Table S Electives - Arts and Social Sciences Descriptions

Electives P-Z

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.
 

Table S Electives - Arts and Social Sciences

Subject Areas P-Z

These units of study are Table S Electives available in the following subject areas:

Philosophy

PHIL1011 Reality, Ethics and Beauty

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1003 or PHIL1004 or PHIL1006 or PHIL1008 Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x1750wd essay (30%), 250wd equiv online quizzes (10%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an introduction to central issues in metaphysics, ethics and aesthetics. It opens with general questions about reality, God, personal identity and free will. The middle section of the unit will consider questions about values, goodness and responsibility. The final part is concerned with the question "what is art", the nature of aesthetic judgment and the role of art in our lives.
PHIL1012 Introductory Logic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 10x250wd weekly problem sets (50%), 1x2hr final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
An introduction to modern logic: the investigation of the laws of truth. One essential aspect of good reasoning or argumentation is that it is valid: it cannot lead from true premises to a false conclusion. In this unit we learn how to identify and construct valid arguments, using techniques such as truth tables, models and truth trees. Apart from being a great aid to clear thinking about any subject, knowledge of logic is essential for understanding many areas not only of contemporary philosophy, but also linguistics, mathematics and computing.
PHIL1013 Society, Knowledge and Self

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1010 Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x1750wd essay (30%), 250wd equiv online quizzes (10%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an introduction to central issues in political philosophy, theories of knowledge and philosophical conceptions of the self. The first part will consider the state, freedom and political obligation. The second part will examine some of the major theories of knowledge in the modern philosophical tradition. The final section will look at conceptions of the self as a knowing and acting subject.
PHIL2607 Eighteenth Century French Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1xhr lecture/wk, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial exercise (10%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the thought of the central French philosophers of the eighteenth century from Voltaire to Rousseau, including the work of Diderot, d'Alembert and the encyclopedists. It will trace the impact of, as well as reactions to, the new science and Locke's theory of ideas, and it will examine changing attitudes to religion and society.
Textbooks
Readings will be available from the University Copy Centre
PHIL2610 Exploring Nonclassical Logic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: PHIL1012 Prohibitions: PHIL3214 Assessment: assignments (50%) and 1x2hr exam (50%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Classical logic is what you study in introductory units such as PHIL1012. This unit covers major extensions of and alternatives to classical logic, such as temporal, modal, intuitionist, relevance, and many-valued logics. As well as looking at the internal workings of these logics, we examine some of their applications, and the philosophical issues surrounding them.
PHIL2611 Empiricism and its Legacy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2211 or PHIL3211 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%), 1x1500wd take-home assignment (35%), 1x2500wd final essay (50%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Science tries to discover the objective nature of reality, but its evidence is always the ways things look to creatures like us. In what sense can a scientific theory ever get beyond this subjective evidence? The problem stems from a deep tension between the metaphysical and epistemological aims of empiricist philosophy, between the search for the true nature of empirical reality and the search for reliable foundations for empirical knowledge. This unit looks at the historical roots of this tension and some post-empiricist responses to it in the work of Carnap, Quine, Sellars, Davidson and Putnam.
PHIL2612 Comparative Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3512 or PHIL2512 Assessment: 2x500wd text analysis exercises (20%), 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit considers classic ethical questions about the nature of the good life and moral obligation through a comparative lens. Canonical Western moral philosophers such as Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill are discussed alongside representatives of other less commonly studied philosophical traditions. These other traditions may include: ancient Chinese philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, feminist philosophy, and the philosophy of race.
PHIL2613 Plato and Aristotle

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History Prohibitions: PHIL3013 or PHIL2013 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
An examination of the major philosophical themes to be found in the works of Plato and Aristotle, with close attention to a few central works. The course emphasises understanding the ways these philosophers think rather than learning a body of doctrine.
PHIL2615 Logic and Proof

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: PHIL1012 Prohibitions: PHIL2215 or PHIL3215 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%) and weekly exercises (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We examine the major ways of proving things in logic: tableaux (trees), axiomatic proofs, natural deduction and sequent calculus. We learn to construct proofs of each of these kinds and then establish fundamental adequacy results (e.g. soundness and completeness) for each kind of proof system.
PHIL2617 Practical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level Prohibitions: PHIL2517 or PHIL3617 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%), Tutorial presentation (10%) and 1x2000wd Take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing practical, ethical questions of our time, including euthanasia, abortion, surrogacy, censorship, animal rights, genetic testing and cloning and environmental ethics. By the end of the unit, students should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues; and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in their personal and professional lives.
PHIL2618 Aesthetics and Art

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Art History Prohibitions: PHIL2518 or PHIL3681 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Why is art important to us? What is an aesthetic response to something? What is the relation between art and aesthetics? Is there such a thing as objective interpretation of an artwork? Or is it all a matter of taste? Should we believe in 'the death of the author'? What is the relation between art and representation, expression and emotion? We shall discuss these and other questions (eg. modernity, metaphor) from the perspective of an historical approach to the philosophical study of aesthetics and art.
PHIL2619 Philosophy of Mathematics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or Mathematics Prohibitions: PHIL3219 or PHIL2219 Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (30%), 1x3000wd essay (60%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit focuses on contemporary problems in philosophy of mathematics. Perhaps the most fundamental of these problems is that of determining the subject matter of mathematics. Is mathematical knowledge just logical knowledge, abstract knowledge of the empirical world, or something else? And how do we come by mathematical knowledge? Other topics include, the significance of mathematical results about the limits of mathematics (such as Godels incompleteness theorems), the nature of infinity, and the relationship between pure mathematics and empirical science.
PHIL2620 Probability and Decision Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2220 Assessment: 1xin-class test (10%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (50%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Throughout our lives, in making decisions large and small, we gamble in the face of uncertainty. Because we are always unsure what the future holds, we base our choices on estimates of probability. But what is probability, how do we know about it, and how should we use that knowledge in making rational choices? This unit provides an introduction to the foundations and philosophical puzzles of probability and rational decision theory.
PHIL2621 Truth, Meaning and Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 1x2hr exam (40%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit covers central issues in contemporary philosophy of language, such as the relationship between language and the world, the nature of meaning and truth, problems involved in interpreting and understanding the speech of others, the role of context in determining meaning, and the nature of metaphor.
PHIL2622 Reality, Time and Possibility: Metaphysics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3662 Assessment: 1x1400wd Essay (33%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%) and 11 short multiple choice quizzes (22%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This is a unit in metaphysics: the discipline that tells us about the nature of the world. The unit carries on from the Reality component of first year. We engage with questions like: What is time? What is space? What makes something a person? How much change can I undergo and still be me? Are objects four-dimensional space-time worms? Do the past or future exist, and could we travel to them? Are there numbers?
PHIL2623 Moral Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2513 or PHIL3513 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 1x2000wd Take-home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We go beyond the question of which actions are morally right to consider the following: How should we evaluate motives and emotions? Is anyone actually virtuous, or are we all weak-willed, self-deceived confabulators? Are any actions or persons evil? When should we feel guilty or ashamed? Should forgiveness be unconditional? Is morality the product of Darwinian natural selection, or of culture and learning? Is there any objective truth in morality, or are moral claims merely subjective or culturally relative?
PHIL2634 Democratic Theory

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Philosophy) or (6 Junior credit points in Philosophy and ANHS1600) Prohibitions: PHIL2514 or PHIL3514 Assessment: presentation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%) and 1x2000wd Take-home exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
A unit in normative political philosophy. The unit will examine ideas of democracy, as well as historical foundations of these ideas, and it will do so in order to address key issues in contemporary democratic theory, such as the tension between republican and liberal ideas, the relationship between justice and democracy, the challenges of social and cultural pluralism, the limits of democratic inclusion, and, importantly, the nature of political legitimacy and the challenge of a suitably inclusive justification of political principles.
PHIL2635 Political Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: PHIL2535 or PHIL3535 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit offers a critical introduction to the major schools of thought in contemporary political philosophy organised around the theme of inclusion and exclusion. The inclusive ambitions of liberal political theory will be confronted with objections from thinkers motivated by concern with various aspects of social and political exclusion based on categories such as gender, cultural difference, and statelessness.
PHIL2640 Environmental Philosophy

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2240 Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (30%), 1x3000wd essay (60%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit presents a variety of philosophical issues associated with the study and management of the natural environment. We will look at questions such as: what does it mean to live in harmony with the environment? what is sustainability? why should we preserve biodiversity? what is the best way to achieve conservation goals? what are ecological models and how do they work? and what is the proper relationship between environmental science and the values found in environmental policy and management?
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHIL2642 Critical Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1xin-class test (20%) and 1x2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
An introduction to critical thinking and analysis of argument. By examining arguments drawn from diverse sources, including journalism, advertising, science, medicine, history, economics and politics, we will learn how to distinguish good from bad arguments, and how to construct rationally persuasive arguments of our own. Along the way we will grapple with scepticism, conspiracy theories and pseudoscience. The reasoning skills imparted by this unit make it invaluable not only for philosophy students but for every student at the University.
PHIL2643 Philosophy of Mind

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3213 or PHIL2205 or PHIL2213 or PHIL3643 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (60%) and 1x2000wd Take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
An introduction to modern theories of the nature of mind, and some important contemporary issues in the philosophy of mind. Topics will include the problem of mental representation (how can minds think about the world?), the relationship of minds to brains, and the problem of consciousness.
PHIL2645 Philosophy of Law

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2510 or PHIL2604 or PHIL3510 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 4x125wd critical reflections (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will analyse a range of theoretical and practical issues in the philosophy of law, both historical and contemporary. Issues addressed may include: legal obligation; punishment; legal responsibility; legal exclusion, including exclusion of race, gender, and class; citizenship; rule of law; legal pluralism; the nature of rights and duties; autonomy; and the relations between law and morality.
PHIL2646 Philosophy and Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%) and 1x2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit addresses the 'ancient quarrel' between philosophy and literature. We will examine arguments about the importance of imagination and sympathy to moral judgement by putting various philosophical and literary texts in dialogue with each other.
PHIL2647 Philosophy of Happiness

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level Prohibitions: PHIL3647 Assessment: 2x 500wd Argument Analysis Exercise (20%), 1x2000wd Research essay (35%), 1x2000wd Take-home Exercise (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We all want to be happy and to live a worthwhile life. But what is happiness? Why should we want it? And how do we get it? These are among the most fundamental questions of philosophy. We will evaluate the answers of major thinkers from ancient and modern and eastern and western traditions; and consider the implications of current psychological research into the causes of happiness for the question of how to live well, as individuals and as a society.
PHIL2648 19th C. Philosophy: Kant to Nietzsche

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2641 or PHIL3011 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (20%), 1x500wd essay outline (15%), 1x3000wd final essay (50%), tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit surveys the history of 19th Century philosophy, from Kant and idealism to Nietzsche and existentialism. The first half examines Kant's "Copernican revolution" in philosophy, and the critical responses to Kant's project in the work of Fichte, Schelling and Hegel. The second half investigates the critique of idealism in the works of Kierkegaard, Dosteovsky and Nietzsche. Throughout, questions of science, morals and politics, art, education, and religion will be considered.
PHIL2655 Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3655 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd oral presenation and summary (10%), tutorial presentation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit addresses philosophical issues concerning how we should live our lives. It surveys theories of which goals are good and which actions are right. Students will gain an overview of philosophical approaches to questions like: must we act for the greater good, or is it ok to show a special concern for our friends; Can we be justified in harming some people to help others; Can small benefits to many people justify imposing a great loss on a few; Is there an objective fact about what is morally right, or is morality subjective or relative?
PHIL2658 Philosophy in Film

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x film screening/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Film Studies Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), 1x1500wd take-home assignment (30%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will use the screening and criticism of carefully chosen classical and contemporary films to raise important philosophical questions and to contribute to our response to them. Each film screening will be paired with a key philosophical question that is explored in the film and further investigated in class: problems of freedom, human action, democracy, crime, love, otherness, marriage, conversation, selfhood, and being human. The class will also explore some central questions in the philosophy of film.
PHIL2661 Philosophy of Sex

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 credit points at 1000-level in Philosophy) or (12 credit points at 1000-level in Gender and Cultural Studies) Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 1x2hr exam (50%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This course addresses philosophical issues concerning sex. From the perspective of metaphysics, we will ask what sexual differences and relations are. From the perspective of moral and political philosophy, we will ask which sexual relationships and identities are ethically justifiable. Sample questions include: What is it to have a sexual identity; Is sexual difference innate or socially constructed; Is intoxicated sexual consent valid; Is there anything wrong with being a sex object; Is pornography problematic; Is bestiality ever ok?
PHIL2663 Justice

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3663 Assessment: 600wd editing assessments (5%), 600wd argument analysis assessment (15%), 600wd multiple-choice tests (20%), 1x1200wd Research essay (30%) and 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines ethical questions concerning social justice. It surveys influential theories of which institutions and social relationships are necessary for a just society. The unit provides students with an overview of views of freedom and equality. Finally, it critically reviews attempts to reconcile these apparently conflicting goals, e.g. as they pertain to questions like: Is taxation theft? Is private education inegalitarian? Are there moral limits to markets? Should we be free to engage in speech that undermines others' statuses?
PHIL2670 Philosophy of Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or History and Philosophy of Science HPSC Assessment: 2x1250wd essays (50%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (40%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit we will explore philosophical questions about the nature of empirical science, including the nature of scientific explanations, scientific laws, and how evidence counts for or against a scientific theory. If observations are our best evidence for science then how can we establish the objective nature of empirical reality on that subjective basis Should we believe that our best scientific theories are true, or approximately true, or only predictively successful What does it take for a truth to count as a law of nature This unit explores these questions by engaging with works of historical and contemporary philosophers of science.
PHIL2672 Time and Space

