Mechatronic Engineering

For a standard enrolment plan for Mechatronic Engineering visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Mechatronic Engineering Stream

Completion of a stream is a requirement of the Bachelor of Engineering Honours.
Students complete 192 credit points comprising:
(a) 48 credit points from the Engineering Core Table, consisting of:
(i) 18 credit points of Engineering Foundation units
(ii) 30 credit points of Project units
(iii) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
(b) 138 credit points from the Mechatronic Engineering Stream table, consisting of:
(i) 114 credit points of Mechatronic Stream Core units
(ii) A maximum of 24 credit points of Mechatronic Stream Elective units, which may include not more than 6 credit points of Mechatronic Stream Machine Learning Elective units
(c) 6 credit points of electives from 3000+ level units offered by the Faculty of Engineering, or from Table S
The completion of a specialisation is not mandatory. If a student chooses to take a specialisation available in their stream, the specialisation can be completed within the 192 credit points described above.

Stream Core units

AMME1362 Materials 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL2110 or CIVL1110 or AMME2302 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AMME1362 is an introductory course in engineering materials. The unit aims to develop students' understanding of the structures, mechanical properties and manufacture of a range of engineering materials as well as how the mechanical properties relate to microstructure and forming and treatment methods. The unit has no prerequisite subject and is therefore intended for those with little or no previous background in engineering materials. However the unit does require students to take a significant degree of independent responsibility for developing their own background knowledge of materials and their properties. The electrical, magnetic, thermal and optical properties of materials are a critical need-to-know area where students are expected to do most of their learning by independent study.
AMME1802 Engineering Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL1802 or ENGG1802 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to provide students with an understanding of and competence in solving statics and introductory dynamics problems in engineering. Tutorial sessions will help students to improve their group work and problem solving skills, and gain competency in extracting a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Emphasis is placed on the ability to work in 3D as well as 2D, including the 2D and 3D visualisation of structures and structural components, and the vectorial 2D and 3D representations of spatial points, forces and moments. Introduction to kinematics and dynamics topics includes position, velocity and acceleration of a point; relative motion, force and acceleration, momentum, collisions and energy methods.
AMME2000 Engineering Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) AND (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems including; Conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The focus will be on real problems, deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables; Fourier series and Fourier transforms; Laplace transforms; scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches.
AMME2200 Introductory Thermofluids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME2261 OR AMME2262 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933). Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Thermofluids is made up of the components Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer and Thermodynamics and it reaches into all areas of Engineering including issues of human comfort, power generation and environment. A broad range of essential topics is covered in this unit, suitable for students who have not already completed similar component units. The emphasis is on analysis and problem solving (detailed calculations) by application of the relevant basic principles to typical engineering problems.
Fluid Mechanics
Properties: viscosity, surface tension, cavitation, capillarity. Hydrostatics: manometers, forces and moments on submerged surfaces, centre of pressure, buoyancy, vessel stability. Flow: Streamlines, turbulence, continuity, Bernoulli, venturi meter, pitot tube, head, loss coefficients, pumps, turbines, power, efficiency. Fluid momentum, drag, thrust, propulsive efficiency, wind turbines, turbomachinery, torque, power, head, Francis, Pelton, Kaplan turbines. Dimensional analysis, similarity, scale modelling, Reynolds No., pipe flow, pressure drop, Moody chart.
Heat Transfer
Conduction: thermal circuits, plane, cylindrical, conduction equation, fins. Heat Exchangers: LMTD and NTU methods. Unsteady Conduction: lumped capacity, Bi, Fo, Heissler charts. Convection (forced), analytical Nu, Pr correlations. Convection (natural) Ra, Gr. Radiation spectrum, blackbody, emissivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, Stefan-Boltzmann, Kirchhoff Laws, selective surfaces, environmental radiation.
Thermodynamics:
1st Law of Thermodynamics, Properties, State postulate. Ideal gases, 2-phase properties, steam quality. Turbines, compressors. thermal efficiency and COP for refrigerators. 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, Kelvin-Planck, Clausius statements. Carnot engine. Entropy; increase of entropy principle, entropy and irreversibility. Isentropic processes, T-s diagrams, isentropic efficiency. Some power and refrigeration cycle analysis, characteristics of main power cycles. Psychrometry, air-conditioning, thermal comfort basics.
