Biomedical Engineering

For more information on units of study visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Biomedical)

To qualify for the award of the Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 96 credit points, including:
(a) 36 credit points of Core units as listed below
(b) ENGG5217 Practical Experience
(c) 48 credit points of Elective units
(d) A minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research Pathway units as detailed below
(e) Candidates undertaking the Research Pathway, replace 12 credit points of elective units with Research Pathway units

Core units

BMET9660 Biomanufacturing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET3660 or AMME3660 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to teach the fundamentals of biomedical manufacturing processes, including traditional and advanced manufacturing technologies. This unit aims to develop the following attributes: to understand the fundamental principles of biomedical manufacturing approaches; to gain the ability to understand and select appropriate manufacturing processes and systems for biomedical applications; to develop ability to create innovative new manufacturing technologies for medical bionics and other applications in biomedical engineering; to develop ability to invent new manufacturing systems suitable for biomedical engineering implementation. At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: merits and advantages of individual manufacturing processes and systems used in the fabrication of medical devices and products that support human health and well-being; principles of developing new technologies for biomedical engineering applications; comprehensive applications and strategic selection of manufacturing processes and systems within the regulatory landscape of biomedical manufacturing. Unit content will include: Materials Processing: An introduction into the use of joining, moulding, and other manufacturing processes. Rapid Prototyping: An introduction into the most current prototyping methods currently in use. Manufacturing Processes: Common processes and their science (machining, moulding, sintering, materials processing, joining processes) and their relative merits and limitations.
BMET9990 Biomedical Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET3990 or AMME4990 or BMET4990 or AMME5990 or AMME9990 Assumed knowledge: 1000 level chemistry, 2000 level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the1000 level, and preferably at the 2000 level. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This UoS will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.
BMET5992 Regulatory Affairs in the Medical Industry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME4992 OR AMME5992 Assumed knowledge: MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 and 6cp of 1000-level Chemistry and 6cp of Biology units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Supply of medical devices, diagnostics and related therapeutic products is regulated in most jurisdictions, with sophisticated and complex regulatory regimes in all large economies. These regulations are applied both to manufacturers and designers and to biomedical engineers undertaking device custom manufacture or maintenance in clinical environments. This UoS will explore the different regulatory frameworks in the 'Global Harmonisation Task Force' group of jurisdictions (US, EU, Canada, Japan, Australia), as well as emerging regulatory practices in Asia and South America. Emphasis will be on the commonality of the underlying technical standards and the importance of sophisticated risk management approaches to compliance.
BMET9921 Biomedical Engineering Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 Assumed knowledge: 1000-level biology, 1000-level materials science and some engineering design Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to the field of biomedical engineering, from the point of view of the engineering and the global biomedical industry itself. After completion of this unit, students will have a clear understanding of what biomedical engineering is, both from the engineering perspective and the commercial/industry perspective.
