Bachelor of Engineering Honours

For standard enrolment plans for all Engineering streams visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Bachelor of Engineering Honours Core

Candidates for the Bachelor of Engineering Honours are required to complete a total of 192 credit points, consisting of the following:
1. 48 credit points of Engineering Core units of study, consisting of:
(a) 18 credit points of Foundation units
(b) 30 credit points of Project units
(c) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
2. 138 credit points of Stream units of study from the relevant Bachelor of Engineering Honours stream table
3. 6 credit points of electives from 3000+ level units offered by the Faculty of Engineering, or from Table S

Foundations

Students are required to take 6 credit points of introductory computing units and 12 credit points of Mathematics.
Students in the Electrical and Software streams are strongly recommended to take INFO1110 or INFO1910 as their introductory computing unit.
Students in other streams are recommended to take ENGG1810 as their introductory computing unit although are free to select INFO1110/INFO1910 if they prefer.

Computing Units

INFO1110 Introduction to Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1910 or INFO1103 or INFO1903 or INFO1105 or INFO1905 or ENGG1810 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.
INFO1910 Introduction to Programming (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1110 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assumed knowledge: ATAR sufficient to enter Dalyell program, or passing an online programming knowledge test, which will be administered during the O-week prior to the commencement of the semester. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The focus of this unit will cover the ground up programming components necessary for study in the computer science discipline. Students will engage with procedural programming using two related programming languages. Students will further their understanding of internal operations as well as reasoning about processing, memory model and conventional programming practices. As an advanced offering, all the course contents of INFO1110 will be covered and there will be additional teaching materials and assessments.
ENGG1810 Introduction to Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1801 or INFO1110 or INFO1910 or INFO1103 or INFO1903 or INFO1105 or INFO1905 or COSC1003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for engineers to learn the knowledge and skills of computer programming, using a procedural language.Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, and functions. Studentswill learn to translate a general engineering problem into a computer program. This unit trains students in the software development process, which includes programming, testing and debugging.

Mathematics Units

MATH units of study offered by the Faculty of Science shown in the tables can be replaced by an equivalent advanced level unit, subject to prerequisite conditions (as required by the Faculty of Science) being met. Students considering doing advanced options should seek advice from their school before enrolling.
MATH1021 Calculus Of One Variable

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1001 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals.
Students are strongly recommended to complete MATH1021 of MATH1921 before commencing MATH1023 or MATH1923.
Textbooks
Calculus of One Variable (Course Notes for MATH1021)
MATH1002 Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1014 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MATH1002 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering.
This unit of study introduces vectors and vector algebra, linear algebra including solutions of linear systems, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Textbooks
Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, (4th edition), David Poole
MATH1023 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1013 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1003 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of complex numbers and methods of differential and integral calculus including integration by partial fractions and integration by parts as for example in MATH1021 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 or HSC Mathematics Extension 2 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable.
Students are strongly recommended to complete MATH1021 of MATH1921 before commencing MATH1023 or MATH1923.
Textbooks
Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Course Notes for MATH1023)
MATH1005 Statistical Thinking with Data

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1015 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Advanced or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a data-rich world, global citizens need to problem solve with data and evidence based decision-making is essential in every field of research and work. This unit equips you with the foundational statistical thinking to become a critical consumer of data. You will learn to think analytically about data and to evaluate the validity and accuracy of any conclusions drawn. Focusing on statistical literacy, the unit covers foundational statistical concepts, including the design of experiments, exploratory data analysis, sampling and tests of significance.
Textbooks
Statistics, (4th Edition), Freedman Pisani Purves (2007)

Professional Engagement Program

Students must complete the Professional Engagement Program units of study.
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP1001 in their first semester of study unless credit has been granted.
ENGP1001 Professional Engagement Program 1A

Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP1000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP1002 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP1001.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the first stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP1.
ENGP1002 Professional Engagement Program 1B

Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGP1001 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP1000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP1002 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP1001.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the first stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP1.
ENGP1003 Professional Engagement Program 1C

Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGP1001 and ENGP1002 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP1000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP1003 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP1002. Except with the permission of the Professional Engagement Program Director, a maximum of one semester will be granted to finalise the requirements of ENGP1003. If the student is approved an additional semester to complete ENGP1003, their grade will be temporarily updated to 'RI'. Once the additional semester is complete the student's grade will be updated to either 'SR' or 'FR'. Single degree students should be aware that applying for an addition semester to complete ENGP1003 will likely delay their graduation by one semester.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the first stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP1.
ENGP2001 Professional Engagement Program 2A

Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGP1000 or ENGP1003 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP2000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP2001 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP1003.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the second stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP2.
ENGP2002 Professional Engagement Program 2B

Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (72cp of Engineering and MATH1XXX units) and ENGP2001 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP2000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP2002 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP2001.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the second stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP2.
ENGP2003 Professional Engagement Program 2C

Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (72cp of Engineering and MATH1XXX units) and ENGP2001 and ENGP2002 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP2000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP2003 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP2002. Except with the permission of the Professional Engagement Program Director, a maximum of one semester will be granted to finalise the requirements of ENGP2003. If the student is approved an additional semester to complete ENGP2003, their grade will be temporarily updated to 'RI'. Once the additional semester is complete the student's grade will be updated to either 'SR' or 'FR'. Single degree students should be aware that applying for an addition semester to complete ENGP2003 will likely delay their graduation by one semester.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the second stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP2.
ENGP3001 Professional Engagement Program 3A

Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGP2000 or ENGP2003 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP3000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP3001 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP2003.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the third stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP3.
ENGP3002 Professional Engagement Program 3B

Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGP3001 Prohibitions: ENGG4000 or ENGG5217 or ENGP3000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students must enrol in ENGP3002 in the semester immediately following completion of ENGP3001. Except with the permission of the Professional Engagement Program Director, a maximum of one semester will be granted to finalise the requirements of ENGP3002. If the student is approved an additional semester to complete ENGP3002, their grade will be temporarily updated to 'RI'. Once the additional semester is complete the student's grade will be updated to either 'SR' or 'FR'. Single degree students should be aware that applying for an addition semester to complete ENGP3002 will likely delay their graduation by one semester.
The BEHonours degree (and all associated combined degrees) requires all students to develop a deep understanding of the professional and social contexts in which their engineering knowledge can be applied, and how this context shapes the application of their knowledge. This involves a strong engagement with the practice of their profession and ensuring that they are responsive to the needs and context of industry and community. This engagement is met through the completion of the PEP - Professional Engagement Program - a degree-long integrated program of professional development activities that involves students in contextualising their learning, progressively taking greater responsibility for their own development, and building the foundations of a strong professional engineering career. Once students have completed the requirements of the third stage of the Professional Engagement Program they will pass PEP3.

