Sustainability and Environmental Engineering

For more information on units of study visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Master of Professional Engineering (Sustainability and Environmental Engineering)

To qualify for the award of the Master of Professional Engineering in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 144 credit points, including:
(a) 108 credit points of Core units of study
(b) ENGG5217 Practical Experience
(c) A minimum of 12 and a maximum of 24 credit points of Project units or Research pathway units of study
(d) A minimum of 18 credit points of Specialist Elective units of study (reduced to 12 credit points if undertaking the Research pathway)
(e) A maximum of 6 credit points of Elective units of study

Core units

Year One

AMME9261 Fluid Mechanics 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with first year basic maths: integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the fundamentals of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic equations governing the statics and dynamics of fluids; the ability to analyze and determine the forces applied by a static fluid; the ability to analyse fluids in motion. The course will cover both inviscid and viscous fluid flow. The course will introduce the relevant parameters for fluid flow in internal engineering systems such as pipes and pumps and external systems such as flow over wings and airfoils. Course content will cover the basic concepts such as viscosity, density, continuum, pressure, force, buoyancy and acceleration; and more detailed methods including continuity, conservation of momentum, streamlines and potential flow theory, Bernoulli equation, Euler equation, Navier-Stokes equation. Experiments will introduce flow measuring devices and flow observation.
CHNG9000 Chemical Engineering for Scientists

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: University level mathematics, calculus, linear algebra and statistics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to chemical engineering for Master of Professional Engineering students whose first degrees are in science. The unit covers the history of the chemical industry and the development of chemical engineering as a profession. Students will develop skills in written, visual and oral communication and the ability to use software tools to solve chemical engineering problems.
CHNG9103 Conservation of Mass and Energy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG1103 OR CHNG5707 Assumed knowledge: University level mathematics, calculus, linear algebra and statistics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The students should develop an understanding of and competence in the formulation and solution of material and energy balance problems in engineering; develop competence in using basic flowsheet analysis and appropriate computational tools; improve their group work and problem solving skills; gain an ability to extract a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Students will also develop a preliminary understanding in the use of process simulator (e. g. , Hysis) to formulate and solve material and energy problems around simple models of unit operations and recycles.
Mass conservation related topics include: unit systems and unit conversions; properties of solids, fluids and gases; mass balance calculations on batch and flow systems; balances on multiple units processes, balances on reactive systems, recycle, bypass and purge calculations; equilibrium compositions of reacting systems; vapour pressure and humidity. Energy conservation includes the following topics: apply the first law of thermodynamics to flow and batch systems in process industries; understand thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy and heat capacity; conduct energy balances for sensible heat changes, phase transformations and reactive processes for practical industrial systems; understand the applications of psychrometry, refrigeration, heat of formation and combustion in industry.
CHNG9201 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG5701 OR CHNG2801 Assumed knowledge: Calculus, Computations (Matlab, Excel), Mass and Energy Balances. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed for postgraduate students who should be proficient at applying the basic principles of mass, energy and momentum balances to solve advanced engineering problems involving fluid flow, heat and mass transfer. Further, students will be able to perform simple dimensional analysis and to see the utility of this general approach in engineering: for example in friction factors, heat and mass-transfer correlations. Students will also develop skills in the advanced design of different types of chemical reactors, given the corresponding chemical rate law. The focus of this unit of study is to provide the key concepts and principles as tools through keynote lectures, with supporting tutorials and laboratory sessions giving valuable hands-on experience. Guidance will be provided to students to seek additional detailed information for specific applications in their projects. This unit of study runs concurrently with another enabling technology unit of study CHNG9202. These two units together will provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle the real-life engineering problems encountered in the concurrent project-based unit of study, CHNG9203. This integrated course structure is designed to help students become familiar with the multi-disciplinary nature of chemical engineering today.
CHNG9203 Heat and Mass Transfer

