Bachelor of Engineering Honours (Chemical and Biomolecular)

For a standard enrolment plan for Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Stream

Completion of a stream is a requirement of the Bachelor of Engineering Honours.
Students complete 192 credit points comprising:
(a) 48 credit points from the Engineering Core Table, consisting of:
(i) 18 credit points of Engineering Foundation units
(ii) 30 credit points of Project units
(iii) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
(b) 138 credit points from the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Stream table, consisting of:
(i) 102 credit points of Stream Core units
(ii) 12 credit points of Chemistry units
(iii) 12 credit points of Stream Breadth electives
(iv) 12 credit points of Stream Depth electives
(c) 6 credit points of electives from 3000+ level units offered by the Faculty of Engineering, or from Table S
The completion of a specialisation is not mandatory. If a student chooses to take a specialisation available in their stream, the specialisation can be completed within the 192 credit points described above.

Stream Core units

CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHNG1103 Conservation of Mass and Energy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The students should develop an understanding of and competence in the formulation and solution of material and energy balance problems in engineering; develop competence in using basic flowsheet analysis and appropriate computational tools; improve their group work and problem solving skills; gain an ability to extract a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation.
Mass conservation related topics include: unit systems and unit conversions; properties of solids, fluids and gases; mass balance calculations on batch and flow systems; balances on multiple units processes, balances on reactive systems, recycle, bypass and purge calculations; equilibrium compositions of reacting systems; vapour pressure and humidity. Energy conservation includes the following topics: apply the first law of thermodynamics to flow and batch systems in process industries; understand thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy and heat capacity; conduct energy balances for sensible heat changes, phase transformations and reactive processes for practical industrial systems; understand the applications of psychrometry, refrigeration, heat of formation and combustion in industry.
CHNG1106 Engineering for a Sustainable Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG1103 Prohibitions: CHNG2805 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of mass and energy balance concepts equivalent to content of CHNG1103 or CHNG9103. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit involves the study of the fundamental concepts which underpin sustainable development, including technical and economic efficiency, environmental stewardship and social responsibility. The unit examines both the material and non-material economies from an engineering perspective. Tools such as life-cycle assessment, input-output analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis are examined and implications for resource and energy consumption, pollution and waste generation are analysed. A number of governing sustainability frameworks are discussed to determine their suitability within the context of chemical and biomolecular engineering. A range of approaches and tools for determining the environmental impact of human activities on small and large scale are introduced as part of a sustainability framework. Energy production and use, and product design are investigated from a sustainability perspective.
CHNG2801 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed CHNG2802 or MATH2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course covers the principal concepts and methods of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. The topics covered include dimensional analysis, fluid properties, conservation of mass and momentum, measurement of flow, and flow in pipes. The course provides an introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics for the solution of flow regimes.
CHNG2802 Chemical Engineering Modelling and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1005 OR MATH1015 OR MATH1905 OR BUSS1020) AND CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: Calculus, linear algebra, descriptive statistics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit consists of two core modules: MODULE A: Applied Statistics for Chemical Engineers and MODULE B: Applied Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineers. These modules aim at furthering your education by extending your skills in statistical analysis and Chemical Engineering computations. This unit will also enable you to develop a systematic approach to solving mathematically oriented Chemical Engineering problems, helping you to make sound engineering decisions. The modules will provide sufficient theoretical knowledge and computational training to progress in subsequent engineering analyses including Process Dynamics and Control and Chemical Engineering Design. This unit will provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle real-life multi-disciplinary chemical engineering problems.
CHNG2803 Heat and Mass Transfer