AMME2301 Mechanics of Solids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME1802 OR ENGG1802) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: CIVL2201 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equilibrium of deformable structures; basic concept of deformation compatibility; stress and strain in bars, beams and their structures subjected to tension, compression, bending, torsion and combined loading; statically determinate and indeterminate structures; energy methods for bar and beam structures; simple buckling; simple vibration; deformation of simple frames and cell box beams; simple two-dimensional stress and Morh's circle; problem-based applications in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering.
AMME2500 Engineering Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) AND (AMME1802 OR ENGG1802) Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with the MATLAB programming environment Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the principles governing the state of motion or rest of bodies under the influence of applied force and torque, according to classical mechanics. The course aims to teach students the fundamental principles of the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles, rigid bodies, planar mechanisms and three-dimensional mechanisms, covering topics including kinematics in various coordinate systems, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy principles, impulse and momentum (linear and angular), gyroscopic motion and vibration. Students will develop skills in analysing and modelling dynamical systems, using both analytical methods and computer-based solutions using MATLAB. Students will develop skills in approximating the dynamic behaviour of real systems in engineering applications and an appreciation and understanding of the effect of approximations in the development and design of systems in real-world engineering tasks.
AMME3500 System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2500 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to allow students to develop an understanding of methods for modeling and controlling linear, time-invariant systems. Techniques examined will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain approaches to modeling of systems. This will allow students to examine the response of a system to changing inputs and to examine the influence of external stimuli such as disturbances on system behaviour. Students will also gain an understanding of how the responses of these mechanical systems can be altered to meet desired specifications and why this is important in many engineering problem domains.
The study of control systems engineering is of fundamental importance to most engineering disciplines, including Mechanical, Mechatronic, Biomedical, and Aerospace Engineering. Control systems are found in a broad range of applications within these disciplines, from aircraft and spacecraft to robots, automobiles, manufacturing processes, and medical diagnostic systems. The concepts taught in this course introduce students to the mathematical foundations behind the modelling and control of linear, time-invariant dynamic systems. In particular, topics addressed in this course will include:
1. Techniques for modelling mechanical systems and understanding their response to control inputs and disturbances. This will include the derivation of differential equations and use of frequency domain (Laplace transform) methods for their solution and analysis.
2. Representation of systems in a feedback control system as well as techniques for determining what desired system performance specifications are achievable, practical and important when the system is under control
3. Techniques including Root Locus, Bode Plots, and State Space for analysis and design of feedback control systems.
4. Case studies inspired by real-world problems in control engineering.
ELEC1103 Fundamentals of Elec and Electronic Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, and PHYS1003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. This is a foundation unit in circuit theory. Circuit theory is the electrical engineer's fundamental tool.
The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of electronics, instrumentation, electrical machines, power systems, communication systems, and signal processing.
Topics: a) Basic electrical and electronic circuit concepts: Circuits, circuit elements, circuit laws, node and mesh analysis, circuit theorems, energy storage, capacitors and inductors, circuits with switches, transient response, sine waves and complex analysis, phasors, impedance, ac power. ; b) Project management, teamwork, ethics; c) Safety issues
ELEC2104 Electronic Devices and Circuits

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103. Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws; action of Current and Voltage sources; network analysis and the superposition theorem; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; inductors and capacitors, transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits; the ability to use power supplies, oscilloscopes, function generators, meters, etc. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern Electronics has come to be known as microelectronics which refers to the Integrated Circuits (ICs) containing millions of discrete devices. This course introduces some of the basic electronic devices like diodes and different types of transistors. It also aims to introduce students the analysis and design techniques of circuits involving these discrete devices as well as the integrated circuits.
Completion of this course is essential to specialise in Electrical, Telecommunication or Computer Engineering stream.
ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC2104 Assumed knowledge: 1. Differential equations, linear algebra, complex variables, analysis of linear circuits. 2. Fourier theory applied to periodic and non-periodic signals. 3. Software such as MATLAB to perform signal analysis and filter design. 4. Familiarity with the use of basic laboratory equipment such as oscilloscope, function generator, power supply, etc. 5. Basic electric circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide the fundamentals of power electronics. It provides description of the operation principles and control of these blocks. Through analysis and design methodologies, it delivers an understanding of modern enabling technologies associated with energy conversion. Through laboratory hands-on experience on actual industrial systems, such as electrical motor drives, robotic arms, and power supplies, it enhances the link between the theory and the "real" engineering world.
The following topics are covered:
Introduction to power electronic converters and systems; analysis, design, simulation, and control of power electronic converters; power semiconductor devices; passive devices; the conversion toplogy includes DC/DC, DC/AC, AC/DC, and AC/AC for various applications.
ELEC3404 Electronic Circuit Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A background in basic electronics and circuit theory is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to teach students analysis and design techniques for electronic systems such as signal amplifiers, differential amplifiers and power amplifiers. Completion of this unit will allow progression to advanced studies or to work in electronics and telecommunication engineering.
Topics covered are as follows. The BJT and MOSFET as an amplifier. Biasing in amplifier circuits. Small signal operation and models. Single stage amplifiers. Internal capacitances and high frequency models. The frequency response of the common-emitter amplifier. Current sources and current mirrors. Differential amplifiers. Output stages and power amplifiers: class A, class B and class AB.
MECH2400 Mechanical Design 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET2400 Assumed knowledge: (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810) and (AMME1802 OR ENGG1802); HSC Maths and Physics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aim: For students to experience a realistic the design process and to develop good engineering skills.
Course Objectives- To develop an understanding of: 1) The need for and use of standard drawings in the communication and definition of parts and assemblies to AS1100; 2) Efficient use of a CAD package; 3) Creativity; 4) The design process from initial idea to finished product; 5) Methods used to analyse designs; 6) Appreciation and analysis of standard components; 7) An understanding of power transmission elements.
MECH3460 Mechanical Design 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MECH2400 and AMME2301 Assumed knowledge: Properties of engineering materials including fatigue failure theories. Statics and dynamics properties of machines. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to apply some newly acquired skills to begin to understand how stress and strain are distributed in the more common categories of machine parts. Reducing the loads in standard parts to just the most significant, leads to a range of relatively simple analyses. By using different degrees of simplification and a proportional amount of effort, the examination of components can provide results of corresponding accuracy. To lead the student to utilise and be aware of modern computer methods, to be aware of past methods and be prepared of future developments. Not all the analysis of mechanical components are covered in the course but the ones that are deal with exemplify principles that can be applied to novel items that our graduates may encounter in their professional life.
At the end of this unit students will be able to: apply fatigue life prediction in general to any component; design a bolted joint to carry tensile and or shear loads: use a numerical solver to arrive at the optimal dimensions of a component, given its loads and sufficient boundary conditions; design shafts to carry specified steady and alternating bending moments and torques; design and construct a space frame, such as that for a dune buggy, to meet requirements of strength and rigidity; be able to arrive at the principle parameters of a pair of matched spur gears, and to be able to extend this to helical gears.
Course content will include: stress and strain in engineering materials; yield and ultimate fail conditions in malleable and brittle materials; spatial, 3D frameworks; deflections due to forces, moments and torques.
MECH3660 Manufacturing Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MECH2400 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR MECH1560 OR ENGG1800 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to teach the fundamentals of manufacturing processes and systems in mechanical, mechatronic and biomedical engineering, including traditional and advanced manufacturing technologies.
This unit aims to develop the following attributes: to understand the fundamental principles of manufacturing technologies for the above mentioned engineering areas; to gain the ability to select existing manufacturing processes and systems for direct engineering applications; to develop ability to create innovative new manufacturing technologies for advanced industrial applications; to develop ability to invent new manufacturing systems.
At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: merits and advantages of individual manufacturing processes and systems; principles of developing new technologies; comprehensive applications and strategic selection of manufacturing processes and systems.