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG2803 OR CHNG5703 Assumed knowledge: Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature, and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on qualitative and quantitative information. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
CHNG2803/9203 is a practically and theoretically-based course, where students will be introduced to types of problems that the modern chemical engineer may be asked to solve. The material is contemporary in nature, and the projects link with the key concepts taught in CHNG2801/9201 and CHNG2802/9202 and across the curriculum.
The objectives in this unit are to provide an interesting, enjoyable, and challenging introduction to fundamental aspects of chemical engineering, particularly conservation and transport processes involving fluids and energy, as well as to the application of mathematical techniques in typical engineering problems.
In this course there is one overall project. The overall goal of the project work throughout this semester is to build a small cooling tower. This cooling tower may be used to cool water from processes that make the water hot, to humidify air that is cold and dry (as in a Sydney winter) or to dehumidify warm wet air (as in a Sydney summer).
The overall project will be split into two sub-projects: Fluid mechanics- 4 weeks; Heat and mass transfer- 8 weeks.
The project in CHNG9203 addresses transport processes, including the movement of momentum (fluid mechanics), thermal energy (heat transfer) and components with mass. The projects are underpinned by a critical and constructive analysis and best practice in learning and teaching. In addition to the basic knowledge and skills required to pass this unit, the development of an understanding sufficient to enable you to tackle new and unfamiliar problems will be emphasized. You will learn to work in largely unsupervised groups and to be responsible for managing your individual and group performance.
CHNG9206 Separation Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG2806 OR CHNG5706 Assumed knowledge: Mass and energy balances, physical chemistry, physics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover the general principles and the development of quantitative models of separation processes based on equilibrium and rate processes. Concepts of phase equilibria, transport phenomena and mass and energy balance will be used to model the separation units. Understanding of these principles will provide the basis for analysis and preliminary design calculations of large scale separation units of importance to manufacturing industries. The principles will be applied to units operations of distillation (binary, multicomponent), solvent extraction, absorption, adsorption and membrane processes.
CIVL9010 Environmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL2010 Assumed knowledge: Strong calculus knowledge and substantial report writing skills are recommended for success in this subject, as well as the ability to program in MATLAB. Basic understanding of structural mechanics is also an advantage. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the role of civil engineers and the historical development of the profession, and relates this to the Code of Ethics - Engineers Australia; impact of engineering on the human and natural environment; energy consumption, resourcing and renewal, dealing with variability in climate; definitions and practice of sustainability; environmental assessment tools and life-cycle analyses. As graduates, students may expect to find themselves in a position which touches upon a wide variety of Engineering fields (including legal, institutional, and environmental considerations). In both small and large firms they could be acting as agents and managers of technology-driven change which has social and environmental impact. Engineering decision-making and problem-solving are made more complex by technical, economic, environmental, social and ethical constraints. The goals of this unit are to introduce students to major problems of environmental deterioration and engage students in active reflection on the role of civil engineers in addressing these issues; to develop the students skills at quantifying the impact of engineering decisions within the broader economic, environmental and socio-cultural contexts; to develop communication skills through participation in group discussions, video production and written report writing. Lectures, group discussions, case problems and projects are all used in teaching and learning in this unit of study.
ENGG9810 Introduction to Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG9801 or ENGG1801 or ENGG1810 or INFO1110 or INFO1910 or INFO1103 or INFO1903 or INFO1105 or INFO1905 or COSC1003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for engineers to learn the knowledge and skills of computer programming, using a procedural language.Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, and functions. Studentswill learn to translate a general engineering problem into a computer program. This unit trains students in the software development process, which includes programming, testing and debugging.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study covers philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It introduces methods from engineering (Process Analysis) and economics (Input-Output Analysis), and discusses current popular LCA tools. The unit places importance on practical relevance by including real-world case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes -1, -2 and -3 emissions and ISO standards. The unit of study will culminate with practical exercises using software tools to provide students with hands-on experience of preparing a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of an application of their choice. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output analysis as the basis of hybrid LCA methods.
Note: Students should select either AMME9261 Fluid Mechanics 1 or CHNG9201 Fluid Mechanics

