Advanced Coursework Table S Electives

Semester 2 2020 unit of study availability

Some Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences units of study originally intended to run in Semester 2, 2020 are no longer available.

A full and up-to-date list of units of study available in Semester 2, 2020 from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, can be found on this webpage.
 

Errata
Item Errata Data
1.

Session have changed for the following unit. S2CIAU Intensive August session has been closed and a new S2CISE Intensive September session has been opened:

SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

22/06/2020
Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Table S 4000-level Elective Units

Units of study
FASS4901
Advanced Industry and Community Project A
6    A Depth of knowledge in at least one discipline (major).
C FASS4902
Intensive February
Intensive July
FASS4902
Advanced Industry and Community Project B
6    A Depth of knowledge in at least one discipline (major).
C FASS4901
Semester 1
Semester 2
NEUR4001
Advanced Seminars in Neuroscience
6    A Advanced knowledge of the structure and function of multicellular organisms, or a background in bioengineering or biophysics or biodesign.
P 144 credit points of units of study, including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level.
Semester 2
PSYC4004
Applied Psychology in the Workplace
6    A Students should have the ability to read and interpret findings from scientific research, and have a basic familiarity with the empirical process.
P 144 cp of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study
N PSYC4730
Semester 1
PSYC4005
Coaching Skills for Work and Life
6    A Students should have the ability to read and interpret findings from scientific research, and have a basic familiarity with the empirical process.
P 144 cp of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study
N PSYC4721 or PSYC4722
Semester 2
PSYC4006
Positive Psychology, Resilience and Happiness
6    A Students should have the ability to read and interpret findings from scientific research, and have a basic familiarity with the empirical process.
P 144 cp of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study
N PSYC4730 or PSYC4723
Semester 1
SCIE4001
Science Communication
6    A Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications.
P 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A.


Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
Semester 1
SCIE4002
Experimental Design and Data Analysis
6    A Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level.
P 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A.
N ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12
Intensive March
SCIE4003
Ethics in Science
6    A Successful completion of a Science major.
P 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A
N HSBH3004 or HPSC3107
Intensive August
Intensive March
The following units will not run in 2020: PSYC4004, PSYC4006.

Table S 4000-level Elective Units

Units of study
FASS4901 Advanced Industry and Community Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: 1x3hr workshop/week Corequisites: FASS4902 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one discipline (major). Assessment: 1x1500wd Individual statement (20%), 1x2500wd Group proposal (40%), 1x20mins Group proposal presentation (20%), 1x Group participation mark (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit students work collaboratively in interdisciplinary teams on authentic, complex problem-based projects developed with project partners. Students will conduct self-directed research to address industry problems or identify industry opportunities which will provide context for their final recommendations. The unit will enhance a student's problem-solving ability through experiential evidence-based teaching approaches focused on project management, professional conduct, reflective practices and collaboration. This experience will equip students with a toolkit to become more adaptive and agile in responding to dynamic industry and community organisational environments.
FASS4902 Advanced Industry and Community Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr workshop/week Corequisites: FASS4901 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one discipline (major). Assessment: 1x1500wd Individual statement (20%), 1x5000wd Final group report (40%), 1x20mins Final group presentation (20%), 1x Group participation mark (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students work collaboratively in interdisciplinary teams on authentic, complex problem-based projects developed with project partners. Students will conduct self-directed research to address industry problems or identify industry opportunities which will provide context for their final recommendations. The unit will enhance a student's problem-solving ability through experiential evidence-based teaching approaches focused on project management, professional conduct, reflective practices and collaboration. This experience will equip students with a toolkit to become more adaptive and agile in responding to dynamic industry and community organisational environments.
NEUR4001 Advanced Seminars in Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 2-hr seminar per week for 8 weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study, including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level. Assumed knowledge: Advanced knowledge of the structure and function of multicellular organisms, or a background in bioengineering or biophysics or biodesign. Assessment: class participation (20%), 1500-wd written assignment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research in neuroscience has made tremendous advances in our understanding of the nervous system and its function in health and disease, however we are still far from fully understanding the form and function of the billions of neurons and the trillions of synapses that make up the brain and spinal cord. This unit is designed to introduce you to cutting edge issues in neuroscience Topics will include imaging pain, emotions, cortical development and plasticity, colour vision, addiction and stress, memory and cognitive processing, neuropsychiatric conditions and neurodegenerative disorders. This unit of study will use small group lectures, seminar groups and short research-based projects to engage students in authentic enquiry. You will be encouraged to explore several specific areas of neuroscience research and develop analytic skills and thinking about the processes and methods of doing neuroscience and engage you in debate and discussion, rather than learn facts. You will shape opinion by listening to the ideas of others and improve your skills and insights into problem solving. You will present your views and ideas, listen to those of others and through this appreciate divergent thinking.
PSYC4004 Applied Psychology in the Workplace

