatial data analytics that are transferable across a broad range of industries and sectors. These skills include the ability to generate a range of outputs, including decision support systems, maps and visualisations that effectively communicate complex information to support strategic, tactical and operational decision making. This unit utilises a widely-used spatial software package and introduces Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial databases and structured query language (SQL).
ITLS6300 Maritime Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5000 or ITLS5020 or ITLS5100 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6200 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second-hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
ITLS6410 Aviation Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ITLS6400 or ITLS6401 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, logistic providers, banks, consultancies and other players of the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain and analysis from the perspectives of consumers (passengers and cargo), producers, distributors, brokers and investors. Students develop industry skills and an understanding of the strategic management and economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including financial analysis, risk management, sustainability, logistics, innovations and implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and alliances both in the global and regional/remote context. The volatilities and disruptions in air traffic (i.e. due to COVID-19) create many management challenges but also opportunities (i.e. in the Asia/Pacific region) and thus the unit also covers data analytics, forecasting, entrepreneurship and the role of the private sector in airline/airport business development. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA and a number of airlines and airports, students have access to industry datasets, senior management guest lecturers, company information and aviation as well as logistics contacts/networks.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide students with practical skills for carrying out environmental footprinting calculations: for individuals, companies, organisations or nations. In particular, this unit will provide a comprehensive introduction to input-output analysis for identifying impacts embodied in regional, national and global supply chains. This unit focuses on contemporary environmental applications such as emissions, energy-use, water, land, loss of animal and plant species; and also social applications such as employment, poverty and child labour. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it presents cutting-edge techniques enabling the global analysis of environmental and social impacts of international trade. Third, it offers hands-on practical activities for mastering the input-output techniques conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provides a step-by-step recipe for undertaking boundary-free environmental and social footprinting for sectors and organisations. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with useful skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5034 for a sound understanding of the role of input-output analysis within the field of Life-Cycle Assessment.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study covers philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It introduces methods from engineering (Process Analysis) and economics (Input-Output Analysis), and discusses current popular LCA tools. The unit places importance on practical relevance by including real-world case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes -1, -2 and -3 emissions and ISO standards. The unit of study will culminate with practical exercises using software tools to provide students with hands-on experience of preparing a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of an application of their choice. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output analysis as the basis of hybrid LCA methods.

Graduate Certificate in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Students must complete 24 credit points in core units of study.
Units of study for this course are as follows:

Core units of study

The core unit, ITLS5020, must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5020 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5000 or ITLS6008 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
An understanding of the role of production and operations management within the context of logistics and supply chain management is essential for business managers to better respond to market opportunities and to manage risks to supply chain sustainability and resilience. The role of the production and operations management team within a supply chain is the design, operation and improvement of the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. The success of a firm's logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Students undertaking this unit are equipped with a solid foundation in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management and how successful production and operations management practices have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a logistics and supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations and sourcing decisions.
ITLS5050 Introductory Supply Chain Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 or ITLS5200 or ITLS6203 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The amount of data generated within organisations is growing rapidly and the ability of supply chains to harness emerging opportunities and respond to issues of sustainability and resilience relies on the ability of managers to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Through this unit students develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis for logistics and supply chain management and develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis and students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making. This unit emphasises how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis for logistics and supply chain management. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and distribution using linear programming, simulation and quantitative performance management. The unit also introduces basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6201 Global Distribution Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 Prohibitions: ITLS6101 or TPTM6440 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with an understanding of global distribution strategy and the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different distribution channels and freight transportation modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment, customs and global market participation strategies. Building on this background, the unit equips students with strategic tools for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning, entrepreneurship, business model and value chain analysis, revenue and cost management, as well as competitive strategy and negotiation in the B2B and B2C contexts. The material covered in the unit considers recent developments in global and regional economic activity, technological and environmental advancements and discusses implications for the various sectors and stakeholders in global distribution chains. This unit involves case studies, industry presentations and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, airlines, wholesalers, retailers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6202 Sustainable Logistics and Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: ITLS5020 or ITLS5000 or ITLS5250 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Procurement of goods and services is an essential business task that has traditionally targeted short-term supply cost reduction. Globalisation and outsourcing creates opportunities for enterprises to better align procurement with longer term corporate strategies. However, this requires collaboration and negotiation within and between organisations, rethinking the role of procurement teams and reconsidering the impacts of sourcing decisions. Stakeholder demands for greater corporate social responsibility require procurement teams to take a strategic approach to spend, category management and sourcing decisions, moving beyond regulatory compliance to facilitate environmentally and socially sustainable outcomes. Ethical and sustainable procurement and logistics creates value for organisations by protecting brand integrity and improving communication, productivity, performance measurement, innovation and supplier diversity. This unit takes a strategic view of procurement, looking beyond the up-front costs and showing how purchasing decisions that consider resilience, entire life cycle costs, environmental and social risks and benefits provide better value. This requires rethinking the involvement of the procurement teams in the design, manufacture, selling and recycling of products and transformation of logistics management practice. Students practice negotiation in realistic industry workshops and gain new insights into effective and persuasive communication for global logistics and supply chain management.