Projects Table

Project 1

Students are to select the introduction unit relevant to their stream. Students in both Electrical and Software Engineering streams are to take ELEC1004.
Students must complete 6 credit points from the following:
AERO1560 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or MECH1560 or MTRX1701 or CIVL1900 or CHNG1108 or AMME1960 or BMET1960 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the role of professional aerospace engineers, along with the development of fundamental engineering knowledge and skills for aerospace vehicle design, analysis performance and operation. Students will learn through experience, to develop professional skills in research, interpretation, communication, and presentation of information relating to aerospace engineering. Expected learning includes: introduction to lateral thinking concepts; glossary of aerospace vehicle components and terminology; an introduction to the multiple disciplines related to aerospace engineering, such as aerodynamics, aircraft and spacecraft performance, mechanics of flight, aerospace structures, materials and propulsion systems; how the various disciplines are integrated into the design and development of flight platform systems; the operating characteristics of modern flight vehicles, their uses and limitations; modern developments and future trends in aerospace; the limitations of the aerospace environment; teamwork; and resource management.
Significantly, professional enhancement is introduced through the development of basic hands-on workshop skills. These practical skills enable students to have a better appreciation of the tools that they are expected to apply their engineering knowledge to, during their aerospace engineering profession. Experiential learning is facilitated through developing skills with machine and hand tools; solid modelling; and microcontrollers in a supervised environment, to develop fundamentals of practical aerospace vehicle component design, manufacture, control, servicing, and repair.
Manufacturing Technology: An overview of a range of processes related to the design and manufacture of aerospace components is provided through hands-on experience. Manufacturing Technology practical work is undertaken in: (a) Hand tools, Machining, and Fibreglassing - an introduction to basic manufacturing processes used to fabricate aerospace engineering hardware. Safety requirements: All students are required to provide their own personal protective equipment (PPE) and comply with the workshop safety rules provided in class. Students who fail to do this will not be permitted to enter the workshops. In particular, approved industrial footwear must be worn, and long hair must be protected by a hair net. Safety glasses must be worn at all times. (b) Solid Modelling - the use of computer aided design (CAD) tools to model geometry and create engineering drawings of engineering components. (c) Microcontrollers - ubiquitous in modern engineered products - will be introduced through experiential learning with development kits.
BMET1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1960 OR ENGG1800 OR CIVL1900 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR MTRX1701 OR AMME1960 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (3 Unit) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomedical Engineering 1A introduces students to the exciting interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering through lectures from experts in the key thematic areas of Biomedical Engineering, and practical hands-on training that every Biomedical Engineer needs to know. Areas you will cover include: (i) Medical Imaging; (ii) Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering; (iii) Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology; (iv) Medical Devices and Sensors; (v) Biomechanics and Computational Biomedical Engineering; (vi) Biomanufacturing; and (vii) Bionics and Neuromodulation.
You will also complete two major assignments. Assignment 1 is the BMET1960 CANNES (creatively argued no-nonsense ethics scenarios) Film Festival, in which you will develop a persuasive position on a biomedical ethical scenario with your peers and present it creatively in a video. In Assignment 2 you will explore one of the areas of Biomedical Engineering that interests you and present a hypothetical "game-changing" technical report for the field.
The quizzes, assignments and exam make up 60% of the total assessment. The remaining 40% comprises practical work (the Manufacturing Technology Workshop) involving a range of hardware and software skills vital to your future work as an engineer.
We hope this introductory unit stirs your passion and interest in the exciting field of Biomedical Engineering!
CHNG1108 Introduction to Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or CIVL1900 or MECH1560 or AERO1560 or AMME1960 or BMET1960 or MTRX1701 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and Chemistry Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce students to the profession of chemical engineering. It will give students an appreciation of the variety of the chemical and process industries, their history, the economic importance and the scale of their operations both in Australia and globally.
The unit will make use of virtual process plants and industrial leaders as guest speakers.
