Dalyell Stream Descriptions

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.
 

Table D - Dalyell Stream

Students must be enrolled in the Dalyell stream to take Dalyell stream units.
Achievement of the Dalyell stream requires 12 credit points of Dalyell units from this table.
Students in the Dalyell stream may take Dalyell units offered by any faculty.
Units of study
The units of study are listed below.

Arts and Social Sciences

FASS2100 Ideas and Movements that Changed the World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: 4x500wd Reponse Papers (40%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), Seminar Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is committed to deep thinking and learning through engaging with six topics and seven or so key texts with the focus on closely reading these texts. The texts examine ideas across a range of cultures. Ideas and debates regarding feminism, aboriginality, racism, power, identity, narcissism, nationalism, and music will be discussed via these texts. Also movements such as the aboriginal and civil rights movements will be explored as will the revolutionary communist and punk movements. The overall aim of the unit is to make a case for the benefits of broad reading and engaging with ideas, and how doing so can help us think more creatively and in less restricted ways. FASS2100 can be taken before, after, or independently of FASS2200.
FASS2200 Great Books that Changed the World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: 4x500wd Response Papers (40%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), Seminar Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Guided by experts from across the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, students will learn how to interrogate, analyse and respond to a range of internationally significant texts in the humanities and social sciences, from both ancient and modern eras. Weekly lectures will be followed by seminars where an emphasis will be placed on detailed group discussion. Authors and texts covered in the unit will vary from year to year, but will include ancient works as the Iliad and the Epic of Gilgamesh, alongside such modern texts as Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed and Elena Ferrante's My Brilliant Friend.
FASS2300 Asian Economic Community

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr in-lecture tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECOS2025 Assumed knowledge: Must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: 1x1.5hr final exam (40%), 1x1000wd equivalent online quiz (10%), 1x2000wd review essay (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop our understanding of major issues concerning Asian economic community and its prospects. Students will study both contemporary and historical developments in various Asian economies from a multidisciplinary perspective. For a deeper and broader understanding, the unit will consider non-economic factors such as geopolitical, cultural and social influences that interact with economic policies and outcomes in the region. This is achieved by bringing guest lecturers of varying expertise who will share their insights and knowledge. This unit will also assess the prospects and preconditions required for a viable and prosperous regional economic community in Asia.

Business School

BUDL2901 Ideas: The Art and Craft of Co-Creation

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February Classes: blended approach; lectures; tutorials; online Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is offered in the intensive February session which means it commences prior to the start of Semester 1. Assessment: short essay (20%); long essay (35%); tutorial/online participation (20%); group presentation (based on text and long essay) (25%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Creative ideas are the first spark of innovation. They thrive if groups can harness their diversity of skills, experiences and perspectives as a shared resource. In this unit, we learn how to lead co-creative teamwork. We take inspiration from pioneering changemakers and their new ways of working. Together, we create through hands-on experimentation, exploration, and play. We question assumptions, imagine, design, prototype, and synthesise towards an outcome. Drawing on the latest research, we discuss how to reinvent businesses as collaborative communities and how good relationships are crucial prerequisites for responding entrepreneurially to our fast-changing world. The unit is based on an experiential and self-reflective pedagogy that helps us consciously understand and change our role in co-creative settings.
BUDL2902 Innovation in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Blended approach; lectures; tutorials; online Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is offered in the intensive January session, which means it commences prior to the start of Semester 1. Assessment: reflective essay (20%); elevator pitch (25%); group assignment (40%); group presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
A creative idea becomes an innovation when it undergoes a transformative process to make it practical. Innovation is the driving force that underpins long-term organisational growth and competitiveness. An innovative and innovating organisation brings new ideas to life in all aspects of its operation to address the needs of internal and external stakeholders. We walk the path to understanding innovation, its different forms and its management. Through case studies and workshops, we learn to identify different types of innovations and how organisations and their stakeholders can benefit from them. Working in multidisciplinary teams, we learn to identify opportunities for innovation, create and design innovative solutions for some of the most pressing issues in different types of organisations. We draw on multidisciplinary insights and employ practice-based design thinking solutions to address key organisational problems and challenges.
BUDL3901 Unravelling Complex Problems