Year Two

AMME9262 Thermal Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer; The ability to analyse the thermodynamics of a simple open or closed engineering system. The basic knowledge to analyse and design 1D thermal circuits. Course content will include concepts of heat and work, properties of substances, first law of thermodynamics, control mass and control volume analysis, thermal efficiency, entropy, second law of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, isentropic efficiency, power and refrigeration cycles, heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, 1D thermal circuits and transient heat transfer.
CHNG9204 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG2804 OR CHNG5704 Assumed knowledge: Calculus, linear algebra, numerical methods, computational tools (Matlab, Excel), basic mass and energy balances, heat transfer, mass transfer, momentum (from fluid mechanics), reaction balances. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical Engineering requires an understanding of material and energy transformations and how these are driven by molecular interactions. The rate of such transformations is dependent on driving forces and resistances, and these need to be defined in terms of fundamental physical and chemical properties of systems.
This course seeks to provide students with a sound basis of the thermodynamics of chemical and biological systems, and how these, in turn, define limits of behaviour for such real systems. The thermodynamic basis for rate processes is explored, and the role of energy transfer processes in these highlighted, along with criteria for equilibrium and stability. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of physical properties of chemical and biological systems in terms of state variables. The course delivery mechanism is problem-based, and examples from thermal, chemical and biological processes will be considered, covering molecular to macro-systems scale.
In addition, there will be considerable time spent during the semester on advanced topics related to the analysis of the behaviour of chemical and biological systems, and recent associated technological developments.
CHNG9301 Process Plant Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG5801 Assumed knowledge: CHNG9201 and CHNG9202 and CHNG9203 and CHNG9204 and CHNG9206 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a project based unit of study that aims to develop the practical skills required in process engineering with the focus on design, simulation, operation, control, and optimization of chemical and biological processes. It employs an interdisciplinary approach that applies the previously acquired knowledge of mass and heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, reaction engineering, design of unit operations, process modelling, and process control to understand the interaction between unit operations, to analyze the process flowsheet, and to carry out equipment selection and sizing for the plant.
The integrated course structure helps students develop their knowledge of integrated process design by working on miniplant design projects, involving process simulation/modelling using flowsheeting software, detailed design of plant equipment (reactor, distillation and absorption columns, pumps, piping), process modification (eg by heat integration) and process optimisation.
CHNG9302 Process Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG5802 Assumed knowledge: CHNG9202. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core chemical engineering units in second year have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The scope and importance of process control technology expands continuously with the growth of industrial automation. Knowledge of process control tools and theory is vital for chemical engineers involved in plant operation or design. This unit covers the development of linear models, control system analysis, the design and performance of feedback control systems, and the use of control related software. Skills developed in the unit include:
- Designing a feedback control system.
- Analysing the system's performance for a range of process applications using both traditional and software-based techniques.
- Designing common control enhancements.
- Appreciating the role, possibilities and limitations of process control tools and methods.
CHNG9305 Particle Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG3805 OR CHNG5805 Assumed knowledge: CHNG9201 and CHNG9202 and CHNG9204. Mass and energy balances, physical chemistry, physics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study teaches principles of particle technology and solid separation process required for chemical and biomolecular engineering.
It provides students with the tools and knowhow to tackle unit operation tasks related to chemical engineering.
It also includes project based study components including a research project on fluidisation of solid particles, a dyer design project and a lab session on chromatograph.
The integrated course structure helps students to develop a physical understanding of particle technology and solid separation process and gain the ability to solve problems of engineering significance.
CIVL5320 Engineering for Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CIVL3310 OR CIVL9310 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to provide students with an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to design and implement sustainable humanitarian engineering projects. The context for the delivery of humanitarian engineering projects are set in developing countries, disaster relief situations, indigenous communities and our societies at large. Sustainability it critical to the long term impact of any engineering project. Students will learn about how engineering fits within a range of sustainability frameworks. Systems thinking, inter-disciplinary approaches, partnerships and government policy are some of the topics that will be covered. This unit of study is the 4th year elective for Humanitarian Engineering major and is open to all undergraduate engineers who have completed the pre-requisites.
CIVL9310 Humanitarian Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Humanitarian Engineering is the application of Engineering design and organisation to improve quality of life, in circumstances where severe conditions of life are preventing the community from achieving those outcomes themselves. It can be anything from large scale infrastructure which benefits provinces to small scale innovations which benefit single families. It can be regarded as developmental aid or as disaster relief. In this unit students will study the world humanitarian sphere and its major and minor players. Students will be expected to critically analyse many of the notions which underpin humanitarian aid by use of various case studies and with reference to scholarly research. The subject will include both historical and contemporary study of engineering application in developmental aid delivered through governments, organisations and individuals. Various humanitarian theories will be studied and applied to specific cases, as well as methods of measuring success. This unit will be first offered in 2017. As well as being a requirement for the Humanitarian major, it is also available to all Civil students as a 3rd year Civil elective and to students from other disciplines as a free elective.
ENGG5204 Engineering Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Competences and experience in engineering obtained during an accepted engineering degree Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide graduate engineers studying for a Master of Professional Engineering degree with an introduction to the professional engineering skills necessary to practice as an engineer.
These include the various elements of engineering practice, an understanding of the role of the engineer in industry, basic knowledge of the law of contracts and legal responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, an understanding of the professional responsibilities of engineers, competence in verbal communication and presentations and in reading and writing reports, and an understanding of ethical considerations. The material, learning and assessment is tailored for graduates from Australian and overseas universities.
Note: Students should select either AMME9262 Thermal Engineering 1 or CHNG9204 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics.

