Space Engineering (Mechanical)

For a standard enrolment plan for Mechanical Engineering visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Mechanical (Space) Engineering Stream for Combined Degrees

To qualify for the Bachelor of Engineering Honours component in the combined degree, students must complete the following:
(a) 42 credit points from the Engineering Core Table, consisting of:
(i) 18 credit points of Engineering Foundation units
(ii) 24 credit points of Project units
(iii) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
(b) 102 credit points from the Mechanical (Space) Engineering Stream table, consisting of:
(i) 78 credit points of Mechanical (Space) Stream Core units
(ii) 18 credit points of Mechanical (Space) Stream Elective units
(iii) 6 credit points of Space Elective units

Mechanical (Space) Stream Core units

AERO2705 Space Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AERO1560 OR MECH1560 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1800) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923). Entry to this unit requires that students are eligible for the Space Engineering Major. Assumed knowledge: ENGG1801. First Year Maths and basic MATLAB programming skills. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to introduce students to the terminology, technology and current practice in the field of Space Engineering. Course content will include a variety of topics in the area of orbital mechanics, satellite systems and launch requirements. Case studies of current systems will be the focus of this unit.
AERO3760 Space Engineering 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Students must have a 65% average in [(AMME2500 AND AMME2261 AND AMME2301 AND AERO2705) OR (AMME2500 AND AMME2301 AND MTRX2700 AND AERO2705) OR (AMME2500 AND AMME2200 AND AMME2301 AND AERO2705)]. Note: MUST have passed AERO2705 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers a range of fundamental and applied topics in space engineering systems including satellite tracking and orbit determination, satellite attitude determination, satellite positioning systems, space robotics and planetary rovers. Students will learn to recognise and appreciate the coupling between the different elements of space system design. Students will learn to use this system knowledge and basic design principles to design and test a solution to problems including space estimation and control tasks, and space systems design.
AERO4701 Space Engineering 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [65% average in (AERO3460 AND AERO3360 AND AERO3560 AND AERO3760) OR (MECH3660 AND MECH3261 AND MECH3361 AND AERO3760) OR (MECH3660 AND AMME3500 AND MTRX3700 AND AERO3760)] AND [Must have passed AERO3760]. Students must have achieved a 65% average mark in 3rd year for enrolment in this unit. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach students the fundamental principles and methods of designing solutions to estimation and control problems in aerospace engineering applications. Students will apply learned techniques in estimation and control theory to solving a wide range of different problems in engineering such as satellite orbit determination, orbit transfers, satellite attitude determination, satellite positioning systems and remote sensing. Students will learn to recognise and appreciate the coupling between the different elements within an estimation and control task, from a systems-theoretic perspective. Students will learn to use this system knowledge and basic design principles to design and test a solution to a given estimation task, with a focus on aerospace applications (such as satellite remote sensing).
AMME1362 Materials 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL2110 or CIVL1110 or AMME2302 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AMME1362 is an introductory course in engineering materials. The unit aims to develop students' understanding of the structures, mechanical properties and manufacture of a range of engineering materials as well as how the mechanical properties relate to microstructure and forming and treatment methods. The unit has no prerequisite subject and is therefore intended for those with little or no previous background in engineering materials. However the unit does require students to take a significant degree of independent responsibility for developing their own background knowledge of materials and their properties. The electrical, magnetic, thermal and optical properties of materials are a critical need-to-know area where students are expected to do most of their learning by independent study.
AMME1802 Engineering Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL1802 or ENGG1802 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to provide students with an understanding of and competence in solving statics and introductory dynamics problems in engineering. Tutorial sessions will help students to improve their group work and problem solving skills, and gain competency in extracting a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Emphasis is placed on the ability to work in 3D as well as 2D, including the 2D and 3D visualisation of structures and structural components, and the vectorial 2D and 3D representations of spatial points, forces and moments. Introduction to kinematics and dynamics topics includes position, velocity and acceleration of a point; relative motion, force and acceleration, momentum, collisions and energy methods.