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1005 OR MATH1905 OR BUSS1020) AND (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810) AND CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed: CHNG2801 or equivalent, and (CHNG2802 or MATH2XXX) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study teaches principles of heat and mass transfer required for chemical and biomolecular engineering. It covers steady and transient conduction and diffusion, convective transport of heat and mass, and radiative heat transfer.
It runs concurrently with CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics) to provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle engineering problems related to transport phenomena.
This unit of study also includes project-based study components including a research project on heat transfer phenomena in biological systems and a lab session on mass transfer.
Students will develop a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and gain the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance.
CHNG2804 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 AND (CHEM1101 OR CHEM1111 OR CHEM1901 OR CHEM1911) Assumed knowledge: Calculus, linear algebra, numerical methods, computational tools (Matlab, Excel), basic mass and energy balances, heat transfer, mass transfer, momentum (from fluid mechanics), reaction balances. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit within the curriculum. Chemical Engineering requires an understanding of material and energy transformations and how these are driven by molecular interactions. The rate of such transformations is dependent on driving forces and resistances, and these need to be defined in terms of fundamental physical and chemical properties of systems. This course seeks to provide students with a sound basis of the thermodynamics of chemical systems, and how these, in turn, define limits of behaviour for such real systems. The thermodynamic basis for rate processes is explored, and the role of energy transfer processes in these highlighted, along with criteria for equilibrium and stability. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of physical properties of chemicalsystems in terms of state variables. The course delivery mechanism is problem-based, and examples from thermal and chemical processes will be considered, covering molecular to macro-systems scale. The course builds naturally from the second year first semester course in heat and mass transfer, and prepares students fundamentally for the third year course in design of chemical and biological processes, which deals fundamentally with reaction/separation systems, and considers phase and chemical equilibria.
CHNG2806 Separation Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed CHNG2804 or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover the general principles and the development of quantitative models of separation processes based on equilibrium and rate processes. Concepts of phase equilibria, transport phenomena and mass and energy balance will be used to model the separation units. Understanding of these principles will provide the basis for analysis and preliminary design calculations of large scale separation units of importance to manufacturing industries. The principles will be applied to units operations of distillation (binary, multicomponent), solvent extraction, absorption, adsorption and membrane processes
CHNG3801 Process Plant Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND CHNG2806 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a project based unit of study that aims to develop the practical skills required in process engineering with the focus on design, simulation, operation, control, and optimization of chemical and biological processes. It employs an interdisciplinary approach that applies the previously acquired knowledge of mass and heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, reaction engineering, design of unit operations, process modelling, and process control to understand the interaction between unit operations, to analyze the process flowsheet, and to carry out equipment selection and sizing for the plant.
The integrated course structure helps students develop their knowledge of integrated process design by working on miniplant design projects, involving process simulation/modelling using flowsheeting software, detailed design of plant equipment (reactor, distillation and absorption columns, pumps, piping), process modification (eg by heat integration) and process optimisation.
CHNG3802 Process Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2802 or AMME2960 OR BMET2960 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The scope and importance of process control technology expands continuously with the growth of industrial automation. Knowledge of process control tools and theory is vital for chemical engineers involved in plant operation or design. This unit covers the development of linear models, control system analysis, the design and performance of feedback control systems, and the use of control related software. Skills developed in the unit include:
- Designing a feedback control system.
- Analysing the system's performance for a range of process applications using both traditional and software-based techniques.
- Designing common control enhancements.
- Appreciating the role, possibilities and limitations of process control tools and methods.
CHNG3803 Reaction Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 and (CHNG2802 or AMME2960 OR BMET2960) and CHNG2803 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, students learn to select and design reactors for a broad range of chemical transformations. The course employs an integrated approach to learning combining the basic principles of material and energy balance, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics with those of chemical reaction kinetics to allow for the design of chemical reactors.