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5x 4-hr seminars for 2 weeks intensive mode Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is offered in the intensive January session, which means it commences prior to the start of Semester 1. Assessment: conceptual foundations (20%); case analysis (30%); ideas paper and poster pitch (20%); enquiry piece (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
There is often no single, one-size-fits-all solution to problems. This is because our complex world is dynamic and interdependent, where multiple stakeholders with competing interests are deeply and widely interconnected. We need to make decisions in this complex, rapidly changing context with incomplete information. Solving complex problems requires not only innovative thinking, but also a multidisciplinary perspective that draws on higher-order thinking. Guided by complex systems theory and higher-level analytical approaches, we engage in the process of enquiry to grasp the complexity of some of the world¿s wickedest problems. We draw on strategic thinking, systems thinking, design thinking, and other higher-order thinking skills to help in the understanding and solutioning of complex problems. In cross-disciplinary teams, we devise different ways of insightfully tackling major issues and proposing innovative and practical approaches for positive social change.
BUDL3902 Disruption for Sustainable Futures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive December,Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must be in the must be enrolled in the Dalyell stream to enrol in this unit.
A key consideration in crafting solutions to problems is sustainability. Sustainability-driven innovations improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and wellbeing of organisations, societies, and the world in the long run. This can be achieved by integrating social, economic and environmental dimensions into the solution. Sustainable innovations meet current needs without disrupting or compromising future welfare.
We explore global grand challenges that require novel and cutting-edge solutions. In examining the various forces driving major trends and movements in the global landscape, we gain key insights into how and why the world is changing. Highlighting the role of responsible organisations and institutions in fostering sustainable development, we investigate how current and future innovations across industries can be harnessed to take on our world¿s grand challenges. In pushing the boundaries of innovation, we contribute new perspectives on how we can pave multiple pathways towards our collective sustainable future.

Engineering

ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Prohibitions: ENGG1111 OR INFO1111 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is designed to introduce Dalyell students to the essential professional skills of leadership, communication, problem identification and solution, design, teamwork, project management and understanding of the social, cultural, global, ethical and environment responsibilities of emerging servant leaders by applying both technical and non-technical skills to real world challenges. The course ends with a Rapid Response Challenge where a number of organisations provide challenges to student teams who will work on the challenge for 10 days and present back to the company. This is all complemented by industry and academic mentors throughout the course. Through the course students learn how to lead themselves, lead a project team and attempt to contribute to society and lead change.
ENGD2001 Protecting People Who Use Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit takes an interdisciplinary approach to think strategically about a selection of key issues that emerge from human-technology interactions. This unit shows how the human-technology interface impacts on what people do with technology (whether a computer program, or a physical equipment), and especially on mistakes that might be made, which can threaten physical safety, social well-being, privacy, and other human needs. The unit will analyse risks that arise from poor or malicious interface design, how one can evaluate these risks, some different ways to limit the risks, and the ethical implications of this. Students will learn about physiological, cognitive, social and cultural aspects of human interaction; diversity among people (including cultural norms etc) impacting both what they aim to do, and how they 'read' instructions, discover affordances and actually use systems. The unit deals with fairness, accountability and transparency of sophisticated interfaces. The unit will provide insights that are important for future leaders, both of technology creation activities and of organizations that include the users. An interdisciplinary approach to evaluating these systems provides an opportunity for collaboration and identification of many factors that would otherwise not typically be considered by the designers of the system. This leads to a collective effort to improve current systems and for future systems to be designed that not only consider better functionality and usability, but also their impact on people, society and the environment across time and space.
ENGD3001 Technological Innovation through New Ventures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to provide students with the challenging experience of transforming a good idea, of their own choosing, into a commercial reality. It provides the opportunity for students to assess and develop their entrepreneurial skills. It develops the key competencies of opportunity identification, creativity, vision, ideas assessment, self-awareness, motivation, mobilising resources, financial and economic literacy, planning and management, coping with uncertainty and the pursuit of learning through experience.
ENGD3002 Sustainable Tech. and Community Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Knowledge of the STEAMM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics and Medicine) is required, together with the interdisciplinary skills of STEAMM students, to enhance community education and facilitate creative solutions to the complex problems in developing a sustainable physical environment and human society in Australia. This unit will allow students to deepen their experience of the interdisciplinary teams while working with groups external to the University on community focused projects. The wide range of skills to be developed by students include: team development; project management; community consultation; client relationship development; research skills; problem identification and solving, presentation skills; verbal and written communication; and team evaluation and individual reflection. The learning approach will be a mix of lectures, together with project consultations and workshops held at university, and on-site, with community project partners. Schools, particularly Stage 5 (Years 9 and10) students and teachers, will be a primary client group. Other potential project partners may include public, private and non-government sector organisations. Projects undertaken will involve a process of client consultation, research and investigation, project design, implementation and evaluation.
ENGD3003 Complexity of the Interconnected World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students an in-depth appreciation of the inter-connected world, its complexities and challenges, and the necessary systems-thinking and analytical skills to handle them. Globalisation, better transport, as well as technical and cultural exchanges have made the modern world truly interconnected, interdependent, and diverse. This interdependent structure and behaviour bring about significant new challenges associated with the design and management of complex systems. This unit will enable the students to tackle these challenges by providing them with the necessary systems-thinking, inter-disciplinary analysis, and leadership skills. The studied topics will include dynamical analysis of complex interdependent networks, local and global measures of network structure and evolution, cascading failures, as well as predictive measures of catastrophic failure in complex adaptive systems, and the tools that enable planning for resilient system design. This unit will equip future professionals with sufficient expertise and technical know-how for the design of efficient failure-prevention and intervention policies, and robust crisis forecasting and management.
ENGD3004 Innovations for Global Education and Literacy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit takes a multidisciplinary approach to address complex human challenges of the 21st century by engaging students with leaders, policy makers, and personnel in sustainable development and humanitarian aid. Through experiential learning and systems thinking approaches, students in this unit will develop innovative solutions to advance gender equity and improve global education and literacy for women and girls. This unit will emphasise students' engaged citizenship and collaboration to enhance their cultural competence, leadership, creativity, complex problem-solving and inter-personal skills required to innovate, and problem solve in today's dynamic world.

