Software Engineering

For a standard enrolment plan for Software Engineering visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Software Engineering Stream

Completion of a stream is a requirement of the Bachelor of Engineering Honours.
Students complete 192 credit points comprising:
(a) 48 credit points from the Engineering Core Table, consisting of:
(i) 18 credit points of Engineering Foundation units
(ii) 30 credit points of Project units
(iii) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
(b) 138 credit points from the Software Engineering Stream table, consisting of:
(i) 96 credit points of Software Stream Core units
(ii) A maximum of 18 credit points of 1000/2000 level Software Stream Elective units
(iii) A minimum of 24 credit points of 3000+ level Software Stream Elective units
(c) 6 credit points of electives from 3000+ level units offered by the Faculty of Engineering, or from Table S
The completion of a specialisation is not mandatory. If a student chooses to take a specialisation available in their stream, the specialisation can be completed within the 192 credit points described above.

Stream Core units

INFO1113 Object-Oriented Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR ENGG1810 Prohibitions: INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Object-oriented (OO) programming is a technique that arranges code into classes, each encapsulating in one place related data and the operations on that data. Inheritance is used to reuse code from a more general class, in specialised situations. Most modern programming languages provide OO features. Understanding and using these are an essential skill to software developers in industry. This unit provides the student with the concepts and individual programming skills in OO programming, starting from their previous mastery of procedural programming.
ELEC1601 Introduction to Computer Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics extension 1 or 2 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the fundamental digital concepts upon which the design and operation of modern digital computers are based. A prime aim of the unit is to develop a professional view of, and a capacity for inquiry into, the field of computing.
Topics covered include: data representation, basic computer organisation, the CPU, elementary gates and logic, machine language, assembly language and high level programming constructs.
COMP2017 Systems Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1103 Corequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2129 OR COMP9017 OR COMP9129 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, elementary methods for developing robust, efficient, and re-usable software will be covered. The unit is taught in C, in a Unix environment. Specific coding topics include memory management, the pragmatic aspects of implementing data structures such as lists and hash tables and managing concurrent threads. Debugging tools and techniques are discussed and common programming errors are considered along with defensive programming techniques to avoid such errors. Emphasis is placed on using common Unix tools to manage aspects of the software construction process, such as version control and regression testing. The subject is taught from a practical viewpoint and it includes a considerable amount of programming practice.
COMP2123 Data Structures and Algorithms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2823 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
COMP2823 Data Structures and Algorithms (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction level results in (INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903) Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
MATH2069 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6 credit points of MATH1XXX except (MATH1XX5 or MATH1111) Prohibitions: MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2969 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to several related areas of discrete mathematics, which serve their interests for further study in pure and applied mathematics, computer science and engineering. Topics to be covered in the first part of the unit include recursion and induction, generating functions and recurrences, combinatorics. Topics covered in the second part of the unit include Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, the theory of trees (used in the study of data structures), planar graphs, the study of chromatic polynomials (important in scheduling problems).
INFO3616 Principles of Security and Security Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5616 OR INFO2315 Assumed knowledge: (INFO1110 OR INFO1910) AND INFO1112 AND INFO1113 AND MATH1064. Knowledge equivalent to the above units is assumed. This means good programming skills in Python or a C-related language, basic networking knowledge, and skills from discrete mathematics. A technical orientation is absolutely required, especially capacity to become familiar with new technology without explicit supervision. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the many facets of security in the digital and networked world, the challenges that IT systems face, and the design principles that have been developed to build secure systems and counter attacks. The unit puts the focus squarely on providing a thorough understanding of security principles and engineering for security. At the same time, we stress a hands-on approach to teach the state-of-the-art incarnations of security principles and technology, and we practice programming for security. We pay particular attention to the fact that security is much more than just technology as we discuss the fields of usability in security, operational security, and cyber-physical systems. At the end of this unit, graduates are prepared for practical demands in their later careers and know how to tackle new, yet unforeseen challenges.
This unit also serves as the initial step for a specialisation in computer and communications security.
ISYS2110 Analysis and Design of Web Info Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO2110 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organisations use to determine how they should conduct their business, with a particular focus on how web-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way business is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analysing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, web-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.
ISYS2120 Data and Information Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1003 OR INFO1903 OR DECO1012 Prohibitions: INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR COMP5138 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ubiquitous use of information technology leaves us facing a tsunami of data produced by users, IT systems and mobile devices. The proper management of data is hence essential for all applications and for effective decision making within organizations.
This unit of study will introduce the basic concepts of database designs at the conceptual, logical and physical levels. We will place particular emphasis on introducing integrity constraints and the concept of data normalization which prevents data from being corrupted or duplicated in different parts of the database. This in turn helps in the data remaining consistent during its lifetime. Once a database design is in place, the emphasis shifts towards querying the data in order to extract useful information. The unit will introduce the SQL database query languages, which is industry standard. Other topics covered will include the important concept of transaction management, application development with a backend database, and an overview of data warehousing and OLAP.
SOFT2201 Software Construction and Design 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO3220 OR COMP9201 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the foundations of software design and construction. It covers the topics of modelling software (UML, CRC, use cases), software design principles, object-oriented programming theory (inheritance, polymorphism, dynamic subtyping and generics), and simple design patterns. The unit aims to foster a strong technical understanding of the underlying software design and construction theory (delivered in the lecture) but also has a strong emphasis of the practice, where students apply the theory on practical examples.
SOFT2412 Agile Software Development Practices

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP9412 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds students skills to follow defined processes in software development, in particular, working in small teams in an agile approach. Content covers the underlying concepts and principles of software processes, their analysis, measurement and improvement. Students will practice with a variety of professional-strength tool support for the practices that ensure quality outcomes. The unit requires students to enter already skilled in individual programming; instead this unit focuses on the complexities in a team setting.
SOFT3202 Software Construction and Design 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: SOFT2201 Prohibitions: INFO3220 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a sequel of Software Construction and Design I (SOFT2201). It introduces advanced concepts which build on the topics of SOFT2201. SOFT3202 covers topics including software validation and verification, the theory of testing, and advanced design patterns. The unit has a strong focus on the theoretical underpinning of software design. In the labs the theory is applied with contemporary tools with concrete examples.
SOFT3888 Software Development Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [18CP 2000-level or above units from SOFT or COMP or INFO] Prohibitions: SOFT3413 Assumed knowledge: SOFT3202 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practice the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of designing and building a substantial software development system in diverse application domains including life sciences. Working in groups for an external client combined with academic supervision, students will need to carry out the full range of activities including requirements capture, analysis and design, coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the XP methodology and make use of professional tools for the management of their project.
COMP5348 Enterprise Scale Software Architecture

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Basem Suleiman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory Assumed knowledge: Experience with software development as covered in SOFT2412 or COMP9103 and also COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit covers topics on software architecture for large-scale enterprises. Computer systems for large-scale enterprises handle critical business processes, interact with computer systems of other organisations, and have to be highly reliable, available and scalable. This class of systems are built up from several application components, incorporating existing "legacy" code and data stores as well as linking these through middleware technologies, such as distributed transaction processing, remote objects, message-queuing, publish-subscribe, and clustering. The choice of middleware can decide whether the system achieves essential non- functional requirements such as performance and availability. The objective of this unit of study is to educate students for their later professional career and it covers Software Architecture topics of the ACM/IEEE Software Engineering curriculum. Objective: The objective of this unit of study is to educate students for their later professional career and it covers topics of the ACM/IEEE Software Engineering curriculum.
ELEC3609 Internet Software Platforms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO1103 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910) AND (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR ISYS2120) Prohibitions: EBUS4001 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the design, the architecture and the development of web applications using technologies currently popular in the marketplace including Java and . NET environments. There are three key themes examined in the unit: Presentation layer, Persistence layer, and Interoperability. The unit will examine practical technologies such as JSP and Servlets, the model-view-controller (MVC) architecture, database programming with ADO. NET and JDBC, advanced persistence using ORM, XML for interoperability, and XML-based SOAP services and Ajax, in support of the theoretical themes identified.
On completion the students should be able to: Compare Java/J2EE web application development with Microsoft . NET web application development; Exposure to relevant developer tools (e. g. Eclipse and VS. NET); Be able to develop a real application on one of those environments; Use XML to implement simple web services and AJAX applications.
ELEC5618 Software Quality Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Writing programs with multiple functions or methods in multiple files; design of complex data structures and combination in non trivial algorithms; use of an integrated development environment; software version control systems. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover software quality planning, validation and verification methods and techniques, risk analysis, software review techniques, software standards and software process improvement and software reliability.
Students who successfully complete this unit will understand the fundamental concepts of software quality engineering and be able to define software quality requirements, assess the quality of a software design, explain specific methods of building software quality, understand software reliability models and metrics, develop a software quality plan, understand quality assurance and control activities and techniques, understand various testing techniques including being able to verify and test a unit of code and comprehend ISO standards, SPICE, CMM and CMMI.
ELEC5619 Object Oriented Application Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Java programming, and some web development experience are essential. Databases strongly recommended Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing large Internet systems by using and building application frameworks. Frameworks allow great reuse so developers do not have to design and implement applications from scratch, as students have done in ELEC3610 The unit lays down the basic concepts and hands on experience on the design and development of enterprise systems, emphasizing the development of systems using design patterns and application frameworks.
A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. Several development Java frameworks will be used, including Spring, Hibernate, and others. Principles of design patterns will also be studied.