Reactor design concepts are introduced through topics, such as ideal batch reactors, combinations of reactors, multiple reaction systems, and catalytic reactions. Principles of chemical reactions, including reaction mechanisms, temperature and concentration dependence of chemical kinetics, and catalytic effects are covered in relation to reactor design. Students practice and deepen their understanding of the course content in a laboratory practical in which they use experimental data from chemical reactors to estimate rate laws.
CHNG3804 Biochemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CHNG2801, CHNG2802, CHNG2803 AND CHNG2806 or equivalents Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biochemical engineering is increasingly playing an important role in technology to modern society. The engineers with knowledge of various aspects of biochemical processes are tremendously valuable. The course will examine cutting edge examples of biochemical technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical engineering. The specific objectives of this course are to understand the history and scope of the biotechnology industry; examine the role of biochemical engineering in the industrial application of biotechnology and its development. We will provide an understanding of the major fundamental aspects of biochemical engineering and implementing the knowledge acquired to some selected industrial applications.
At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of biochemical engineering and the ability to apply these skills to new and novel situations. The students will be able to critically analyse different types of biochemical engineering processes and to improve these processes consistent with the principles of biochemical engineering.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information and develop problem-solving skills for successfully handling challenging engineering situations. This course will be assessed by projects, an interview and a final exam.
CHNG3805 Particle Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 and CHNG2802 and CHNG2803 and CHNG2804 and (CHNG2805 or CHNG1106) and CHNG2806 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study teaches principles of particle technology and solid separation process required for chemical and biomolecular engineering.
It provides students with the tools and knowhow to tackle unit operation tasks related to chemical engineering.
It also includes project based study components including a research project on fluidisation of solid particles, a dyer design project and a lab session on chromatograph.
The integrated course structure helps students to develop a physical understanding of particle technology and solid separation process and gain the ability to solve problems of engineering significance.
CHNG3806 Risk Management for Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 and CHNG2802 and CHNG2803 and CHNG2804 and (CHNG2805 OR CHNG1106) and CHNG2806 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop an appreciation of project and risk management practice of process systems for chemical and process engineering. It employs a holistic approach to management covering vital concepts in project management, technical risk assessment and decision making, economic evaluation and financial risk assessment, and project design optimization.
It provides students with the experience and working knowledge to solve real world engineering problems in process-led and product-driven industries.
By the end of this unit of study a student should be competent in: preparing a resume for use in employment applications; developing project work plans in conjunction with project management schedules; performing economic evaluations of projects, plans and processes; performing qualitative and quantitative risk assessments of projects, plans and processes; exploring optimization of complex processes under risk and uncertainty, covering unit operations, business units, enterprises and value chains.
CHNG4802 Chemical Engineering Design A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3804 AND CHNG3806 Corequisites: CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 Prohibitions: CHNG4203 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the overall design process, chemical engineers must clearly understand the (often complex) interactions and trade-offs that occur between technical, economic, social and environmental considerations. The capstone design projects are spread over two units of study (Chemical Engineering Design A and B) run in first and second semester. These units of study build on concepts in each of these areas introduced in previous years but with an emphasis on their successful integration within a comprehensive design activity.
The primary aim of the first unit of study (Chemical Engineering Design A) is to consider the challenge of process selection and feasibility including both technical and broader issues- with an emphasis on creating and evaluating a range of alternative options that exist at both the unit operation and complete flowsheet levels.
The primary emphasis in the subsequent unit of study (Chemical Engineering Design B) is on process design and including how non-technical considerations affect the final process design and its operation.
By the end of both units of study a student should be able to develop a wide range of alternative conceptual designs for a given product specification and market analysis, have an appreciation of how to evaluate process alternatives at the conceptual level with a view to creating a 'short-list' worthy of more detailed technical investigation, be familiar with the use of process flowsheeting software to compare alternative designs , appreciate the fact that technical considerations are only one component in an overall successful design project and be able to clearly present the results from both individual and group work in oral/written formats. This unit of study is part of an integrated (two semester) fourth year program in chemical engineering design whose overarching aim is to complete the 'vertical integration' of knowledge- one of the pillars on which this degree program is based.
CHNG4806 Chemical Engineering Design B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG4802 or CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 3000 level chemical engineering units of study have been successfully completed, as well as the related first semester UoS CHNG4802 or CHNG4203. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Permission required for enrolment prior to CHNG4802 in the case of Mid-Year Entry students.
In the overall design process, chemical engineers must clearly understand the (often complex) interactions and trade-offs that occur between technical, economic, social and environmental considerations. This unit of study builds on concepts in each of these areas introduced in previous years but with an emphasis on their successful integration within a comprehensive design activity.
This design activity is spread over two units (Chemical Engineering Design A and B) run in first and second semester. The primary aim in the first unit is to consider the technical issues- with an emphasis on creating and evaluating a range of alternative options that exist at both the unit operation and complete flowsheet levels. The primary emphasis in this unit is on evaluating how non-technical considerations affect the final process design and its operation. Students joining this course from the Major Industrial Placement Project (MIPPs CHNG 4203) or as overseas students (with approval) do the same assignment but on a different schedule.