AMME2000 Engineering Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) AND (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems including; Conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The focus will be on real problems, deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables; Fourier series and Fourier transforms; Laplace transforms; scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches.
AMME2261 Fluid Mechanics 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the fundamentals of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic equations governing the statics and dynamics of fluids; the ability to analyze and determine the forces applied by a static fluid; the ability to analyse fluids in motion. The course will cover both inviscid and viscous fluid flow. The course will introduce the relevant parameters for fluid flow in internal engineering systems such as pipes and pumps and external systems such as flow over wings and airfoils. Course content will cover the basic concepts such as viscosity, density, continuum, pressure, force, buoyancy and acceleration; and more detailed methods including continuity, conservation of momentum, streamlines and potential flow theory, Bernoulli equation, Euler equation, Navier-Stokes equation. Experiments will introduce flow measuring devices and flow observation.
AMME2262 Thermal Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer; The ability to analyze the thermodynamics of a simple open or closed engineering system. The basic knowledge to analyse and design 1D thermal circuits. Course content will include concepts of heat and work, properties of substances, first law of thermodynamics, control mass and control volume analysis, thermal efficiency, entropy, second law of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, isentropic efficiency, power and refrigeration cycles, heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, 1D thermal circuits and transient heat transfer.
AMME2301 Mechanics of Solids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME1802 OR ENGG1802) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: CIVL2201 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equilibrium of deformable structures; basic concept of deformation compatibility; stress and strain in bars, beams and their structures subjected to tension, compression, bending, torsion and combined loading; statically determinate and indeterminate structures; energy methods for bar and beam structures; simple buckling; simple vibration; deformation of simple frames and cell box beams; simple two-dimensional stress and Morh's circle; problem-based applications in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering.
AMME2500 Engineering Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) AND (AMME1802 OR ENGG1802) Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with the MATLAB programming environment Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the principles governing the state of motion or rest of bodies under the influence of applied force and torque, according to classical mechanics. The course aims to teach students the fundamental principles of the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles, rigid bodies, planar mechanisms and three-dimensional mechanisms, covering topics including kinematics in various coordinate systems, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy principles, impulse and momentum (linear and angular), gyroscopic motion and vibration. Students will develop skills in analysing and modelling dynamical systems, using both analytical methods and computer-based solutions using MATLAB. Students will develop skills in approximating the dynamic behaviour of real systems in engineering applications and an appreciation and understanding of the effect of approximations in the development and design of systems in real-world engineering tasks.
AMME2700 Instrumentation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AERO1560 OR MECH1560 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1800 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills, 1st year maths skills, familiarity with fundamental Engineering concepts. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop in students an understanding of the engineering measurements and instrumentation systems. The students will acquire an ability to make accurate and meaningful measurements. It will cover the general areas of electrical circuits and mechanical/electronic instrumentation for strain, force, pressure, moment, torque, displacement, velocity, acceleration, temperature and so on.
AMME3500 System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2500 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to allow students to develop an understanding of methods for modeling and controlling linear, time-invariant systems. Techniques examined will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain approaches to modeling of systems. This will allow students to examine the response of a system to changing inputs and to examine the influence of external stimuli such as disturbances on system behaviour. Students will also gain an understanding of how the responses of these mechanical systems can be altered to meet desired specifications and why this is important in many engineering problem domains.
The study of control systems engineering is of fundamental importance to most engineering disciplines, including Mechanical, Mechatronic, Biomedical, and Aerospace Engineering. Control systems are found in a broad range of applications within these disciplines, from aircraft and spacecraft to robots, automobiles, manufacturing processes, and medical diagnostic systems. The concepts taught in this course introduce students to the mathematical foundations behind the modelling and control of linear, time-invariant dynamic systems. In particular, topics addressed in this course will include:
1. Techniques for modelling mechanical systems and understanding their response to control inputs and disturbances. This will include the derivation of differential equations and use of frequency domain (Laplace transform) methods for their solution and analysis.