Course content will include:
CAD / CAM: An introduction into the use of CAD and manual CNC coding as separate tools combined with an introduction into the kinematics and structural requirements in the construction of a CNC machine.
Rapid Engineering: An introduction into the most current Rapid Engineering methods currently in use.
Manufacturing Processes: Common processes and their science (machining, casting, powder metallurgy, metal working, welding) and their relative merits and limitations.
MTRX1702 Mechatronics 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC1101 or ELEC2602 or COSC1902 or COSC1002 Assumed knowledge: MTRX1701 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide a foundation for the study of systems and embedded programming for the degree in Mechatronic Engineering.
It is based around a systems engineering approach to requirements capture, software design, implementation, debugging and testing in the context of the C programming language. Problem definition and decomposition; the design process; designing for testing and defensive coding methods; modular code structure and abstract data types; best practice in programming. Programming in teams; documentation and version control.
The C language: Preprocessor, tokens, storage classes and types; arithmetic, relational and bit manipulation operators; constructs for control flow: if, switch, for, do and while; arrays; pointers and character strings; dynamic memory allocation; functions and parameter passing; derived storage classes: structures and unions; file I/O.
MTRX1705 Introduction to Mechatronic Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to the basic hardware elements of mechatronic systems.
Basic electrical theory: Ohms law, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws, passive component characteristics (resistors, capacitors and inductors).
Number systems and codes; Logic gates and Boolean algebra, universal (NAND) logic gates; Digital arithmetic: operations and circuits, Two's complement addition and subtraction, overflow; Combinational logic circuits; Flip-flops and related devices; Counters and registers, shift register applications; sequential circuits, designs of synchronous, cascadable counters (BCD and binary). Integrated circuit logic families and interfacing; practical issues including, fan out, pull-up/down, grounds, power supplies and decoupling; timing issues, race conditions. Tri-state signals and buses; MSI logic circuits, multiplexers, demultiplexers, decoders, magnitude comparators; Introduction to programmable logic devices.
Brushed DC Motors: Introduction to characteristics and control, motor specifications, torque-speed characteristics, power and efficiency, thermal considerations.
Introduction to BJTs and FETs as switches. PWM control of DC motors; half- and full-bridge configurations; Feedback and operational amplifiers; selected op-amp applications circuits with an emphasis on sensor and actuator interfacing.
The unit of study will include a practical component where students design and implement logic and linear circuits. Purchase of a basic laboratory tool kit as described in classes will be required.
MTRX2700 Mechatronics 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MTRX1702 AND MTRX1705 Prohibitions: ELEC2601 or ELEC3607 Assumed knowledge: MTRX1701 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to microprocessor and microcomputer systems, emphasising assembly language programming and building on the digital logic foundations from first year. In particular, the following subjects are addressed:
Introduction to microprocessors, stored-program computer architecture, instruction codes and addressing modes, instruction execution cycle; Memory devices. Computer architecture and assembly language programming. Microprocessor and microcontroller systems, memory and IO interfacing, interrupts and interrupt handling. Serial and parallel communications. System design, documentation, implementation, debugging and testing.
MTRX2700 is the introductory course in the basics of real Mechatronic systems. This course builds on knowledge obtained in the courses ENGG1801, MTRX1701, ELEC1103 and MTRX1702, MTRX1705. This course extends this knowledge by introducing students to their first practical applications in Mechatronic Engineering. By passing this subject, the student will have obtained the necessary skills to undertake Mechatronics 3 (MTRX3700).
MTRX3700 Mechatronics 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MTRX2700 Prohibitions: MECH4710 Assumed knowledge: Completion of a first course in microprocessor systems, including assembly and C language programming, interfacing, introductory digital and analogue electronics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide experience, confidence and competence in the design and implementation of microprocessor-based products and instruments; to impart a detailed knowledge of the software and hardware architecture of a typical modern microcontroller, and an understanding of the use of these resources in product design; and to provide experience of working in a project team to prototype a realistic product to meet a specification.