Chemistry units

CHEM2521 Molecular Stability and Reactivity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2921 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2921 Molecular Stability and Reactivity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2521 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. Molecular Stability and Reactivity (Adv) differs from CHEM2521 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2991 Molecular Stability and Reactivity (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 75 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2921 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. Molecular Stability and Reactivity (SSP) differs from CHEM2921 in that it includes an additional seminar series on three research-led topics in chemistry. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2522 Sustainable Chemical Manufacture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2922 or CHEM2532 or CHEM2404 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern society is reliant on manufactured chemicals to meet our everyday needs in food production, medicines, clothing and technological applications. Traditional approaches to building molecules have largely ignored the detrimental environmental impacts of the manufacturing processes, but this has changed. In this unit you will study contemporary methods used to create life-changing molecules, from pharmaceuticals and bulk chemicals to polymers in the context of the environmental impact of chemical manufacture and the challenges of ensuring both sustainability of source materials and sustainability of waste treatment. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices of chemical manufacture, the application of catalytic processes, and the methods used to tailor molecular properties, including the spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques of chemical analysis. In this unit you will address the general issues of renewable and non-renewable resources and waste recycling. By doing this unit you will develop an integrated understanding of the challenges of sustainable chemical manufacture and the fundamental basis for continued study in the topics of organic synthesis, environmental chemistry, polymer science and industrial processes. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2532 Concepts in Sustainable Chemical Manufacture but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2922 Sustainable Chemical Manufacture (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2522 or CHEM2532 or CHEM2404 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern society is reliant on manufactured chemicals to meet our everyday needs in food production, medicines, clothing and technological applications. Traditional approaches to building molecules have largely ignored the detrimental environmental impacts of the manufacturing processes, but this has changed. In this unit you will study contemporary methods used to create life-changing molecules, from pharmaceuticals and bulk chemicals to polymers in the context of the environmental impact of chemical manufacture and the challenges of ensuring both sustainability of source materials and sustainability of waste treatment. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices of chemical manufacture, the application of catalytic processes, and the methods used to tailor molecular properties, including the spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques of chemical analysis. In this unit you will address the general issues of renewable and non-renewable resources and waste recycling. Sustainable Chemical Manufacture (Adv) differs from CHEM2522 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop an integrated understanding of the challenges of sustainable chemical manufacture and the fundamental basis for continued study in the topics of organic synthesis, environmental chemistry, polymer science and industrial processes. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2532 Concepts in Sustainable Chemical Manufacture but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2523 Chemistry of Biological Molecules