BMET9961 Biomaterials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5961 or AMME9961 or MECH4961 or BMET4961 or BMET3961 Assumed knowledge: Chemistry, biology, materials engineering, and engineering design at least at the 1000-level. AMME9901 or BMET9901 or 6 credit points of 1000-level biology, 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry, 6 credit points of 1000-level materials science, 6 credit points of engineering design. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is divided into two parts: biomechanics and biomaterials: Biomechanics is the study of the body from the point of view of it being an engineering structure. There are many aspects to this since the human body contains soft tissues, hard tissues (skeletal system), and articulating joints. We will begin with a general introduction to biomechanics, modelling the human body from the macroscopic level to the microscopic level. We will then study soft tissue mechanics, with respect to both non-linear and viscoelastic descriptions, with a significant focus on the mathematical methods used in relation to the mechanics of the system. We will then look at specific aspects of biomechanics: muscle mechanics, joint mechanics, kinematics and dynamics of human gait (gait analysis), biomechanics of cells, physiological fluid flow, biomechanics of injury, functional and mechanical response of tissues to mechanical loading. Biomaterials This course will involve the study of biomaterials from two perspectives: firstly, the response of the body towards the biomaterial - an immune response and foreign body reaction; secondly, the response of the biomaterial to the body - corrosion, biodegradation, and mechanical failure. Our study will begin with the response of the body towards the biomaterial. We will begin by looking at the immune system itself and then move on to look at the normal inflammatory response. We will then study in detail the foreign body reaction caused by biomaterials. The final part of this section is the study of protein adsorption onto biomaterials, with a strong focus on the Vroman effect. Then we will move onto the response of the biomaterial to the body. We will begin by a review of biomaterials, their applications, and compositions, and mechanical properties. We will then look at key problems such as corrosion, stress shielding, static fatigue, and mechanical failure. Finally, we will take a practical look at the materials themselves. Beginning with metals, then polymers (thermoplastic, thermosetting, and biodegradable), and finally ceramics (bioinert, biodegradable, and bioactive).
BMET9971 Tissue Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5971 or AMME9971 or AMME4971 or BMET4971 or BMET3971 Assumed knowledge: AMME9901 or BMET9901 or [6 credit points of 1000-level biology and 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry] Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With the severe worldwide shortage of donor organs and the ubiquitous problem of donor organ rejection, there is a strong need for developing technologies for engineering replacement organs and other body parts. Recent developments in engineering and the life sciences have begun to make this possible, and as a consequence, the very new and multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering has been making dramatic progress in the last few years. This unit will provide an introduction to the principles of tissue engineering, as well as an up to date overview of recent progress and future outlook in the field of tissue engineering. This unit assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of tissue engineering. The objectives are: To gain a basic understanding of the major areas of interest in tissue engineering; To learn to apply basic engineering principles to tissue engineering systems; To understand the promises and limitations of tissue engineering; To understand the advances and challenges of stem cell applications; Enable students to access web-based resources in tissue engineering; Enable students to develop basic skills in tissue engineering research.
ENGG5217 Practical Experience

Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG5205 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed one year of their MPE program before enrolling in this unit.
The 3 year MPE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students can undertake their work experience in the final year of the MPE program (Year 3). Students may have prior work in an Engineering field carried out on completion of their undergraduate degree accepted as meeting the requirements of this component.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to inform the Faculty of any work arrangements by emailing the Graduate School of Engineering and Information Technologies. Assessment in this unit is by the submission of a portfolio containing written reports on the involvement with industry. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience portfolio web site http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml

Elective units

Candidates must complete 48 credit points from the following Biomedical elective units.
AMME5271 Computational Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Understanding of basic principles of Newtonian mechanics, physics and chemistry, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course introduces atomistic computational techniques used in modern engineering to understand phenomena and predict material properties, behaviour, structure and interactions at nano-scale. The advancement of nanotechnology and manipulation of matter at the molecular level have provided ways for developing new materials with desired properties. The miniaturisation at the nanometre scale requires an understanding of material behaviour which could be much different from that of the bulk. Computational nanotechnology plays a growingly important role in understanding mechanical properties at such a small scale. The aim is to demonstrate how atomistic level simulations can be used to predict the properties of matter under various conditions of load, deformation and flow. The course covers areas mainly related to fluid as well as solid properties, whereas, the methodologies learned can be applied to diverse areas in nanotechnology such as, liquid-solid interfaces, surface engineering, nanorheology, nanotribology and biological systems. This is a course with a modern perspective for engineers who wish to keep abreast with advanced computational tools for material characterisation at the atomic scale.
AMME9301 Mechanics of Solids 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5301 Assumed knowledge: Physics, statics, Differential Calculus, Linear Algebra, Integral Calculus and Modelling. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach the fundamentals of analysing stress and deformation in elemental structures/components in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering (bars, beams, frames, cell box beams and tubes) under simple and combined loading of tension, compression, bending and torsion. The vibration will also be addressed. At the end of this unit students will have gained knowledge of: equilibrium of deformable structures; basic concept of deformation compatibility; stress and strain in bars, beams and their structures subjected to tension, compression, bending, torsion and combined loading; statically determinate and indeterminate structures; energy methods for bar and beam structures; simple buckling; simple vibration; deformation of simple frames and cell box beams; simple two-dimensional stress and Morh`s circle; problem-based applications in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering.
AMME9500 Engineering Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5500 Assumed knowledge: University level Maths and Physics, especially covering the area of Mechanics, and familiarity with the MATLAB programming environment. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the principles governing the state of motion or rest of bodies under the influence of applied force and torque, according to classical mechanics. The course aims to teach students the fundamental principles of the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles, rigid bodies, planar mechanisms and three-dimensional mechanisms, covering topics including kinematics in various coordinate systems, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy principles, impulse and momentum (linear and angular), gyroscopic motion and vibration. Students will develop skills in analysing and modelling dynamical systems, using both analytical methods and computer-based solutions using MATLAB. Students will develop skills in approximating the dynamic behaviour of real systems in engineering applications and an appreciation and understanding of the effect of approximations in the development and design of systems in real-world engineering tasks.
BMET5790 Introduction to Biomechatronics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MECH3921 or BMET3921) or MTRX3700 or MTRX3760 or (AMME5921 or BMET5921 or BMET9921) Prohibitions: AMME4790 or AMME5790 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in mechanical and electronic engineering; adequate maths and applied maths skills; background knowledge of physics, chemistry and biology; Some programming capability: MATLAB, C, C++, software tools used by engineers including CAD and EDA packages. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomechatronics is the application of mechatronic engineering to human biology, and as such it forms an important subset of the overall biomedical engineering discipline. This unit focusses on a number of areas of interest including auditory and optical prostheses, artificial hearts and active and passive prosthetic limbs and examines the biomechatronic systems (hardware and signal processing) that underpin their operation.