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Assessment: 1x1000wd essay 1 (20%), 1x1000wd essay 2 (20%), 1x1500wd essay 3 (40%), 1x1000wd take-home exercise (20%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Are time and space substances, or is there nothing more to them than the relations between objects or events? How is time different from space? Does time have a direction? If it does, what gives it its direction? If it doesnt, why does it seem to us that it does? Does space have a direction? This unit investigates the nature of time and space and objects (including persons) within space and time.
PHIL2674 Philosophy and Mythology

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
PHIL2675 Existentialism

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Assessment: 1x1500wd mid-term essay (30%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), 1x2500wd final essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This course examines a major movement in 19th and 20th century European philosophy, and focuses on key questions and figures from the movement. Topics to be considered include: the possibility of morality after the death of God, meaning in human life, the self, freedom, finitude and historicity.
PHIL2678 Introduction to Formal Philosophy

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Philosophy major Assessment: 7x130wd equivalent complex problem sets (35%), 2x800wd short essays (25%), 1x2hr (2000wd equivalent) exam (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit explores how philosophy interacts with and contributes to disciplines like logic, probability theory, statistics, and decision theory. Classic philosophical problems will be explored such as the character of proof and proofs, how we learn from experience, the nature of the mind and its mental events, and what it means for a society to be fair and just. Mathematical tools will be developed that help to articulate and tackle these problems. This unit is designed for philosophy majors interested in learning more about formal methods and for majors in scientific and mathematical fields interested in seeing how the methods of their fields can be applied to philosophical problems.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHIL3605 Early Modern Theories of Perception

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/wk, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level from the Philosophy major Prohibitions: PHIL2605 Assessment: 1x2hr Final Exam (50%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd Tutorial Assignment (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines theories of perception from Descartes to Reid. It comprises four main themes. First, early modern accounts of sense perception are discussed in tandem with developments in the science of optics and the understanding of visual perception. Second, perception as a faculty of the understanding, that is, mental perception, is studied in the writings of Locke and Condillac. Third, sense perception and mental perception are treated together in a detailed assessment of the Molyneux Problem from Leibniz and Berkeley to Diderot. And fourthly, the course examines the notions of a moral sense and an aesthetic sense in the writings of Hutcheson.
PHIL3608 Philosophy of Information

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Philosophy major Assessment: 1x2500wd Final essay (50%), 1x2000wd Mid-semester essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit we will explore the informational-turn in philosophy. We will investigate the nature of information itself, as well as information-based approaches to central philosophical issues across epistemology, metaphysics, logic, and semantics. We will also examine the role played by information in the sciences, as well as the socio-ethical impact of information-based technologies including web-based communication platforms, the impact of remote/autonomous systems such as drones and facial recognition on freedom and agency, data-as-labour vs data-as-capital, and the weaponisation of information itself.
PHIL3609 Philosophy of Logic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Philosophy major Assessment: Participation 10 1x3000wd Essay 60 1x1500wd equivalent Logic Exercise 30 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will explore some of the fascinating philosophical issues arising from the study of formal logic. These include theory choice in logic, the relationships between various logics, the use of nonclassical logics in escaping paradox, and whether we need to be pluralist about logic.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHIL3610 Logic and Computation

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: PHIL1012 Prohibitions: PHIL2650 Assessment: 1x2hr final examination (50%), 10x250wd weekly problem sets (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit covers central topics and results concerning the nature of logic, the nature of computation, and the relationships between the two, such as Turing machines, computability and uncomputability, the undecidability of first order logic, computational complexity, and Godel's incompleteness theorems.
PHIL3611 Philosophy of Economics

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/wk, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy or Economics or Economic Policy Assessment: Participation (10%), 1x2500wd Take home exercise (50%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We will explore questions at the intersection of economics and philosophy, such as: What is it to make rational decisions, and how well do we live up to the rational ideal? Does individual selfishness promote the common good? Are there things that should be kept out of the market? What should be the goals of economic policy? Is economics a science?
PHIL3613 Philosophy of Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x 2000 wds Midterm Essay (35%), 1x 2500 wds Final Essay (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit addresses central themes from the history and philosophy of human rights. Topics may include justifications for human rights, dangers and threats to human rights, the meaning and role of dignity, tensions between human rights and state sovereignty, as well as wider themes in political thought such as equality, liberty, and power. Thinkers may include Burke, Wollstonecraft, Paine, Marx, Arendt, Levi, Rawls, and Nussbaum.
PHIL3615 Contemporary Pragmatism

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3015 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (20%), 1x1000wd take-home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will explore the distinctive philosophical outlook known as "Pragmatism" which many see as a third way beyond the analytic-continental divide. After a brief survey of classical American Pragmatism (C.S. Peirce, William James, John Dewey) we will consider in depth neo-pragmatism (Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam), linguistic pragmatism (Robert Brandom, Huw Price), and methodological pragmatism (David Macarthur). Key issues will include realism, empiricism, naturalism, scientism, metaphysical quietism, the fact/value distinction, and the agent point of view in philosophy.
PHIL3639 Hellenistic Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1hr tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3023 or PHIL3039 Assessment: Essay and exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This course will cover the period from the death of Aristotle up to the beginnings of Christian philosophy. It is designed to give a comprehensive introduction to the philosophy of the Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics. Approximately half the course will be devoted to questions in Hellenistic metaphysics, epistemology and logic. The other half of the course will be devoted to Hellenistic ethics and psychology.
PHIL3640 Nature and Crisis

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level and 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Philosophy major Assessment: 1x1000wd group project (30%), participation (10%), 1x2000wd journal/reflections (10%), 1x3000wd final essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
While the environmental crisis is a physical crisis--a crisis of extinction, pollution, drastic weather patterns, and climate change--it is also a crisis of reason: a crisis that challenges our usual ways of thinking and demands significant changes in the ways we act and behave. The aims of this unit are to investigate the philosophical origins of the environmental crisis, and develop alternative models of thinking and acting. In addition, we will analyse key philosophical concepts (including nature, culture, self, society, and responsibility), explore the possibility of an ethics beyond the human, and investigate new conceptions of agency, responsibility and multi-species justice.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHIL3643 Philosophy of Mind Advanced

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3213 or PHIL2205 or PHIL2213 or PHIL2643 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 10xweekly tests (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This is an advanced Philosophy of Mind course which has common lectures with PHIL2643 but different assessments and tutorials. It will cover the latest research on metaphysics of mind, and the theory of the content of mental states - how it is that mental stages get to be 'about' the world. It deals with similar issues as PHIL2643 but at a more advanced level, with reading from contemporary journal articles and research-based Essays as the principal assessment.
PHIL3651 Emotions and Embodied Cognition

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2651 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research Project (50%), 1x1000wd Group Presentation (20%), 1x Applied Methods Assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Students will apply advanced philosophical methods to the understanding of the passions. Students will analyse the most influential theories, historical and contemporary, about how passions function in society. They will evaluate how passions have reflected and interacted with the predominant culture since the early-modern era. Students will learn how to apply their understanding of the passions to the social and political challenges of today.
PHIL3655 Ethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2655 Assessment: 1x2000wd advanced research essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd research presentation (10%), tutorial presentation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This is the advanced version of PHIL2655, with separate tutorials and assessment. Students will apply advanced philosophical methods to issues concerning how we should live our lives. This unit surveys theories of which goals are good and which actions are right. Must we act for the greater good, or is it ok to show a special concern for our friends Can we be justified in harming some people to help others Can small benefits to many people justify imposing a great loss on a few Is there an objective fact about what is morally right, or is morality subjective or relative
PHIL3662 Reality Time and Possibility M'physics Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2622 Assessment: 1x1475wd Essay (33%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%) and 12 quizzes (22%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an advanced version of PHIL2622. It explores the relationship between space, time and modality. It asks the questions: What is time? What is space? How do objects exist through time? Could our world have been other than it is? What sorts of things are persons? Is it possible to travel backwards in time? Is our world ultimately composed of fundamental simple objects? The course provides a general background in analytic metaphysics.
PHIL3677 Philosophy of Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Philosophy Assessment: 1x 1000 Assignment (20%), 1x 1500 Assignment (30%), 1x 2000 Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the much-disputed distinction between the normal and the pathological, drawing on work from both continental and analytic traditions, from Georges Canguilhem and Michel Foucault to Ruth Millikan and Karen Neander. Related topics include: are illness or disability intrinsically harmful? What is the relationship between illness and personal identity? Is health more than the absence of disease? Note: Students should be aware that this is not a unit in clinical bioethics.
PHIL3681 Aesthetics and Art Advanced

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial presentation (20%), 1x4000wd essay (70%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This is the advanced version of PHIL2681, with common lectures, but separate tutorials and assessment. In this unit we will explore the idea that a work of art is best thought of on the model of intentional action. By considering examples of painting, sculpture, literature, conceptual art, film and photography we will consider questions of artifactuality, artistic intentionality, interpretation, and objecthood. A guiding theme will be the challenge to a demanding conception of art posed by various forms of skepticism about art including relativism, physicalism, and a modern scientific-minded cynicism about non-scientific understanding.
PHIL3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Political Economy

ECOP1001 Economics as a Social Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 10x10 question multiple choice quizzes (20%), 1x250wd issues paper (15%), 1x2250wd essay 1 (35%), 1x2000wd essay 2 (30%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores different views about the economy, the role of government, policies, and the causes, social and political aspects of economic events. You are introduced to the principal schools of economic thought -Classical, Marxian, Institutional, Neoclassical, Keynesian and Contemporary Political Economy. You will learn to apply these different perspectives to a political economy analysis of contemporary issues like climate change, social protest, the gig economy, wage theft, and global health pandemics. You will study the analytical focus, core concepts and insights of the different schools of economic thought within the context of the historical development of capitalist economies.
ECOP1003 Global Economy: Production-Trade-Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive session Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores global economic integration, especially the renewed 'globalisation' from the 1980s. You will be introduced to different explanatory theories of changing historical patterns. You will analyse debates about whether increased trade, production and financial integration has been for the better or worse, and who have been the winners and the losers. You will concurrently explore the forms of, and debates about, the regulation of economic activity on a global scale, addressing the development and changing roles of states and international agencies.
ECOP2011 Economic Theories of Capitalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP2001 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), 1x1000wd tutorial leadership and write up (10%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is designed to extend your understanding of the workings of the evolving capitalist economy. You will do this by critically engaging with economic theory which will deepen your knowledge of different schools of economic thought introduced to you in ECOP1001. This critical engagement will enable you to evaluate the fundamental economic features of capitalism such as: the role of markets in social provisioning and capital accumulation; class and inequality; the workings of money and finance; the nexus between unemployment and inflation; the tension between economic growth and the environment; and innovation and technological change.
ECOP2012 Social Foundations of Capitalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP2002 Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (25%),1x2000wd major essay (40%),1x1.5hr exam (35%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the ways in which the economic activities of capitalism are 'embedded' within a much broader social structure. To do this, you will study the nature, structure, and relations of capitalism’s core institutions such as capital, labour, households, and the state. You will consider the conflict, contradiction, and cohesion inherent in the relationships between these institutions with respect to the racialised, classed, gendered and environmental processes of capital accumulation.
ECOP2612 Economic Policy and the State

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Political Economy Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 2x2000wd essay (35%), 1.5hr exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
One of the most contentious issues in economic debates concerns the role of the state in responding to contemporary economic and social problems such as financial crises, ruptures in relations with major trading partners, or pandemics like COVID-19. In this unit, you will interrogate the contemporary economic policies of the Australian state. You will consider: how these macroeconomic policies have evolved as they have been shaped by different economic theories, interests, and ideologies; how these policies actually operate in practice; and, how a nation-state’s economic policies are influenced by international economic factors.
ECOP2616 Inequality and Distribution

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP3620 Assessment: 1x800wd data analysis (20%), 1x1500wd major essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (25%), Tutorial participation (700wd equivalent) (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Although our current era is characterized by the unprecedented legitimacy of equality as an ideal and as a political norm, it is marked by vast social and economic inequalities. This unit seeks to explain this paradoxical situation. It introduces students to some of the central theoretical questions; investigates the historical development of inequality within and between countries; and examines some of the key mechanisms through which inequality is produced in modern societies. It concludes by considering possible alternatives and responses.
ECOP2619 Global Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lectorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP3014 Assessment: 1x1000wd short data analysis (20%), 1x2000wd research essay (35%), 1x1500wd equivalent lectorial participation (15%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit interrogates the political economy of global development. You will be introduced to debates about the meaning, measurement and politics of poverty and economic development as they have changed over time. You will learn to evaluate the socio-economic dynamics of poverty and approaches to global development, particularly as they are evolving in the post-COVID era. Models of development finance and aid, the use of social policy, and the critical role that gender, climate change, technology and migration play in the global development experience are all explored.
ECOP3011 Race, Gender and Class

