Table S Electives - Business School Descriptions

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.
 

Table S Electives - Business School

1000-level units of study

ACCT1006 Accounting and Financial Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BUSS1030 or ACCT1005 Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Accounting and Financial Management is an introduction to financial reporting, and the gateway unit to further study in accounting. This unit builds upon the accounting context, presented in BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society, and aims to develop the technical skills to record basic business transactions through accounting systems. In addition to this technical focus, specific attention is given to the way in which the accounting information can be used to undertake financial management and analysis, to give students the ability to produce and interpret financial reports.
BUSS1020 Quantitative Business Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ECMT1010 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or STAT1021 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1115 Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (equivalent of band 4 in the NSW HSC subject Mathematics or band E3 in Mathematics Extension 1 or 2) OR MATH1111 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
All graduates from the BCom need to be able to use quantitative techniques to analyse business problems. This ability is important in all business disciplines since all disciplines deal with increasing amounts of data, and there are increasing expectations of quantitative skills. This unit shows how to interpret data involving uncertainty and variability; how to model and analyse the relationships within business data; and how to make correct inferences from the data (and recognise incorrect inferences). The unit will include instruction in the use of software tools (primarily spreadsheets) to analyse and present quantitative data.
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting at an introductory level. It aims to provide students with a user-focussed understanding of accounting information. The interactive format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The course moves from internal business planning, to an introduction to key accounting concepts, then a user focussed approach to understanding simple financial statements, working capital and evolving topics such as sustainability and corporate governance. The user-focussed course aims to provide desirable graduate attributes such as critical thinking and decision making skills through the various knowledge building tasks. Authentic assessment is used to evaluate and assist students in the learning process.
BUSS1040 Economics for Business Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ECON1001 OR ECON1040 Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (equivalent of band 4 in the NSW HSC subject Mathematics or band E3 in Mathematics Extension 1 or 2) OR MATH1111 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Economics underlies all business decisions, from pricing to product development, to negotiations, to understanding the general economic environment. This unit provides an introduction to economic analysis with a particular focus on concepts and applications relevant to business. This unit addresses how individual consumers and firms make decisions and how they interact in markets. It also introduces a framework for understanding and analysing the broader economic and public policy environment in which a business competes. This unit provides a rigorous platform for further study and a major in economics as well as providing valuable tools of analysis that complement a student's general business training, regardless of their area of specialisation.
CLAW1001 Foundations of Business Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The entire fabric of commerce is woven from a complex legal regime, judicial and statutory, which regulates all commercial activity. Every decision in business and every transaction and relationship is made in the context of this legal regime. The aim of Foundations of Business Law is to introduce the students to the legal framework and regulatory systems which underlie all business activity and to expose them to the legal implications of commercial conduct. This unit of study introduces the Australian legal system and key areas of substantive business law including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and privacy), property and securities, white collar crime, intellectual property, competition and consumer law (in particular advertising, product liability and unfair contracts), business structures and operations, misleading and unconscionable conduct and dispute resolution.
CLAW1003 Company Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLAW1001 Prohibitions: CLAW2214 or CLAW2201 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Companies exist in all parts of business and society. All who wish to participate effectively in a business environment need to understand the general nature and operation of companies. This unit focuses on key company law issues relevant to business. Students learn about the process and effects of incorporation; the roles, rights and responsibilities of directors and members; and the ways in which the activities of companies are regulated. Each of these topics is addressed in an interactive setting, with case studies relating to current business developments forming an integral part of the learning activities in this unit.
IBUS1101 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides the foundational knowledge in international business. The focus is on understanding the strategy of firms in the context of increasing globalization of markets and production. Students gain knowledge about multinational enterprises from the developed and developing economies, theories and frameworks explaining foreign direct investment and trade and country and firm level factors that impact global strategy.