2. Representation of systems in a feedback control system as well as techniques for determining what desired system performance specifications are achievable, practical and important when the system is under control
3. Techniques including Root Locus, Bode Plots, and State Space for analysis and design of feedback control systems.
4. Case studies inspired by real-world problems in control engineering.
MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1XX2) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2921 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit opens with topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, through cylinders, spheres and other parametrised surfaces), Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a basic grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MECH2400 Mechanical Design 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET2400 Assumed knowledge: (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810) and (AMME1802 OR ENGG1802); HSC Maths and Physics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aim: For students to experience a realistic the design process and to develop good engineering skills.
Course Objectives- To develop an understanding of: 1) The need for and use of standard drawings in the communication and definition of parts and assemblies to AS1100; 2) Efficient use of a CAD package; 3) Creativity; 4) The design process from initial idea to finished product; 5) Methods used to analyse designs; 6) Appreciation and analysis of standard components; 7) An understanding of power transmission elements.
Students in a combined degree with Bachelor of Science may substitute MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations for AMME2000.

Mechanical (Space) Stream Elective units

MECH3260 Thermal Engineering 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2200 OR AMME2262 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics are needed to begin this more advanced course Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop an understanding of: 1) The principles of thermodynamics- energy, entropy and exergy balances- applied to pure substances, mixtures and combustion and the application of these principles to engineering processes, power and refrigeration systems. 2) The principles of heat transfer- conductive, convective, radiative heat transfer- in the context of a variety of physical situations and the application of these principles in order to design and size engineering equipment and analyse engineering processes.
Course content includes: 1) Thermodynamics- properties of matter, energy, entropy and exergy balances for closed and steady state flow systems, mixtures, mixing and separation, psychrometry and air-conditioning and combustion- stoichiometry, first and second law analysis of reacting systems. 2) Heat Transfer- conduction, thermal circuits, general conduction equation, conduction through cylindrical bodies and fins, heat exchangers, transient conduction including analytic solutions, forced convection and natural convection, boiling and radiation- spectrum, intensity, surface radiative properties, environmental radiation, solar radiation.
At the end of this unit students will be able to: 1) Thermodynamics- apply the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer to engineering situations; have the ability to tackle and solve a range of problems involving thermodynamic cycles, devices such as compressors and turbines, mixtures, air conditioning, combustion. 2) Heat Transfer- have the ability to tackle and solve a range of heat transfer problems including heat exchangers, cooling by fluids, quenching, insulation and solar radiation.
MECH3261 Fluid Mechanics 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2200 OR (AMME2261 AND AMME2262) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the theory and practice of fluid mechanics in the context of mechanical engineering. Students will gain skills in problem solving in areas of pipe, pump and channel flow; lift and drag on immersed bodies; boundary layer theory and gas dynamics.
At the end of this unit students will have the ability to critically assess and solve problems commonly found in fluid mechanics practice, such as sizing pumps and piping systems, designing channels, and determing the lift and drag characteristics of submerged bodies. Additionally, they will develop a structured and systematic approach to problem solving.
MECH3361 Mechanics of Solids 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2301 AND (AMME1362 OR AMME2302 OR CIVL2110 OR CIVL1110) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit of study aims to: teach the fundamentals of analysing stress and deformation in a solid under complex loading associated with the elemental structures/components in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering; develop the following attributes: understand the fundamental principles of solid mechanics and basic methods for stress and deformation analysis of a solid structure/element in the above mentioned engineering areas; gain the ability to analyse problems in terms of strength and deformation in relation to the design, manufacturing and maintenance of machines, structures, devices and elements in the above mentioned engineering areas.