BMET5907 Orthopaedic and Surgical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH4902 OR MECH5907 Assumed knowledge: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901 OR AMME9901 OR BMET9901) AND (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921) Basic concepts in engineering mechanics - statics; dynamics; and solid mechanics. Basic concepts in materials science; specifically with regard to types of materials and the relation between properties and microstructure. A basic understanding of human biology and anatomy. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims and objectives of the UoS are: 1. To introduce the student to the details and practice of orthopaedic engineering; 2. To give students an overview of the diverse knowledge necessary for the design and evaluation of implants used in orthopaedic surgery; 3. To enable students to learn the language and concepts necessary for interaction with orthopaedic surgeons and the orthopaedic implant industry; 4. To introduce the student to the details and practice of other engineering applications in surgery, particularly in the cardiovascular realm.
BMET5911 Advanced Instrumentation for Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in calculus, linear differential equations, basic mechanics and electromagnetism. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers fundamental knowledge about the working principles of scanning probe microscopies, microsensors and other key instrumentation in nanotechnology with a focus on biophysical, biomedical and material science applications. Scanning probe microscopes work in a variety of environments ranging from vacuum to liquids, and are frequently used to study samples spanning from single atoms all the way up to live cells and tissues. Besides imaging, these technologies enable the manipulation of matter and the acquisition of many physical and chemical properties of samples up to the atomic scale. The knowledge provided in this UoS is intended to improve the competences of the students to understand, use and create technologies of great value in nanotechnology with applications across multiple disciplines.
BMET5931 Nanomaterials in Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5931 Assumed knowledge: [[(BIOL1xxx OR MBLG1xxx) AND CHEM1xxx AND PHYS1xxx] OR [(AMME1961 OR BMET1961)] AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901)]] AND (NANO2xxx OR AMME1362) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The application of science and technology at the nanoscale for biomedical problems promises to revolutionise medicine. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by applying nanotechnology to medicine. This course focuses on explaining the fundamentals of nanomedicine, and highlighting the special properties and application of nanomaterials in medicine. This course also reviews the most significant biomedical applications of nanomaterials including the recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, medical imaging, gene therapy, biosensors and cancer treatment.
BMET5933 Biomedical Image Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: An understanding of biology (1000-level), experience with programming (ENGG1801, ENGG1810, BMET2922 or BMET9922). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomedical imaging technology is a fundamental element of both clinical practice and biomedical research, enabling the visualisation of biological characteristics and function often in a non-invasive fashion. The advancement of digital scanning technologies alongside the development of computational tools has driven significant progress in medical image analysis tools that support clinical decisions and the analysis of data from biological experiments. The focus of this unit will be the development of fundamental computational skills and knowledge in biomedical imaging, including data acquisition, formats, visualisation, segmentation, feature extraction, and machine learning based image analysis. On completion of this unit, students will be able to engineer and develop solutions for different biomedical imaging tasks encountered across a variety of use cases: clinical practice (e.g., computerised disease detection and diagnosis), research (e.g., cell video analysis), and industry (e.g., fabrication of customised implants from patient image data).
BMET5944 Bioinspired Materials: Design and Fabrication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000-level materials science and mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
BMET5944 equips students with the state-of-the-art knowledge about the design and development of new generations of multifunctional materials by learning from nature. The unit covers: (a) the construction, deformation and failure behaviour of hard and soft natural materials which confer them with outstanding mechanical properties and multi-functionalities such as shape-morphing, self-healing and damage sensing, (b) the fabrication techniques to implement similar principles in engineering materials in order to improve their performance, (c) the theoretical and experimental approaches to study the mechanics of resulting materials, and (d) examples of bioinspired materials in industries, current challenges of the field and future perspectives.
BMET5953 Rehabilitation Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000-level mathematics and 1000-level biology Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehabilitation Engineering is a staple course of biomedical engineering programs worldwide. This unit focuses on rehabilitation devices, external and internal, for communication and mobility. Rehabilitation engineering is the application of engineering analysis and design expertise to overcome disabilities and improve quality of life with assistive technologies. The unit will cover the inclusive design or 'design for all' process with consumer engagement, human-computer interfaces, mobility and communication needs. All students will design a project that addresses an unmet need. There will be visits to disability services organisations and learn about the National Disability Insurance Scheme. The unit will be taught through lectures and the design lab including computational and hands on design. Communication skills will be tested through a project 'pitch' presentation. Some teaching will be provided by rehabilitation engineers working in industry.