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2923 or CHEM2533 or CHEM2403 or CHEM2913 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All known life is based on four extraordinary families of molecules: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and the nucleic acids. While the chemistry of these molecules within living cells is the subject of biochemistry, this unit of study explores the chemistry beyond that of normal biological function to provide the foundations for drug design, development of bio-sensors and programmed self-assembly. This unit of study will cover the fundamental chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. You will learn about the spontaneous organisation of these molecules into larger structures - globular proteins, DNA helices, and lipid membranes - and the new properties that emerge as a result. You will explore how metal ions interact with proteins to produce a variety of catalytic and molecular binding sites. Powerful modern techniques such as fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy will be explained and their capacity to provide deeper insights in biological and medical applications explored. By doing this unit you will develop a fundamental understanding of the properties of biological molecules and a firm foundation for further studies in drug design, food and cosmetic science, advanced bio-sensing and the growing field of chemical applications based on biological materials. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2533 Concepts in Chemistry of Biological Molecules but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2923 Chemistry of Biological Molecules (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2523 or CHEM2533 or CHEM2403 or CHEM2913 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All known life is based on four extraordinary families of molecules: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and the nucleic acids. While the chemistry of these molecules within living cells is the subject of biochemistry, this unit of study explores the chemistry beyond that of normal biological function to provide the foundations for drug design, development of bio-sensors and programmed self-assembly. This unit of study will cover the fundamental chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. You will learn about the spontaneous organisation of these molecules into larger structures - globular proteins, DNA helices, and lipid membranes - and the new properties that emerge as a result. You will explore how metal ions interact with proteins to produce a variety of catalytic and molecular binding sites. Powerful modern techniques such as fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy will be explained and their capacity to provide deeper insights in biological and medical applications explored. Chemistry of Biological Molecules (Advanced) differs from CHEM2523 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop a fundamental understanding of the properties of biological molecules and a firm foundation for further studies in drug design, food and cosmetic science, advanced bio-sensing and the growing field of chemical applications based on biological materials. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2533 Concepts in Chemistry of Biological Molecules but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2524 Chemical Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2924 or CHEM2534 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical physics is the study of how the laws of physics gives rise to the complexity of molecular behavior and the extraordinary variety of materials and properties - from liquid crystals to tungsten carbide - that result when large numbers of atoms or molecules interact with each other. To trace the connection between fundamental physical laws and their diverse material outcomes you will apply computational techniques and gain experience in the modelling tools used in material design and technological development. You will address the fundamentals of structure in materials including symmetry and crystal stability, defects, porous structures and emergent properties such as magnetism. You will explore the statistical origins of thermodynamic stability and chemical kinetics, concepts fundamental to battery, fuel cell, sensor, and capacitor technologies. Modern experimental methods for structural determination (e. g. neutron diffraction) and dynamics (e. g. pulsed laser spectroscopy) will be covered. By doing this unit you will develop a deep insight into the physical basis of complex chemical systems and a firm foundation for future studies in physical and computational chemistry, materials science, and device design. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2534 Concepts in Chemical Physics but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2924 Chemical Physics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2524 or CHEM2534 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical physics is the study of how the laws of physics give rise to the complexity of molecular behavior and the extraordinary variety of materials and properties - from liquid crystals to tungsten carbide - that result when large numbers of atoms or molecules interact with each other. To trace the connection between fundamental physical laws and their diverse material outcomes you will apply computational techniques and gain experience in the modelling tools used in material design and technological development. You will address the fundamentals of structure in materials including symmetry and crystal stability, defects, porous structures and emergent properties such as magnetism. You will explore the statistical origins of thermodynamic stability and chemical kinetics, concepts fundamental to battery, fuel cell, sensor, and capacitor technologies. Modern experimental methods for structural determination (e. g. neutron diffraction) and dynamics (e. g. pulsed laser spectroscopy) will be covered. Chemical Physics (Advanced) differs from CHEM2524 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop a deep insight into the physical basis of complex chemical systems and a firm foundation for future studies in physical and computational chemistry, materials science, and device design. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2534 Concepts in Chemical Physics but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.