Science

SCDL1991 Science Dalyell Showcase

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assumed knowledge: strong understanding of the scientific method. Students should have completed a science subject at HSC level. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Scientific research is one of the keys to expanding our understanding of the workings of the universe, and is a key driver of technological innovation, which in turn drives many social changes. This unit of study introduces scientific research at a tertiary level to students with a passion and enthusiasm for research science and a demonstrated aptitude in science. In small groups, you will engage with cutting-edge problems studied by research groups across the Faculty of Science. Led by a senior undergraduate group leader, and supported by an academic expert, you will learn about a field of study related to this problem. Together you will collect and critically investigate data, then create models, formulate hypotheses, and draw conclusions supported by these data. Your group will collectively develop collaboration and communication skills, and engage a wide audience in the Showcase event where you will present your results to other students, academics, and the general public. You will also develop your scientific writing skills by preparing a scientific report on the outcomes of your study.
SCDL2991 Leadership in STEMM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How can you prepare for impactful careers and leadership in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM)? This unit will span leadership theory, experience, and practice. You will host, hear from, and engage with experts and leaders with experience leading a wide range of STEMM organizations and endeavours. Examples include entrepreneurs, science policy experts, scientific media personalities, coaching psychologists, leading academics, and leaders of scientific cultural institutions. A key aspect of this unit is your participation in practical leadership of your choice, reflection on this experience, and sharing your learning with your cohort of like-minded future leaders. This unit is open to any student enrolled in the Dalyell stream.
SCDL3991 Science Dalyell Individual Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
To discover something new, we must go beyond what we read in books, what we hear in lectures, beyond what is already known. In this unit, you will be doing research, rather than just learning about research others have done. This Dalyell unit is your opportunity to engage in genuine scientific, mathematical, health or medical research, from your second year. You will research and contribute to answering a novel research question, closely aligned to the current research interests of an academic supervisor and group. You will design, plan, and execute a research project, and communicate your results. Depending on your project, this may involve collecting and analysing data, modelling a phenomenon, devising an instrument, synthesizing materials, or theoretical predictions. You will present and report your results and conclusions in a scientific seminar and report. By completing this unit, you will get a first-hand experience of cutting-edge research. Please note: You may consult with departmental Dalyell coordinators to locate potential supervisors. The research question will be chosen in consultation with the academic supervisor, in advance of enrolling in the unit. As part of this, the unit requires permission from an academic supervisor, and the unit coordinator. If necessary, the supervisor may require you to have previous WHS experience relevant to the project. An Individual Research Project Proposal signed by the supervisor should be submitted in the supporting information of your application for departmental permission in Sydney Student.
SCDL3992 Science Dalyell Individual Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
To discover something new, we must go beyond what we read in books, what we hear in lectures, beyond what is already known. In this unit, you will be doing research, rather than just learning about research others have done. This Dalyell unit is your opportunity to engage in genuine scientific, mathematical, health or medical research, from your second year. You will research and contribute to answering a novel research question, closely aligned to the current research interests of an academic supervisor and group. You will design, plan, and execute a research project, and communicate your results. Depending on your project, this may involve collecting and analysing data, modelling a phenomenon, devising an instrument, synthesizing materials, or theoretical predictions. You will present and report your results and conclusions in a scientific seminar and report. By completing this unit, you will get a first-hand experience of cutting-edge research. Please note: You may consult with departmental Dalyell coordinators to locate potential supervisors. The research question will be chosen in consultation with the academic supervisor, in advance of enrolling in the unit. As part of this, the unit requires permission from an academic supervisor, and the unit coordinator. If necessary, the supervisor may require you to have previous WHS experience relevant to the project. An Individual Research Project Proposal signed by the supervisor should be submitted in the supporting information of your application for departmental permission in Sydney Student. Please note: This unit is structurally identical to SCDL3991. This allows completion of multiple individual research projects.