Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

For a standard enrolment plan for Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Stream Combined Degrees

To qualify for the Bachelor of Engineering Honours component in the combined degree, students must complete the following:
(a) 42 credit points from the Engineering Core Table, consisting of:
(i) 18 credit points of Engineering Foundation units
(ii) 24 credit points of Project units
(iii) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
(b) 102 credit points of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Stream Core units
Stream Core
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHNG1103 Conservation of Mass and Energy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The students should develop an understanding of and competence in the formulation and solution of material and energy balance problems in engineering; develop competence in using basic flowsheet analysis and appropriate computational tools; improve their group work and problem solving skills; gain an ability to extract a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation.
Mass conservation related topics include: unit systems and unit conversions; properties of solids, fluids and gases; mass balance calculations on batch and flow systems; balances on multiple units processes, balances on reactive systems, recycle, bypass and purge calculations; equilibrium compositions of reacting systems; vapour pressure and humidity. Energy conservation includes the following topics: apply the first law of thermodynamics to flow and batch systems in process industries; understand thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy and heat capacity; conduct energy balances for sensible heat changes, phase transformations and reactive processes for practical industrial systems; understand the applications of psychrometry, refrigeration, heat of formation and combustion in industry.
CHNG1106 Engineering for a Sustainable Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG1103 Prohibitions: CHNG2805 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of mass and energy balance concepts equivalent to content of CHNG1103 or CHNG9103. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit involves the study of the fundamental concepts which underpin sustainable development, including technical and economic efficiency, environmental stewardship and social responsibility. The unit examines both the material and non-material economies from an engineering perspective. Tools such as life-cycle assessment, input-output analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis are examined and implications for resource and energy consumption, pollution and waste generation are analysed. A number of governing sustainability frameworks are discussed to determine their suitability within the context of chemical and biomolecular engineering. A range of approaches and tools for determining the environmental impact of human activities on small and large scale are introduced as part of a sustainability framework. Energy production and use, and product design are investigated from a sustainability perspective.
CHNG2801 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed CHNG2802 or MATH2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course covers the principal concepts and methods of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. The topics covered include dimensional analysis, fluid properties, conservation of mass and momentum, measurement of flow, and flow in pipes. The course provides an introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics for the solution of flow regimes.
CHNG2802 Chemical Engineering Modelling and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1005 OR MATH1015 OR MATH1905 OR BUSS1020) AND CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: Calculus, linear algebra, descriptive statistics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit consists of two core modules: MODULE A: Applied Statistics for Chemical Engineers and MODULE B: Applied Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineers. These modules aim at furthering your education by extending your skills in statistical analysis and Chemical Engineering computations. This unit will also enable you to develop a systematic approach to solving mathematically oriented Chemical Engineering problems, helping you to make sound engineering decisions. The modules will provide sufficient theoretical knowledge and computational training to progress in subsequent engineering analyses including Process Dynamics and Control and Chemical Engineering Design. This unit will provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle real-life multi-disciplinary chemical engineering problems.
CHNG2803 Heat and Mass Transfer

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1005 OR MATH1905 OR BUSS1020) AND (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810) AND CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed: CHNG2801 or equivalent, and (CHNG2802 or MATH2XXX) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study teaches principles of heat and mass transfer required for chemical and biomolecular engineering. It covers steady and transient conduction and diffusion, convective transport of heat and mass, and radiative heat transfer.
It runs concurrently with CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics) to provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle engineering problems related to transport phenomena.
This unit of study also includes project-based study components including a research project on heat transfer phenomena in biological systems and a lab session on mass transfer.
Students will develop a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and gain the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance.