Software Stream 1000/2000 Level Elective units

COMP2022 Models of Computation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Prohibitions: COMP2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969) AND (INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computing. The main aims are to introduce and compare different models of computation based on state-machines, grammars and algebra, and logic.
COMP2922 Models of Computation (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction level result in (INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113) Prohibitions: COMP2022 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969) AND (INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computing. The main aims are to introduce and compare different models of computation based on state-machines, grammars and algebra, and logic.
DATA1002 Informatics: Data and Computation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1902 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e.g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model.
DATA1902 Informatics: Data and Computation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1002 Assumed knowledge: This unit is intended for students with ATAR at least sufficient for entry to the BSc/BAdvStudies(Advanced) stream, or for those who gained Distinction results or better, in some unit in Data Science, Mathematics, or Computer Science. Students with portfolio of high-quality relevant prior work can also be admitted. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e. g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model. This unit includes the content of DATA1002, along with additional topics that are more sophisticated, suited for students with high academic achievement.
DATA2001 Data Science, Big Data and Data Variety

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103 Prohibitions: DATA2901 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry.
Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, eg. , social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The course will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'.
DATA2901 Big Data and Data Diversity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 75% or above from (DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103) Prohibitions: DATA2001 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry. Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, eg. , social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The course will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'. This unit is an alternative to DATA2001, providing coverage of some additional, more sophisticated topics, suited for students with high academic achievement.
INFO2150 Introduction to Health Data Science

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josiah Poon Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (INFO1003 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902) AND (DATA1001 OR MATH1005 OR MATH1905 OR MATH1015 OR BUSS1020) Corequisites: DATA2001 OR DATA2901 OR ISYS2120 OR INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR INFO1903 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of Entity Relationship Modelling, database technology and SQL Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Health organisations cannot function effectively without computer information systems. Clinical data are stored and distributed in different databases, different formats and different locations. It requires a lot of effort to create an integrated and clean-up version of data from multiple sources, This unit provides basic introduction to the process and knowledge to enable the analysis of health data. The unit will be of interest to students seeking the understanding of the various coding standards in health industry, data retrieval from databases, data linkage issue, cleaning and pre-processing steps, necessary statistical techniques and presentation of results.
It will be valuable to those who want to work as health-related occupations, such as health informatics analysts, healthcare administrators, medical and health services manager or research officers in hospitals, government health agencies and research organisations. Having said that, a good understanding of health data analysis is a useful asset to all students.
INFO2222 Computing 2 Usability and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1113) AND (INFO1111 OR INFO1711 OR ENGG1111 OR ENGD1000 OF ENGG1805) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an integrated treatment of two critical topics for a computing professional: human computer interaction (HCI) and security. The techniques and core ideas of HCI will be studied with a particular focus on examples and case studies related to security. This unit builds the students' awareness of the deep challenges in creating computing systems that can meet people's needs for both HCI and security. It will develop basic skills to evaluate systems for their effectiveness in meeting people's needs within the contexts of their use, building knowledge of common mistakes in systems, and approaches to avoid those mistakes.
ISYS2160 Information Systems in the Internet Age

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ISYS2140 Assumed knowledge: INFO1003 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a comprehensive conceptual and practical introduction to information systems (IS) in the Internet era. Key topics covered include: system thinking and system theory, basic concepts of information systems, internet and e-commerce, e-payment and m-commerce, online marketing and social media, information systems for competitive advantage, functional and enterprise systems, business intelligence, information systems development and acquisition, information security, ethics, and privacy
ELEC2103 Simulation and Numerical Solutions in Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: COSC1001 or COSC1901 Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103. Understanding of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits and aspects of professional project management, teamwork, and ethics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives: How to apply the software package Matlab to achieve engineering solutions; Critical assessment of various computer numerical techniques; Professional project management, teamwork, ethics.
This unit assumes an understanding of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. As well as covering the specific topics described in the following paragraphs, it aims to develop skills in professional project management and teamwork and promote an understanding of ethics.
Basic features of Matlab. The Matlab desktop. Interactive use with the command window. Performing arithmetic, using complex numbers and mathematical functions. Writing script and function m-files. Matrix manipulations. Control flow. Two dimensional graphics. Application of Matlab to simple problems from circuit theory, electronics, signals and systems and control. Investigation of the steady state and transient behaviour of LCR circuits.
Matlab based numerical solutions applicable to numerical optimization, ordinary differential equations, and data fitting. Introduction to symbolic mathematics in Matlab. Applications, including the derivation of network functions for simple problems in circuit analysis. Introduction to the use of Simulink for system modelling and simulation.
ELEC2104 Electronic Devices and Circuits

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103. Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws; action of Current and Voltage sources; network analysis and the superposition theorem; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; inductors and capacitors, transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits; the ability to use power supplies, oscilloscopes, function generators, meters, etc. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern Electronics has come to be known as microelectronics which refers to the Integrated Circuits (ICs) containing millions of discrete devices. This course introduces some of the basic electronic devices like diodes and different types of transistors. It also aims to introduce students the analysis and design techniques of circuits involving these discrete devices as well as the integrated circuits.
Completion of this course is essential to specialise in Electrical, Telecommunication or Computer Engineering stream.
ELEC2302 Signals and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND MATH1002 AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023). Basic knowledge of differentiation & integration, differential equations, and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach some of the basic properties of many engineering signals and systems and the necessary mathematical tools that aid in this process. The particular emphasis is on the time and frequency domain modeling of linear time invariant systems. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of communication, control, power systems and signal processing. A basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, differential equations, and linear algebra is assumed.
ELEC2602 Digital Logic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601. This unit of study assumes some knowledge of digital data representation and basic computer organisation Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to equip students with the skills to design simple digital logic circuits which comprise modules of larger digital systems.
The following topics are covered: logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, number systems (integer and floating point), combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, simple CAD tools for logic design, and the design of a simple computer.
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
MATH2061 Linear Mathematics and Vector Calculus

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1011 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1014 or MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2961 or MATH2067 or MATH2021 or MATH2921 or MATH2022 or MATH2922 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is only available to Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies students.
This unit starts with an investigation of linearity: linear functions, general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations (including differential equations), linear independence and the dimension of a linear space. The study of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, begun in junior level linear algebra, is extended and developed. The unit then moves on to topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, though cylinders, spheres and parametrised surfaces), Gauss' Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem.
Textbooks
Course Notes for MATH2061 Vector Calculus, S Britton and K-G Choo
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in Semester 1 and Semester 2 sessions.
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
PHYS1001 Physics 1 (Regular)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is for students who gained 65 marks or better in HSC Physics or equivalent. The lecture series covers the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1003 Physics 1 (Technological)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905). Prohibitions: PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study is designed for students majoring in physical and engineering sciences and emphasis is placed on applications of physical principles to the technological world. The lecture series covers the topics of fluids, electromagnetism, and quantum physics.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS2213 Physics 2EE