Stream Breadth units

CHNG3808 Engineering Macromolecules and Nanocomposites

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CHNG2801 and 12 cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Macromolecules and composite materials find a wide range of applications from construction, food to biomedical engineering. A significant number of engineers are employed by the related industries. This unit of study will facilitate engagement with a broad spectrum of modern engineering principles that range from the synthesis of such materials to design of products and processes for a range of industries with an innovative approach. The unit will also enable an understanding of developing sustainable technologies with the materials for producing goods used within industries or by consumers. The industrial applications will range from chemical, biomedical to electronics and nanotechnology. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through workshops, seminars, class work and project-based learning.
CHNG3809 Laboratory and Industrial Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an opportunity for students to gain experience in the operation of process plants and pilot plants. In particular students will have the opportunity to apply chemical and biomolecular engineering fundamentals to real world problems including distillation, heat transfer, fermentation, filtration, crystallisation and reverse osmosis. The unit will give students experience with examples drawn from the petrochemical, minerals, biotech, pharmaceutical and water industries.
In addition the unit will also give students an additional opportunity to apply the knowledge of experimental design, data analysis and statistics.
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Completion of 72 cp in science, engineering or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5005 Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of mass and energy balances, mathematics, process design, biochemical processes, and particle mechanics at a level typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to material covered in CHNG1103 AND CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3804 AND CHNG3805. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Key learning objectives are to provide students with an overview of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used.
The key issues considered are: wastewater characterisation; the cost of wastewater treatment and disposal; the (Australian) regulatory framework; primary, secondary and tertiary treatment options; solids management and water reuse; process integration; an introduction to process simulation.
CHNG5601 Membrane Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Membrane Science" provides background in the physics and electrochemistry of a variety of synthetic membranes used in industry as well as cellular membranes.
The course aims to develop students' understanding of:
- membrane self-assembly and manufacture;
- membrane separation processes such as filtration, desalination, ion exchange and water-splitting;
- and techniques for membrane characterisation and monitoring.
CHNG5605 Bio-Products: Laboratory to Marketplace

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year students.
The objectives of the course are to provide students with an overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical industry. It will give students an insight into drug delivery systems and formulation; how therapeutic drugs work; and a general overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical marketing. The design and management of clinical trials, which are key factors for development of any new therapeutic agent will also be covered in the course. The challenges for commercialisation of innovative methods and/or biochemical and pharmaceutical products and aspects of intellectual property protection will be elaborated. Ultimately the aspects of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and international legislation for marketing pharmaceutical products will be illuminated.
Lectures in this course will be delivered by both University of Sydney staff and by a number of visiting professional representatives from industry and government agencies. We will also arrange a site visit for a bio-manufacturing company as warranted.
When you successfully complete this course you acquire knowledge about drug formulation, pharmaceutical processing including physical processes, legislation governing the bio-manufacturing and commercialisation of biochemicals and pharmaceuticals. The information would be beneficial for your future career in pharmaceutical manufacturing companies.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information. This course will be assessed by quizzes, assignments, oral presentation and final report. This unit of study is offered as an advanced elective unit of study to final year undergraduate students. Students may be required to attend lectures off-campus.
FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit needs to be available as a non-award course so that students seeking admission to the MND have an option to fulfil the 6 cp Food Science prerequisite, if their previous study does not fulfil this requirement already.
All of the food that we produce and consume is processed in some way. The manufacture of composite food products, which have distinct properties to their constituent ingredients, requires a complex series of processing operations. However, even ready-to-eat fresh foods undergo processing to facilitate distribution to consumers, maximise shelf-life, and ensure food safety. This unit will examine the biochemical and physicochemical transformations that occur in food materials during processing and how processing parameters affect the fulfilment of food quality, shelf-life, and safety objectives. The unit is divided into modules on (1) processing to modify food structure; (2) processing for preservation; and value-adding, focused on (3) healthier food and (4) fermentation as interesting case studies in food processing. You will learn methods of food analysis and apply a scientific approach to investigating the relationships between food composition, functionality, processing conditions, and end-product properties. By doing this unit, you will develop a sound understanding of the scientific principles underpinning food processing decisions and outcomes. This is well-regarded in the food industry, particularly FMCG and manufacturing, as the ability to systematically characterise, analyse, and troubleshoot processes can be applied to a wide range of industrial situations.