CHNG2804 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 AND (CHEM1101 OR CHEM1111 OR CHEM1901 OR CHEM1911) Assumed knowledge: Calculus, linear algebra, numerical methods, computational tools (Matlab, Excel), basic mass and energy balances, heat transfer, mass transfer, momentum (from fluid mechanics), reaction balances. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit within the curriculum. Chemical Engineering requires an understanding of material and energy transformations and how these are driven by molecular interactions. The rate of such transformations is dependent on driving forces and resistances, and these need to be defined in terms of fundamental physical and chemical properties of systems. This course seeks to provide students with a sound basis of the thermodynamics of chemical systems, and how these, in turn, define limits of behaviour for such real systems. The thermodynamic basis for rate processes is explored, and the role of energy transfer processes in these highlighted, along with criteria for equilibrium and stability. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of physical properties of chemicalsystems in terms of state variables. The course delivery mechanism is problem-based, and examples from thermal and chemical processes will be considered, covering molecular to macro-systems scale. The course builds naturally from the second year first semester course in heat and mass transfer, and prepares students fundamentally for the third year course in design of chemical and biological processes, which deals fundamentally with reaction/separation systems, and considers phase and chemical equilibria.
CHNG2806 Separation Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed CHNG2804 or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover the general principles and the development of quantitative models of separation processes based on equilibrium and rate processes. Concepts of phase equilibria, transport phenomena and mass and energy balance will be used to model the separation units. Understanding of these principles will provide the basis for analysis and preliminary design calculations of large scale separation units of importance to manufacturing industries. The principles will be applied to units operations of distillation (binary, multicomponent), solvent extraction, absorption, adsorption and membrane processes
CHNG3801 Process Plant Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND CHNG2806 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a project based unit of study that aims to develop the practical skills required in process engineering with the focus on design, simulation, operation, control, and optimization of chemical and biological processes. It employs an interdisciplinary approach that applies the previously acquired knowledge of mass and heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, reaction engineering, design of unit operations, process modelling, and process control to understand the interaction between unit operations, to analyze the process flowsheet, and to carry out equipment selection and sizing for the plant.
The integrated course structure helps students develop their knowledge of integrated process design by working on miniplant design projects, involving process simulation/modelling using flowsheeting software, detailed design of plant equipment (reactor, distillation and absorption columns, pumps, piping), process modification (eg by heat integration) and process optimisation.
CHNG3802 Process Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2802 or AMME2960 OR BMET2960 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The scope and importance of process control technology expands continuously with the growth of industrial automation. Knowledge of process control tools and theory is vital for chemical engineers involved in plant operation or design. This unit covers the development of linear models, control system analysis, the design and performance of feedback control systems, and the use of control related software. Skills developed in the unit include:
- Designing a feedback control system.
- Analysing the system's performance for a range of process applications using both traditional and software-based techniques.
- Designing common control enhancements.
- Appreciating the role, possibilities and limitations of process control tools and methods.
CHNG3803 Reaction Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 and (CHNG2802 or AMME2960 OR BMET2960) and CHNG2803 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, students learn to select and design reactors for a broad range of chemical transformations. The course employs an integrated approach to learning combining the basic principles of material and energy balance, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics with those of chemical reaction kinetics to allow for the design of chemical reactors.

Reactor design concepts are introduced through topics, such as ideal batch reactors, combinations of reactors, multiple reaction systems, and catalytic reactions. Principles of chemical reactions, including reaction mechanisms, temperature and concentration dependence of chemical kinetics, and catalytic effects are covered in relation to reactor design. Students practice and deepen their understanding of the course content in a laboratory practical in which they use experimental data from chemical reactors to estimate rate laws.
CHNG3804 Biochemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CHNG2801, CHNG2802, CHNG2803 AND CHNG2806 or equivalents Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biochemical engineering is increasingly playing an important role in technology to modern society. The engineers with knowledge of various aspects of biochemical processes are tremendously valuable. The course will examine cutting edge examples of biochemical technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical engineering. The specific objectives of this course are to understand the history and scope of the biotechnology industry; examine the role of biochemical engineering in the industrial application of biotechnology and its development. We will provide an understanding of the major fundamental aspects of biochemical engineering and implementing the knowledge acquired to some selected industrial applications.