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP2901 or ECOP2911 Assessment: 1x1200wd seminar paper (15%), 1x1500wd manifesto essay (20%), 1x2500wd final paper (40%), 1x800wd seminar presentation (15%), seminar participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces you to some of the big debates in the social sciences, through an exploration of the meaning and limits of class concepts in social theory. You will consider structure and agency, theory and praxis, gender, race, and the contemporary relevance of class. Your knowledge will be extended as you explore the methods used for the empirical study of race, gender and class. You will learn to communicateideas verbally and in clear readable prose through an oral presentation and structured essays. This unit adds breadth to the range of political economy issues you have studied previously and adds depth to your political economy analytical and writing skills.
ECOP3015 Environmental Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP3005 Assessment: 1x1200wd essay (25%), 1x2500wd case study (45%), 1x800wd group tutorial paper/presentation (20%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the relationship between our economy and our environment. You will be introduced to different ways of understanding this relationship including environmental economics, ecological economics, Marxist ecology and eco-feminism. You will learn how these schools diagnose environmental problems as products of market failures, limits to growth or social inequalities. You will examine different policy solutions for creating more sustainable economies, such as market mechanisms, steady state and environmental justice. You will apply debates on the political economy of the environment through case studies of issues such as climate change, biodiversity loss and water scarcity.
ECOP3019 Money and Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP3009 Assessment: 1x750wd essay (20%), 1x1750wd essay (35%), 1.5hr exam (35%), 1x500wd equivalent tutorial presentation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The capitalist economy is organised around the circulation and pursuit of money. The financial system is neither a parasite on nor a veil over the 'real economy'; it is the organiser and disciplinarian of capitalism as an economic system, and it also breaks down from time to time, sometimes spectacularly. In this unit, you will explore: the evolution of money from the gold standard to the present; and, the institutions, instruments, and markets of modern finance, with a special focus on financial innovation and its challenges. You will critically engage with mainstream and other economic theories of finance, and apply these to understanding real world financial structures and events.
ECOP3021 Development and Environment in India

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February Classes: 3 week field school Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Assessment: 1x2000wd group seminar report (30%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd blog post (15%), 1x1500wd field diary (10%) participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Field experience Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is an intensive 3 week integrated program of classes and field visits on the political economy of development and environmental management in India. The course provides students with a cross-disciplinary international learning experience in which they develop familiarity with an important Asian regional economy and the cultural competency to do research in this context.
ECOP3601 Economic Cycles and Instability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP2601 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x3500wd research project (50%), seminar participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit journeys through episodes of crises and instability in order to understand their key dynamics are embedded within historical, institutional and social contexts. You will study why some crises have a cyclical character while others do not, and how crisis contains elements to unlock the secrets of present-day and future sources of instability. To detect patterns (trends, cycles and volatility), you will be trained to use basic time series techniques for data analysis which will also assist you to undertake a project that evaluates sources of instability and discusses the challenges for policymakers to soften the ill-effects of economic downturns and create conditions for recovery.
ECOP3618 Neoliberalism: Theory, Practice, Crisis

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP2618 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent oral presentation (10%), 1x500wd paper (10%), x participation (10%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Neoliberalism is a key concept in contemporary debates about the forces reshaping the global economy. This unit introduces students to the history, theories and practices of neoliberalism. The unit begins with a focus on neoliberal ideas. It then examines institutional transformations in the neoliberal era, and changes to the economy and processes of capital accumulation. Students are exposed to competing scholarly interpretations of neoliberalism, before turning to an examination of neoliberalism and the global financial crisis.
ECOP3911 Theories in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP3901 Assessment: 1x1000wd seminar presentation and participation (20%), 1x2000 essay (35%), 1x3000 essay (45%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Third year students who have not completed the prerequisites should consult the Department of Political Economy about alternative requirements.
This unit seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the various theoretical frameworks within which political economic analysis is constructed, and to which you have been introduced in other political economy units. To do this, you will focus on the methodologies, core concepts and philosophical underpinnings of the principal schools of economic thought with particular emphasis on the non-neoclassical approaches to the study of economic issues. If you are considering further study in political economy (Honours, MPhil or PhD), you are strongly encouraged to undertake this unit as it provides the necessary fundamental preparation for further study.
ECOP3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Politics

GOVT1621 Introduction to International Relations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x 1000wd Essay (20%), 1x 1500wd Essay (30%), 1x 2hr (2000 wd equivalent) Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides students with a foundational understanding in two key areas of international relations. First students will gain an understanding of the history of the international political and economic system, and the forces, events, and processes that have shaped the contemporary international system. Second, students will be introduced to the main theories of international relations and explore how these help explain the forces that shape international relations.
GOVT1641 Introduction to Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x 1000wd Research Exercise (20%), 1x 2000wd Essay (40%), Participation (10%), 1x 1.5hr Examination (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What is politics? What is political science? How can we compare political systems? This unit introduces key political institutions, organisations, processes, activities and ideologies and how these differ between countries. It explains different approaches to political science, using examples from a range of countries, including Australia.
GOVT1661 Politics and Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 4x 250wd Online and in-lecture quizzes (25%), 1x 2000wd Essay (40%), 1x 1.5hr Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We can understand contemporary debates in politics and international relation via studying popular culture. The unit is based on three core concepts: power, identity and conflict. After introducing major theories and definitions the unit will apply them in multifaceted ways to popular culture: from House of Cards to Borgen, and from Eurovision to Game of Thrones.
GOVT2112 Modern Political Thought

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Politics or International Relations or 12 credit points in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1500wd Mid-semester Take-home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd final Essay (60%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit considers key themes in modern and contemporary political thought. It uses primary texts to address topics such as sovereignty, democracy, fascism, liberalism, human rights, politics and religion, violence, and political identity. Authors may include Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Nietzsche, Marx, J.S. Mill, Tocqueville, Rawls, Arendt, Schmitt, and Foucault.
GOVT2119 Southeast Asian Politics

This unit of study does not have Data Audit Committee approval

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 1000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Asian Studies Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent tutorial presentation (10%), 1x1000wd essay portfolio (15%), 1x2000wd research essay (50%), 1x1000wd in-class test (25%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Southeast Asia is among the world's most politically diverse regions and host to a wide variety of state structures, regime types, historical trajectories, social conflicts and identities, and religious and ideological streams. This unit familiarises students with major concepts and theories in political science, and applies them to cases drawn from the countries of Southeast Asia. Topics covered include political institutions; the formation of states and nations; regime classification and analysis; the role of ideology and religion; economic structures and social identities; the causes of peace and conflict; human rights and development.
GOVT2225 International Security in 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 1000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2205 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces the theoretical foundations, essential concepts and central issues in the field of international security. It provides students with analytical tools to understand and participate in current debates concerning security and threats. The first part of the unit provides an introduction to the theoretical interpretations of international security. The second part discusses security phenomena, problems and strategies, including the coercive use of force, deterrence, guerrilla and counterinsurgency, nuclear stability, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, crisis management, arms races and disarmament, security cooperation and security regimes. The discussion in this part includes a critical review of the dilemmas, strategies, and solutions in each of the issue areas.
GOVT2226 International Organisations

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 1000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2206 Assessment: 1x700wd Short paper (15%), 1x1800wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
International Organisations is a survey of both the range of institutions created in response to various economic, security and environmental challenges faced by states and other actors in the global system, and some of the most prominent theories aimed at explaining them. The unit will be arranged around a series of case studies of particular issue areas, from international peacekeeping, to the regulation of multinational corporations, and the struggle to slow global warming. More broadly, the unit will question whether international organisations are instruments of or rivals to sovereign states, and whether they reflect the hegemony of the West, solutions to international collective problems, or agents of new transnational communities.
GOVT2228 Environmental Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Politics or International Relations or Government and International Relations or Environmental Studies majors Prohibitions: GOVT2208 Assessment: 1x1000wd Short Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Major Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Examination (30%), 1xTutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Environmental issues pose increasingly difficult challenges to our societies. What is the nature of these challenges? Where have they come from? How have political institutions adapted to them, at the national and international levels? What further changes might be necessary to better meet them? How might these changes come about? What effects might they have on the future of politics? This unit of study will engage these kinds of questions as an introduction to some theoretical and practical dimensions of environmental politics.
GOVT2603 Media Politics and Political Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 1000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations Assessment: 2000wd essays (2x45%) and in-class quiz (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is primarily about news, its production, contents and impacts. It will examine the special demands of different news organisations and of reporting different news areas; the news media as an arena in political conflicts and the consequent interests and strategies of various groups in affecting news content; and the impacts of news on political processes and relationships. Our primary focus is on Australia, but there is some comparison with other affluent liberal democracies. The substantive areas the unit will focus on include election reporting, scandals and the reporting of war and terrorism.
GOVT2941 Making Policy in Political Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in GOVT and a minimum of 36 credit points Assessment: 1x750wd policy brief proposal (15%), 1x2000wd policy brief (40%), 1x1750wd take-home assessment (35%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Public policy is about what governments do or choose not to do. This unit explores how public policy is formulated, implemented and evaluated, and what governance processes are typically followed. It also covers circumstances under which governments may choose to abstain from taking policy action. This unit examines a range of approaches to the study of public policy in both theory and practice and in the context of national and international politics, with both an Australian and comparative focus.
GOVT2991 Political Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in GOVT and a minimum of 36 credit points Prohibitions: GOVT2091 Assessment: 4x375wd tutorial exercises (30%), 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x1hr exam (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces students to the diversity of theoretical and methodological approaches used by politics and international relations scholars. 'What is politics?' and 'how can we understand it?' are questions used to explore conceptual approaches, ranging from behaviouralism to feminism, and the way in which social science research is designed and conducted.
GOVT3641 Government, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2558 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x 1000wd Case study (20%), 1x 2000wd Essay (40%), 1x 1.5hr (1500 wd equivalent) Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Modern corporations have multiple roles and responsibilities. They perform functions for which states were once responsible, and are political and social as well as market actors. This unit provides students with theoretical and methodological approaches to explore how political agendas are set as well as influenced by corporate decision-making, and an advanced understanding of the social and ethical responsibilities and impacts of business.
GOVT3651 Politics of China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2424 or GOVT2402 Assessment: 1x1000wd exam (30%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), tutorial participation (10%), 1x500wd tutorial debate (10%), 3x500wd in-class quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces the government and politics of modern China. The primary focus will be on ideology, leadership, institutions and political processes of the People's Republic. We explore politics of social groups, major issue areas in Chinese politics, the Cultural Revolution and the politics of reform.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
GOVT3653 The Australian Political Party System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2114 or GOVT2104 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd website review (20%), 1x1.5hr (1500wd equivalent) examination (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit examines the Australian party system, including colonial-era pre-party politics, the development of major parties (Labor, Liberal and National) and minor parties (Greens, One Nation etc), parties and ideology, parties and social movements, internal party politics, parties and the law, parties and elections, parties and parliamentary politics, and parties and public policy. Emphasis is placed on how theoretical and comparative models of political parties help to explain Australian party politics.
GOVT3655 Latin American Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2013 Assessment: 1x 1500wd Essay 1 (25%), 1x 1500wd Essay 2 (25%), Participation (10%), 1x 1.5hr (1500 wd equivalent) Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit addresses the comparative politics of Latin America. It explores the dynamics of political and economic change in the region during the 20th and 21st centuries, examining topics such as military rule, democratisation, political parties, institutional design, social movements, and strategies for development. Drawing on diverse theoretical perspectives, it considers broad regional patterns and sources of variation among countries.
GOVT3665 Collateral Damage and The Cost of Conflict

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x 1200wd equivalent Research proposal (20%), 1x 1800wd equivalent Progress report (30%), 1x 3000wd Research paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit will discusses all aspects of the cost of international security conflict, including collateral damage. By cost of war, the unit refers to the material, human, cultural, social, institutional, and development impact of war and security conflict. Each student will chose one angle of the cost of conflict, and develop her/his own research agenda, as she/he applies the theoretical knowledge gained from the literature to empirical world.
GOVT3671 Australian Foreign and Security Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prohibitions: GOVT2116 or GOVT2106 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), 1x1000wd Presentation(10%), Participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines Australia's foreign and security policies since Federation, with a focus on contemporary issues such as defence planning and operations and engagement with the global economy. We explore Canberra's stance on terrorism, nuclear affairs, asylum seekers, and global environmental management.
GOVT3672 American Politics and Foreign Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in GOVT or 12 credit points at 2000 level in American Studies Prohibitions: GOVT2405 or GOVT2445 Assessment: 1x 2000wd Research essay (40%), 8x 500wd Reading quizzes (10%), 1x 2hr Final Exam (40%), x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an overview of the American political system and the formulation of foreign policy. The unit considers how foreign policy is made through the interaction of executive, legislative and judicial branches and with other elements of civil society, with a special emphasis on the post-Cold War period. It seeks to answer: (a) what is the influence of domestic politics on US foreign policy; and (b) how does the US system cope with the apparent contradictions between its ideals and the imperatives of global power?
GOVT3980 Democracy and Dictatorship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 2x1500wd analytical essay (60%), 1x1.5 hr final exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The end of the Cold War marks the victory of democracy as the 'best' political system in the world. Yet many existing democracies today are fledgling and of poor quality and are at risk of breaking down. This unit will examine advanced theoretical and empirical debates about the origin, development and collapse of democracies since the 20th century. It also focuses in-depth on understanding why some authoritarian regimes remain resilient despite an ongoing global trend towards democratization.
GOVT3986 Gender, Security and Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level International Relations or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Diversity Studies or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2336 Assessment: 800wd Essay proposal (15%) and 2000wd Essay (35%) and 1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) and 4x175wd tutorial quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit offers a gender perspective on human rights, with a focus on gender and insecure international contexts. The unit covers themes related to the challenges of pursuing human rights, violations of human rights, and the role of civil society groups in advocating human rights. Attention will be given to the gendered nature of human rights and to specific issues that impact men and women differently when it comes to human rights protection and promotion.
GOVT3987 Public Sector Management