Year Three

ENGG5102 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5701 Assumed knowledge: Some limited industry experience is preferred but not essential. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce graduate engineering students from all disciplines to the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial thinking. Introduction to Entrepreneurship will offer the foundation for leaders of tomorrow's high-tech companies, by providing the knowledge and skills important to the creation and leadership of entrepreneurial ventures. The focus of the unit of study is on how to launch, lead and manage a viable business starting with concept validation to commercialisation and successful business formation.
The following topics are covered: Entrepreneurship: Turning Ideas into Reality, Building the Business Plan, Creating a Successful Financial Plan, Project planning and resource management, Budgeting and managing cash flow, Marketing and advertising strategies, E-Commerce and Entrepreneurship, Procurement Management Strategies, The Legal Environment: Business Law and Government Regulation, Intellectual property: inventions, patents and copyright, Workplace, workforce and employment topics, Conflict resolution and working relationships, Ethics and Social Responsibility.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
CHNG9306 Risk Management for Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHNG3806 OR CHNG5806 Assumed knowledge: CHNG9201 and CHNG9202 and CHNG9203 and CHNG9204and CHNG9206. Mass and energy balances, physical chemistry, physics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop an appreciation of project and risk management practice of process systems for chemical and process engineering. It employs a holistic approach to management covering vital concepts in project management, technical risk assessment and decision making, economic evaluation and financial risk assessment, and project design optimization.
It provides students with the experience and working knowledge to solve real world engineering problems in process-led and product-driven industries.
By the end of this unit of study a student should be competent in: preparing a resume for use in employment applications; developing project work plans in conjunction with project management schedules; performing economic evaluations of projects, plans and processes; performing qualitative and quantitative risk assessments of projects, plans and processes; exploring optimization of complex processes under risk and uncertainty, covering unit operations, business units, enterprises and value chains.
ENGG5217 Practical Experience

Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG5205 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed one year of their MPE program before enrolling in this unit.
The 3 year MPE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students can undertake their work experience in the final year of the MPE program (Year 3). Students may have prior work in an Engineering field carried out on completion of their undergraduate degree accepted as meeting the requirements of this component.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to inform the Faculty of any work arrangements by emailing the Graduate School of Engineering and Information Technologies. Assessment in this unit is by the submission of a portfolio containing written reports on the involvement with industry. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience portfolio web site http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml
Note: Students should select either ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis or CHNG9306 Risk Management for Chemical Engineering