CIVL1900 Introduction to Civil Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or CHNG1108 or MECH1560 or AERO1560 or AMME1960 or BMET1960 or MTRX1701 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of this unit of study is to introduce students to the field of civil engineering and its areas of specialisation: structural engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, construction management, transportation engineering, and humanitarian engineering. The unit will cover basic physics concepts relevant to civil engineering. The unit will equip students with knowledge of foundational civil engineering tools and techniques such as the identification and calculation of loads on structures, structural systems, and load paths in structures. The unit covers design and construction issues related to the use of standard materials such as steel, concrete, and timber. The unit includes several design tasks and a design project with an emphasis on issues associated with the impact of civil infrastructure on the natural environment, the economy, and social and humanitarian outcomes. The topics will provide a sound foundation for the further study of civil infrastructure design, analysis, construction, and maintenance.
ELEC1004 Practical Intro to Electrical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics and Mathematics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to expose the students with fundamental (basic) concepts of different specializations within electrical engineering and give them hands on experience to develop the required engineering skills. The unit is based on extensive laboratory work covering Measuring skills using basic electrical instruments, Soldering skills to make electronic circuits and test them, Computer programming skills including real time programming and simulation programming, Use of internet technology, Wireless technology, Renewable energy technology.
MECH1560 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AERO1560 or MTRX1701 or ENGG1800 or CIVL1900 or CHNG1108 or AMME1960 or BMET1960 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives:
a) To develop an understanding of the role of Mechanical Engineers and the core concepts within the discipline.
b) To understand the content of the degree structure and how the subjects are applied.
c) To develop an understanding of a range of machining and manufacturing processes required to make mechanical components.
Introductory Mechanical Engineering (60%): The subject introduces the core mechanical engineering concepts of design and mechanisms, intelligent systems, applied materials and fluid machinery. An overview is provided of the range of roles and the skills and knowledge required of a Mechanical Engineer. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the subjects in the degree program and how they are applied by practicing engineers.
Manufacturing Technology (40%): An overview of a range of processes related to the design and manufacture of aerospace components is provided through hands-on experience. Manufacturing Technology practical work is undertaken in: (a) Hand tools, Machining, and Welding - an introduction to basic manufacturing processes used to fabricate mechanical engineering hardware. Safety requirements: All students are required to provide their own personal protective equipment (PPE) and comply with the workshop safety rules provided in class. Students who fail to do this will not be permitted to enter the workshops. In particular, approved industrial footwear must be worn, and long hair must be protected by a hair net. Safety glasses must be worn at all times. (b) Solid Modelling - the use of computer aided design (CAD) tools to model geometry and create engineering drawings of engineering components. (c) Microcontrollers - ubiquitous in modern engineered products - will be introduced through experiential learning with development kits.
MTRX1701 Introduction to Mechatronic Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH1560 or ENGG1800 or AERO1560 or CIVL1900 or CHNG1108 or AMME1960 or MET1960 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underlie the study of mechatronic engineering. It lays the foundation for later studies, including advanced mechatronic engineering, computing, control and system design courses. The subject also provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of a range of machining and manufacturing processes required to make mechanical components.
Introduction to Mechatronic Engineering (60%): (a) Introduction to mechatronics and to the structure of the BE in Mechatronic Engineering. (b) Systems Modelling and Control - Fundamental concepts which underlie the modelling and control of dynamic systems. (c) Design Process - The process of design synthesis as an important part of engineering. (d) Actuators - Components that exert effort to accomplish a given task. (e) Sensors - Components that take measurements of the environment. (f) Computers - Hardware and software components that, when combined, allow a system to be controlled. (g) Advanced Topics - Case studies relating to the application of mechatronic engineering principles.
Manufacturing Technology (40%): An overview of a range of processes related to the design and manufacture of aerospace components is provided through hands-on experience. Manufacturing Technology practical work is undertaken in: (a) Hand tools, Machining, and Soldering - an introduction to basic manufacturing processes used to fabricate mechatronic engineering hardware. Safety requirements: All students are required to provide their own personal protective equipment (PPE) and comply with the workshop safety rules provided in class. Students who fail to do this will not be permitted to enter the workshops. In particular, approved industrial footwear must be worn, and long hair must be protected by a hair net. Safety glasses must be worn at all times. (b) Solid Modelling - the use of computer aided design (CAD) tools to model geometry and create engineering drawings of engineering components. (c) Microcontrollers - ubiquitous in modern engineered products - will be introduced through experiential learning with development kits.