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PHYS1001 or PHYS1901) and (PHYS1003 or PHYS1902) Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to build on the knowledge gained in Junior Physics, to provide Electrical Engineering students with the knowledge of relevant topics of Physics at the Intermediate level, and with associated skills. Completion of the unit provides a solid foundation for further studies in Electrical Engineering and related engineering areas. The aims of this unit are linked to the generic attributes required of graduates of the University in knowledge skills, thinking skills, personal skills and attributes, and practical skills. By the end of this unit of study, students will be able to describe and apply concepts in optics, electromagnetism and basic solid state physics and technology at the Intermediate level. They will be able to use computational techniques to analyze optics problems. The modules in this unit of study are: Optics (13 lectures): The wave nature of light, optical phenomena and the interaction of light with matter: interference and diffraction effects; fundamental limits to resolution of optical instruments; polarisation; dispersion; coherence. These are presented within the context of several key optical technologies including lasers, CD/DVD players, optical fibre communication systems, gratings and Mach Zehnder modulation. Electromagnetic Properties of Matter (12 lectures): Electric and magnetic effects in materials; the combination of electric and magnetic fields to produce light and other electromagnetic waves in vacuum and matter. Solid State and Device Physics (13 lectures): Introduction to quantum mechanics, Fermi-Dirac statistics, electronic properties of solids (metal, semiconductors and insulators), doping and the semiconductor PN junction; introduction to nanotechnology; fabrication technologies, nano-imaging technologies, nanoelectronics. Computational Physics (10 sessions of 2 hours each): In a computing laboratory students use Matlab-based simulation software to conduct virtual experiments in optics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. Students also gain experience in the use of computers to solve problems in physics.
Textbooks
Notes published by the School of Physics: - Physics 2EE Computational Physics Optics Notes - Physics 2EE Electromagnetic Properties of Matter Notes - Physics 2EE Solid State and Device Physics Notes Other relevant texts: see the Unit of Study outline.

Software Stream 3000+ Level Elective Units

COMP3027 Algorithm Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2007 OR COMP2907 OR COMP3927 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the design techniques that are used to find efficient algorithmic solutions for given problems. The techniques covered include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and adjusting flows in networks. Students will extend their skills in algorithm analysis. The unit also provides an introduction to the concepts of computational complexity and reductions between problems.
COMP3109 Programming Languages and Paradigms

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bernhard Scholz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, Tutorials Prerequisites: COMP2017 AND COMP2022 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of programming languages and their implementation. The main aims are to teach what are: semantics, programming paradigms and implementation of programming languages.
COMP3221 Distributed Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO1105 OR INFO1905) OR ((INFO1103 OR INFO1113) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823)) Prohibitions: COMP2121 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide broad introduction to the principles of distributed computing and distributed systems and their design; provide students the fundamental knowledge required to analyse, design distributed algorithms and implement various types of applications, like blockchains; explain the common algorithmic design principles and approaches used in the design of message passing at different scales (e.g., logical time, peer-to-peer overlay, gossip-based communication).
COMP3308 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: COMP3608 Assumed knowledge: Algorithms. Programming skills (e.g. Java, Python, C, C++, Matlab) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all about programming computers to perform tasks normally associated with intelligent behaviour. Classical AI programs have played games, proved theorems, discovered patterns in data, planned complex assembly sequences and so on. This unit of study will introduce representations, techniques and architectures used to build intelligent systems. It will explore selected topics such as heuristic search, game playing, machine learning, neural networks and probabilistic reasoning. Students who complete it will have an understanding of some of the fundamental methods and algorithms of AI, and an appreciation of how they can be applied to interesting problems. The unit will involve a practical component in which some simple problems are solved using AI techniques.
COMP3419 Graphics and Multimedia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a broad introduction to the field of graphics and multimedia computing to meet the diverse requirements of application areas such as entertainment, industrial design, virtual reality, intelligent media management, social media and remote sensing. It covers both the underpinning theories and the practices of computing and manipulating digital media including graphics / image, audio, animation, and video. Emphasis is placed on principles and cutting-edge techniques for multimedia data processing, content analysis, media retouching, media coding and compression.
COMP3520 Operating Systems Internals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (COMP2017 OR COMP2129) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a comprehensive discussion of relevant OS issues and principles and describe how those principles are put into practice in real operating systems. The contents include internal structure of OS; several ways each major aspect (process scheduling, inter-process communication, memory management, device management, file systems) can be implemented; the performance impact of design choices; case studies of common OS (Linux, MS Windows NT, etc.).
COMP3530 Discrete Optimization