At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: applicability of the theories and why so; how and why to do stress analysis; why we need equations of motion/equilibrium; how and why to do strain analysis; why we need compatibility equations; why Hooke's law, why plasticity and how to do elastic and plastic analysis; how and why to do mechanics modelling; how to describe boundary conditions for complex engineering problems; why and how to solve a mechanics model based on a practical problem; why and how to use energy methods for stress and deformation analysis; why and how to do stress concentration analysis and its relation to fracture and service life of a component/structure; how and why to do fundamental plastic deformation analysis; how and why the finite element method is introduced and used for stress and deformation analysis.
The students are expected to develop the ability of solving engineering problems by comprehensively using the skills attained above. The students will get familiar with finite element analysis as a research and analysis tool for various real-life problems.
MECH3362 Materials 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2301 AND (AMME2302 OR AMME1362 OR CIVL2110 OR CIVL1110) Assumed knowledge: (1) A good understanding of basic knowledge and principles of material science and engineering from Materials I and mechanics of solids for simple structural elements (in tension, bending, torsion); (2) Reasonable mathematical skills in calculation of stresses and strains in simple structural elements. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims for students to understand the relationship between properties of materials and their microstructures and to improve mechanical design based on knowledge of mechanics and properties of materials.
At the end of this unit students should have the capability to select proper materials for simple engineering design.
Course content will include: short-term and long-term mechanical properties; introductory fracture and fatigue mechanics, dislocations; polymers and polymer composite materials; ceramics and glasses; structure-property relationships; selection of materials in mechanical design.

Space Elective Units

AERO5700 Space Engineering (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AERO3760 AND AERO4701) OR AERO9760 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Estimation techniques are applied to a wide range of aerospace systems. In this subject optimal estimation techniques will be presented as a collection of algorithms and their implementation.
AMME3060 Engineering Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME2000 OR MATH2067 OR (MATH2061 AND MATH2065) OR MATH2021 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will address the use of state of the art engineering software packages for the solution of advanced problems in engineering. We will cover the solution of partial differential equations in heat transfer; fluids, both inviscid and viscous, and solids. While some analytical methods will be considered, the primary focus of the course will be on the use of numerical solution methods, including finite difference, finite element, finite volume and discrete element methods. Commercial engineering packages will be introduced with particular attention given to the development of standards for the accuracy.
AMME4010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 credits of at least 3rd year units of study with 65% average Prohibitions: AMME4111 OR AMME4112 OR AMME4121 OR AMME4122 OR ENGG4000 OR MECH4601 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For students whose degree includes ENGG4000, AMME4010 counts in place of this unit. Students whose degree includes the Professional Engagement Program must enrol in all PEP units. AMME4010 will count toward the Engineering Work requirement.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to AMME4111/4112 Thesis A and B, and two recommended electives.
This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged fulltime on the project at the industrial site.
AMME4710 Computer Vision and Image Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30cp of any 3000 or higher level Engineering units of study AND (ENGG1801 OR ENGG1810 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910) Assumed knowledge: The unit assumes that students have strong skills in either MATLAB or Python. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to vision sensors, computer vision analysis and digital image processing. This course will cover the following areas: fundamental principles of vision sensors such as physics laws, radiometry, CMOS/CDD imager architectures, colour reconstruction; the design of physics-based models for vision such as reflectance models, photometric invariants, radiometric calibration. This course will also present algorithms for video/image analysis, transmission and scene interpretation. Topics such as image enhancement, restoration, stereo correspondence, pattern recognition, object segmentation and motion analysis will be covered.
AMME5202 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(MECH3261 AND AMME2000) OR (AERO3260 AND AMME2000)] OR ENGG5202 OR MECH8261 Assumed knowledge: Partial differential equations; Finite difference methods; Taylor series; Basic fluid mechanics including pressure, velocity, boundary layers, separated and recirculating flows. Basic computer programming skills. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives: To provide students with the necessary skills to use commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics packages and to carry out research in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics. Expected outcomes: Students will have a good understanding of the basic theory of Computational Fluid Dynamics, including discretisation, accuracy and stability. They will be capable of writing a simple solver and using a sophisticated commercial CFD package.