Specialist Elective units

Candidates must complete a minimum of 18 credit points from the following Specialist Elective units of study:
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites where students will be introduced to climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Completion of 72 cp in science, engineering or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5004 Particles and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that students have acquired knowledge equivalent to CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Particles and Surfaces: Mineral Processing. Aims and Objectives: Solid-solid and solid-liquid interactions are an important aspect in mineral processing. The aim of any mineral processing operation is the efficient extraction of the valuable metals or minerals (concentrate) from the waste materials in the ore (gangue). The goal of this course is to understand the various key steps and the corresponding principles required to achieve metal extraction from the ores.
Syllabus summary: This course will elucidate the principles in size reduction or comminution of the ore in liberating the valuable minerals, examine the microscopic details of solid-liquid, solid-gas and solid-solid interactions in mineral processing and their roles in macroscopic phenomena such as adhesion, wetting, adsorption, and mineral reactions such as reduction roasting and leaching. The general understanding of these factors will allow manipulation and improvement of performance in mineral beneficiation, dewatering of mineral slurries and extractive metallurgy.
By the end of this course students should develop a proficiency in characterisation of physical, surface and chemical properties of solids and metal aqueous streams; devising strategies to achieve extraction process objectives, within the constraints imposed by social, economic and physical environments, developing management strategies for treating liquid and solid effluents and becoming familiar with computer software packages in modelling aqueous and solid systems. This unit is an advanced Chemical Engineering elective.
CHNG5005 Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of mass and energy balances, mathematics, process design, biochemical processes, and particle mechanics at a level typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to material covered in CHNG1103 AND CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3804 AND CHNG3805. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Key learning objectives are to provide students with an overview of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used.
The key issues considered are: wastewater characterisation; the cost of wastewater treatment and disposal; the (Australian) regulatory framework; primary, secondary and tertiary treatment options; solids management and water reuse; process integration; an introduction to process simulation.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used (equivalent to CHNG5005) OR the principles of biochemical engineering and their application in engineering (equivalent to CHNG3804). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 12cp CHEM2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5601 Membrane Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Membrane Science" provides background in the physics and electrochemistry of a variety of synthetic membranes used in industry as well as cellular membranes.
The course aims to develop students' understanding of:
- membrane self-assembly and manufacture;
- membrane separation processes such as filtration, desalination, ion exchange and water-splitting;
- and techniques for membrane characterisation and monitoring.
CHNG5604 Advanced Membrane Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: The physics and electrochemistry of synthetic and cellular membranes. Knowledge of membrane manufacture, membrane separation processes and membrane characterisation and monitoring. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to CHNG5601. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a practical unit of study where students apply the theoretical concepts of membrane science to engineering practice via a series of laboratory experiments. The students will gain practical insights into mass transport processes through various membranes. Students will understand the construction and functional properties of synthetic separation membranes and also will explore experimentally the various factors affecting the performance of membranes.
CIVL5351 Geoenvironmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Geoenvironmental Engineering is an applied science concerned with the protection of soil and aquifers from human activities. It can be divided into 2 main branches: waste containment and treatment of pollution sites. The former is usually a preventative activity, whereas the latter is corrective, i.e., it occurs after pollution has taken place. Geoenvironmental Engineering draws on fundamental science, especially fluid flow and contaminant migration in soil and the physics and chemistry of low-permeability material such as clay. The goal of CIVL5351 is to introduce you to the science behind Geoenvironmental Engineering and develop your skills at designing barrier systems for groundwater protection.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Analyse flow regime in saturated and unsaturated soils using Darcy¿s Law; 2. Analyse contaminant migration in soil using coupled flow and reactive diffusion-advection equations; 3. Describe the main processes of clay-water interactions and their influence on behaviour of barrier systems; 4. Design a contaminant barrier system satisfying groundwater quality requirements; 5. Assess the feasibility of waste-to-energy conversion; 6. Conduct research on a geoenvironmental topic; 7. Build simulation models and appraise quality of their predictions.
Syllabus Summary: introduction to geoenvironmental engineering; integrated waste management and life cycle assessment; soil composition and mineralogy; types and characteristics of contaminants; theory of water seepage in saturated and unsaturated soils; theory of reactive contaminant transport in soil including molecular diffusion, mechanical dispersion and advective flow; analytical and numerical solutions of reactive diffusion advection equation; design of barrier systems; geosynthetics and geomembranes; defects and leakage rates; methane generation in landfills and waste-to-energy potential.
CIVL5670 Reservoir, Stream and Coastal Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit of study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, natural river systems will be discussed, and the principles of sediment transport and scour, monitoring and management will be introduced. The basic equations for linear and nonlinear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
CIVL6665 Advanced Water Resources Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5665 Assumed knowledge: CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The objective of this unit of study is to introduce students and professionals to water resources engineering. The aim of this unit is to provide an understanding of one or more aspects related to: hydrologic cycle from the broadest perspective, physical, chemical and biological characterization of water, how to change the water quality parameters, water quality control and management, water quality in the environment, nutrient and contaminant cycling and removal, water treatment methods for drinking, wastewater and groundwater, conservation/reuse/treatment techniques, desalination, stormwater, bioremediation and phytoremediation techniques. The topics mentioned above may be covered in both a qualitative and quantitative aspect depending on the subject of the project in this year. A basic level of integral and differential calculus is required as well as knowledge and use of calculation software such as Excel and Matlab, and micro-controlling systems and boards.
ELEC5206 Sustainable Energy Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A background in power electronics converters and control theory such as that covered in ELEC3204/9204 and ELEC3304/9304 is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many sustainable energy technologies including hybrid cars, photovoltaic energy systems, efficient power supplies, and energy-conserving control systems have at their heart intelligent, high-power electronics. This unit examines this technology and uses sustainable-tech examples to teach the engineering principles of modeling, optimization, analysis, simulation, and design. Topics include power converter topologies, periodic steady-state analysis, control, motors and drives, photovoltaic systems, and design of magnetic components. The unit involves a hands-on laboratory and a substantial final project.