This unit of study does not have Data Audit Committee approval

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points in Politics or 12 credit points in International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2557 Assessment: 1x500wd formative assessment (15%), 1x2000wd summative research essay (40%), 1x2000wd take home assessment (35%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores how the public sector sets policy and delivers public services. It begins by using the main concepts and theories of public management and governance to assess the various trade-offs that are involved in designing and implementing different types of public sector change. These theories are then applied to evaluate specific change initiatives across different policy sectors in Australia and on a cross-national comparative basis. Topics include: modes of governance (including 'traditional public administration', 'new public management' and 'new public governance'), privatisation, performance management, partnership working and community engagement.
GOVT3989 Divided Societies

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2412 or GOVT2442 Assessment: 1x2500wd Research essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit critically examines the role that ethnic conflict plays in national and international politics. Students will have advanced knowledge of nationalism, and close familiarity with current thinking around the role of the ethnic nationalism in particular. This unit will analyse the most influential theories, historical and contemporary, about the role of ethnic nationalism (as opposed to civic nationalism), regionally and internationally. We will consider a range of competing theoretical approaches, concentrating on the theory of a "divided society".
GOVT3993 Power

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT3991 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (2x15%), 2500wd Essay (50%), Seminar and online participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Power is the essential concept of political science, which is the systematic study of politics. Bertrand Russell, perhaps the greatest mind of the 20th Century, said power is the central concept of all the social sciences. Students explore this concept in different parts of political science and survey some debates on power, assessing the advantages and disadvantages of concepts of power. There are three themes in this unit. The first is the distribution of power in society. The second is power in comparative politics and the third is power in international relations. The emphasis is on the nature, sources and use of power.
GOVT3995 Politics and Environment: Current Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2615 Assessment: 2x750wd Essay (2x25%) and 2500wd Research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The focus of environmental politics often shifts, and this unit will examine key contemporary issues in the field - from the more longstanding to emergent issues just gaining political urgency. The unit will focus on key issues in depth; this may include climate change, environmental justice, food politics, sustainable cities, and/or other timely issues in the Australian or global context. Students will be required to do intensive research in a relevant and salient area of interest in environmental politics and policy.
GOVT3997 Parliament and Democracy

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1250wd Short Paper (25%), 1x1250wd Draft Inquiry Submission (25%), 1x2000wd Critical Analysis Paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Just how important are parliaments to democracy? This unit takes a critical look at how well Australian parliaments carry out their representative, law-making and accountability functions. Analytical material will be complemented by practical insights from members and staff of the NSW Parliament.
GOVT3999 Terrorism and Organised Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in International Relations or 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1hr mid-semester exam (20%), 1x1hr final in-class exam (20%), 1x2500wd briefing paper (50%), tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit serves as a rigorous investigation of the politics of violent and criminal non-state actors. It will start with a conceptual discussion of such groups, focusing on analysis of their structure and behaviour and the roles that globalisation and technology play in non-state threats, before moving on to specific types of dark networks. The dark networks that may be covered include terrorist organisations, non-state nuclear proliferation networks, and various forms of organised crime, including maritime piracy, drug trafficking, mafias, mundane smuggling, and money laundering.
GOVT3898 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Sanskrit

SANS1001 Sanskrit Introductory 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x500wd revision tests (50%), 1x2000wd final exam (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an introduction to Sanskrit. It is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge of the language. Emphasis will be given to understanding the basic grammatical structures and the Devanagari script. Pronunciation will be given attention. There will be exercises in translation from Sanskrit to English and English to Sanskrit.
SANS1002 Sanskrit Introductory 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SANS1001 Assessment: 5x500wd revision tests (50%), 1x2000wd final exam (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an extension of work done in SANS1001. By the end of the unit, students will have covered the grammar necessary for reading simple Sanskrit texts.
SANS2601 Sanskrit Intermediate 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1.5hr seminars/week Prerequisites: SANS1002 Prohibitions: SANS2001 Assessment: 1x1500wd take home assignment (25%), 1x1000wd equivalent presentation (25%), 1x2000wd final exam (40%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will complete the more advanced grammatical forms in the first half of the semester and will then be devoted to reading classical Sanskrit literature, especially selections relevant to the study of Indian religion and culture. Readings will be drawn from the Hitopadesha and Mahabharata.
SANS2602 Sanskrit Intermediate 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1.5hr seminars/week Prerequisites: SANS2001 or SANS2601 Prohibitions: SANS2002 Assessment: 1x1500wd take home assignment (25%), 1x1000wd equivalent presentation (25%), 1x2000wd final exam (40%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will be devoted to reading classical Sanskrit literature, especially selections relevant to the study of Indian religion and culture. Readings will be drawn from texts such as the Bhagavad Gita, Mahabharata and Jatakamala.

Social Policy

SCPL2601 Australian Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Social Policy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-legal Studies Prohibitions: SCPL3001 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%) , 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (45%), 1x450wd equivalent participation in on-line discussions (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit of study Australian social policy is explored: the legal and administrative framework; relationships between family and the state; employment, unemployment, unpaid work and welfare; the public/private mix; aged care policies, the culture of welfare state provision, indigenous policies, migration, multiculturalism and the formulation and delivery of social welfare services in Australia.
SCPL2602 Understanding Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Social Policy Prohibitions: SCPL3002 Assessment: 1x1000wd Tutorial reflection (10%), 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is essentially conceptual and theoretical, emphasising the contested principles of social policy - discourse, theories, ideas and ideologies - around which the contemporary welfare state was, is and continues to be organised, discussed and debated. This unit focuses on the application of concepts and theories in practical social policy arenas. In particular, the emphasis will be on the debated, sometimes contested, nature of concepts and theories in social policy discourses in contemporary societies.
SCPL2604 Comparative Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Social Policy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2509 or SCLG2611 Assessment: 1x 1000wd equivalent Presentation (10%), 1x 1500wd Research essay (40%), 1x 2000wd Take-home exercise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines how industrialised countries manage social risks and how welfare policies can be meaningfully compared. By exploring theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of social policy, it investigates key principles underpinning social policies in a variety of countries, and how we can best explain differences between them.
SCPL3604 Making Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Social Policy or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Diversity Studies Assessment: 4x15min online quizzes (20%),1x1500wd essay (40%),1x2000wd group work (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How and why do some ideas about social justice, distribution and inequality get translated into social policy while others do not? This unit explores concepts that feature prominently in the contemporary configuration of welfare states. It examines how key social policy ideas are translated (or not) into policy practice and the conditions under which these ideas become materialised and changed over time. Through the use of case studies, students are given the opportunity to explore the policy dynamics that underpin the emergence, development and demise of social policies.

Socio-legal Studies

SLSS1001 Introduction to Law, Policy and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd short writing task (10%), 1x250wd online quiz (5%), 1x1750wd report (35%), 1x2000wd exam (40%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides students with an introduction tothe understanding of legal ideas, policy formation, institutions and practices in their social and historical contexts. It will provide an historical overview of legal institutions and forms of law in Australia, the place of the idea of the rule of law in state-formation, liberalism, processes of civilisation and colonialism, law, policy and the public/private distinction, changing conceptions of human rights, as well as outlining the central features of the various fields of law and policy.
SLSS1003 Law and Contemporary Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x500wd short essay (10%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an understanding of the central themes and issues in social scientific analyses of the operation of law in society. After briefly outlining the various ways in which social life is organised in terms of law, the unit will examine a range of key concerns in the development of legal ideas, institutions and processes today, including the increasing legal regulation of private life, law and science, human rights, the globalisation of law, terrorism, risk and security, law and social inequality and citizenship.
SLSS2604 Indigenous Social and Legal Justice

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-legal Studies Assessment: 1000wd workbook (30%) and 500wd equivalent in-class presentation (10%) and 3000wd research essay (50%) and tutorial participation/attendance (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will provide students with an appreciation of issues facing Indigenous peoples in the struggle for social and legal justice, focusing on the idea of Indigenous justice in Australia in the context of other comparable nations, such as the United States, Canada and New Zealand. We will compare specific examples or models of law and policy recognising Indigenous social and legal justice in specific areas, such as child protection, criminal justice, and land rights, in Australia and overseas.
SLSS2606 Socio-Legal Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-Legal Studies Prohibitions: SCLG2615 Assessment: 1x 1500wd Case Study Essay (30%), 1x 2500wd Research Essay (50%), 1x 500wd Equivalent Presentation (10%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This core unit explores theoretical approaches to studying socio-legal dynamics in a globalised society. It examines key theoretical debates drawing on classical theorists (Weber, Durkheim, Marx), more recent social theorists (Habermas, Foucault, Bourdieu) and critical notes from gender, queer, race, postcolonial, and science studies.
SLSS3601 Doing Socio-Legal Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Socio-legal Studies Prohibitions: SLSS2601 Assessment: 2x500wd research output - data analysis exercise (20%),2x2500wd research report (70%),participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will develop an understanding of social science research methods as they apply to quantitative and qualitative socio-legal studies. The unit will consider the epistemological, ontological and theoretical aspects of qualitative and quantitative research design and methodology and provide an overview of the main research methods applicable in both qualitative and quantitative socio-legal studies. Students will learn about the different stages involved in the development of both qualitative and quantitative socio-legal research projects.
SLSS3602 Human Rights: Law, Policy and Protest

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Criminology Prohibitions: SCLG2624 Assessment: 1x1500wd minor essay (30%), 1x3000wd major essay (60%), required participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Global human rights and the idea of 'one humanity' became politically possible with the end of the Cold War. This unit explores the production of the human rights system as a top down process of legalisation, institutionalisation, policy development and intervention and the bottom up process of victim claim-making, collective mobilisation and transnational advocacy.
SLSS3603 Social Justice, Law and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Social Policy Prohibitions: SCLG2605 or SCLG2017 or SCLG2536 Assessment: 1x1000wd short answer questions (30%), 1x1000wd equiv presentation (15%), 1x2500wd research paper (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores different theoretical perspectives on social justice relating to income and wealth distribution, identity, social recognition, law and rights. It applies these to contemporary examples, including income and wealth disparities, race and gender inequality, disability rights, the environment and treatment of non-human animals.
SLSS3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Sociology

SCLG1001 Introduction to Sociology 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd review exercise (10%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x1500wd take home assessment (35%), 1x1000wd equiv discussion posts (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How does society shape the world we live in? What influences interactions between people in everyday life? Why is society structured the way it is, and is change possible? By delving into diverse topics such as discrimination and inequality to family life and friendship, this unit introduces the conceptual tools sociologists use to explain the world.
SCLG1002 Introduction to Sociology 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1750wd take-home exercise (35%), 1x1750wd research essay (35%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In a rapidly changing world, how do we make sense of current social and political problems effectively? By exploring sociological concepts in creative ways, this unit gives students the tools to analyse, research and respond to real world issues such as globalisation, crime, social justice, community breakdown, and racial, sexual and indigenous inequality.
SCLG2000 Global Social Problems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Innovation and Entrepreneurship Assessment: 1x1750wd comparative research report (40%), 1x1750wd social problem policy paper (40%), 1x1000wd panel presentation (20%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit takes a multidisciplinary approach to the study of major global problems. Lectures, readings, and activities will examine these problems through the multiple lenses of comparative sociology, systems engineering, climate science, humans rights discourses, world history, and literature.
SCLG2601 Sociological Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points of Cultural Studies or 12 credit points of Socio-legal Studies Prohibitions: SCLG2001 or SCLG2520 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Critical analysis quiz (25%), 4x250wd Short reading presentations (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit of study we will examine the main strands of sociological thought and identify the key concepts, debates and issues in the development of sociological theory. It will focus on the writings of leading social theorists and sociologists, their contribution to the development of a distinctly sociological theory, and their continuing impact on current theoretical debates in sociology. Topics covered will include: the origins of sociology; industrialism; classical theorists; sociology of urban society; interactionism and everyday life; psychoanalysis; sociology of knowledge and culture; feminist challenges to sociological paradigms; postmodernity and the future of society. This unit is mandatory for Sociology majors.
SCLG2613 Sociology of Childhood and Youth

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2522 Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (30%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines the main sociological approaches to childhood and youth in modern industrial societies, as well as the ways in which particular perspectives on childhood are central to all social theory. It will examine the debates surrounding the historical development of childhood, and the various approaches to the impact of state intervention and social policies on both the experiences of childhood and youth and the transition to adulthood. Specific topics discussed include; the social construction of child abuse, youth homelessness and youth criminality as social problems, the stolen generations, children and the law, the fertility decline, and the differentiation of childhood experience along lines of class, gender, race and ethnicity.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
SCLG2623 Sociology of Terror

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Criminology Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the relationship between terrorism and globalisation. Explores themes of massacre, ethnic cleansing, and terrorism in the context of social uncertainty and crises in nation states. Examines the production of victims and the process of cultural symbolisation of the body and the new social and political imaginaries emerging. Examines the uses of victimhood in trying to escape terror and achieve reconciliation. Draws on the work of Scarry, Kristeva, Appadurai, Nordstrom, Foucault, Zulaika and Taussig.
SCLG2637 Society and Identity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2612 or SCLG2625 or SCLG2626 or SCLG2629 Assessment: 1x 1000wd presentation (20%), 1x 2000wd essay (40%), 1x 1500wd take-home exercise (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines identity and self in changing social, political and technological conditions, including religious identity, emotions and social life, power relations in forming selves, celebrity identities, the influence of new technology and communication, social identity in friendship and families, and commodified identities in consumer culture.
SCLG2638 Sociology of Exclusion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2604 or SCLG2635 or SCLG3606 Assessment: 12x1000wd total equivalent discussion posts (20%), 1x1500wd essay 1 (30%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores concepts of exclusion, marginalisation, inequality, and discrimination. It examines structural and institutional sources of those processes, and considers policy, political and legal solutions to practices of exclusion and recognition of difference in relation to aspects of identity, such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity and disability.
SCLG3601 Contemporary Sociological Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG3002 Assessment: 1xOral Presentation (20%) 1x4000wd Essay (70%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides a detailed introduction to key social theorists whose ideas are being used extensively in contemporary sociological theory and research. These theorists include: Irving Goffman, Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu. A particular focus is on approaches to human action in its various structural and cultural contexts, the possibilities and limits of human agency, and questions of social change.
SCLG3607 Nature and Society