Syllabus summary: A course of lectures, tutorials and laboratories designed to provide the student with the necessary tools for using a sophisticated commercial CFD package. A set of laboratory tasks will take the student through a series of increasingly complex flow simulations, requiring an understanding of the basic theory of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The laboratory tasks will be complemented by a series of lectures in which the basic theory is covered, including: governing equations; finite difference methods, accuracy and stability for the advection/diffusion equation; direct and iterative solution techniques; solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations; turbulent flow; Cartesian tensors; turbulence models.
AMME5292 Advanced Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: MECH3261 OR MECH9261 OR CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612 OR AERO3260 OR AERO9260 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to cover advanced concepts in fluid dynamics, focusing particularly on turbulent flows, optical and laser based experimentation, and applied fluid dynamics in the context of engineering design. Specific topics to be covered will be: instability and turbulence, Reynolds decomposition, the Kolmogorov hypotheses, laser-based fluid flow measurement, and applied concepts such as multiphase flows, environmental flows, and biomedical flows. The project component of the unit will give students the opportunity to work on an advanced topical research or practical problem in fluid dynamics.
AMME5510 Vibration and Acoustics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (AMME2200 OR AMME2261 OR AMME9261) AND (AMME2500 OR AMME9500) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study should prepare the student to be able to undertake vibration and acoustic measurement calculations for industry design situations.
The unit aims to introduce a number of new concepts required for analysis of vibrations and acoustics. The response of structure under different dynamic forces, including human and aerodynamic, will be investigated. A number of hands-on experiments will be performed to allow an understanding of the concepts and applicability.
The acoustics component will include: basic acoustics theory, sound generation and propagation, impedance, absorbing materials, industrial noise sources, isolation methods of noise control, enclosures, instrumentation and measurement, frequency analysis, noise regulations and computational acoustics.
AMME5520 Advanced Control and Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME3500 OR AMME9501 or AMME8501 Assumed knowledge: Strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces engineering design via optimisation, i. e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilise and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion. The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimisation frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with Dijkstra's algorithm, A*, and probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs), state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.
AMME5902 Computer Aided Manufacturing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this course is to enhance the student's manufacturing engineering skills in the CAD/CAM area. The course focuses on CNC milling as a manufacturing automation process applied to a project. The management, planning and marketing of a typical engineering project are also discussed.
Through integrated project-based learning and hands-on-machine training, you will learn: How to successfully complete a CAD/CAM and CNC mill based project; Manufacturing management and system skills, such as product planning, manufacturing sequence, time and cost; The science in designing and selecting a manufacturing method; How to effectively present your ideas and outcomes using oral and report based methods.
It is expected that through your hard work in the semester, you will find: Enhanced learning by real-world problems; Improved comprehensive skill in manufacturing design.
AMME5912 Crash Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Computer Aided Drafting, Basic FEA principles and Solid Mechanics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of the course is to give students skills in the area of highly non-linear finite element analysis. Major topics covered include CAD, Implicit / explicit codes, Wire frame geometry, Elemental Theory, Materials, Pre-processing using ETA-PreSys, Contact, LS-Dyna, using NCAC FEM models, Modeling fasteners and the interaction between solids and fluids. Material covered in lectures is reinforced through independent research, assignments, quizzes and a major capstone project. The capstone project involves the development of an approved crash scenario.
MECH5265 Combustion

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MECH3260 AND MECH3261) OR MECH9260 or MECH8260 Prohibitions: MECH4265 OR MECH8265 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to teach the basic principles of combustion highlighting the role of chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, and molecular transport in determining the structure of flames. Students will become familiar with laminar and turbulent combustion of gaseous and liquid fuels including the formation of pollutants. Students will also be briefly introduced to various applications such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and fires.