Project 2 & 3

Students enrolled in the Dalyell Stream may count any Dalyell unit in place of ENGG2112 and may count any Dalyell unit offered by the Faculty of Engineering (ENGDXXXX) in place of ENGG3112.
Students must complete 12 credit points from the following:
ENGG3112 Interdisciplinary Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Minimum of 84cp of engineering foundation/project/stream table units Prohibitions: ENGG2111 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ENGG3112 will provide an opportunity for students to experience the interaction of different disciplines of engineering needed to deliver complex engineered systems. Students will work in multi-engineering-disciplinary teams to evaluate complex engineered systems in the context of contemporary global challenges, and put forward recommendations for change during semester-long project. The project will also have an emphasis on how engineering can contribute (positively and negatively) to complex global challenges.
ENGGG2112 Multi-disciplinary Engineering will be available from 2022.

Thesis Units

Students are to select the thesis units relevant to their stream. Aeronautical, Mechanical and Mechatronic students are to enrol in the AMME coded units. Students in both Electrical and Software are to enrol in the ELEC coded units.
Where approved by the Faculty, students undertaking a 24cp Major Industrial Project unit will have the requirement for Thesis A and B waived.
Students must complete 12 credit points from the following:
AMME4111 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level Engineering units of study Prohibitions: AMME4010 or AMME4122 or AMME4121 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Prospective students in Thesis A are expected to have consulted with supervisors and selected a topic of interest at the end of third year, guided by the advertised list of suggested thesis topics and supervisors. Availability of topics is limited and students should undertake to speak with prospective supervisors as soon as possible. Students who are unable to secure a supervisor and topic will be allocated a supervisor by the unit coordinator. Alternatively, students may do a thesis with a supervisor in industry or in another university department. In this case, the student must also find a second supervisor within the School of AMME.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
AMME4112 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level Engineering units of study Prohibitions: AMME4121 or AMME4010 or AMME4122 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
BMET4111 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: BMET4010 or AMME4111 or AMME4112 or AMME4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two CONSECUTIVE semesters of enrollment, if not students will have to enroll in Thesis A again. Taken together, the thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Honours Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
BMET4112 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: BMET4010 or AMME4111 or AMME4112 or AMME4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two CONSECUTIVE semesters of enrollment, if not students will have to enroll in Thesis A again. Taken together, the thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Honours Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CHNG4811 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 Prohibitions: CHNG4813 OR CHNG4814 OR CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 3000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: School permission required for enrolment in semester 2.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CHNG4812 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG4811 Prohibitions: CHNG4813 OR CHNG4814 OR CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that Honours Thesis A and all (six) core chemical engineering units of study in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
Note: School permission required for enrolment in semester 1.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CIVL4022 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Prohibitions: CIVL4203 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator and School's Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CIVL4023 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Prohibitions: CIVL4203 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
ELEC4712 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: ELEC4714 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note that students require permission from the HOS to do both A and B units in the same Semester, and will have an accelerated assessment schedule. Note also that entry to Honours Thesis is by permission.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
ELEC4713 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC4714 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note that students require permission from the HOS to do both A and B units in the same Semester, and will have an accelerated assessment schedule. Note also that entry to Honours Thesis is by permission.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
AMME4010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 credits of at least 3rd year units of study with 65% average Prohibitions: AMME4111 OR AMME4112 OR AMME4121 OR AMME4122 OR ENGG4000 OR MECH4601 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, AMME4010 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. AMME4010 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to AMME4111/4112 Thesis A and B, and two recommended electives.
This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged fulltime on the project at the industrial site.
CHNG4203 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 CP prior study with >65% WAM Prohibitions: CHNG4811 OR CHNG4812 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG4802 Assumed knowledge: Passed at least 144 credit points. Students wishing to do this unit of study are required to discuss the matter with the Head of School prior to enrolment. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrollment by permission only. The candidate will be selected by interview and at the discretion of the Head of School. For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, CHNG4203 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. CHNG4203 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
This unit of study will give students a rich experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision and extends over several months, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site. Previous students have been placed with industries in areas including the mining industry, oil and gas processing, plastic and paint manufacture, food production, manufacturing and so on. Students will learn from this experience the following essential engineering skills: how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organise a program of work, and analyse results and evaluate these in relation to existing knowledge. Presentation skills will also be developed, which are highly relevant to many branches of engineering activity.
CIVL4203 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [36 credits of 3000 level units of study] and WAM >= 70 Prohibitions: CIVL4022 or CIVL4023 or ENGG4000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, CIVL4203 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. CIVL4203 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to Civil Engineering. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to CIVL4022/4023 Thesis and two other subjects as approved by the Civil Director of Undergraduate studies. The two other subjects will most commonly be Civil electives, and students will normally need to have 12cp of Civil electives available in their degree at the time of enrolment in CIVL4203. Places in this unit are limited and dependent on the availability of suitable industry partners. Students will be required to have consistently high academic results in their previous years. If there are more applicants than there are available positions an applicant will be chosen based on the highest WAM and and other suitability factors relating to the project and the company. This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site. The placement is usually a full-time on-site placement for one semester in the student's final year.
ELEC4714 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: ELEC4710 OR ELEC4711 OR ELEC4712 OR ELEC4713 OR ENGG4000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, ELEC4714 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. ELEC4714 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to ELEC4712/4713 Thesis A and B, and two recommended electives. This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged full time on the project at the industrial site.