BMET5957 Bioelectronic Medicine Circuits and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC2104 and BMET2922 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is focused on the emergent and highly interdisciplinary field of electroceuticals as an alternative to pharmaceutical therapeutics. Biomedical devices, circuits and systems employ electrical, magnetic, optical, ultrasound, or other pulses to modulate peripheral nerves for target- and organ-specific effects. We want to understand: What is electroceutical therapy? How bioelectronic medicine could replace drugs? What are the benefits and side effects of electroceuticals in terms of safety, efficacy, and cost compared with pharmaceutical therapeutics?, and How a future bioelectrician works with clinician and conventional clinical practice? This unit aims to build complementary capabilities in design and simulation of circuits and systems for bioelectronic medicine interfaces. Students review, learn, design, simulate and implement test platforms for circuits and systems that enable bioelectronic treatments. Students will be equipped with knowledge on how to make more targeted and personalised treatments for neurological based diseases and conditions with a focus on closed-loop control systems. Students are expected to perform research on circuit implementation for different applications such as pain relief, bionic eye, pace makers. The unit also provides a deep overview on the roadmap of technologies and future trends in bioelectronic medicine and electroceuticals.
BMET5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5958 Assumed knowledge: (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR BMET9921) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
BMET5962 Introduction to Mechanobiology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5962 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of 1000-level biology, 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry and 6 credit points of 2000-level physiology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mechanobiology has emerged as a new field of science that integrates biology and engineering and is now considered to have significant influence on the development of technologies for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. It is well known that tissues and cells are sensitive to their mechanical environment and changes to this environment can affect the physiological and pathophysiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms by which biological cells sense and respond to mechanical signals can lead to the development of novel treatments and therapies for a variety of diseases.
BMET5995 Advanced Bionics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5995 OR AMME5951 OR BMET5951 Assumed knowledge: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 OR BMET3921 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The field of 'bionics' is one of the primary embodiments of biomedical engineering. In the context of this unit, bionics is defined as a collection of therapeutic devices implanted into the body to restore or enhance functions lost through disease, developmental anomaly, or injury. Most typically, bionic devices intervene with the nervous system and aim to control neural activity through the delivery of electrical impulses. An example of this is a cochlear implant which delivers electrical impulses to physiologically excite surviving neurons of the auditory system, providing the capacity to elicit the psychological perception of sound. This unit primarily focuses upon the replacement of human senses, the nature and transduction of signals acquired, and how these ultimately effect neural activity.
BMET9400 Biomechanical Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH2400 or BMET2400 Assumed knowledge: (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810) and ENGG1802. HSC Maths and HSC Physics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ability to design within the context of biomedical engineering requires cross-disciplinary knowledge and an appreciation and application of professional engineering standards and ethics. This unit provides students the opportunity to experience the design process and to develop good engineering skills. Students will build on skills and knowledge developed in prerequisite units and be introduced to standards and creative tools relevant to biomedical applications. The importance of standard engineering drawings in the communication and definition of parts and assemblies, the use of a CAD package to create them, and the importance and deeper understanding of standard components will be integral to the learning in this unit. Students will also learn and use the design process from initial idea to finished product, and practice various methods used to generate creative solutions.
BMET9802 Biomedical Instrumentation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC3802 or ELEC8882 or BMET3802 Assumed knowledge: A knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology and electrical circuits is required: Ohm's law, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, basic circuit theory involving linear resistors, capacitors and inductors, operational amplifiers. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assumes a knowledge of basic principles in physics, mathematics, circuit theory and electronics. In particular, some understanding of the following is required: Thevenins and Nortons theorems, Fourier analysis, radiation, filtering, bipolar and field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. The following topics are covered. Biology of the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems, physiology of nerve and muscle cells, fundamental organization of the brain and spinal cord. Medical instrumentation. ElectrocardioGram and automated diagnosis. Heart pacemakers and defibrillators. The bionic ear. Apparatus for treatment of sleep disordered breathing(sleep apnoea). Medical imaging and signal processing This unit is descriptive and does not require detailed knowledge of electronics or mathematics, but does require an understanding of some key aspects of mathematical and electronic theory. The unit concentrates on some of the practical applications of biomedical engineering to patient diagnosis and treatment.
BMET9925 AI, Data, and Society in Health