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Grant Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial 1 hr/week Prerequisites: 144 cp of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study Prohibitions: PSYC4730 Assumed knowledge: Students should have the ability to read and interpret findings from scientific research, and have a basic familiarity with the empirical process. Assessment: online tutorial quiz (15%), class participation (10%), reflective report (50%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Most of us will spend at least one third of our lives in the workplace. Psychology has given us considerable insights into how people think, feel and behave as they do, and this has great implications for the workplace. Workplace psychology, sometimes called business psychology, refers to the practice of applying psychological principles and practices to a work environment. The goal is to identify and solve problems, increase employee satisfaction and well-being, improve workplace dynamics and to generally make the workplace a better place in which to spend one third of your life. In this unit of study there will be a particular focus on using positive psychology in the workplace. You will be equipped to use psychological principles in the workplace to make the workplace a more productive, fairer and a more need-satisfying experience. Drawing on Self-determination Theory you will explore the concept of the Positive Built Workplace Environment and how the interface between leadership, building design and workplace culture can produce sustainable, flourishing workplaces. You will also explore issues like overcoming procrastination and increasing productivity; positively influencing and leading people in organisations; the formation of effective teams; the psychology of negotiation and conflict resolution; facilitating wellness; preventing stress and burnout; psychopaths in the workplace and the creation of positive workplace experiences. You will also cover issues such as the evaluation of positive workplace interventions with data collection methods including questionnaires, surveys, focus groups, interviews and case studies. This theoretically-grounded but very practical unit of study gives you the tools to enhance the work experiences of yourself and others.
PSYC4005 Coaching Skills for Work and Life

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Grant Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial 1 hr Prerequisites: 144 cp of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study Prohibitions: PSYC4721 or PSYC4722 Assumed knowledge: Students should have the ability to read and interpret findings from scientific research, and have a basic familiarity with the empirical process. Assessment: online tutorial quiz (15%), class participation (10%), reflective report (50%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coaching skills are now an essential part of the contemporary workplace. Research shows that the ability to coach self and others is one of the most important skills for employees, managers and leaders. However, to date, opportunities for learning evidence-based coaching skills at universities has been very limited. By completing this unit you will develop a solid understanding of the psychology of coaching in the workplace, in organisations and in relation to personal life matters and the ability to apply such theories in real life situations. We will explore the theoretical foundations of the psychology of coaching including self-regulation theory, goal theory, change theory and solution-focused approaches to coaching and show how to apply these to real-life issues and goals. Students will leave with a portfolio of applied coaching skills, the ability to conduct both formal and informal coaching conversations, the ability to evaluate and create conceptually coherent coaching processes and having experienced a personal coaching program. Active learning in the form of peer coaching is central to this program and will guide students to integrate their developing knowledge, skills and values about coaching in ways that question and build understanding. Students need to be prepared and willing to engage in peer coaching conversations.
PSYC4006 Positive Psychology, Resilience and Happiness