At the end of this unit students will understand microprocessor system organisation, and the organisation of multiple and distributed processor systems, special purpose architectures (DSPs etc. ) and their application. The student will have a detailed knowledge of the software and hardware architecture of a modern microcontroller. This knowledge will include an in-depth understanding of the relationship between assembly language, high-level language, and the hardware, of the utilisation and interfacing of microcontroller hardware resources, and of the design and development of software comprised of multiple interrupt-driven processes. The student will have the competence to develop prototype microprocessor-based products.
Course content will include single processor systems, multiple and distributed processing systems, special purpose architectures (DSPs etc) and their application; real-time operating systems for microcontrollers; standard interfacing of sensor and actuation systems; ADC/DAC, SSI, parallel, CAN bus etc. ; specific requirements for microprocessor-based products; problem definition and system design; tools for design, development and testing of prototype systems; the unit of study will include a project, where groups of students design, develop and commission a microprocessor-based product.
MTRX3760 Mechatronic Systems Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MTRX2700 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study follows a systems engineering approach to the integration of hardware and software components to form mechatronic systems.
Sensors: dead reckoning and inertial sensors; external sensors including ultrasonic, laser, radar and GPS; sensor interfaces, serialisation and data streams.
Methodologies for object-oriented design; the C++ language: classes and class design; overloading; inheritance and polymorphism; iostreams.
Operating system: introduction to structure and principles; facilities for interprocess communication and synchronisation; device drivers and applications programming; Gnu software tools; make and related utilities; communications middleware for distributed software.
Students will complete a six-week project working in groups to design and implement a distributed mechatronic system.

Stream Elective units

Students must complete 18 or 24 credit points from the following units of study:
AMME4010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 credits of at least 3rd year units of study with 65% average Prohibitions: AMME4111 OR AMME4112 OR AMME4121 OR AMME4122 OR ENGG4000 OR MECH4601 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, AMME4010 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. AMME4010 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to AMME4111/4112 Thesis A and B, and two recommended electives.
This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged fulltime on the project at the industrial site.
AMME4710 Computer Vision and Image Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30cp of any 3000 or higher level Engineering units of study AND (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910) Assumed knowledge: The unit assumes that students have strong skills in either MATLAB or Python. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to vision sensors, computer vision analysis and digital image processing. This course will cover the following areas: fundamental principles of vision sensors such as physics laws, radiometry, CMOS/CDD imager architectures, colour reconstruction; the design of physics-based models for vision such as reflectance models, photometric invariants, radiometric calibration. This course will also present algorithms for video/image analysis, transmission and scene interpretation. Topics such as image enhancement, restoration, stereo correspondence, pattern recognition, object segmentation and motion analysis will be covered.
AMME5520 Advanced Control and Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME3500 OR AMME9501 or AMME8501 Assumed knowledge: Strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces engineering design via optimisation, i. e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilise and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion. The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimisation frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with Dijkstra's algorithm, A*, and probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs), state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.
BMET5790 Introduction to Biomechatronics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MECH3921 or BMET3921) or MTRX3700 or MTRX3760 or (AMME5921 or BMET5921 or BMET9921) Prohibitions: AMME4790 or AMME5790 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in mechanical and electronic engineering; adequate maths and applied maths skills; background knowledge of physics, chemistry and biology; Some programming capability: MATLAB, C, C++, software tools used by engineers including CAD and EDA packages. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomechatronics is the application of mechatronic engineering to human biology, and as such it forms an important subset of the overall biomedical engineering discipline. This unit focusses on a number of areas of interest including auditory and optical prostheses, artificial hearts and active and passive prosthetic limbs and examines the biomechatronic systems (hardware and signal processing) that underpin their operation.
MECH5720 Sensors and Signals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MTRX3700 or MTRX3760 Prohibitions: MECH4720 Assumed knowledge: Strong MATLAB skills Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Syllabus Summary: This course starts by providing a background to the signals and transforms required to understand modern sensors. It goes on to provide an overview of the workings of typical active sensors (Radar, Lidar and Sonar). It provides insight into basic sensing methods as well as aspects of interfacing and signal processing. It includes both background material and a number of case studies.