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2022 or SCLG2610 or SCLG2631 Assessment: 1x 2000wd Case study essay (40%), 1x 2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x 500wd equivalent Presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores various sociological perspectives relating to nature and the nonhuman in society, addressing how nonhumans (e.g. environments, animals, technologies) are central to the emergence of contemporary social phenomena, including globalisation, transformations in modernist identities, and the structure of politics.
SCLG3608 Sociology of Deviance and Difference

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2608 or SCLG2523 or SCLG2004 Assessment: 1x 1500wd Research essay (30%), 1x 2500wd Take-home exercise (40%), x 500wd equivalent Discussion posts (20%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study focuses on social understandings of 'deviance' and 'difference.' Covering various theories, the unit addresses how deviance is constructed and regulated, and how the idea of the 'abnormal' is central to social debate on a wide range of issues, such as obesity, disability, extreme body modification, and mental health.
SCLG3610 Sociology, Power and Violence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2607 or SCLG2618 or SCLG2621 or SCLG2630 Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x1500wd Take Home Exercise (30%), 1x1800wd Major Essay (35%), 1x1200wd Minor Essay (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Power is a fundamental resource in the organisation and control of society and in disciplining individual behaviour. This unit explores social order and disorder by examining how power is exercised, sometimes violently, through political, legal, economic and cultural processes and structures and how it is concentrated, distributed and resisted.
SCLG3612 Sociology of Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week or 1x online lecture/week with participation activities, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2606 or SCLG2609 Assessment: 4x300wd Discussion board participation (15%), 1x1800wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Takehome exam (35%), x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will examine key issues in the sociology of culture, using a combination of traditional lectures and tutorials and a flipped classroom approach. It will explore a range of frameworks for understanding cultural practices, productions, and media representations. It aims to link culture to specific case studies to combine theory with research.
SCLG3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive February,Intensive July,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Spanish and Latin American Studies

SPAN1621 Spanish Level 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1hr tutorials/week Prohibitions: SPAN1601 or SPAN1611 Assessment: 2x275wd language tests (10%), 2x400wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Students must not have undertaken any substantial prior study of Spanish.
This unit of study is for absolute beginners or for students who have no substantial prior knowledge of Spanish. It focuses on the basic vocabulary and grammar necessary to introduce and talk about yourself and other people, and communicate successfully in simple everyday situations, both by speaking and in writing. It also introduces elements of the history, society and culture of the Spanish-speaking countries.
SPAN1622 Spanish Level 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: SPAN1601 or SPAN1611 or SPAN1621 Prohibitions: SPAN 1602 or SPAN 1621 or 65% or above in HSC Beginners Spanish or HSC Continuers or HSC Extension or International Baccalaureate Ab Initio Grade 6 or higher Assessment: 2x275wd language test (10%), 2x400wd culture test (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd equivalent oral task (15%), 1x550wd online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study builds on the skills acquired in SPAN1621. It continues to focus on everyday communication but introduces students to more complex grammatical structures such as the past tenses. It also continues our exploration of the history, society and culture of the Spanish-speaking countries.
SPAN2611 Spanish Level 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: SPAN1002 or SPAN1602 or SPAN1612 or SPAN1622, or more than 65% in HSC Spanish Beginners Prohibitions: SPAN2001 or SPAN2601 or HSC Spanish Continuers Minimum Mark 70% Assessment: 2x550wd language tests (10%), 2x800wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the basic language skills acquired in SPAN1621 and 1622 or HSC Beginners Spanish. It will introduce you to more complex grammatical structures and expand your vocabulary so that you are able to communicate both in writing and speech in a wider variety of situations than you could previously. Activities used in the classroom will be designed to allow you to further explore the culture and history of the Spanish-speaking world as well as improving your Spanish.
SPAN2612 Spanish Level 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN2611 or SPAN2601 Prohibitions: SPAN2002 or SPAN2602 or HSC Spanish Continuers Mark 70% or higher, IB SL 5 or above Assessment: 2x550wd language tests (10%), 2x800wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the language skills acquired in SPAN2611. It introduces you to more complex grammatical structures, and expands your vocabulary so that you are able to communicate both in writing and speech in a wider variety of situations, including some more formal or academic uses of the language. Activities used in the classroom are designed to allow you to further explore the culture and history of the Spanish-speaking world as well as improving your Spanish.
SPAN2621 Spanish and Latin American Film Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Spanish and Latin American Studies or Film Studies Assessment: 3x500wd online reflections (45%), 1x1500wd equivalent presentation (15%), 1x3000wd research project (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
While approaches to Latin American cinema neglect the relationship of the region with Spain as former colonial center, this unit, taught in English, will introduce you to Spanish and Latin American film studies exploring the tensions, negotiations, and complex flows of influence from a transatlantic angle. Comprising history, theory and criticism through the exploration of 'national' cinema industries, we will explore sites of production and circulation, by examining the role coproductions and film festivals play in the conceptualisation and consumption of Latin American and Spanish cinema. This unit offers a regional overview and delves into case studies of the history of film production.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
SPAN2622 Latin American Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Spanish and Latin American Studies or SPAN3001 Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1xOral Presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), 2xshort written tasks (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit, taught in Spanish, presents students with a variety of Latin American texts from modern and contemporary popular culture. Students are exposed to a range of different traditions and approaches to reading popular forms in the context of the history and culture of Latin America.
SPAN2631 Cultural and Social Change in Spain

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Spanish and Latin American Studies or SPAN3001 Assessment: Seminar participation (5%), 1xOral Presentation in a small group (equivalent to 1000wds) and 1x1000wd individual written memorandum on research for the presentation (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester in-class test (25%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Spanish society has changed dramatically over the last half century. The restrictions on personal freedoms that were part of the Franco regime have been lifted to reveal a liberal, tolerant European society that nevertheless still shows some elements of its conservative heritage. This unit (taught in English) explores contemporary Spanish society and culture to show the reasons for the changes, and their effects. The areas under discussion will be family, sexuality and gender; class, money and consumerism; and mass/popular culture.
SPAN2641 Filmmaking in the Latin American Context

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Spanish and Latin American Studies or Film Studies or SPAN3001 Assessment: 1x1500wd research journal (30%), 1x10 minute Oral Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1xacademic article review (10%), class participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit, taught in English, will introduce you to Latin American film studies, comprising history, theory and criticism through the exploration of 'national' cinema industries. We will examine the history of film production of Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Brazil, looking at the cultural and socio-political context in which filmmaking should be placed. Apart from tracing the history of film production in such countries, we will be focusing on recent developments in this field from the 1990's to the present day.
SPAN3001 Spanish Level 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN2612 or SPAN2602, or HSC Spanish Continuers Minimum 70%. At least 5/7 in IB 'Spanish B' Prohibitions: SPAN2613 or SPAN2614 or SPAN3601 or SPAN3602 Assessment: 2x 225wds language tests (10%), 2x 400wds culture tests (15%), 1x 1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x 800wd oral task (15%), 1x 550wd final online test (10%), 1x 800wd final in-class test (25%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the language skills acquired in SPAN2612 or HSC Continuers Spanish. It will consolidate your previous knowledge of Spanish and extend it into more complex areas of grammar, vocabulary and expression, so that you are able to communicate in a wide variety of formal and informal situations. Activities used in the classroom are designed to allow you to further explore the culture and history of the Spanish-speaking world as well as improving your Spanish.
SPAN3002 Spanish Level 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN2613 or SPAN3001 or SPAN2602 Prohibitions: SPAN2614 or SPAN3602 Assessment: 2x 225wds language tests (10%), 2x 400wds culture tests (15%), 1x 1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x 800wd oral task (15%), 1x 550wd final online test (10%), 1x 800wd final in-class test (25%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the language skills acquired in SPAN3001. By the end of this unit students should be competent and independent users of spoken and written Spanish in most general situations. Activities used in the classroom are designed to allow students to further explore the culture and history of the Spanish-speaking world as well as improving their Spanish. All activities, in which students are expected to participate actively, are designed to improve their analytical and critical abilities, written and oral communication skills, awareness of cross-cultural issues and teamwork skills.
SPAN3611 Spanish Level 7

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN3002 Prohibitions: SPAN3601 Assessment: 2x275wd language tests (10%), 2x400wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is for students who wish to extend their knowledge of Spanish beyond the level of general competence achieved in SPAN3002. It focuses on the use of Spanish in a variety of formal and informal contexts, using authentic materials in order to help you deepen and perfect your Spanish. Class discussion and written tasks will allow you to improve your oral and written competence in Spanish as well as your analytical and communication skills.
SPAN3612 Spanish Level 8

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN3611 or SPAN3601 Prohibitions: SPAN3602 Assessment: 2x275wd language tests (10%), 2x400wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is for students who wish to extend their knowledge of Spanish to an advanced level of proficiency in all kinds of communicative situations. It focuses on the use of Spanish in a variety of formal and informal contexts, using authentic materials in order to help you deepen and perfect your Spanish. Class discussion and written tasks will allow you to improve your oral and written competence in Spanish as well as your analytical and communication skills.
SPAN3613 Spanish Level 9

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN3612 Assessment: 2x550wd language tests (10%), 2x800wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Building on the linguistics skills acquired in Level 8, this unit emphasizes cultural and linguistic competence in academic, professional, and business-oriented settings, as well as an understanding of the status of Spanish as a global language in our contemporary world. The unit will grant students practice and communicative techniques for effective use of advanced Spanish language skills. The unit will assist students to fulfill their academic needs and give them an advantage in their future lives and careers tailoring content and assignments to different professional sectors such as education, business, law, health, etc.
SPAN3614 Spanish Level 10

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN3613 Assessment: 2x550wd language tests (10%), 2x800wd culture tests (15%), 1x1000wd written reflective project (15%), 1x800wd oral task (15%), 1x550wd final online test (10%), 1x800wd final in-class test (25%), participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the linguistic abilities developed in Level 9. The unit expands on grammar and structures to consolidate linguistic competence in academic, professional, and business-oriented settings, as well as in-depth reflections on the status of Spanish as a global language. The unit will assist students to gain practice in linguistic structures and acquire vocabulary in specific areas. All of the skill areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening as well as in-depth knowledge of the cultural, academic and professional context of language use are emphasised.
SPAN3615 Indigenous Movements in Latin America

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: SPAN3001 or SPAN3611 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Anthropology major Prohibitions: SPAN2615 Assessment: Active seminar participation (10%), 1x1500wd group presentation (20%), 1x2000wd literature review (30%), 1x2500wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This course approaches the study of Latin American societies through an interdisciplinary approach to studying indigenous movements. These movements have been pivotal actors in the shaping of contemporary conceptions of democracy, citizenship and statecraft in the continent, and have also drawn attention globally. Students will gain insight into cultural diversity of Latin American societies and acquire analytical tools for studying and understanding a wide variety of topics associated with political structure and agency in the continent.
SPAN3624 Spain: A Nation of Nations?