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET2925 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with general mathematical and statistical concepts. Online learning modules will be provided to support obtaining this knowledge. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Unprecedented growth in computing power, the advent of artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning technologies, and global data platforms are changing the way in which we approach real-world healthcare challenges. This interdisciplinary unit will introduce students from different backgrounds to the fundamental concepts of data analytics and AI, and their practical applications in healthcare. Throughout the unit, students will learn about the key concepts in data analytics and AI techniques, and obtain hands-on experience in applying these techniques to a broad range of healthcare problems. At the same time, they will develop an understanding of the ethical considerations in health data analytics and AI, and how their use impacts society: from the patient, to the doctor, to the broader community. A key element of the learning process will be a team-based Datathon project where students will deploy their knowledge to address an open-ended healthcare problem, in particular developing a practical solution and analysing how it's use may change things in the healthcare domain. Upon completion of this unit, students will understand and be able to enlist data analytics and AI tools to design solutions to healthcare problems.
BMET9981 Applied Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME4981 or BMET4981 OR AMME5981 OR AMME9981 Assumed knowledge: AMME9301 AND AMME9302 AND AMME9500 AND MECH9361 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS will give students an understanding of CT/MRI based solid modelling, finite element methods, constitutive material models, design analysis and optimisation, experimental validation and their use in biomedical engineering. The students are expected to gain skills and experience with finite element software for the solution to sophisticated problems associated with biomedical engineering and experimentation techniques for the validation of these problems. The unit will take a holistic approach to the learning outcomes: an overview of typical biomedical design problems, an overview of finite element analysis software, a detailed look at finite element methods in biomedical applications, and a project-based learning approach to the development of a biomedical prosthesis. By the end of the unit, the students are expected to have familiarised themselves with design analysis, optimisation, and validation for biomedical engineering problems.
CIVL5320 Engineering for Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CIVL3310 OR CIVL9310 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to provide students with an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to design and implement sustainable humanitarian engineering projects. The context for the delivery of humanitarian engineering projects are set in developing countries, disaster relief situations, indigenous communities and our societies at large. Sustainability it critical to the long term impact of any engineering project. Students will learn about how engineering fits within a range of sustainability frameworks. Systems thinking, inter-disciplinary approaches, partnerships and government policy are some of the topics that will be covered. This unit of study is the 4th year elective for Humanitarian Engineering major and is open to all undergraduate engineers who have completed the pre-requisites.
CIVL5330 Global Engineering Field Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit of study is to provide fieldwork experience for undergraduate engineering students. The unit of study is one of the four subjects offered in the Humanitarian Engineering Major. The fieldwork will be between two to four weeks in either a developing country or remote communities in Australia. From this fieldwork experience, students will learn about the diversity of communities in need and how engineering can be used to address some of these problems. The fieldwork will focus on applying the human-centered design process to a student identified design challenge in the community. It is not anticipated that there will be any implemented project at the conclusion of the fieldwork. However, the fieldwork design challenge will result in student-generated ideas that the local partner organisation might wish to develop further. The fieldwork unit will require students to demonstrate an applied use of engineering skills, cross-cultural competence, effective communication, resilience and an ability to work closely in teams. Enrolment in this subject is competitive and is open to undergraduate engineering students from any stream of engineering.
CIVL9310 Humanitarian Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Humanitarian Engineering is the application of Engineering design and organisation to improve quality of life, in circumstances where severe conditions of life are preventing the community from achieving those outcomes themselves. It can be anything from large scale infrastructure which benefits provinces to small scale innovations which benefit single families. It can be regarded as developmental aid or as disaster relief. In this unit students will study the world humanitarian sphere and its major and minor players. Students will be expected to critically analyse many of the notions which underpin humanitarian aid by use of various case studies and with reference to scholarly research. The subject will include both historical and contemporary study of engineering application in developmental aid delivered through governments, organisations and individuals. Various humanitarian theories will be studied and applied to specific cases, as well as methods of measuring success. This unit will be first offered in 2017. As well as being a requirement for the Humanitarian major, it is also available to all Civil students as a 3rd year Civil elective and to students from other disciplines as a free elective.
COMP5310 Principles of Data Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO3406 Assumed knowledge: Good understanding of relational data model and database technologies as covered in ISYS2120 or COMP9120 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The focus of this unit is on understanding and applying relevant concepts, techniques, algorithms, and tools for the analysis, management and visualisation of data- with the goal of enabling discovery of information and knowledge to guide effective decision making and to gain new insights from large data sets.
To this end, this unit of study provides a broad introduction to data management, analysis, modelling and visualisation using the Python programming language. Development of custom software using the powerful, general-purpose Python scripting language; Data collection, cleaning, pre-processing, and storage using various databases; Exploratory data analysis to understand and profile complex data sets; Mining unlabelled data to identify relationships, patterns, and trends; Machine learning from labelled data to predict into the future; Communicate findings to varied audiences, including effective data visualisations.
Core data science content will be taught in normal lecture + tutorial delivery mode. Python programming will be taught through an online learning platform in addition to the weekly face-to-face lecture/tutorials. The unit of study will include hands-on exercises covering the range of data science skills above.
COMP5318 Machine Learning and Data Mining