This unit will cover equilibrium compositions, flammability limits, simple chemically reacting systems, detailed chemical kinetics, and the basic theory underlying laminar and turbulent combustion for both premixed and non-premixed cases. There will be an introduction to droplet and spray combustion, the concept of mixture fraction for non-premixed flames, combustion in engines and gas turbines as well as the formation of pollutants. New concepts for clean modern engines, with increasing reliance on renewable energy, are highlighted. Issues relating to buoyant fires and plumes, including fire suppression may also be covered.
MECH5304 Materials Failure

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MECH9361 OR MECH3361 or MECH8361) AND (MECH9362 or MECH8362 OR MECH3362) Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge in materials science and engineering: 1) atomic and crystal structures 2) metallurgy 3) structure-property relationship 4) mechanics of engineering materials 5) solid mechanics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Develop advanced knowledge and skills in diagnostic analyses of materials failure using advanced techniques; enhance students' ability in handling complex engineering cases using interdisciplinary technologies; and provide students an opportunity to understand project research.
MECH5305 Smart Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME9301 OR AMME2301) AND (AMME9302 OR AMME2302 OR AMME1362) Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge in materials science and engineering: 1) atomic and crystal structures 2) metallurgy 3) structure-property relationship 4) mechanics of engineering materials 5) solid mechanics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Develop an essential understanding of structure-property relationship of smart materials, as well as their applications in practical applications; develop student's capability to design functional structures using smart materials; and provide students an opportunity to learn the new knowledge through project approaches.
MECH5310 Advanced Engineering Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MECH3362 OR MECH9362 or MECH8362 Prohibitions: MECH4310 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To understand (a) how to define the relationship between properties and microstructures of advanced engineering materials, (b) how to improve mechanical design with the knowledge of mechanics and properties of materials, and (c) how to conduct failure diagnosis of engineering materials.
MECH5311 Microscopy and Microanalysis of Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: AMME1362 or AMME9302 or CIVL2110. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers the fundamental knowledge that is essential for the microscopy and microanalysis of materials. The UoS will cover the basic fundamental concepts of materials structures and modern materials characterisation techniques that are available in the University, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
MECH5720 Sensors and Signals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MTRX3700 or MTRX3760 Prohibitions: MECH4720 Assumed knowledge: Strong MATLAB skills Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Syllabus Summary: This course starts by providing a background to the signals and transforms required to understand modern sensors. It goes on to provide an overview of the workings of typical active sensors (Radar, Lidar and Sonar). It provides insight into basic sensing methods as well as aspects of interfacing and signal processing. It includes both background material and a number of case studies.
The course covers the following topics:
a) SIGNALS: Convolution, The Fourier Transform, Modulation (FM, AM, FSK, PSK etc), Frequency shifting (mixing)
b) PASSIVE SENSORS: Infrared Radiometers, Imaging Infrared, Passive Microwave Imaging, Visible Imaging and Image Intensifiers
c) ACTIVE SENSORS THE BASICS: Operational Principles, Time of flight (TOF) Measurement and Imaging of Radar, Lidar and Sonar, Radio Tags and Transponders, Range Tacking, Doppler Measurement, Phase Measurement
d) SENSORS AND THE ENVIRONMENT: Atmospheric Effects, Target Characteristics, Clutter Characteristics, Multipath
e) ACTIVE SENSORS: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES: Probability of Detection, Angle Measurement and Tracking, Combined Range/Doppler and Angle Tracking, Frequency Modulation and the Fast Fourier Transform, High Range Resolution, Wide Aperture Methods, Synthetic Aperture Methods (SAR)
Objectives: The course aims to provide students with a good practical knowledge of a broad range of sensor technologies, operational principles and relevant signal processing techniques.
Expected Outcomes: A good understanding of active sensors, their outputs and applicable signal processing techniques. An appreciation of the basic sensors that are available to engineers and when they should be used.