The course covers the following topics:
a) SIGNALS: Convolution, The Fourier Transform, Modulation (FM, AM, FSK, PSK etc), Frequency shifting (mixing)
b) PASSIVE SENSORS: Infrared Radiometers, Imaging Infrared, Passive Microwave Imaging, Visible Imaging and Image Intensifiers
c) ACTIVE SENSORS THE BASICS: Operational Principles, Time of flight (TOF) Measurement and Imaging of Radar, Lidar and Sonar, Radio Tags and Transponders, Range Tacking, Doppler Measurement, Phase Measurement
d) SENSORS AND THE ENVIRONMENT: Atmospheric Effects, Target Characteristics, Clutter Characteristics, Multipath
e) ACTIVE SENSORS: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES: Probability of Detection, Angle Measurement and Tracking, Combined Range/Doppler and Angle Tracking, Frequency Modulation and the Fast Fourier Transform, High Range Resolution, Wide Aperture Methods, Synthetic Aperture Methods (SAR)
Objectives: The course aims to provide students with a good practical knowledge of a broad range of sensor technologies, operational principles and relevant signal processing techniques.
Expected Outcomes: A good understanding of active sensors, their outputs and applicable signal processing techniques. An appreciation of the basic sensors that are available to engineers and when they should be used.
MTRX5700 Experimental Robotics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME3500 OR AMME9501 OR AMME8501) AND (MTRX3700 OR MTRX3760) Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of statics and dynamics, rotation matrices, programming and some electronic and mechanical design experience is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to present a broad overview of the technologies associated with industrial and mobile robots. Major topics covered are sensing, mapping, navigation and control of mobile robots and kinematics and control of industrial robots. The subject consists of a series of lectures on robot fundamentals and case studies on practical robot systems. Material covered in lectures is illustrated through experimental laboratory assignments. The objective of the course is to provide students with the essential skills necessary to be able to develop robotic systems for practical applications.
At the end of this unit students will: be familiar with sensor technologies relevant to robotic systems; understand conventions used in robot kinematics and dynamics; understand the dynamics of mobile robotic systems and how they are modeled; have implemented navigation, sensing and control algorithms on a practical robotic system; apply a systematic approach to the design process for robotic systems; understand the practical application of robotic systems in manufacturing, automobile systems and assembly systems; develop the capacity to think critically and independently about new design problems; undertake independent research and analysis and to think creatively about engineering problems.
Course content will include: history and philosophy of robotics; hardware components and subsystems; robot kinematics and dynamics; sensors, measurements and perception; robotic architectures, multiple robot systems; localization, navigation and obstacle avoidance, robot planning; robot learning; robot vision and vision processing.

Machine Learning Elective units

Students may complete 0 or 6 credit points from the following units of study:
COMP3308 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: COMP3608 Assumed knowledge: Algorithms. Programming skills (e.g. Java, Python, C, C++, Matlab) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all about programming computers to perform tasks normally associated with intelligent behaviour. Classical AI programs have played games, proved theorems, discovered patterns in data, planned complex assembly sequences and so on. This unit of study will introduce representations, techniques and architectures used to build intelligent systems. It will explore selected topics such as heuristic search, game playing, machine learning, neural networks and probabilistic reasoning. Students who complete it will have an understanding of some of the fundamental methods and algorithms of AI, and an appreciation of how they can be applied to interesting problems. The unit will involve a practical component in which some simple problems are solved using AI techniques.
COMP5318 Machine Learning and Data Mining

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFO2110 OR ISYS2110 OR COMP9120 OR COMP5138 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Machine learning is the process of automatically building mathematical models that explain and generalise datasets. It integrates elements of statistics and algorithm development into the same discipline. Data mining is a discipline within knowledge discovery that seeks to facilitate the exploration and analysis of large quantities for data, by automatic and semiautomatic means. This subject provides a practical and technical introduction to machine learning and data mining.
Topics to be covered include problems of discovering patterns in the data, classification, regression, feature extraction and data visualisation. Also covered are analysis, comparison and usage of various types of machine learning techniques and statistical techniques.