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SPAN3001 or SPAN3611 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in European Studies major Assessment: 1xOral Presentation (equivalent to 1500wd) (30%), 1x500wd Essay plan (10%), 1x4000wd Research essay (50%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Contemporary Spain is a very diverse country with several distinct cultural and linguistic groups. In some cases, this has given rise to minority nationalisms that challenge the sovereignty and hegemony of the Spanish state. This unit introduces students to the advantages and challenges of such diversity, including some of its political aspects. Specific topics include language planning, regional cultures, ethnicity, minority nationalism, and independence movements. No knowledge of Spanish is required to take this unit.
SPAN3625 New Latin American Geopolitics of Power

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: SPAN3001 or SPAN3611 Assessment: 1xOral Presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (25%), 1x1000wd test (20%), 1x500wd Essay plan (5%), 1x3000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
If the 20th century was "America's century", to whom does the 21st belong? Much is touted in the name of the new global economic, cultural, political and technological alliances signalled by the acronym, BRIC, among Brazil, Russia, India and China. This unit presupposes that, beyond a mere focus on economics, important global political shifts towards and in Latin America are in evidence. Who and which powers are driving this change? What do these tendencies mean regionally and globally?
SPAN3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Studies in Religion

RLST1002 Religion: Texts, Life and Tradition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Take-home paper (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd early feedback (10%), 1x500wd Tutorial presentation (10%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit, students will learn about the major religions, ancient and modern: Indigenous traditions, Egypt and Mesopotamia, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Taoism. History, texts, beliefs and practices are outlined to provide a foundation using the lens of lived religion. Fundamental skills and methodologies of the discipline are integrated into the program.
RLST1005 Atheism, Fundamentalism and New Religions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home paper (40%), 1x500wd Presentation (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines religion in the contemporary world including recent high-profile debates and the emergence of new religions. Case studies and themes include: fundamentalism, the 'new' atheism, the effect of globalisation, consumerism and new media on religious practice, new forms of spirituality and enchantment.
RLST2624 The Birth of Christianity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studies in Religion or 6 credit points at 1000 level in in Studies in Religion and 6 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History Prohibitions: RLST2024 Assessment: 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Take-home paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit discusses the textual, archaeological and socio-cultural evidence for the origins of Christianity; with a particular purpose to analyse how cults centred on the charismatic figure of Jesus of Nazareth led to the construction of such a powerful religious tradition. Tensions within that emergent tradition will be considered, and especially its struggle towards self-identity with both Judaism and the Greco-Roman world.
RLST2639 From Secular Faith to Conspiracy Belief

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1h lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Studies in Religion major Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (50%), 1x1500wd community-engaged tutorial paper (35%), seminar participation (15%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: A community-based investigation paper is part of the assessment. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines tensions between states and religions during the emergence of Western secular societies. It investigates the 'ultimate concerns' of moderns, the focus on self-transformation of the individual, and how 'multi-faith' states operate in relation to religious concerns. The unit examines the sacrality of the state by examining the development and perpetuation of conspiracy theories that seek to challenge this modern continuum through both myth and apocalyptic thinking. This unit will challenge students to develop methodologies to better investigate the nature of 'religion', 'faith', 'spirituality' and 'conspiracy' in a late-modern context.
RLST2640 Contemporary Religious Trends

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2627 or RLST3603 Assessment: 1x500wd scoping task (10%), tutorial participation (10%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), 1x500wd site visit presentation (10%), 1x1000wd media journal (20%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Contemporary Australia manifests low levels of institutional religion, a multi-cultural and multi-faith population, and a vocal atheist/ secularist lobby. Students explore religion in the media and law, the Constitution, and Census data on religion. Issues examined include atheism and secularity, Aboriginal religion, values, sport and ANZAC as religious phenomena.
RLST3601 Rethinking Religion

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd research proposal (50%), 1x1000wd oral presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Contemporary issues in the academic study of religion are investigated to give students experience of advanced research. The history of religion/s and contentious key terms are debated, and students are introduced to field studies methodology and other complex research strategies. In devising research questions and completing an extended research project, students develop a dynamic and assured academic voice.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
RLST3604 Ancient Egyptian Religion and Magic

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Ancient History Prohibitions: RLST2636 Assessment: 1x1000wd seminar presentation (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd take-home paper (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Students will learn about the cosmologies, gods and religious structures of Pharaonic Egypt from the imperial cult to the domestic; its legacy including the Roman cult of Isis, Hermeticism, magical handbooks from the Greek to the Islamic era; the popular and scientific rediscovery of ancient Egypt and its influence on modern esotericism and popular culture.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
RLST3605 Sex, Desire and the Sacred

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2635 Assessment: 1x2000wd public discourse analysis (30%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd equivalent presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the relation between sexuality, desire, gender and the sacred as presented in a diverse range of religious traditions; mysticism; tantra; cults of virginity and abstinence; sacred androgyny; philosophy of religion approach to gender and ontology, epistemology and ethics; cultural difference as it pertains to issues of religion and sexuality.
RLST3606 Sacred Creativity: Text, Image, Film

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2628 or RLST2625 Assessment: 1x4000wd (55%), 1x2000wd essay on creative methods (30%), participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The keys to human creativity have long been encoded in religious endeavour. Here we examine the thoughts and methods that have enabled profound artistic and literary responses within, and in response to, religious worldviews. The impact of inspiration, prophecy, dreams, drug-taking, and ritual on great art, literature, and film will be demonstrated.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
RLST3607 Witchcraft Paganism and Western Esotericism

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2626 Assessment: 1x1500wd site visit and blog report (15%), participation (15%), 1x3000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd film review (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Witchcraft, Paganism and Western Esotericism examines the rebirth of esoteric traditions in the modern world. Esotericism is diverse and connections between Pagans, goddess worshippers, witchcraft and occultists are complex. This unit attempts to assess their importance in contemporary spirituality.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
RLST3608 Religion and Violence, Faith and Blood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2620 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x5mins or 500wd equivalent tutorial presentation (10%), 1x500wd source review (15%), 1x500wd essay proposal (15%), 1x3000wd essay (50%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The last century has been beset by wars, depressions, and extraordinary technological advances. Traditional values and the rise of reactive fundamentalisms have backgrounded this extreme violence. This unit examines how this has been addressed through religious thought and action, new spiritualities, and by leading religious figures.
RLST3609 Religion and the Medieval World

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/ week Prerequisites: 12 credit point at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2605 Assessment: 1x1000wd Primary Source Analysis (25%), 1x Participation (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1000wd Fieldwork Task (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit covers the period from 500 to 1500 and asks whether the Western idea of the "Middle Ages" can be usefully applied to non-Western cultures of the era. It considers the development of Christianity in the first millennium alongside indigenous Paganisms, Judaism and Islam. In the second millennium it investigates Western Christian contacts with Buddhism, Confucian and Taoist culture, and the religions of India. The idea of a monolithic Christianity is destabilised through the lenses of Eastern Christianity (for example, the various Orthodox churches, Maronites, Melkites) and of heretical groups whose beliefs and practices attracted persecution, inquisition and crusade or holy war.
RLST3610 New Discoveries in Religion in Antiquity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Studies in Religion Assessment: 1x2500wd essay A (content): description and analysis of a specific new discovery (40%), 1x1000wd research proposal (20%), 1x2500wd essay B (method/theory): discussion of approaches and implications (40%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit will discuss a series of new discoveries regarding religion in antiquity, such as manuscripts, artefacts or ritual sites. These often derive from archaeological work or the antiquities market and involve various types of controversy such as matters of authenticity, dating, ownership. The unit will consider the impact of the find; the nature of academic debate; issues of ethics and funding; research and career development. In the latter part of the unit students will trial a proposal for a project of their own in preparation for future research training.
RLST3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Theatre and Performance Studies

PRFM1601 Making Theatre: The work of the director

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Assessment: 1x1000wd scene plan (25%), 1x1000wd workshop description and analysis (25%), 1x1500wd per student group work documentation (25%), 1x1000wd analysis of rehearsal process (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What is involved in creating a work of theatre? This unit introduces students to the craft of directing theatre, both through a study of the historical emergence of the director and the practices involved, and participation in practical workshops in which key skills, involving creative leadership and collaboration, are developed and put to work. Students will then reflect upon this work, applying theoretical and methodological approaches in theatre and performance studies, including embodiment theory, ethnography, and dramaturgy. No theatre-making experience is required.
PRFM1602 Dangerous Performances

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive December,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial-workshop/week Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (20%), 1x1000wd per student group exercise (25%), 1x1000wd per student class presentation (25%), 1x1500wd final essay (30%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Performance has long been associated with risk: in the popular imagination, among performers, writers and theorists. From breathless narratives of courageous actors taking on risky roles, to the extremes of performance art, contemporary performance and political action, you will explore and understand performance pushed to the limits.
PRFM1603 Placemaking and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Assessment: 1x1500wd per student group work (40%), 1x1000wd short assessment (30%), 1x2000wd practice journal (30%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: This unit will involve the application and implementation of a range of performance-making techniques in order to explore and understand how sites are transformed into places. No performance-making experience is assumed. The unit will be taught by experienced scholar-practitioners who will guide students through the processes involved. Students should understand that this is not simply a 'drama' unit: it involves researching local issues, engaging with a range of people, and discovering ways in which to animate, performatively, complex environments.
Using a range of case studies, including examples of local theatre and performance companies working in Sydney, students will explore the relationship between place and performance. They will learn techniques and theories of site-specific performance: that is, performance which creatively responds to built and natural environments, to contested histories, and to complex cultural politics. They will then apply those techniques to create their own site-specific performance works on University of Sydney campuses. Students will produce portfolios documenting the performance work they have created.
PRFM2601 Being There: Theories of Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lectures/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM2001 Assessment: Short responses to set readings (1200wd total)(30%), 1x800wd research proposal (20%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What if all the world really is a stage? In this unit, you will learn key theories and conceptual tools for analysing the broad spectrum of performance events that lie beyond what is conventionally associated with the term 'theatre'. You will conduct original research, focusing on how performance (re)constitutes identity and (re)forms a culture.
PRFM2602 Performance: Production and Interpretation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM2002 Assessment: 1x600wd short response to performance (10%), 1x1200wd tutorial paper (30%), 1x500wd raw notes (10%), 1x2200wd performance analysis essay (50%) Practical field work: Students will undertake some workshop exercises in their tutorials and will attend professional theatre productions outside class times Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How do we make meaning from our experience of text, movement, spatial design, costuming, lighting, sound and other elements of theatrical performance? Through practical workshops and theatre excursions, you will learn some basic production techniques and develop a critical language for analysing live performance.
PRFM2605 Rehearsing Shakespeare

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lectureweek 1x2hr workshopweek Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd Analytical Rehearsal Log 30 3x In Class Scenework equiv to 500wd 20 1x2500wd Essay 50 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How did actors in Shakespeares time rehearse a play In this unit students will explore rehearsal in the Elizabethan and Jacobean theatre from part playing cueing and exploring the relationship between voice and gesture through to the general rehearsal Students will have the opportunity to workshop selected scenes from plays by Shakespeare or his contemporaries in order to understand how a Renaissance English actor embodied his part
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PRFM3602 Performance Histories

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Assessment: 1x group presentation, 1x1000wd essay, 1x3000wd essay Practical field work: Group projects researching a history of an Australian performing arts company institution or individual will be conducted at State Library of NSW Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study reflects on the issues and methods that constitute theatre history and its relationship to Performance Studies. We will consider the source materials on which histories of performance are based and some of the genres of historical scholarship that are useful for such historians. We will also study how descriptions and theorisations of creative practices from the past are influential in the work of contemporary theatre and performance practitioners.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PRFM3603 Playing Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM3026 or PRFM3015 Assessment: 1x1000wd response to set readings (20%), 1x1500wd contribution to group research (30%), 1x2000wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We'll be exploring how performing artists make 'political' work but also how political processes themselves, from election campaigns to street protests, are becoming increasingly theatricalised. The unit involves practical workshops, analysis of performances and closely supervised group research.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PRFM3606 Approaches to Acting

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr workshop/week Prerequisites: PRFM2601 and PRFM2602 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM3022 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (40%), 1x500wd equivalent group presentation (20%), 5x100wd online interlocutions (20%), 1x500wd reading summary (20%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit you will survey a range of acting practices from the seventeenth century to the present, and interrogate their truth claims in order to reveal the social, cultural and historical contingency of each approach. The unit invites you to examine how these different approaches to acting have been influenced by implicit theories of the human self.
PRFM3607 Production Strategies for Performance

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week for seven weeks, 1x4hr workshop/week for seven weeks Prerequisites: PRFM2601 and PRFM2602 Assessment: 1x20min WHS simulation (350wd equiv) (10%), 1x40min Technical Installation Test (650wd equiv)(20%), 1x2000wd Production Analysis (30%), 1x30min Production Design Presentation (500wd equiv) (20%), 1x1000wd Production Design Rationale (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit offers an introduction to theatre lighting, sound design and audiovisual projection. Through practical workshops and site visits, students will develop some basic technical skills as well as an understanding of the creative contribution that production personnel can bring to the realisation of performance concepts.
PRFM3611 Dramaturgy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: PRFM2601 and PRFM2602 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM3010 Assessment: 1x500wd performance analysis (20%), 1x1500wd group project (30%), 1x2500wd script assessment (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What is a dramaturg? How do you read a play? Write a non-text based performance? Prepare a production of a classic play? This unit of study will investigate the various roles of the dramaturg, focusing on new play dramaturgy, background research for historical texts, translation and the role of the dramaturg as co-creator in non-text-based work. This unit will include practical exercises in analysing and workshopping a new Australian play or text for performance.
PRFM3621 Ritual, Play and Performance

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies or (PRFM2601 and PRFM2602) Prohibitions: PRFM2606 Assessment: 1x 1000wd Research proposal (15%), 1x 1000wd Book review (15%), 1x 1000wd equivalent Presentation (20%), 1x 3000wd Ethnographic essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Setting out from a distinction between special events and everyday life, you will investigate fundamental kinds of performative events, including play, ritual, work and carnival, developing an understanding of culture as performance. You will learn and apply ethnographic approaches to a range of contemporary case studies.
PRFM3624 Performance Studio

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x2hr seminars/semester, 30 hours workshops (typically scheduled in intensive mode) Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Theatre and Performance Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent journal (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent research project presentations (30%), 1x2500wd research paper (50%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In collaboration with an artist/artists in residence, students will experience training and/or rehearsal and/or creative development practices geared towards public performance. Guided by the artists and lecturers, students will participate physically, conceptually, and creatively through the course of intensive workshops, framed by preparatory and post-experience seminars. Students will keep a journal of the experience, and will prepare a presentation and research paper critically reflecting upon the workshops, employing methodologies and theoretical perspectives from the major.
PRFM3961 Rehearsal Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar in Week 1, 1x4hr seminar/week in Weeks 2-10 Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Assessment: 4 x draft journal entries (10%), 1x1500wd final journal (re-work of draft journal entries) (30%), 1x3000wd essay (60%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The 'hidden world' of rehearsal is typically off-limits to outsiders but the exceptional creativity of performance-makers makes it a compelling focus for research. Approaching the study of rehearsal through ethnographic theory, you will read and apply key texts on participant-observation fieldwork to rehearsal observation and workshop exercises.
PRFM3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Visual Arts