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR COMP2007 OR COMP2907 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the algorithmic theory and applications of discrete optimisation. The main aims of this unit are: Learn how to model various practical problems as abstract optimisation problems; Learn the theory underlying efficient algorithms for solving these problems; Learn how to use these tools in practice.
Specific topics include: Linear and integer programming, polyhedral theory, and approximation algorithms.
COMP3608 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction-level results in at least one 2000 level COMP or MATH or SOFT unit Prohibitions: COMP3308 Assumed knowledge: Algorithms. Programming skills (e.g. Java, Python, C, C++, Matlab) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: COMP3308 and COMP3608 share the same lectures, but have different tutorials and assessment (the same type but more challenging).
An advanced alternative to COMP3308; covers material at an advanced and challenging level.
COMP3927 Algorithm Design (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction level results in (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905) Prohibitions: COMP2007 OR COMP2907 OR COMP3027 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the design techniques that are used to find efficient algorithmic solutions for given problems. The techniques covered include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and adjusting flows in networks. Students will extend their skills in algorithm analysis. The unit also provides an introduction to the concepts of computational complexity and reductions between problems.
DATA3404 Scalable Data Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: DATA2001 OR DATA2901 OR ISYS2120 OR INFO2120 OR INFO2820 Prohibitions: INFO3504 OR INFO3404 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes that students have previous knowledge of database structures and of SQL. The prerequisite material is covered in DATA2001 or ISYS2120. Familiarity with a programming language (e.g. Java or C) is also expected. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive overview of the internal mechanisms data science platforms and of the systems that manage large data collections. These skills are needed for successful performance tuning and to understand the scalability challenges faced by when processing Big Data. This unit builds upon the second' year DATA2001 - 'Data Science - Big Data and Data Diversity' and correspondingly assumes a sound understanding of SQL and data analysis tasks.
The first part of this subject focuses on mechanisms for large-scale data management. It provides a deep understanding of the internal components of a data management platform. Topics include: physical data organization and disk-based index structures, query processing and optimisation, and database tuning.
The second part focuses on the large-scale management of big data in a distributed architecture. Topics include: distributed and replicated databases, information retrieval, data stream processing, and web-scale data processing.
The unit will be of interest to students seeking an introduction to data management tuning, disk-based data structures and algorithms, and information retrieval. It will be valuable to those pursuing such careers as Software Engineers, Data Engineers, Database Administrators, and Big Data Platform specialists.
DATA3406 Human-in-the-Loop Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (DATA2001 OR DATA2901) AND (DATA2002 OR DATA2902) Assumed knowledge: Basic statistics, database management, and programming. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on methods and techniques to take into consideration the human elements in data science. Humans can act as both sources of data and its interpreters, introducing a range of complexities with regards to analysis. How do we account for the unreliability in data collected from humans? What can be done to address the subjects' concerns about their data? How can we create visualisations that facilitate understanding of the main findings? What are the limitations of any predictions? The ability to consider human factors is essential in any loop that involves people gathering, storing, or interpreting data for decision making.
On completion of this unit, students will be able to identify and analyse the human factors in the data analytics loop, and will be able to derive solutions for the challenges that arise.
ELEC3104 Engineering Electromagnetics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Differential calculus, integral calculus, vector integral calculus; electrical circuit theory and analysis using lumped elements; fundamental electromagnetic laws and their use in the calculation of static fields. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the broad spectrum of engineering electromagnetics and helps students to develop theoretical and analytical skills in the area of electrical and telecommunications engineering and develop understanding of the basic electromagnetic theory underpinning optical communications, wireless communications and electrical engineering.
ELEC3203 Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes a competence in 1000 level MATH (in particular, the ability to work with complex numbers), in elementary circuit theory and in basic electromagnetics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to electrical power engineering and lays the groundwork for more specialised units. It assumes a competence in first year mathematics (in particular, the ability to work with complex numbers), in elementary circuit theory and in elements of introductory physics. A revision will be carried out of the use of phasors in steady state ac circuit analysis and of power factor and complex power. The unit comprises an overview of modern electric power system with particular emphasis on generation and transmission. The following specific topics are covered. The use of three phase systems and their analysis under balanced conditions. Transmission lines: calculation of parameters, modelling, analysis. Transformers: construction, equivalent circuits. Generators: construction, modelling for steady state operation. The use of per unit system. The analysis of systems with a number of voltage levels. The load flow problem: bus and impedance matrices, solution methods. Power system transient stability. The control of active and reactive power. Electricity markets, market structures and economic dispatch. Types of electricity grids, radial, mesh, networks. Distribution systems and smart grids.
ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC2104 Assumed knowledge: 1. Differential equations, linear algebra, complex variables, analysis of linear circuits. 2. Fourier theory applied to periodic and non-periodic signals. 3. Software such as MATLAB to perform signal analysis and filter design. 4. Familiarity with the use of basic laboratory equipment such as oscilloscope, function generator, power supply, etc. 5. Basic electric circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide the fundamentals of power electronics. It provides description of the operation principles and control of these blocks. Through analysis and design methodologies, it delivers an understanding of modern enabling technologies associated with energy conversion. Through laboratory hands-on experience on actual industrial systems, such as electrical motor drives, robotic arms, and power supplies, it enhances the link between the theory and the "real" engineering world.
The following topics are covered:
Introduction to power electronic converters and systems; analysis, design, simulation, and control of power electronic converters; power semiconductor devices; passive devices; the conversion toplogy includes DC/DC, DC/AC, AC/DC, and AC/AC for various applications.
ELEC3206 Electrical Energy Conversion Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC3203 Assumed knowledge: Following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit of study: familiarity with circuit theory, electronic devices, ac power, capacitors and inductors, and electric circuits such as three-phase circuits and circuits with switches, the use of basic laboratory equipment such as oscilloscope and power supply. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students a good understanding of electrical energy conversion techniques and equipment.
Students who successfully complete this unit will: Have a broad view of electrical energy conversion systems including transformers, DC machines, induction machines and synchronous machines; Be able to analyse and solve problems in transformers and electric machines; Have gained confidence in their ability to undertake more advanced study in the power area.
The following specific topics are covered: magnetic circuits, inductance, sinusoidal excitation, hysteresis and eddy current loss, permanent magnets, electromechanical energy conversion, singly-excited and doubly-excited systems, transformers, single-phase, equivalent circuit parameters, three-phase transformers, autotransformers, DC machines, separate excitation, shunt excitation, series excitation, and compound excitation, efficiency, armature reaction, induction machines, revolving field, equivalent circuit, squirrel cage machines, measurements of the parameters, DC resistance test, no-load test, blocked-rotor test, synchronous machines, field relationships, power-angle relationships, salient pole machines.
ELEC3304 Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC2302 AND (MATH2061 OR MATH2067 OR MATH2021 OR MATH2961 OR AMME2000) Prohibitions: AMME3500 Assumed knowledge: Specifically the following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit: familiarity with basic Algebra, Differential and Integral Calculus, Physics; solution of linear differential equations, Matrix Theory, eigenvalues and eigenvectors; linear electrical circuits, ideal op-amps; continuous linear time-invariant systems and their time and frequency domain representations, Laplace transform, Fourier transform. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is mainly concerned with the application of feedback control to continuous-time, linear time-invariant systems. It aims to give the students an appreciation of the possibilities in the design of control and automation in a range of application areas. The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study in the areas of communication, control, electronics, and signal processing.
The following specific topics are covered: Modelling of physical systems using state space, differential equations, and transfer functions, dynamic response of linear time invariant systems and the role of system poles and zeros on it, simplification of complex systems, stability of feedback systems and their steady state performance, Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion, sketching of root locus and controller design using the root locus, Proportional, integral and derivative control, lead and lag compensators, frequency response techniques, Nyquist stability criterion, gain and phase margins, compensator design in the frequency domain, state space design for single input single-output systems, pole placement state variable feedback control and observer design.
ELEC3305 Digital Signal Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with basic Algebra, Differential and Integral Calculus, continuous linear time-invariant systems and their time and frequency domain representations, Fourier transform, sampling of continuous time signals. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach how signals are processed by computers. It describes the key concepts of digital signal processing, including details of various transforms and filter design. Students are expected to implement and test some of these ideas on a digital signal processor (DSP). Completion of the unit will facilitate progression to advanced study in the area and to work in the industrial use of DSP.
The following topics are covered. Review of analog and digital signals. Analog to digital and digital to analog conversion. Some useful digital signals. Difference equations and filtering. Impulse and step response of filters. Convolution representation of filters. The Z-transform. Transfer functions and stability. Discrete time Fourier transform (DTft) and frequency response of filters. Finite impulse response (FIR) filter design: windowing method. Infinite impulse response (IIR) filter design: Butterworth filters, Chebyshev filters, Elliptic filters and impulse invariant design. Discrete Fourier Transform (Dft): windowing effects. Fast Fourier Transform (Fft): decimation in time algorithm. DSP hardware.
ELEC3404 Electronic Circuit Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A background in basic electronics and circuit theory is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to teach students analysis and design techniques for electronic systems such as signal amplifiers, differential amplifiers and power amplifiers. Completion of this unit will allow progression to advanced studies or to work in electronics and telecommunication engineering.
Topics covered are as follows. The BJT and MOSFET as an amplifier. Biasing in amplifier circuits. Small signal operation and models. Single stage amplifiers. Internal capacitances and high frequency models. The frequency response of the common-emitter amplifier. Current sources and current mirrors. Differential amplifiers. Output stages and power amplifiers: class A, class B and class AB.
ELEC3405 Communications Electronics and Photonics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC2104. A background in basic electronics and circuit theory is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to the fundamental operation and design of transmitter and receiver subsystems for two broad classes of communications systems: those based on electronic transmission and those based on optical transmission.
In the area of electronic communication subsystems, the course presents transmitter and receiver design. Topics relating to the transmitter comprise electronic oscillator sources, tuned electronic amplifiers, and modulators. Topics relating to receiver design comprise RF and IF frequency selective amplifiers, mixers, demodulators, phase-lock loops, feedback amplifiers, and high frequency RF and microwave communication amplifiers. In the area of optical communication subsystems, the course presents photonic transmitters and receivers. On the transmitter side this focuses on the principles of light generation in optical sources such as semiconductor lasers and light emitting diodes, electro-optic modulation of light, and optical amplifiers. On the receiver side, photodetectors, optical receivers, and front-end circuits are discussed. The principles and design of these subsystems are considered with reference to a basic optoelectronic communication link.
ELEC3505 Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC2302. Fourier transform, fundamental in signals and systems theory, convolution, and similar techniques. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an intermediate unit of study in telecommunications following on the general concepts studied in earlier units such as Signal and Systems and leading on to more advanced units such as Digital Communication Systems. Student will learn how to critically design and evaluate digital communication systems including the elements of a digital transmission system, understand the limitations of communications channels, different analog and digital modulation schemes and reasons to use digital techniques instead of analog, and the effect of noise and interference in performance of the digital communication systems. On completion of this unit, students will have sufficient knowledge of the physical channel of a telecommunications network to approach the study of higher layers of the network stack.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to communications systems, random signals and stochastic process, components, signals and channels, sampling, quantization, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM), pulse code modulation (PCM), quantization noise, time division multiplexing, delta modulation. Digital communications: baseband signals, digital PAM, eye diagram, equalization, correlative coding, error probabilities in baseband digital transmission, bandpass transmission, digital amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK), phase shift keying (PSK) and quadrature shift keying (QPSK), error probabilities in bandpass digital transmission, a case study of digital communication systems. Introduction to information theory: fundamental limits in communications, channel capacity and channel coding, signal compression.
ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students undertaking this unit should be familiar with fundamental digital technologies and representations such as bit complement and internal word representation. Students should also have a basic understanding of the physical properties of communication channels, techniques and limitations. Furthermore, students should be able to apply fundamental mathematical skills.
The unit will cover the following specific material: Communication reference models (TCP/IP and OSI). Circuit switched and packet switched communication. Network node functions and building blocks. LAN, MAN, WAN, WLAN technologies. Protocols fundamental mechanisms. The TCP/IP core protocols (IP, ICMP, DHCP, ARP, TCP, UDP etc. ). Applications and protocols (ftP, Telnet, SMTP, HTTP etc. ), Network Management and Security.
ELEC3607 Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC1601 AND ELEC2602 Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601 AND ELEC2602. Logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, data representation, number operations (binary, hex, integers and floating point), combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, simple CAD tools for logic design, basic computer organisation, the CPU, peripheral devices, software organisation, machine language, assembly language, operating systems, data communications and computer networks. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Embedded systems have become pervasive in modern society. The aim of this unit of study is to teach students about embedded systems architecture, design methodology, interfacing and programming. Topics covered include peripheral devices, interrupts, direct memory access (DMA), assembly language, communications and data acquisition. A major design project is part of this course.
ELEC3608 Computer Architecture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC2602 Assumed knowledge: ELEC3607. Knowledge of microprocessor systems (embedded systems architecture, design methodology, interfacing and programming) is required. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the design of a computer system at the architectural and digital logic level. Topics covered include instruction sets, computer arithmetic, performance evaluation, datapath design, pipelining, memory hierarchies including caches and virtual memory, I/O devices, and bus-based I/O systems. Students will design a pipelined reduced instruction set processor.
ELEC3610 E-Business Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: EBUS3003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the essential pre-production stages of designing successful internet websites and services. It focuses on the aspects of analysis, project specification, design, and prototype that lead up to the actual build of a website or application. Topics include, B2C, B2B and B2E systems, business models, methodologies, modeling with use cases / UML and WebML, the Project Proposal and Project Specification Document, Information Architecture and User-Centred Design, legal issues, and standards-based web development. Students build a simple use-case based e-business website prototype with web standards. A final presentation of the analysis, design and prototype are presented in a role play environment where students try to win funding from a venture capitalist. An understanding of these pre-production fundamentals is critical for future IT and Software Engineering Consultants, Project Managers, Analysts and CTOs.
ELEC3702 Management for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG3005 or MECH3661 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop an understanding of the principles and practices of industry, to provide an overview of the various issues facing an industrial organisation, and of the basic approaches to their management, to understand the changing nature and effects of globalisation on Australia's economic performance, the competitiveness of Australian firms, and the generation of employment and wealth, to gain an insight into the importance of innovation at all levels and functions of all organisations, and of the ways of developing people-skills and organisational styles to promote innovation, to develop the broader skills required by employers of engineers, and to understand the objectives and roles appropriate to governments. The following topics are covered; Engineers and management, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Managerial decision analysis, Management science models, Behaviour of people in organisations, Human resource management, Strategic management, Accounting and management, Operations management, Marketing for engineers, Legal environment of business, Industrial relations.
ELEC3802 Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: ELEC2004 or ELEC2104 A knowledge of basic electrical engineering is required: Ohm's law, Thevenin and Nortons' theorems, basic circuit theory involving linear resistors, capacitors and inductors, a basic knowledge of bipolar and field effect transistor theory, simplified theoretical mechanism of operation of transformers. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assumes a knowledge of basic principles in physics, mathematics, circuit theory and electronics. In particular, some understanding of the following is required: Thevenins and Nortons theorems, Fourier analysis, radiation, filtering, bipolar and field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers.
The following topics are covered. Biology of the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems, physiology of nerve and muscle cells, fundamental organization of the brain and spinal cord. Medical instrumentation. ElectrocardioGram and automated diagnosis. Heart pacemakers and defibrillators. The bionic ear. Apparatus for treatment of sleep disordered breathing (sleep apnoea).
This unit is descriptive and does not require detailed knowledge of electronics or mathematics, but does require an understanding of some key aspects of mathematical and electronic theory. The unit concentrates on some of the practical applications of biomedical engineering to patient diagnosis and treatment.
ELEC3803 Bioelectronics