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFO2110 OR ISYS2110 OR COMP9120 OR COMP5138 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Machine learning is the process of automatically building mathematical models that explain and generalise datasets. It integrates elements of statistics and algorithm development into the same discipline. Data mining is a discipline within knowledge discovery that seeks to facilitate the exploration and analysis of large quantities for data, by automatic and semiautomatic means. This subject provides a practical and technical introduction to machine learning and data mining.
Topics to be covered include problems of discovering patterns in the data, classification, regression, feature extraction and data visualisation. Also covered are analysis, comparison and usage of various types of machine learning techniques and statistical techniques.
COMP5329 Deep Learning

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: COMP5318 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This course provides an introduction to deep machine learning, which is rapidly emerging as one of the most successful and widely applicable set of techniques across a range of applications. Students taking this course will be exposed to cutting-edge research in machine learning, starting from theories, models, and algorithms, to implementation and recent progress of deep learning. Specific topics include: classical architectures of deep neural network, optimization techniques for training deep neural networks, theoretical understanding of deep learning, and diverse applications of deep learning in computer vision.
COMP5349 Cloud Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of computer networks as covered in INFO1112 or COMP9201 or COMP9601 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers topics of active and cutting-edge research within IT in the area of 'Cloud Computing'.
Cloud Computing is an emerging paradigm of utilising large-scale computing services over the Internet that will affect individual and organization's computing needs from small to large. Over the last decade, many cloud computing platforms have been set up by companies like Google, Yahoo!, Amazon, Microsoft, Salesforce, Ebay and Facebook. Some of the platforms are open to public via various pricing models. They operate at different levels and enable business to harness different computing power from the cloud.
In this course, we will describe the important enabling technologies of cloud computing, explore the state-of-the art platforms and the existing services, and examine the challenges and opportunities of adopting cloud computing. The unit will be organized as a series of presentations and discussions of seminal and timely research papers and articles. Students are expected to read all papers, to lead discussions on some of the papers and to complete a hands-on cloud-programming project.
COMP5427 Usability Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Skills with modelling as covered in ISYS2110 or ISYS2120 or COMP9110 or COMP9201 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Usability engineering is the systematic process of designing and evaluating user interfaces so that they are usable. This means that people can readily learn to use them efficiently, can later remember how to use them and find it pleasant to use them. The wide use of computers in many aspects of people's lives means that usability engineering is of the utmost importance.
There is a substantial body of knowledge about how to elicit usability requirements, identify the tasks that a system needs to support, design interfaces and then evaluate them. This makes for systematic ways to go about the creation and evaluation of interfaces to be usable for the target users, where this may include people with special needs. The field is extremely dynamic with the fast emergence of new ways to interact, ranging from conventional WIMP interfaces, to touch and gesture interaction, and involving mobile, portable, embedded and desktop computers.
This unit will enable students to learn the fundamental concepts, methods and techniques of usability engineering. Students will practice these in small classroom activities. They will then draw them together to complete a major usability evaluation assignment in which they will design the usability testing process, recruit participants, conduct the evaluation study, analyse these and report the results
ELEC9302 Signals and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5721 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, differential equations, and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach some of the basic properties of many engineering signals and systems and the necessary mathematical tools that aid in this process. The particular emphasis is on the time and frequency domain modeling of linear time invariant systems. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of communication, control, power systems and signal processing. A basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, differential equations, and linear algebra is assumed.
ELEC9704 Electronic Devices and Circuits