CAVA1001 Visual Art Foundation 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prohibitions: CASF1001 or CASF1002 Assessment: academic led peer assessment of final project (50%) and final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to art practice in the 2 Dimensional (image) and 3 Dimensional (sculpture) realms of creative practice at Sydney College of the Arts. You will engage with a variety of creative learning experiences specific to each field of enquiry and will be provided with project-based content designed to develop your conceptual understanding and problem solving skills within a creative arts studio framework. Each week you will have 2 hours of academic tuition supported by a 1 hour technical workshop. You will undertake two consecutive projects of 6-weeks duration that will encourage you to: explore a wide range of media and processes; develop a participatory, collaborative and cooperative approach; and build on your understanding of the creative scope of Contemporary Art. Each 6-week block will be delivered by a different academic and technical team. You will be encouraged to experiment, experience a range of facilities and equipment, and develop generic technical skills necessary to realise your projects. You will also become aware of Workplace Health and Safety essential to SCA and all current art practices.
CAVA1002 Visual Art Foundation 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: CAVA1001 Prohibitions: CAST1001 or CASF1001 or CASF1002 Assessment: academic led peer assessment of final project (50%) and final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to art practice in the 4 Dimensional (screen) realm of creative practice at Sydney College of the Arts. In this first, 6 week project you will engage with a variety of creative learning experiences specific to this field of enquiry and will be provided with project-based content designed to develop your conceptual understanding and problem solving skills within a creative arts studio framework, encouraging you to: explore a wide range of media and processes; develop a participatory, collaborative and cooperative approach; and build on your understanding of the creative scope of Contemporary Art. This will be followed by a second, 6-week long X Dimensional (interdisciplinary) project allowing you to build on the skills and thinking developed throughout the year, while allowing you to deepen your understanding of Contemporary Art practice by merging the disciplines of your choosing. You will be introduced to interdisciplinary principles and relevant theories. You will become familiar with a broad range of concepts and work methods within your merged disciplines so as to develop your own visual language, ideas and mode of expression. In Each week you will have 2 hours of academic tuition supported by a 1 hour technical workshop. Each 6-week block will be delivered by a different academic and technical team. You will be encouraged to experiment, experience a range of facilities and equipment, and develop generic technical skills necessary to realise your projects.
CAEL1001 Contemporary Drawing: Experimental

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour studio class/week Prohibitions: CADR1006 Assessment: visual diary/research file (30%) and curated set project work (40%) and self-directed project work (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Experimental Drawing encourages you to develop your own visual language as a catalyst for creative thought and a means to develop greater visual literacy. Through an in-depth studio investigation into a variety of modes, approaches, materials, tools and techniques, Experimental Drawing opens the field of drawing into the exploration and discovery of new and interdisciplinary methods of mark making and visual communication. You will be encouraged to take risks, be innovative, work collaboratively, and stretch your perceptions of the medium by translating these experiences into a unique and speculative approach to the processes of drawing and mark making. In addition to studio based activities and production where you will develop a portfolio and establish archives of source material that you can draw on for future creative endeavours and experimentation, you will participate in peer-evaluation and undertake theoretical research.
CAEL1002 Contemporary Drawing: Life

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour studio class/week Prohibitions: CADR1005 Assessment: visual diary/research file (30%) and curated set project work (40%) and self-directed project work (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Life Drawing encourages you to develop your own visual language as a catalyst for creative thought and a means to develop greater visual literacy. The importance of observational drawing in the contemporary context can be observed by investigating the key conventions and precedents of the life drawing mode. By working through a series of practice led lab sessions investigating ways of evaluating, describing and illustrating the various elements of a visual image such as shape and form, space, line, values and texture, you will learn to apply, test and boldly question these techniques through the development of your own conceptually driven project. In addition to studio based activities and production where you will develop a portfolio and establish archives of source material that you can draw on for future creative and scholarly endeavours, you will participate in peer-evaluation and undertake theoretical research.
CAEL2039 Screen Arts: an Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Film Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: individual presentation and project proposal (15%) and assessment 1 (video project) (20%) and major self-directed project (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to the conceptual frameworks and technologies that shape the making of screen-based media and contemporary art practices. Through a series of lectures, seminars, tutorials and screenings you will explore the evolution of experimental film, video art and independent filmmaking from the 1960s to the present. You will engage in the production of a self-directed digital film that may be realized in any style or genre. The unit is supported by a technical program that provides you with the applied skills and competencies needed for the use of studio facilities and equipment.
CAEL2041 The Art of Sound and Noise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: directed project (40 %) and major self-directed project (60 %) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study approaches sound in the broadest sense as it crosses barriers through physical and cultural space, and exists as a force in the world. In this unit, you will undertake a studio-based approach to the production of sound art works, including sound objects, instruments, sonic sculpture, sound installation, performance and new ways of working with sound. The unit begins with the physicality of sound and music physics. You will listen to sonic phenomena, materials, forms and existing sound works. This unit will be conducted in an open studio framework including a variety of workshops, sound studios and digital labs.
CAEL2042 Photography and the Darkroom

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: technique task (20%) and concept task (20%) and self-directed major project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces the principles of black and white photography via the 35mm camera and the darkroom. You explore alternative documentary photography strategies by challenging the role of the camera to simply observe and capture. You experiment with the genres of reportage, street photography and conventional documentary practices, and are encouraged to take an interventionist approach to the urban environment. You are introduced to the 35 mm manual SLR camera, black and white film processing, dark room printing, film exposure and photographic print enlargement.
CAEL2044 Radical Rock Video

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: proposal documentation or journal (20%), introductory assignment (20%), major project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores the intersection between contemporary visual art practice and contemporary music and sound. Is it possible to make innovative connections between sound and image that embrace experimental music, sound arts and screen based experimental work, without reverting to the moribund conventions of commercial music video? In an age where everything seems to have already been done, are there new formations of art and music to be discovered, even by people who have no traditional skills in these areas? This unit operates within an open studio framework that encompasses all skill levels from beginner, to intermediate, to advanced. You will make creative and practical responses based on your interest in art and sound through guided and self-directed individual and collaborative projects.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2045 Site Works: Sculptural Interventions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: project proposal (30%), site work (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides a studio-based approach to designing and making art works for specific locations or in response to specific guidelines. Stepping outside of the gallery opens up possibilities for exploring some of the broader issues of art and everyday life. In this unit, you will consider the key issues and methodologies relevant for site specific, interventionist or tactically oriented art works, and develop a sound understanding of the proposals required in the competitive field of public art. The unit focuses on the development of your ideas with a view to encouraging inventive approaches to proposals and includes strategies for realising virtual and physical outcomes. The unit combines studio work, short presentations by the lecturer, student presentations and group discussion/critiques, and is conducted in the sculpture studio, the digital labs and various other locations.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2046 Painting Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 1000 level units in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit points of 1000 level Studio Foundation units in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: seminar presentation (30%) and production and exhibition of a painting (70%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From Piet Mondrian to Albert Oehlen, artists have been influenced by music. This has had both direct and sublimated effects on the development of the techniques and styles of painting. From seriality to polyrhythms, synchronicity between painting and music has been a constant for a century now. Abstraction has especially taken its cue from the autonomy of music to create a painting that is free from a direct representational quality and instead focuses on an engagement with its own reality through colour, materials and action. This unit of study investigates the dovetailing of painting and music, from modernism to contemporary art, and examines the current trends of painting, relating these processes to those of contemporary music. You will research and investigate the influences of music on painting, and create a work that has music as its core value.
CAEL2047 Animation

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: project proposal (30%), major self-directed project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to the fundamental concepts and skills associated with 2D animation production. The unit provides both a conceptual and technical framework for you to explore the possibilities of animation in relation to your existing practice or as a completely new endeavour. Working in the digital domain, you will explore a range of approaches including frame-by-frame animation and stop motion animation. The technical component of this course provides you with the necessary skills to realise a self-directed project while encouraging exploration and experimentation. Class discussions, seminars and individual tutorials support screenings of historical and contemporary animated works to allow you to situate your own projects within a contemporary context.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2048 Investigating Clay

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: experimental process folio (20%), proposal for final work (20%), final work (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides a studio-based approach to the production of creative work in ceramics. You will be introduced to concepts, methodologies and technologies integral to contemporary ceramics. You will also be introduced to historical and contemporary frameworks that underpin the processes and paradigms of ceramics today and provide the foundations of a 3D vocabulary. Thematic approaches accompany technical introductions to handbuilding, wheelwork, surface treatments and kiln firing to encourage exploration with ceramics methodologies. The unit develops and enhances critical skills through group and individual tutorials and critiques. This unit is suitable for those who have no or limited experience with the ceramic material and its technologies.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2049 Vessel as Concept: Hot Glass Intro

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit point at 1000 level Studio Foundation units in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent class presentation of creative work (25%), 1x1500wd equivalent class presentation of project proposal (35%), 1x2000wd equivalent final creative work assessment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines the glass vessel in everyday life and its application as a conceptual agent in contemporary art. By nature, the glassblowing process creates a vessel or container from a mass of molten glass. Through research projects you will investigate the psychology of the glass vessel through its function and physical properties. You will develop fundamental hand skills and glassblowing techniques through structured weekly workshops, and combine practical skills with contextual knowledge in the development of conceptually themed projects. You may work exclusively with glass or in conjunction with other media and processes.
CAEL2053 Screen Printing: an Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (20%) and major work (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to screen printing and its broad application across media. The unit explores the technical basics of this process through various projects. It provides for the development and enhancement of critical skills through group and individual tutorials and critiques and the acquisition of technical knowledge required to independently access and use the Printmedia studio facilities.
CAEL2054 Silversmithing: Exoskeleton Extension

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 1000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit points of 1000 level Studio Foundation units in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: technical samples (15%) and research presentation (20%) and major work (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From the symbolically charged through to the functionally utilized, the hammer formed metallic object builds upon the dynamic landscape of the body. In this unit of study you investigate the potential for an object to expand the metaphysical self. The malleable and ductile qualities of metal will be examined as a creative catalyst enabling material characteristics to form a transformative element of a work that is made for the body by the body. You will explore silversmithing processes, in alignment with your individual research interests, as a technical and conceptual starting point to negotiate ideas of metamorphosis and growth. The appropriate forming processes, including sinking, raising, hot forging and planishing, will be introduced alongside an examination of the historic foundations and key principles of contemporary metalsmithing, as a means to generate your own individual project.
CAEL2055 Bodyworks: Jewellery as Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 1000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit points of 1000 level Studio Foundation units in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: technical samples (15%) and research presentation (20%) and major work (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides a studio-based approach to the production of creative contemporary jewellery work that engages with the space and physical dimensions of the body. Fundamental to this approach is an investigation of the role of the worn or carried object in social communication. The unit provides for the development and enhancement of critical skills through group and individual tutorials and critiques and the acquisition of technical skills appropriate to the assigned projects.
CAEL2069 Screenwriting and Directing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: participation in seminars (30%) and script (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to the art and craft of writing for the screen. Through a series of lectures, seminars, tutorials and film screenings you will explore a range of approaches to screenwriting. These include looking at the structure of dialogue and character driven scripts, then moving to an analysis of more experimental approaches to script writing that rely less on character or dialogue and more on mood, situation and atmosphere. You will write an original script for a digital film that can be realized in any style or genre.
CAEL2072 Ceramics: Potter's Wheel as Sculptural Tool

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: experimental process folio (20%) and written research report (20%) and final studio work (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores notions of the void and the aperture through the development of hollow formed objects created by hand or the potter's wheel. You will be introduced to the creation of various common forming techniques on the potter's wheel and will be encouraged to use these to create new techniques and develop modular and sculptural assemblages. This unit also examines the philosophical underpinnings associated with the traditional and contemporary practice of this genre of ceramics through group discussion and individual research.
CAEL2076 Upcycled Glass: Introducing Warm Glass

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent class presentation of creative studio work (25%), 1x1500wd equivalent class presentation of studio project proposal (35%), 1x2000wd equivalent final creative studio work assessment (40%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines conceptual and practical applications of fused glass through contemporary art and design. In studio based research projects and contextual presentations you will develop your understanding of the role of glass as an everyday and cultural material that can be fused together to produce new forms and creative narratives. You will explore a variety of processes, including: diamond cutting, polishing, lathe-working, engraving and hot and cold glass joining. You will select a range of studio projects that combine sustainable, critical and practical skills to develop and realise creative works. You can work exclusively with glass or with other media andand creative processes.
CAEL2080 Etching: Expanded Workshops

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: preliminary small project (20%), research proposal (20%), major work (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces and enhances skills in etching. You will follow a project-based curriculum in a broad range of technically based workshops intrinsic to the medium of etching. You will be encouraged to engage in a sustained self-directed project addressing concepts and methodologies central to your creative ideas. This project will be supported by more specialised workshops that expand on conventional etched plate techniques. You will learn innovative methods that enable digital processes to be integrated with traditional print media and offer a greater flexibility in output and presentation. The unit promotes investigation and exploration across media to develop your creative practice.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2081 Fusion: Jewellery and Ceramics

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: research proposal and moulds (50%), final work (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Fusion refers to the merging or melting of different materials into one. Working across jewellery and ceramics, in this unit of study you consider this concept also in relationship to the construction of an object from multiple parts. In this sense the artist becomes alchemist, scientist, or musician, mixing, constructing and blending to create a new object. By experimenting with processes of moulding, you explore notions of multiplicity, the original, the copy and the archetype. This unit addresses the development of conceptual, formal and aesthetic approaches in making.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2085 Photography and the Lighting Studio