Stream Depth units

CHNG4203 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 CP prior study with >65% WAM Prohibitions: CHNG4811 OR CHNG4812 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG4802 Assumed knowledge: Passed at least 144 credit points. Students wishing to do this unit of study are required to discuss the matter with the Head of School prior to enrolment. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrollment by permission only. The candidate will be selected by interview and at the discretion of the Head of School. For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, CHNG4203 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. CHNG4203 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
This unit of study will give students a rich experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision and extends over several months, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site. Previous students have been placed with industries in areas including the mining industry, oil and gas processing, plastic and paint manufacture, food production, manufacturing and so on. Students will learn from this experience the following essential engineering skills: how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organise a program of work, and analyse results and evaluate these in relation to existing knowledge. Presentation skills will also be developed, which are highly relevant to many branches of engineering activity.
CHNG5001 Process Systems Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000 level physics and mathematics (differential equations). Use of mathematical and/or computer-based modelling tools and techniques. Feedback control concepts and principles as taught in CHNG3802/CHNG9302 or similar courses. Students who are unsure about meeting these requirements should contact the unit coordinator for advice. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Whatever its purpose, any process requires some level of process monitoring and control to allow it to operate satisfactorily. Once a process is under control, the option exists to further improve performance via the implementation of some level of optimisation. This unit will develop skills in integrating process modelling, simulation, design, optimisation and control concepts. The aims of this unit are (i) to demonstrate that modelling, process control and optimisation are integral concepts in the overall consideration of industrial plants, (ii) to demonstrate that a unified approach allows a diversity of application fields to be readily handled, and (iii) to allow each student to achieve and demonstrate acceptable competency over the unit material through a range of individual and group-based activities.
CHNG5004 Particles and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that students have acquired knowledge equivalent to CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Particles and Surfaces: Mineral Processing. Aims and Objectives: Solid-solid and solid-liquid interactions are an important aspect in mineral processing. The aim of any mineral processing operation is the efficient extraction of the valuable metals or minerals (concentrate) from the waste materials in the ore (gangue). The goal of this course is to understand the various key steps and the corresponding principles required to achieve metal extraction from the ores.
Syllabus summary: This course will elucidate the principles in size reduction or comminution of the ore in liberating the valuable minerals, examine the microscopic details of solid-liquid, solid-gas and solid-solid interactions in mineral processing and their roles in macroscopic phenomena such as adhesion, wetting, adsorption, and mineral reactions such as reduction roasting and leaching. The general understanding of these factors will allow manipulation and improvement of performance in mineral beneficiation, dewatering of mineral slurries and extractive metallurgy.
By the end of this course students should develop a proficiency in characterisation of physical, surface and chemical properties of solids and metal aqueous streams; devising strategies to achieve extraction process objectives, within the constraints imposed by social, economic and physical environments, developing management strategies for treating liquid and solid effluents and becoming familiar with computer software packages in modelling aqueous and solid systems. This unit is an advanced Chemical Engineering elective.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used (equivalent to CHNG5005) OR the principles of biochemical engineering and their application in engineering (equivalent to CHNG3804). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 12cp CHEM2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5009 Digital Circular Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Key global drivers impacting our environment and urban living include population growth expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, and increasing affluence, which will see the tripling of global consumption of natural resources. Current patterns of production and consumption described as the linear "take-make-dispose" model are unsustainable, in contrast to the circular economy model described as the "reduce-reuse-recycle" which seeks to preserve upstream natural resources (energy and materials), optimise manufacturing processes that reduce generation of irreversible waste. The Circular Economy sets the foundations for engineering resource efficient, sustainable technologies and driving sustainable manufacturing, required to bring deep cuts in environmental damage driven by a growing and more affluent global population. Circular economy is an emerging paradigm in environmental management being adopted by organisation around the world to facilitate more efficient resource utilisation, while creating new economic opportunity in a digital age.