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anthony Grant Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial 1 hr/week Prerequisites: 144 cp of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study Prohibitions: PSYC4730 or PSYC4723 Assumed knowledge: Students should have the ability to read and interpret findings from scientific research, and have a basic familiarity with the empirical process. Assessment: online tutorial quiz (15%), class participation (10%), reflective report (50%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The search for happiness and well-being is ubiquitous. Humans crave a sense of well-being, and resilience in the face of hardships has been a prized attribute since time immemorial. However, it is only relatively recently that psychology has turned its attention to the scientific exploration of well-being, resilience, happiness and the life well-lived. This unit of study teaches skills and pathways for cultivating wellbeing, resilience and happiness in individuals, groups, organisations and communities as a whole. The teaching in this unit advocates scientific methods and promotes critical thinking and analysis of key facets of positive psychology. We will explore the theoretical perspectives and conceptual frameworks that underpin positive psychology. The related empirical research will be examined and critiqued in order to identify best practice interventions and to facilitate the utilisation of this knowledge into effective real world methods. Active learning is a central feature of this unit. Students will be expected to apply positive psychology principles in their own lives and to reflect on these experiences. A wide range of learning approaches will be used including: debates, role plays, case studies, and reflective journal entries. These will form part of the learning and assessment activities.
SCIE4001 Science Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice E Motion Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2-3 hrs/week, workshops 1-2hrs/week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Assumed knowledge: Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications. Assessment: seminar/workshop attendance and completion of 'course notebook' (10%; individual), written article communicating science topic to specific audience (25%; individual), illustrating science (sound/figure/animation/diagram etc; 15%), 3 minute presentation of science topic to specific audience (25%; individual), group report (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough". This quote is widely attributed to Albert Einstein, but regardless of its provenance, it suggests that one measure of an expert's knowledge can be found in their ability to translate complex ideas so that they are accessible to anyone. The communication of science to the public is essential for science and society. In order to increase public understanding and appreciation of science, researchers must be able to explain their results, and the wider context of their research, to non-experts. This unit will explore some theoretical foundations of science communications, identify outstanding practitioners and empower students to produce effective science communication in different media. In this unit you will learn the necessary skills and techniques to tell engaging and informative science stories in order to bring complex ideas to life, for non-expert audiences. By undertaking this unit you will develop a greater understanding of the wider context of your honours unit, advance your communication skills and be able to explain your honours research to non-expert audiences such as friends, family or future employers. These transferable skills will equip you for future research - where emphasis is increasingly placed on public communication and/or outreach - or professional pathways - where effective communication of complex ideas is highly valued.
SCIE4002 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 4 x 1 hr lectures/week, for six weeks, either online or face-to-face and 1 x 2 hour workshop/week for six weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Prohibitions: ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level. Assessment: design critique (20%), research plan (30%), analysis critique (20%), 2 x analysis quizzes (15% each) Mode of delivery: Block mode
An indispensable attribute of an effective scientific researcher is the ability to collect, analyse and interpret data. Central to this process is the ability to create hypotheses and test these by using rigorous experimental designs. This modular unit of study will introduce the key concepts of experimental design and data analysis. Specifically, you will learn to formulate experimental aims to test a specific hypothesis. You will develop the skills and understanding required to design a rigorous scientific experiment, including an understanding of concepts such as controls, replicates, sample size, dependent and independent variables and good research practice (e. g. blinding, randomisation). By completing this unit you will develop the knowledge and skills required to appropriately analyse and interpret data in order to draw conclusions in the context of an advanced research project. From this unit of study, you will emerge with a comprehensive understanding of how to optimise the design and analysis of an experiment to most effectively answer scientific questions.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: part a: lecture/seminars 4hr/week for 3 weeks, in which all students participate, followed by two modules, part b (human ethics) and part c (animal ethics), from which students select one; each module comprises 8 hours of workshops over 1-2 weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major. Assessment: essay (40%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.
The following units will not run in 2020: PSYC4004, PSYC4006.