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: ELEC2104 OR ELEC2602. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover recent advances in bioelectronics circuits and systems including electronic medical devices, implanted devices, lab on a chip devices, biomedical signal processing and neuromorphic engineering. Regulatory aspects of bioelectronic system design will be addressed including the IEC standards and TGA approval processes. The unit will have a strong practical design focus with laboratories focused on dealing with real life bioelectronic signals and subject-device interfaces. Industry, clinical and research guest lecturers will introduce current topics and design needs.
ELEC4505 Digital Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ELEC3505 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The lecture starts with an overview of major components of a digital communication system and current technology. Then the following knowledge will be covered: efficient coding/representation of information source, channel coding of information to combat noise and interference, optimal received design, principles of incoherent systems, error probability calculations, solutions to problems caused by transmitting a signal through a bandlimited channel and caused by multipath, and spread spectrum systems. The lecture concludes with a discussion of future directions of digital communication systems.
ELEC4714 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: ELEC4710 OR ELEC4711 OR ELEC4712 OR ELEC4713 OR ENGG4000 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, ELEC4714 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. ELEC4714 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to ELEC4712/4713 Thesis A and B, and two recommended electives. This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged full time on the project at the industrial site.
ELEC5101 Antennas and Propagation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The basics of antenna radiation are introduced with emphasis on the important performance characteristics of the radiation field pattern (in 3 dimensions) and feed impedance. The omnidirectional and Hertzian dipole antennas (both hypothetical in practise but robust theoretically) provide the starting point to analyse real antenna operation. Mutual coupling between close antennas and important 'ground' imaging effects lead to the design of antenna arrays to increase gain and directivity. Aperture antennas and frequency broadbanding techniques are introduced. Ionospheric propagation is discussed and also the the reception efficiency of receiving antennas which allows consideration of a Transmitter - Receiver 'Link budget'. The important 'Pocklington' equation for a wire dipole is developed from Maxwell's equations and leads to the numerical analysis of wire antennas using 'Moment' methods. Real world applications are emphasised throughout and are reinforced by the hands on laboratory program which includes design projects.
ELEC5203 Topics in Power Engineering

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 Power Engineering and ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Drives. Familiarity with basic mathematics and physics; competence with basic circuit theory and understanding of electricity grid equipment such as transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling; and fundamentals of power electronic technologies. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an in depth understanding of modern power electronic equipment supporting the intelligent grid of the future and the associated electronic control. Electronic power systems rely on a complex system of methods and equipment for controlling the voltage levels and for maintaining the stability and security of the supply. It covers recent findings in the fundamental theory and the massive change of modern power electronic equipment and methods supporting the electricity grids. It also looks at the huge influence of computer-aided analysis of electric power systems and the effects of the deregulation of the industry.
The specific topics covered are as follows: Introduction to power electronic systems and applications in the electrical grid, power semiconductors, reactive power control in power systems, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), high-voltage direct-current transmission (HVDC), static reactive power compensator, dynamic voltage restorer, unified-power flow controller, line-commutated converters, thyristor-controlled equipment, phase-angle regulators, voltage-source converter based power electronic equipment, harmonics, power quality, passive and active filters, distributed generation, grid-interconnection of renewable energy sources, intelligent grid technologies.
ELEC5204 Power Systems Analysis and Protection

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734). The unit assumes basic knowledge of circuits, familiarity with basic mathematics, competence with basic circuit theory and an understanding of three phase systems, transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling and operation of such equipment. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the basis for the analysis of electricity grids using symmetrical components theory. Such analysis theory is the basis for the understanding of electrical faults and the design of protection strategies to safeguard the electrical equipment, and maintain safety of the plant at the highest possible level.
The following specific topics are covered: The types and causes of power system faults; balanced faults and short circuit levels; an introduction to fault current transients in machines; symmetric components, sequence impedances and networks; the analysis of unsymmetrical faults. Review of the impact of faults on power system behaviour; issues affecting protection scheme characteristics and clearance times; the security and reliability of protection schemes; the need for protection redundancy and its implementation as local or remote backup; zones of protection and the need for zones to overlap; the analysis and application of over-current and distance relay protection schemes with particular reference to the protection of transmission lines.
ELEC5205 High Voltage Engineering