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5720 OR ELEC2104 Assumed knowledge: Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Laws; action of Current and Voltage sources; network analysis and the superposition theorem; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; inductors and capacitors, transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits; the ability to use power supplies, oscilloscopes, function generators, meters, etc. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern Electronics has come to be known as microelectronics which refers to the Integrated Circuits (ICs) containing millions of discrete devices. This course introduces some of the basic electronic devices like diodes and different types of transistors. It also aims to introduce students the analysis and design techniques of circuits involving these discrete devices as well as the integrated circuits.
Completion of this course is essential to specialize in Electrical, Telecommunication or Computer Engineering stream.
ENGG5102 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5701 Assumed knowledge: Some limited industry experience is preferred but not essential. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce graduate engineering students from all disciplines to the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial thinking. Introduction to Entrepreneurship will offer the foundation for leaders of tomorrow's high-tech companies, by providing the knowledge and skills important to the creation and leadership of entrepreneurial ventures. The focus of the unit of study is on how to launch, lead and manage a viable business starting with concept validation to commercialisation and successful business formation.
The following topics are covered: Entrepreneurship: Turning Ideas into Reality, Building the Business Plan, Creating a Successful Financial Plan, Project planning and resource management, Budgeting and managing cash flow, Marketing and advertising strategies, E-Commerce and Entrepreneurship, Procurement Management Strategies, The Legal Environment: Business Law and Government Regulation, Intellectual property: inventions, patents and copyright, Workplace, workforce and employment topics, Conflict resolution and working relationships, Ethics and Social Responsibility.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5203 Quality Engineering and Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: First degree in Engineering or a related discipline Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This subject is designed to support Engineers in the implementation of engineering tasks in the workplace. It addresses the use of quality control and management as well as systems assurance processes. It is designed to enable engineers entering practice from other related disciplines or with overseas qualifications to do so in a safe and effective way. The study program will include management of quality in research, design and delivery of engineering works and investigation, as well as of safe work practices and systems assurance.
MECH5311 Microscopy and Microanalysis of Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: AMME1362 or AMME9302 or CIVL2110. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers the fundamental knowledge that is essential for the microscopy and microanalysis of materials. The UoS will cover the basic fundamental concepts of materials structures and modern materials characterisation techniques that are available in the University, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Project units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research units during the final year of study.
Candidates achieving an average mark of 70% or higher are eligible for the Extended Capstone Project.
Extended Capstone Project candidates take Capstone Project units BMET5020 and BMET5022 (total 18 CP) in place of Capstone Project BMET5021 and 6 credit points of elective units.
BMET5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: BMET5222 or BMET5223 or BMET 5010 or AMME5020 or AMME5020 or AMME5021 or AMME5022 or AMME5222 or AMME5223 or AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results. Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
BMET5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: BMET5022 or BMET5222 or BMET5223 or BMET5010 or AMME5020 or AMME5020 or AMME5021 or AMME5022 or AMME5222 or AMME5223 or AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results. Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
BMET5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70, or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70] Prohibitions: BMET5021 or BMET5222 or BMET5223 or AMME5020 or AMME5020 or AMME5021 or AMME5022 or AMME5222 or AMME5223 or AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results. Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.

Research Pathway

Candidates achieving an average mark of 75% or higher are eligible for the Research Pathway.
Research pathway candidates take Dissertation units BMET5222 and BMET5223 (total 24 CP) in place of Capstone Project units and 12 credit points of elective units.
BMET5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET5020 or BMET5021 or BMET5022 or AMME5020 or AMME5020 or AMME5021 or AMME5022 or AMME5222 or AMME5223 or AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have achieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.
BMET5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET5020 or BMET5021 or BMET5022 or AMME5020 or AMME5020 or AMME5021 or AMME5022 or AMME5222 or AMME5223 or AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have achieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.

Major Industrial Project

Candidates undertaking the Major Industrial Project take BMET5010 in place of ENGG5217 Practical Experience, BMET5020/5021 Capstone Project A & B and 12 credit points of Elective units of study.
BMET5010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [A credit (WAM>=65) average in prior semester enrolment.] Prohibitions: BMET5020 or BMET5021 or BMET5022 or BMET5222 or BMET5223 or ENGG5217 or AMME5020 or AMME5020 or AMME5021 or AMME5022 or AMME5222 or AMME5223 or AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students achieving an average mark of 75% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study in the Year Two Table or equivalent, BMET5010 replaces BMET5222/BMET5223 Dissertation A and B and ENGG5217 Practical Experience.
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to ENGG5217 Practical Experience, BMET5020/5021 Capstone Project A and B and 12cp of specialist electives. This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site.

Exchange units

With approval of the Program Director, up to 12 credit points of Exchange units may be taken in place of other units, towards the requirements of the degree.