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: project 1 (40%) and project 2 research presentation (20%) and project 2 major work (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study offers you an introduction to lighting and its effects in photography. Considering the lighting studio as a site for experimentation and critical exploration, you will learn the fundamentals of lighting while exploring both how it has been historically used and how contemporary artists use it today both in and out of the studio. Through the nexus of photographic portraiture and still life, lighting is explored as a mechanism for both documenting and transforming its subjects/objects. You are encouraged to work in groups to create original photographic work for two major photo assignments. Please note this unit of study is for students who have had little or no experience in high-end digital photography, software and lighting. The unit of study introduces you to photo editing software, file management and the fundamentals of digital printing.
CAEL2092 Sculpture: Introduction

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: project proposal (20%) and final artwork (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides you with an introduction to building processes within Sculpture and Installation. You will be introduced to working in the sculpture studio, and in particular, will gain practical experience in plaster and wax and discover key contemporary artists who reinterpret the casting process in innovative ways. You will be invited to consider a range of ideas -including negative forms and anti-monuments - that challenge the preconceptions of what sculpture can be. Initially, you work through a series of material-based workshop activities to learn basic construction techniques as well as to gain confidence in the safe use of machinery and equipment within the studio and workshop. The unit introduces a broad range of traditional and contemporary sculptural practices (including the use of wood, metal, fibre, plastic) and encourages you to develop original and creative solutions. The unit combines studio work, short presentations by the lecturer, student presentations and group discussion/critiques. In consultation with the lecturer, you will develop a studio work proposal and create a finished work that responds to the notion of 'negative sculpture.'
CAEL2093 Sculpture: Installation and Space

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (20%) and final artwork (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will explore installation as a spatial practice within the expanded terrain of sculpture. You will examine installation as a hybrid form that negotiates and incorporates the boundaries of traditional art practices like painting, sculpture and video. The unit of study provides an overview of contemporary installation art practice and explores methods for producing work in a variety of media to activate and utilise space. Students explore innovative applications of conventional materials, found objects and time-based media such as video, sound and custom technologies in the development of their work. This unit engages with dedicated installations spaces and the adapting of environments and locations. The unit combines studio work, short presentations by the lecturer, student presentations and group discussion/critiques. In consultation with the lecturer, you will develop a studio work proposal and create a finished work.
CAEL2094 Painting: Transcultural Collaborations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr seminar/week and 1x 2hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit point at 1000 level Studio Foundation units in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Prohibitions: CAEL2067 Assessment: in class participation, preparation of reading material, active contribution to group discussions (10%) and reflective journal (200wd or equivalent weekly) (20%) and production and exhibition of fully resolved body of work (painting/s) (70%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
For Aboriginal people of Australia, the place where saltwater and freshwater meet, is a site of intermingling, mixing and sharing of knowledge. The Yolngu people of north-east Arnhem Land call this place where the river meets the sea: Ganmu and it is usually used as a metaphor for two way learning. This unit of study explores how contact with other cultures through the reciprocal sharing of images, stories, histories, experiences, ideas, skills and culture can activate collaborative practices to create meaningful connections both locally and globally. The investigation of issues such as representation and presentation, protocols and practices, combined with a critical understanding of the cultural complexities of Indigenous culture, will foster greater understanding and enable students to facilitate the development of a collaborative and sustainable practice.
CAEL2095 Video Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit points at 1000 level in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: directed project (40 %) and major self-directed project (60 %). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study approaches video art in the broadest sense as it unites a great variety of practices regarding time based manifestations of abiding artistic concerns. Video has become a pervasive medium in contemporary art and makes an appearance in many different contexts that span from the most experimental exhibition settings all the way through to the museum. In this unit, you will undertake a studio-based approach to the production of video art works, including video installation, single channel and synchronized multichannel artworks, streaming video and video as it appears in other digital forms. The aim of the unit is to produce original artworks that forge new image worlds and innovative production methodologies. This unit will be conducted in an open studio framework including a variety of workshops, studios and digital labs.
CAEL2096 Non-Objective Painting

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts major or 12 credit points of 1000 level Studio Foundation unit in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: 1 x studio-based reflections on outcomes of workshops (30%), 1 x studio based guided self-led project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit covers historical and contemporary concepts and techniques relating to non-objective painting. Painting is addressed in its history and as a category of contemporary art. It is broadly defined as an extended practice with a broad range of material, spatial and intellectual possibilities. Geometric abstraction, gestural abstraction and minimalism have all made their marks on contemporary painting, which often mixes them together. In the course a variety of these approaches are explored through focused and self-initiated projects. As their studies progress, students are encouraged to develop their own approaches and set out their own parameters to create a valid studio practice.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL2098 Intermediate Hot Glass

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr workshop/week Prerequisites: CAEL2049 or relevant prior experience commensurate to a 12 x 3hrs per week introduction to glass blowing Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent class presentation of creative work (25%), 1x1500wd equivalent class presentation of project proposal (35%), 1x2000wd equivalent final creative work assessment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Building on Introduction to Hot Glass this course will deepen your hands-on experience in glassblowing. The unit explores additional techniques such as mould blowing and hot sculpting, cold working and polishing skills such as lathe working. You will learn a range of different traditional methods as well as sustainable contemporary practice approaches. You will learn through series of directed and self-directed studio based assignments, and contextualise your ideas through the lens of contemporary global glass focused art and design practices. This unit is designed for students who have some previous experience in glassblowing.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL3014 Image/Object in Photomedia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Prohibitions: CAEL2043 Assessment: project 1 (40%) and research project (20%) and project 2 (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores how photography intersects with sculpture. You research and explore the relationship between objects and photography and how sculptural ideas can stretch the function of an image. You consider what a photograph may be materially when extended to encompass sculptural, performative and interactive dimensions. Projects may utilise and combine image-based practices such as digital photography and analogue photography, projection, print, performance, objects and installation to encourage an expanded approach to photographic practice.
CAEL3015 Glass in Time: Advanced Hot Glass

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Visual Arts including CAEL2049 Prohibitions: CAEL2078 Assessment: research project and presentation (20%) and self-directed project (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit of study you consider the scientific, cultural and artistic impact of Venetian glassblowing from the Renaissance to present day through research projects. Structured weekly workshops traverse contemporary use of a range of Venetian glassblowing techniques and methods. You will apply learned theoretical knowledge and developed practical skills to a self-directed work that reinterprets the Venetian glassmaking tradition. You may work exclusively with glass or in conjunction with other media and processes.
CAEL3016 Experimental Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: found footage film project (25%) and 16 mm film project (60%) and in-class presentation and product documentaion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores key processes and issues related to the production and exhibition of experimental film works. The unit includes discussions, readings and screenings of relevant historical and contemporary film works. It focuses on the creative potential of the physical properties of film. You will produce a short 16mm film project. A Bolex 16mm camera workshop and hand processing of 16mm film will also be an integral part of this unit of study.
CAEL3017 Skin and Sign: Ceramic Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prohibitions: CAEL2073 Assessment: experimental folio (20%) and proposal for final work (30%) and final work (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study will focus on the development of an in-depth understanding and application of the ceramic surface. It will explore notions of trace, impression, wound, scar, identification, memory and memento through material layering and surface specificity, and the construction of meaning associated with surface qualities such as depth, absorption and incorporation. You will be introduced to a range of applied ceramic surfaces including ceramic pencil, paint and crayon, glaze, screenprint and decal production, as well as found and mixed media surfaces, and kiln firings. Initial instruction and individual experimentation will form the foundations for the completion of a student-generated studio project. This unit would be of particular interest if you want to develop your investigation into three dimensional form and/or broaden the possibilities of the two dimensional surface.
CAEL3018 Introduction to Digital Publishing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prohibitions: CAEL2052 Assessment: digital booklet (20%) and typography design (20%) and digital publication (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores the boundary between artwork, publication and portfolio. The unit acquaints you with the principal tools of InDesign, a software program that has become industry standard for designing digital and paper publications. Focusing on experimental magazines and other small scale artist's publications the unit explores the visual language of contemporary publishing from an artist's perspective. You learn about the complex interplay of text, image and sequence involved in producing multipage documents/artworks through the practical experience of creating your own InDesign publication. A series of lectures and in-class digital tutorials will equip you with the technical skills and critical framework to produce intelligent, engaging and innovative output.
CAEL3020 Critical Bodies: Performance Art Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr studio practical/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Visual Arts major or 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Bachelor of Visual Arts Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (20%), 2x1500wd equivalent visual art project (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Critical Bodies explores innovative and exploratory approaches to contemporary Performance art practice, placing the body at the centre of these investigations. Using studio-based skills students will explore performativity as a broader concept through re-enactment, photo construction as tableau and video performance alongside 'live' actions.
CAEL3021 Expanded Painting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x0.5hr tutorial/week, 1x1.5hr studio practical/week, 1x0.25hr technical workshop/week for 3 weeks Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or Studio Foundation Assessment: 1x3600wd equivalent self-directed project (60%), 1x1200wd equivalent proposal (20%), 1x1200wd equivalent studio projects 1-3 (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit of study you will explore the interfaces between painting, installation, digital technology, monoprinting, sculpture and performance. In considering these hybrid forms you experiment with painting in the expanded field. You will work on a self-directed project developed through studio work, lectures, tutorials and group critiques.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CAEL3022 Posters to Paste-ups

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or Studio Foundation Prohibitions: CAEL2051 Assessment: 1x1900wd equivalent Presentation of works in context (40%), 3x600wd equivalent Production of experimental print (40%), 1x800wd equivalent Poster production and research (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Images made for public space have been integral to modern art. This unit looks at printmedia's role in this history, surveying agitprop graphics and subcultural poster making to examine the currency of screen-printing and digital processes in urban intervention. This will support studio research and the production of print works intended for public display.
CAEL3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

Writing Studies

WRIT1000 Introduction to Academic Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x900wd sentence task (20%), 1x900wd research task (20%), 1x900wd paragraph task (20%), 1x900wd review task (20%), 1x900wd revision / reflection task (20%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
WRIT1000 teaches the fundamentals of academic writing across disciplines. Frequent, short writing assignments are designed to help students engage with the writing process at the sentence and paragraph levels and and to make appropriate style, grammar, punctuation, and syntax choices. Students will learn to research topics, document sources in keeping with academic honesty principles, and edit and revise their own and others' writing. While WRIT1000 may be suitable for non-native English speakers, it is not a language acquisition UoS and assumes basic competence in English.
WRIT1001 Writing and Rhetoric: Academic Essays

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 4x500wd written assignments (40%), 1x1000wd oral presentation (20%), 1x1500wd essay (40%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The persuasive power of the English language emerges from its richness and variation. This unit introduces students to rhetorical theory as a resource for the creative construction of meaning. Students will learn to discover topics, arrange ideas, and analyse the delivery of arguments across a variety of contexts. We examine print, visual media, political debates and engage in virtual exchanges with universities around the world.
WRIT1002 Writing and Rhetoric: Argumentation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr online lecture/week, 1x1hr online readings and activities/week, 1x1hr online tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%),1x1000wd literature review (20%), 1x500wd critical analysis video (10%), 1x500wd critical analysis report (10%), 1x1500wd argumentative essay (40%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This is a fully online unit of study. It focuses on advanced rhetorical reasoning and the theory, construction, and delivery of sound arguments, which are critical to success in the university and the workplace. Designed to improve writing and critical thinking abilities, the unit teaches students to craft persuasive, ethical, and engaging arguments. It will focus on the production and reception of arguments across a range of genres, including digital environments. Online tutorials feature collaborative writing and editing exercises on global, participatory writing platforms.
WRIT2000 Contemporary Rhetoric

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Writing Studies Assessment: 1x1125wd analysis (25%), 1x1125wd comparison (25%), 1x1125wd essay (25%), 1x1125wd reflection (25%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will introduce students to contemporary theories and practices of rhetoric, examining the work of Kenneth Burke and Chaïm Perelman, among others. It will trace the development of contemporary rhetoric from the classical era, comparing these approaches through examples of social, political, and popular rhetoric across a range of genres. Students will develop a better understanding of the relationship between rhetoric and writing and how to apply rhetorical principles to the analysis, interpretation and production of a range of texts.
WRIT2002 Arguments that Change the World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture in flipped classroom mode/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Writing Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd close reading task (35%), 1x10min group poster presentation (20%), 1x500wd individual reflection (10%), 1x1500wd analytical report (35%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What do great poets, preachers and politicians have in common? Using case studies of enduring persuasive texts from the pulpit to the courtroom to the concert hall, this unit introduces students to rhetorical hermeneutics as a method of interpretation. The unit extends their ability to interrogate and think critically about various text types and their affective qualities. It cultivates intensive and effective research and reporting practices, through which students develop discipline-based inquiry questions to effectively discover, invent, produce, and deliver their own arguments.
WRIT3002 Rhetorical Traditions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Writing Studies minor Assessment: 1x2000wd assignment: comparative essay (45%), 1x1800wd assignment: descriptive essay (40%), 1x700wd in-class presentation (15%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From Aristotle to Vico, Joyce to Oodgeroo, multiple traditions of rhetoric have influenced society. In this unit, experts in medieval, modernist, new and cultural rhetorics will help you understand how rhetorical traditions emerge as you form your own argument about language, thought and behaviour.
WRIT3003 Visual Rhetoric and Contemporary Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Writing Studies minor Assessment: 1x2000wd individual research essay (40%), 1x1500wd analytical report (35%), 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (25%). Please refer to the unit of study outline for individual sessions https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How are we to make sense of our visually-orientated world? Debating theoretical, historical, and methodological developments in the fields of writing studies and rhetoric, we will develop a clearer understanding of the vital role that visual and nonverbal rhetoric plays in the contemporary realm.