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Swamidoss Sathiakumar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734) Assumed knowledge: The following previous knowledge is assumed for this unit. Circuit analysis techniques, electricity networks, power system fundamentals. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides advanced knowledge associated with high voltage engineering methods, techniques and equipment. It is divided into two sections. The first section presents fundamentals of the failure mechanisms of solid, liquid and gaseous insulation at high voltages. It also discusses consequent design principles for high-voltage equipment; of the generation of high direct, alternating and impulse voltages for testing high-voltage equipment; and of methods for monitoring and assessing the condition of high-voltage equipment such as dissolved gas analysis for oil-filled transformers and partial discharge in cables. The second section presents in detail all the high-voltage equipment and in particular underground cables, overhead transmission lines, transformers, bushings and switchgear. It finally offers asset management solutions for modern transmission and distribution electricity networks.
ELEC5206 Sustainable Energy Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A background in power electronics converters and control theory such as that covered in ELEC3204/9204 and ELEC3304/9304 is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many sustainable energy technologies including hybrid cars, photovoltaic energy systems, efficient power supplies, and energy-conserving control systems have at their heart intelligent, high-power electronics. This unit examines this technology and uses sustainable-tech examples to teach the engineering principles of modeling, optimization, analysis, simulation, and design. Topics include power converter topologies, periodic steady-state analysis, control, motors and drives, photovoltaic systems, and design of magnetic components. The unit involves a hands-on laboratory and a substantial final project.
ELEC5207 Advanced Power Conversion Technologies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3204 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to cover advanced topics in power electronics and it applications. In particular, the power electronics interface design and implementation for microgrid, smart grids and modern power systems which have received tremendous attention in recent years. Many countries including Australia are developing different power electronics technologies such as integrating renewable energy sources into the grid, managing charging and discharging of high power energy storage system, controlling the reactive power of power electronics interfaces for grid stability, and adding communication capability to power electronics interfaces for smart meter implementation. The unit assumes prior fundamental knowledge of power electronics systems and applications, including the ability to analyse basic power converters for all four conversions (ac-ac, ac-dc, dc-ac, and ac-dc), and design and implement various applications, such as motor drive and battery charger, with the consideration of electrical characteristics of semiconductors and passive elements. This unit will cover advanced technologies on power electronics interfaces for smart grids and microgrid implementation, which include dynamic voltage restorer, active power filter, reactive power compensation, energy storage management, hybrid energy sources optimisation, multilevel inverter and control, D-STATCOM, etc. To analyse these advanced power conversion systems, some analytical techniques will be introduced. This includes resonant converters, soft-switching technique, ac equivalent circuit modeling, converter control and input/output filter design.
ELEC5208 Intelligent Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Electricity Networks, Control Systems and Telecommunications Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an introduction to the planning and operation of modern electricity grids, also known as "smart" grids. Traditional power networks featured a small number of large base-load plants sending power out over transmission lines to be distributed in radial lower voltage networks to loads. In response to the need to reduce carbon impact, future networks will feature diverse generation scattered all over the network including at distribution levels. Also there will be new loads such as electric vehicles and technologies including energy storage and lower voltage power flow control devices. The operation of these new networks will be possible by much greater use of information and communication technology (ICT) and control over the information networks.
The unit will cover recent relevant developments in energy technologies as well as important components of 'smart grids' such as supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), substation automation, remote terminal units (RTU), sensors and intelligent electronic devices (IED). Operation of these electricity grids requires a huge amount of data gathering, communication and information processing. The unit will discuss many emerging technologies for such data, information, knowledge and decision processes including communication protocols and network layouts, networking middleware and coordinated control. Information systems and data gathering will be used to assess key performance and security indicators associated with the operation of such grids including stability, reliability and power quality.
ELEC5211 Power System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732. The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is a deep understanding on circuit analysis and its applications in power system steady state analysis. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit deals with power systems modelling, analysis and simulation under dynamic conditions.
The unit will cover the following topics: The links between power system steady state analysis and transient analysis; Basics of dynamic system in general and stability analysis methods; Analysis of power systems subject to electromagnetic and electromechanical transients. Power system modelling for stability analysis and electromagnetic transients analysis: Synchronous machine modelling using Park's transformation; Modelling of excitation systems and turbine governors; Modelling of the transmission system; Load modelling. Simulation of interconnected multi-machine systems; Stability analysis- Transient stability, Small signal stability, Voltage stability; Power system control: Voltage control, Power system transient stability control, Power system dynamic stability control, Emergency control; The unit is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power and Electrical) and ME (Power and Electrical). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power).
ELEC5212 Power System Planning and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732. The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is power system steady state analysis Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Deregulation of the electricity industry has fundamentally changed the power systems operation paradigm. The focus has shifted from central planning of vertically integrated utilities to market driven operation. Traditional electric energy producers and consumers play new roles in a power market environment and their behaviors are affected by the economic incentives to a large extent. Nevertheless, electric energy is a special commodity and cannot be traded as the other common goods. So a power market design has many special considerations compared with a conventional commercial market design. Knowledge of the power market mechanisms has become a necessary part in fully understanding the whole power system operations. To equip students with necessary skills to address the challenges of modern power systems, the unit will cover the following topics:
-Overview of the traditional electricity industry structure and operation: Economic dispatch, Power system operation states and respective reliability requirements.
-Drivers for the restructuring of the electricity industry.
-Electricity market design: Market structures (spot, bilateral, hybrid); Energy market; Ancillary services market; Key components in an electricity market.
-Electricity market participants and their roles in a market.
-Electricity economics: Power market from suppliers' view (Supply curve) and from demands' view (Demand curve); Market mechanism; Price and its elasticity; Cost and supply; Market power and monopoly.
-Cost of capital: Time value of money; Project evaluation methods from investments' point of view; Risk and return.
-Operation mechanisms of various designs of power markets.
-Power market practices around the world.
-Power system expansion planning: Fundamental knowledge of power system planning considerations, procedures and methods; Transmission planning; Generation planning; Power system adequacy assessment.
ELEC5212 is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power) and ME (Electrical and Power). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power). This unit focuses on the power market principles and practices. Based on the knowledge of the power market operation, the power system planning procedures and methods will also be discussed.
ELEC5213 Engineering Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Linear algebra, differential calculus, and numerical methods. Competency at programming in a high-level language (such as Matlab or Python) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit of study provides an introduction to engineering optimisation, focusing specifically on practical methods for formulating and solving linear, nonlinear and mixed-integer optimisation problems that arise in science and engineering. The unit covers conventional optimisation techniques, including unconstrained and constrained single- and multivariable optimisation, convex optimisation, linear and nonlinear programming, mixed-integer programming, and sequential decision making using dynamic programming. The emphasis is on building optimisation models, understanding their structure and using off-the-shelf solvers to solve them. While the unit is designed with engineers in mind, it provides sufficiently rigorous mathematical treatment to allow deeper study. The application focus is on the optimisation problems arising in electrical engineering, including power systems, communications, signal processing, control and computer engineering. The unit will use Matlab and AMPL as modelling tools and a range of state-of-the-art solvers, including Cplex, Gurobi, Knitro and Ipopt.
ELEC5304 Intelligent Visual Signal Understanding

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g. probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces basic and advanced concepts and methodologies in image processing and computer vision. This course mainly focuses on image processing and analysis methods as well as intelligent systems for processing and understanding multidimensional signals such as images, which include basic topics like multidimensional signal processing fundamentals and advanced topics like visual feature extraction and image classification as well as their applications for face recognition and object/scene recognition. It mainly covers the following areas: multidimensional signal processing fundamentals, image enhancement in the spatial domain and frequency domain, edge processing and region processing, imaging geometry and 3D stereo vision, object recognition and face recognition.
ELEC5305 Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (ELEC2302 OR ELEC9302) AND (ELEC3305 OR ELEC9305). Linear algebra, fundamental concepts of signals and systems as covered in ELEC2302/ELEC9302, fundamental concepts of digital signal processing as covered in ELEC3305/9305. It would be unwise to attempt this unit without the assumed knowledge- if you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is designed to meet the needs of the increasing demand for advanced signal processing in the areas of acoustics and speech, biology and medicine, sonar and radar, communication and networks. Modern systems typically incorporate large sensor arrays, multiple channels of information, and complex networks. The course will cover topics in compressed sensing, multiresolution analysis, array signal processing, and adaptive processing such as kernel recursive least squares. The course will develop concrete examples in areas such as microphone arrays and soundfield analyses, medical signal processing, tomography, synthetic aperture radar and speech and audio. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in sensor arrays, wearable medical systems, communication systems, and adaptive processing for complex financial, power, and network systems. The Defense, Science, and Technology Organisation will contribute to this course with teaching support and data.
ELEC5306 Video Intelligence and Compression