CHNG5602 Cellular Biophysics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will be given a good background in the physics of biological processes. Students will understand the differences between thermodynamically closed and open systems and its relevance to cells and other biological systems. Students will be provided with an introduction to the thermodynamics of irreversible and evolutionary processes of relevance to biology. Students will be introduced to the statistical mechanics of self assembly and equilibrium structures and its relevance to biology at the molecular level.
CHNG5603 Advanced Industrial Modelling and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students have a general knowledge of mathematics typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering, equivalent to MATH1021 AND MATH1023 AND (CHNG2802 OR MATH2XXX). This unit is for postgraduate students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year undergraduate students. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year students. Some lectures my be given by a guest lecturer.
This course will give students an insight into the use of (computer-based) statistical techniques in extracting information from experimental data obtained from real life bio-physical systems. The issues and techniques required for mathematical modeling as well as monitoring and/or control scheme for bio-physical systems will be discussed and implemented in diverse range of bioprocesses, including biomaterials and fermentation products.
We will review statistical distribution; tests based on z, t, F variables; calculation of confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; linear and nonlinear regression; analysis of variance; principal component analysis; and use of computer-based statistical tools. The issues associated with dynamic response of bio-physical processes; inferred or estimated variables; control system design and implementation; introduction to model-based control; use of computer-based control system design and analysis tools will be elaborated.
When this course is successfully completed you will acquire knowledge to choose the appropriate statistical techniques within a computer based environment, such as Excel or MATLAB, for a given situation. The students will also obtain potential for monitoring/control scheme based on the key dynamic features of the process. Such information would be beneficial for any future career in Bio-manufacturing companies. Students are encouraged to promote an interactive environment for exchange of information.
CHNG5604 Advanced Membrane Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: The physics and electrochemistry of synthetic and cellular membranes. Knowledge of membrane manufacture, membrane separation processes and membrane characterisation and monitoring. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to CHNG5601. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a practical unit of study where students apply the theoretical concepts of membrane science to engineering practice via a series of laboratory experiments. The students will gain practical insights into mass transport processes through various membranes. Students will understand the construction and functional properties of synthetic separation membranes and also will explore experimentally the various factors affecting the performance of membranes.
CHNG5606 Advanced Food Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of fluid mechanics and mathematics at a level typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to CHNG2801 (or AMME2261 or AMME2200 or CIVL2611 or CIVL3612 or CIVL9612) AND CHNG2802 (or AMME2000 or MATH2021 or MATH2061 or MATH2921). This unit is for postgraduate students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year undergraduate students. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Working at an advanced level in the food processing industry requires an ability to independently familiarise yourself with new and emerging challenges and technologies, to recognise the potential and limitations of new tools and methods, and to devise innovative solutions. Students in this unit will critically examine a range of issues and technologies in food processing technologies particularly in the areas of energy requirements, product design and process design. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through seminars and projects in three parts. In the first part, students will evaluate a range of processes based on their energy requirements. In the second part students will investigate particulate food processing and product design. In the third part of the course students will be tasked with devising and justifying their own optimum solution for a selected food processing challenge.
ENGG5206 Exponential and Emerging Technologies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Minimum 24 credit points of 3000 level units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The pace of technological change has never been greater. Tomorrow's professional engineer needs to master the core skills of their specialisation, and be able to recognise and eventually master future technologies likely to have a profound impact throughout their working lives and across the 'future of work' more broadly. These technologies are variously known as disruptive, emerging and exponential technologies; defined as those for which performance doubles whilst cost halves in any given period (c.f. Moore's law), providing opportunities to solve global problems in ways that were not previously believed possible. This unit of study will introduce students to a broad suite of these exponential and emerging technologies, through a series of keynote lectures (delivered by subject matter experts from across the University and professional practice) as well enable students to experience them first-hand through practical, laboratory and field work engagements. Each year a global scale theme (e.g. energy, poverty, food production, health) will be chosen to consider each of the technologies studied as tools to address the theme, building from week to week as the course progresses.