Elective units

Candidates may complete a maximum of 6 credit points from the following Elective units of study:
CHNG5001 Process Systems Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000 level physics and mathematics (differential equations). Use of mathematical and/or computer-based modelling tools and techniques. Feedback control concepts and principles as taught in CHNG3802/CHNG9302 or similar courses. Students who are unsure about meeting these requirements should contact the unit coordinator for advice. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Whatever its purpose, any process requires some level of process monitoring and control to allow it to operate satisfactorily. Once a process is under control, the option exists to further improve performance via the implementation of some level of optimisation. This unit will develop skills in integrating process modelling, simulation, design, optimisation and control concepts. The aims of this unit are (i) to demonstrate that modelling, process control and optimisation are integral concepts in the overall consideration of industrial plants, (ii) to demonstrate that a unified approach allows a diversity of application fields to be readily handled, and (iii) to allow each student to achieve and demonstrate acceptable competency over the unit material through a range of individual and group-based activities.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used (equivalent to CHNG5005) OR the principles of biochemical engineering and their application in engineering (equivalent to CHNG3804). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CIVL5670 Reservoir, Stream and Coastal Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit of study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, natural river systems will be discussed, and the principles of sediment transport and scour, monitoring and management will be introduced. The basic equations for linear and nonlinear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
CIVL9612 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CIVL9201 AND CIVL9611 AND (ENGG9802 OR CIVL9802). This unit of study follows on from Fluid Mechanics CIVL9611, which provides the essential fundamental fluid mechanics background and theory, and is assumed to be known and fully understood. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the conservation of mass and momentum in differential forms for viscous fluid flows. It provides the foundation for advanced study of turbulence, flow around immersed bodies, open channel flow, pipe flow and pump design.
CIVL9614 Hydrology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CIVL9611 Assumed knowledge: (CIVL9802 or ENGG9802) AND CIVL9612 AND MATH2061 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The overall objective of this unit of study is to give a general introduction to water resources, how these are linked the hydrological processes, and how engineering plays a role in the management of water resources. The aim of this unit is to provide a detailed understanding of: the hydrologic cycle of water as a whole and its specific components including: geophysical flows of water throughout the environment, dynamics of precipitation formations, transformations into runoff, reservoir and lake dynamics, stream flow discharge, surface runoff assessment, calculation of peak flows, the hydrograph theory, ground water flows, aquifers dynamics, concept of water quality and water treatment methods and units. The topics mentioned above will be covered in both qualitative and quantitative aspects. Use will be made of essential concepts of energy, mass and momentum conservation. An intermediate level of integral and differential calculus is required as well as knowledge and use of calculation software such as Excell and Matlab.
CSYS5010 Introduction to Complex Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Globalisation, rapid technological advances, the development of integrated and distributed systems, cross-disciplinary technical collaboration, and the emergence of "evolved" (as opposed to designed) systems are some of the reasons why many systems have begun to be described as complex systems in recent times. Complex technological, biological, socio-economic and socio-ecological systems (power grids, communication and transport systems, food webs, megaprojects, and interdependent civil infrastructure) are composed of large numbers of diverse interacting parts and exhibit self-organisation and/or emergent behaviour. This unit will introduce the basic concepts of "complex systems theory", and focus on methods for the quantitative analysis and modelling of collective emergent phenomena, using diverse computational approaches such as agent-based modelling and simulation, cellular automata, bio-inspired algorithms, and game theory. Students will gain theoretical knowledge of complex adaptive systems, coupled with practical skills in computational simulation and forecasting using a range of modern toolkits.
INFC7000 Inventing the Future