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic understanding of digital signal processing (filtering, DFT) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces digital image and video compression algorithms and standards. This course mainly focuses on fundamental and advanced methods for digital video compression. It covers the following areas: digital video fundamentals, digital image and video compression standards, and video codec optimization.
ELEC5307 Advanced Signal Processing with Deep Learning

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g., probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces deep learning for a broad range of multi-dimensional signal processing applications. It covers deep learning technologies for image super-resolution and restoration, image categorization, object localization, image segmentation, face recognition, person detection and re-identification, human pose estimation, action recognition, object tracking as well as image and video captioning.
ELEC5308 Intelligent Information Engineering Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Students must have a good understanding of Linear algebra and basic mathematics, Basic Programming skills in C, Python or Matlab Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims at the practising ability of students on utilizing intelligent information engineering techniques for solving practical problems in the latest applications of AI, e.g., Autopilot. Students will get programming skills for many tasks related to automatic driving, including lane detection, traffic sign detection, pedestrian detection, and path planning. Lane detection, traffic sign detection, pedestrian detection, and path planning are information processing techniques that will help students to learn how to use the Video Intelligence and Signal Understanding approaches for many practical problems. All students will be involved in designing mini-projects and a large project. The unit is project-oriented. Students will run their programs on simulated environment. The course will be taught through lectures mainly on how to accomplish the goal for the mini-project and the final project. A specific lab design will be provided to students for hands-on design. Communication skills will be tested through several project presentations. Some teaching will be provided by intelligent information engineers working in the industry.
ELEC5507 Error Control Coding

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Fundamental mathematics including probability theory and linear algebra. Basic knowledge on digital communications. Basic MATLAB programming skills is desired. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit deals with the principles of error control coding techniques and their applications in various communication and data storage systems. Its aim is to present the fundamentals of error control coding techniques and develop theoretical and practical skills in the design of error control encoders/decoders. Successful completion of this unit will facilitate progression to advanced study or to work in the fields of telecommunications and computer engineering. It is assumed that the students have some background in communications principles and probability theory.
The following topics are covered: Introduction to error control coding, Linear algebra, Linear block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Solomon codes, Applications of block codes in communications, Convolutional codes, Viterbi algorithm, Applications of convolutional codes in communications, Soft decision decoding of block and convolutional codes, LDPC codes, Turbo codes, MIMO and rateless codes.
ELEC5508 Wireless Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge in probability and statistics, analog and digital communications, error probability calculation in communications channels, and telecommunications network. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the key ideas in modern wireless telecommunications networks. It will address both physical layer issues such as propagation and modulation, plus network layer issues such as capacity, radio resource management and mobility management issues.
The following topics are covered. Wireless channel: Multipath fading, frequency selective fading, Doppler spread, statistical models, diversity, GSM, OFDM. Capacity and Interference: Cell types, coverage, frequency reuse, interference management, SIMO, MISO, multiuser diversity, CDMA, OFDMA, beamforming, superposition coding. MIMO: SVD, waterfilling, beamforming, V-BLAST, SIC, MMSE, Power Allocation. LTE/LTE-Advanced: Uplink-downlink channels, control signals, data transmission, spatial multiplexing, CoMP, spectrum reuse, heterogeneous networks, inter-cell interference coordination, carrier aggregation. Queueing theory: basic models, queueing systems, waiting time, delay, queue length, priority queues, wireless network virtualization (WNV) queues.
ELEC5509 Mobile Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3505 AND ELEC3506. Basically, students need to know the concepts of data communications and mobile communications, which could be gained in one the following units of study: ELEC3505 Communications, ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet, or similar units. If you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study serves as an introduction to communications network research. The unit relies on a solid understanding of data communications and mobile networks. It introduces some of the currently most debated research topics in mobile networking and presents an overview of different technical solutions. Students are expected to critically evaluate these solutions in their context and produce an objective analysis of the advantages/disadvantages of the different research proposals. The general areas covered are wireless Internet, mobility management, quality of service in mobile and IP networks, ad hoc networks, and cellular network architectures.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to wireless and mobile Internet. Wireless cellular data networks. Cellular mobile networks. Mobile networks of the future. Quality of service in a mobile environment. Traffic modelling for wireless Internet. Traffic management for wireless Internet. Mobility management in mobile networks. Transport protocols for mobile networks. Internet protocols for mobile networks.
ELEC5510 Satellite Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of error probabilities, analog and digital modulation techniques and error performance evaluation studied in ELEC3505 Communications and ELEC4505 Digital Communication Systems, is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Satellite communication systems provide fixed and mobile communication services over very large areas of land, sea and air. This unit presents the fundamental knowledge and skills in the analysis and design of such systems. It introduces students to the broad spectrum of satellite communications and its position in the entire telecommunications network; helps students to develop awareness of the key factors affecting a good satellite communications system and theoretical and practical skills in the design of a satellite communications link.
Topic areas include: satellite communication link design; propagation effects and their impact on satellite performance; satellite antennas; digital modem design, speech codec design; error control for digital satellite links.
ELEC5511 Optical Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3405 OR ELEC9405) AND (ELEC3505 OR ELEC9505). Basic knowledge of communications, electronics and photonics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Optical telecommunications has revolutionized the way we receive information and communicate with one another. This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of optical fibre communication systems. It commences with a description of optical fibre propagation characteristics and transmission properties. We will then consider light sources and the fundamental principles of laser action in semiconductor and other lasers including quantum well lasers, tunable lasers and fibre lasers, and also the characteristics of optical transmitters based on semiconductor and electro-optic modulation techniques. The characteristics of optical amplifiers will also be discussed. On the receiver side, the principles of photodetection and optical receiver sensitivity will be presented. Other aspects such as fibre devices and multiple wavelength division multiplexing techniques will also be discussed. Finally, the complete optical fibre communication system will be studied to enable the design of data transmission optical systems, local area networks and multi-channel optical systems.
ELEC5512 Optical Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of digital communications, wave propagation, and fundamental optics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds upon the fundamentals of optical communication introduced in ELEC3405 (Communications Electronics and Photonics). It focuses on photonic network architectures and protocols, network design, enabling technologies and the drivers for intelligent optical network.
Students will learn how to analyse and design optical networks and optical components.
Introduction, photonic network architectures: point to point, star, ring, mesh; system principles: modulation formats, link budgets, optical signal to noise ratio, dispersion, error rates, optical gain and regeneration; wavelength division multiplexed networks; WDM components: optical filters, gratings, multiplexers, demultiplexers, wavelength routers, optical crossconnects, wavelength converters, WDM transmitters and receivers; Wavelength switched/routed networks, ultra high speed TDM, dispersion managed links, soliton systems; broadcast and distribution networks, multiple access, subcarrier multiplexed lightwave video networks, optical local area and metropolitan area networks; protocols for photonic networks: IP, Gbit Ethernet, SDH/SONET, FDDI, ATM, Fibre Channel.
ELEC5514 Networked Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3305 AND ELEC3506 AND ELEC3607 AND ELEC5508 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aim to teach the fundamentals concepts associated with: Networked Embedded Systems, wireless sensor networks; Wireless channel propagation and radio power consumption; Wireless networks, ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc. ; Sensor principle, data fusion, source detection and identification; Multiple source detection, multiple access communications; Network topology, routing, network information theory; Distributed source channel coding for sensor networks; Power-aware and energy-aware communication protocols; Distributed embedded systems problems such as time synchronization and node localisation; Exposure to several recently developed solutions to address problems in wireless sensor networks and ubiquitous computing giving them a well-rounded view of the state-of the-art in the networked embedded systems field.
Student involvement with projects will expose them to the usage of simulators and/or programming some types of networked embedded systems platforms.
Ability to identify the main issues and trade-offs in networked embedded systems; Understanding of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area; Based on the above understanding, ability to analyse requirements and devise first-order solutions for particular networked embedded systems problems; Familiarisation with a simulator platform and real hardware platforms for network embedded systems through the students involvement in projects.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5517 Software Defined Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce an emerging networking paradigm- Software Defined Networks (SDNs). By separating the control logics from the physical networks, the software defined networks allow an automated and programmable software program to logically control and manage the network. This unit introduces the basic principles of software defined networks, its architecture, abstraction, SDN programming, programmable control plane and data plane protocols, network update, network virtualisation, traffic management as well as its applications and implementations. Student will learn and practice SDN programming, testing and debugging on SDNs platforms through experiments and group projects. It is assumed that the students have some knowledge on data communications and networks.
ELEC5518 IoT for Critical Infrastructures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Connected smart objects, platforms and environments have been identified as the next big technology development. The intelligent network for automatic interaction and processing between objects and environments is referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT). This unit aims to introduce the design, processing and operation of critical IoT applications, including smart grids, intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and healthcare. The unit will cover the IoT architecture, important components of IoT, such as sensors, communications networks and information processing, critical IoT applications, and the design and operations of these IoT systems and infrastructures. The students will be engaged in IoT programming and system development using advanced IoT platforms.
ELEC5616 Computer and Network Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.
ELEC5620 Model Based Software Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Model-Based Software Engineering focuses on modern software engineering methods, technologies, and processes used in professional development projects. It covers both the pragmatic engineering elements and the underlying theory of the model-based approach to the analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of complex software-intensive systems.
Students will participate in a group project, which will entail developing and/or evolving a software system, following a full development cycle from requirements specification through to implementation and testing using up-to-date industrial development tools and processes. At the end of the course they will provide a presentation and demonstration of their project work to the class. There is no formal teaching of a programming language in this unit, although students will be expected to demonstrate through their project work their general software engineering and architectural skills as well as their mastery of model-based methods and technologies.
Students successfully completing this unit will have a strong practical and theoretical understanding of the modern software development cycle as applied in industrial settings. In particular, they will be familiar with the latest model-based software engineering approaches necessary for successfully dealing with today's highly complex and challenging software systems.
The pedagogic grounds for this course and its focus on model-based approaches are to arm new software engineers with skills and perspectives that extend beyond the level of basic programming. Such skills are essential to success in software development nowadays, and are in great demand but very low supply. The dearth of such expertise is one of the key reasons behind the alarmingly high failure rate of industrial software projects (currently estimated at being greater than 40%). Therefore, this unit complements SQE and strengthens a key area in the program.
ELEC5622 Signals, Software and Health