At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of biochemical engineering and the ability to apply these skills to new and novel situations. The students will be able to critically analyse different types of biochemical engineering processes and to improve these processes consistent with the principles of biochemical engineering.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information and develop problem-solving skills for successfully handling challenging engineering situations. This course will be assessed by projects, an interview and a final exam.
CHNG3805 Particle Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 and CHNG2802 and CHNG2803 and CHNG2804 and (CHNG2805 or CHNG1106) and CHNG2806 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study teaches principles of particle technology and solid separation process required for chemical and biomolecular engineering.
It provides students with the tools and knowhow to tackle unit operation tasks related to chemical engineering.
It also includes project based study components including a research project on fluidisation of solid particles, a dyer design project and a lab session on chromatograph.
The integrated course structure helps students to develop a physical understanding of particle technology and solid separation process and gain the ability to solve problems of engineering significance.
CHNG3806 Risk Management for Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG2801 and CHNG2802 and CHNG2803 and CHNG2804 and (CHNG2805 OR CHNG1106) and CHNG2806 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 2000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop an appreciation of project and risk management practice of process systems for chemical and process engineering. It employs a holistic approach to management covering vital concepts in project management, technical risk assessment and decision making, economic evaluation and financial risk assessment, and project design optimization.
It provides students with the experience and working knowledge to solve real world engineering problems in process-led and product-driven industries.
By the end of this unit of study a student should be competent in: preparing a resume for use in employment applications; developing project work plans in conjunction with project management schedules; performing economic evaluations of projects, plans and processes; performing qualitative and quantitative risk assessments of projects, plans and processes; exploring optimization of complex processes under risk and uncertainty, covering unit operations, business units, enterprises and value chains.
CHNG4802 Chemical Engineering Design A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3804 AND CHNG3806 Corequisites: CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 Prohibitions: CHNG4203 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the overall design process, chemical engineers must clearly understand the (often complex) interactions and trade-offs that occur between technical, economic, social and environmental considerations. The capstone design projects are spread over two units of study (Chemical Engineering Design A and B) run in first and second semester. These units of study build on concepts in each of these areas introduced in previous years but with an emphasis on their successful integration within a comprehensive design activity.
The primary aim of the first unit of study (Chemical Engineering Design A) is to consider the challenge of process selection and feasibility including both technical and broader issues- with an emphasis on creating and evaluating a range of alternative options that exist at both the unit operation and complete flowsheet levels.
The primary emphasis in the subsequent unit of study (Chemical Engineering Design B) is on process design and including how non-technical considerations affect the final process design and its operation.
By the end of both units of study a student should be able to develop a wide range of alternative conceptual designs for a given product specification and market analysis, have an appreciation of how to evaluate process alternatives at the conceptual level with a view to creating a 'short-list' worthy of more detailed technical investigation, be familiar with the use of process flowsheeting software to compare alternative designs , appreciate the fact that technical considerations are only one component in an overall successful design project and be able to clearly present the results from both individual and group work in oral/written formats. This unit of study is part of an integrated (two semester) fourth year program in chemical engineering design whose overarching aim is to complete the 'vertical integration' of knowledge- one of the pillars on which this degree program is based.
CHNG4806 Chemical Engineering Design B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG4802 or CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 3000 level chemical engineering units of study have been successfully completed, as well as the related first semester UoS CHNG4802 or CHNG4203. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Permission required for enrolment prior to CHNG4802 in the case of Mid-Year Entry students.
In the overall design process, chemical engineers must clearly understand the (often complex) interactions and trade-offs that occur between technical, economic, social and environmental considerations. This unit of study builds on concepts in each of these areas introduced in previous years but with an emphasis on their successful integration within a comprehensive design activity.
This design activity is spread over two units (Chemical Engineering Design A and B) run in first and second semester. The primary aim in the first unit is to consider the technical issues- with an emphasis on creating and evaluating a range of alternative options that exist at both the unit operation and complete flowsheet levels. The primary emphasis in this unit is on evaluating how non-technical considerations affect the final process design and its operation. Students joining this course from the Major Industrial Placement Project (MIPPs CHNG 4203) or as overseas students (with approval) do the same assignment but on a different schedule.