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be experienced in their own discipline at a postgraduate level. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must be able to start in the first week and commit to the full semester. Students must be at a postgraduate level within their own faculty. An application form will be required to be completed to ensure appropriate fit for students to this style of Unit. The Unit is designed for high achieving students and is not suitable for all students. The application form is designed to ensure students who undertake this unit are suitable for such a program.
This is an interdisciplinary unit, that would be jointly run by the faculties of Science, Engineering, Business, Architecture, Design and Planning. It is aimed at high achieving post-graduate students from these faculties, to provide them with high level skills in research translation, design and innovation. Student teams are a given a real product brief, of social and economic importance, and aligned with areas of university research. They must respond to this brief, producing a working prototype product and business case.
MECH9261 Fluid Mechanics 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AMME9261 OR AMME9200 Prohibitions: MECH8261 Assumed knowledge: Linear Mathematics, Vector Calculus, Differential Equations and Fourier Series Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the theory and practice of fluid mechanics in the context of mechanical engineering. At the end of this unit students will have the ability to critically assess and solve problems commonly found in fluid mechanics practice, such as sizing pumps and piping systems, designing channels, and determining the lift and drag characteristics of submerged bodies. Additionally, they will develop a structured and systematic approach to problem solving. Course content will include dimensionless analysis, Bernoulli equation, pipe flow, frictional losses, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, open channel flow and hydraulic jump, lift and drag, compressible flow and shock waves, turbomachinery.

Project units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research units during the final year of study.
Candidates achieving an average mark of 70% or higher are eligible for the Extended Capstone Project.
Extended Capstone Project candidates take Capstone Project units CHNG5020 and CHNG5022 (total 18 cp) in place of Capstone Project CHNG5020, CHNG5021 and 6 cp of elective units, or CIVL5020 and CIVL5022 (total 18 cp) in place of CIVL5020 and CIVL5021 and 6 credit points of elective units.
CHNG5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 OR CHNG5205 Assumed knowledge: (CHNG9301 OR CHNG5801) AND (CHNG9302 OR CHNG5802) AND (CHNG9303 OR CHNG5803) AND (CHNG9305 OR CHNG5805) AND (CHNG9306 OR CHNG5806). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Minimum 12 A and B) run over two semesters. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG5020 Prohibitions: CHNG5022 OR CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 OR CHNG5205 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that Capstone Project A has been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Minimum 12 A and B) run over two semesters. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70, or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70, or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Corequisites: CHNG5020 Prohibitions: CHNG5021 OR CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission required for semester 1 or 2 based on achievement in Capstone Project A and taking other program requirements into consideration.
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Capstone Project A and B/B extended) run in first and second semester. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Capstone Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion - typically 1 hour per week. Capstone Project B extended enables the student to undertake a project of greater scope and depth than capstone project B.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CIVL5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: CIVL5222 OR CIVL5223 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to conduct original research. Students will generally work individually and an individual thesis must be submitted by each student.
Capstone Project is a major task and is to be conducted with work spread over most of the year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Capstone Project A (CIVL5020) and Capstone Project B (CIVL5021). This particular unit of study, which must precede CIVL5021 Capstone Project B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete Capstone Project. In particular, it should include almost all planning of a research or investigation project, a major proportion of the necessary literature review (unless the entire project is based on a literature review and critical analysis), and a significant proportion of the investigative work required of the project.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CIVL5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CIVL5020 Prohibitions: CIVL5222 OR CIVL5223 OR CIVL5022 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to conduct original research. Students will generally work individually and an individual thesis must be submitted by each student.
Capstone Project is a major task and is to be conducted with work spread over most of the year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Capstone Project A (CIVL5020) and Capstone Project B (CIVL5021). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with CIVL5020 Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete Capstone Project. In particular, it should include completion of all components of the research or investigation project planned but not undertaken or completed in CIVL5020 Capstone Project A.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CIVL5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70 or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: CIVL5021 OR CIVL5222 OR CIVL5223 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to conduct original research. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of the thesis will be done individually; i. e. , a separate thesis must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
Capstone Project is a major task and is to be conducted with work spread over most of the year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Capstone Project A (CIVL5020) and Capstone Project B (CIVL5021) or this unit Capstone Project B extended (CIVL5022) worth 12 credit points. This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with CIVL5020 Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete Capstone Project. In particular, it should include completion of all components of the research or investigation project planned but not undertaken or completed in CIVL5020 Capstone Project A.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.