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (linear algebra and probabilities) and basic programming skills (python/matlab/C++/java) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is related to health informatics and focuses on introducing the acquisition, processing, and analysis of medical imaging signals. It introduces multiple widely used medical imaging techniques such as MRI, diffusion MRI, X-ray, and CT, as well as both the conventional and deep learning based image processing and machine learning methods to analyse medical image data for diagnosis. During the course, some commonly used software and platforms for medical image analysis, especially for brain image analysis, will also be covered.
ELEC5701 Technology Venture Creation

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workgroups Prohibitions: ENGG5102 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study prepares graduating students with insight and skills in how to turn a concept into a high technology startup company. The class will provide students with knowledge, practical experience and frameworks to assist in evaluating the market for a technology product or service, the design and viability of business models around it, the formulation of a funding-reading business plan and financials, capital raising options and process, venture capital, building distribution channels, intellectual property protection, putting together an A-grade management team, term sheets and funding documentation, technology sales models and going global. We will look at real world case studies of successful technology companies (and flame outs). Does Twitter have a viable business model? Will Facebook eat its lunch? Is YouTube just burning cash? Will Google rule the world?
During the period of the course, students will form teams and write a business plan around a concept they propose. Each student will assume a role in the team (CEO, CTO, CFO, VP Sales and Marketing). The plan will be judged by a panel of real world venture capitalists, entrepreneurs and angel investors to determine the final grade for the course.
Be warned that a serious commitment will be required in developing the concept into a viable business plan. The outcome, however, will be very rewarding to those students interested in starting the next Google.
This course is taught by instructors experienced in technology startups and venture capital. The course will include a number of guest lectures by industry.
INFO3315 Human-Computer Interaction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a first subject in HCI, Human Computer Interaction. It is designed for students who want to be involved in one of the many roles required to create future technology. There are three main parts: the human foundations from psyschology and physiology; HCI methods for design and evaluation of interfaces; leading edge directions for technologies.
This subject is highly multi-disciplinary. At the core, it is a mix of Computer Science Software Engineering combined with the design discipline, UX - User Experience. It draws on psychology, both for relevant theories and user study methods. The practical work is human-centred with project work that motivates the formal curriculum. This year the projects will be in area of health and wellness.
INFO3333 Computing 3 Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 2000-level units Prohibitions: INFO3402 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit teaches students vital skills for an effective professional career: preparing them to eventually be a leader, who ensures that others achieve high-quality outcomes. Building on experiences from earlier units (that covered working in a team, agile development practices, paying attention to needs and characteristics of users, and the value of data) this unit teaches students key concepts needed as a manager, or when working with managers. The focus includes managing projects, managing services, and ensuring governance.
INFO4444 Computing 4 Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO3333 Prohibitions: INFO4990 Assumed knowledge: Students should have knowledge of several different aspects of computing at the 3000-level Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The computing field is changing very rapidly. Innovation is continual, with novel technology, novel processes, and novel business models. This unit prepares students for this aspect of their professional career, with a focus on understanding the complex relationships between innovation ideas and business value. The Business Canvas Model will be used to make systematic, the development of a case for business value. In particular, students will hear guest lectures from industry innovators, and they will learn about both successful and unsuccessful attempts to create business value from an innovative idea.
ISYS3401 Information Technology Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (INFO2120 OR ISYS2120) AND (ISYS2140 OR ISYS2160) Assumed knowledge: MATH1005 OR MATH1905 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Information Systems (IS) professionals in today's organisations are required to play leadership roles in change and development. Your success in this field will be aided by your being able to carry out research-based investigations using suitable methods and mastery over data collection and analysis to assist in managing projects and in decision making. Practical research skills are some of the most important assets you will need in your career.
This unit of study will cover important concepts and skills in practical research for solving and managing important problems. This will also provide you with the skills to undertake the capstone project in the IS project unit of study offered in Semester 2 or other projects. It will also provide hand-on experience of using Microsoft Excel and other tools to perform some of the quantitative analysis.
ISYS3402 Decision Analytics and Support Systems

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Soyeon Han Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: (ISYS2110 OR INFO2110) AND (ISYS2120 OR INFO2120) Assumed knowledge: Database Management AND Systems Analysis and Modelling Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With the rapid increases in the volume and variety of data available, the problem of providing effective support to facilitate good decision making has become more challenging. This unit of study will provide a comprehensive understanding the diverse types of decision and the decision making processes. It will introduce decision modelling and the design and implementation of application systems to support decision making in organisational contexts. It will include a range of business intelligence and analytics solutions based on online analytical processing (OLAP) models and technologies. The unit will also cover a number of modelling approaches (optimization, predictive, descriptive) and their integration in the context of enabling improved, data-driven decision making.
ISYS3888 Information Systems Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (INFO2120 OR ISYS2120) AND (ISYS2140 OR ISYS2160) Prohibitions: INFO3600 OR ISYS3207 OR ISYS3400 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practise the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of a substantial information systems research or development project and to experience in a realistic way many aspects of analysing and solving information systems problems. Since information systems projects are often undertaken by small teams, the experience of working in a team is seen as an important feature of the unit. Students often find it difficult to work effectively with others and will benefit from the opportunity provided by this unit to further develop this skill.
SOFT3410 Concurrency for Software Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO1105 OR INFO1905) OR ((INFO1103 OR INFO1113) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823)) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The manufacturing industry has experienced a radical shift in the way they design computers, with the integration of multiple processors on the same chip. This hardware shift now requires software developers to acquire the skills that will allow them to write efficient concurrent software. Software developers used to wait for manufacturers to increase the clock frequency of their processors to see increases in the performance of their programs, the challenge is now to exploit, in the same program, more and more processing resources rather than faster processing resources. In this unit, you will learn how to tackle the problems underlying this challenge, including developing and testing concurrent programs, synchronizing resources between concurrent threads, overcoming fairness issues and guaranteeing progress, and ensuring scalability in the level of concurrency.