Research Pathway

Candidates achieving an average mark of 75% or higher are eligible for the Research Pathway.
Research pathway candidates take Dissertation units CHNG5222 and CHNG5223 (total 24 cp) or CIVL5222 and CIVL5223 (total 24 cp) in place of Capstone Project units and 12 cp of elective or specialist elective units.
CHNG5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG5220 OR ENGG5221 OR CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR CHNG5022 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CHNG5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG5222 Prohibitions: ENGG5220 OR ENGG5221 OR CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR CHNG5022 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CIVL5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5020 OR CIVL5021 OR CIVL5022 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CIVL5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5020 OR CIVL5021 OR CIVL5022 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.

ESIPS-MIPPS (Engineering Sydney Industry Placement Scheme)

ESIPS candidates take CHNG5205 Major Industrial Project Placement (24 credit points) in place of the Engineering Project units (12 credit points) plus two of the electives from the Specialist Units of Study.
CHNG5205 Major Industrial Placement Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Passed at least 48 credit points in Master of professional engineering with adequate foundation knowledge in discipline. Students wishing to do this unit of study should contact the Head of School prior to enrolment. Prohibitions: CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR ENGG5217 OR CHNG9402 OR CHNG5112 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment by permission only. The students enrolled in this subject should have completed the first year Master of Professional Engineering with specialisation in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and a minimum credit average. The candidate will be selected by interview and at the discretion of the Head of School. Students enrolled in this subject are exempted from completing Chemical Engineering Design A (CHNG9402), Capstone Project A and B (CHNG5020 and CHNG5021) and one of the electives from the Specialist Units of Study that students are expected to take in the first semester of the second year. This exemption is granted because students are exposed to the core aspects of these courses through practical exercises undertaken during the MIPPS placement. While undertaking MIPPS, students have a unique opportunity to see and experience the industrial environment around them, in a manner which is not available at University. MIPPS students are required to enroll in Chemical Engineering Design B (CHNG9406) in the following semester.
The purpose of this proposal is to introduce a new subject into the Master of Professional Engineering with specialisation in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. The new subject is designed to equip students with practical experience in the area of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Industrial project placement will clearly cover and widen the practical nature of curriculum base studies.
This unit of study will give students a rich experience for undertaking a major project in an industrial environment and developing skills in the preparation and presentation of technical reports. The project is performed under industry supervision supported by School staff and extends over one semester. The students will be engaged full time on the project at the industrial site. Students will be placed with industries, such as mining, oil and gas processing, plastic and paint manufacturing, food production, wastewater and water treatment. The students will learn essential engineering skills, such as how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, project management, and analysis of results and assess these with theory and existing knowledge.

Exchange units

With approval of the Program Director, up to 12 credit points of Exchange units may taken in place of other units, towards the requirements of the degree.