IBUS1102 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: IBUS2102 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Critical to effective management in international and multicultural business environments is an understanding of cultural differences and how to manage those differences. This unit provides conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that develops an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Strategies for managing and harnessing cultural differences are also evaluated. The subject matter is explored from an internal perspective as well as from an external perspective, looking at issues within the company as well as issues between the multinational company and its host environment. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management; the meaning and dimensions of culture; comparative international management styles; managing communication across cultures; global business ethics; cross-cultural negotiations; cross-cultural leadership and motivation; culture and consumer behaviour; and managing cross-cultural conflict.
INFS1000 Digital Business Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ISYS1003 or INFO1000 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The Digital Economy, with its focus on information as a key business resource, has changed the way Business Information Systems (BIS) is viewed in organisations. BIS are now seen as enablers of innovation in which people, supported by powerful technology, are considered to be the most important component. This is because problem-solving, innovation and critical thinking skills cannot be outsourced or easily acquired by competitors. This unit is designed to develop your understanding of how businesses operate. It shows how information systems support business operations and management through integration of people, business processes and systems. You will be provided with an introduction to state-of-the-art business analysis techniques, frameworks and models to assist in understanding the nature and contribution of BIS in a range of business contexts. With its emphasis on business rather than IT, this unit does not require prior IT-related experience. In this unit, you will learn about the increasingly important role of IT in business and acquire valuable business analysis and problem-solving skills.
INFS1020 Working in Digital Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Digital ecosystems (such as social media, blockchain, technology platforms, artificial intelligence, big data, people analytics, and cybersecurity) fundamentally change the way we collect and present ideas, communicate, and work together. In this unit, students are introduced to various digital ecosystems and their implications for how work is done. Students learn about how employers recruit graduates online, what it is like to join and work in a modern, digital workplace, and the tensions that arise when traditional, structured workplaces are transformed through digital, flexible, and networked ways of working. Students engage in hands-on activities to acquire skills for how to present themselves effectively and professionally online (personal branding), how to communicate in digital channels in an organisational context (professional communication), how to effectively search for and work with digital information (data literacy), and how to digitally coordinate work in teams.
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in Semester 1 and Semester 2 sessions.
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
MKTG1002 Marketing Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Marketing research is an essential research activity which provides objective, accurate and timely information to entities (e.g. government, businesses and not-for-profit organisations) to help reduce the uncertainty and risk associated with decision-making. This unit introduces students to the preparation and planning work required when initiating a marketing research project. Conducting market research requires a thought process to formulate research questions, and propose a research strategy adhering to best practices that answer the research questions posed. Particular emphasis is given to the initial stages of the market research process involving problem identification, problem contextualisation and conceptualisation, developing a research proposal, conducting exploratory research through secondary data and administering a pilot survey as well as conducting some basic analysis.
QBUS1040 Foundations of Business Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH 1000-level units which must include MATH1905 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with the necessary foundations and skills to undertake second year units in business analytics and successfully complete the Business Analytics major. Theoretical models discussed are motivated by real-life business applications and decision problems. The unit provides a grounding in linear algebra (matrix properties) and calculus and applies these methods to regression models with multiple variables. Topics covered include logistic regression, interaction and nonlinear effects. The unit also introduces the key ideas of optimization (particularly for quadratic problems) and shows how optimisation models can be used to make statistical estimates. At the same time as building the understanding of the mathematical foundations needed in business analytics, the unit helps students to build programming skills to solve practical problems from the business area. The unit makes use of modern programming languages such as Python.
SIEN1000 Innovation and Entrepreneurship Foundation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In this unit students acquire foundational knowledge about innovation and entrepreneurship (I&E), including: perspectives, theoretical frameworks, processes, and mindsets required for success. Students discuss topics such as: sources of innovation; different types of I&E; defining and operationalising 'value'; ethical and responsible innovation; I&E for sustainability, and contemporary technological frontiers and trends. This unit takes an inclusive, multidisciplinary view, identifying complementarities and specificities of innovation and entrepreneurship across different disciplines to enhance students' ability to articulate and defend arguments on the topics of innovation and entrepreneurship in their course of study.
SIEN1001 Innovators' Skills and Actions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: SIEN1000 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit presents students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge and hone foundational skills in innovation and entrepreneurship: creativity and ideation; design thinking and empathy; opportunity framing, identification and construction; experimentation and hypothesis validation; systems thinking; critical thinking; project management; and networking skills. The unit introduces various frameworks and processes for developing ideas and opportunities into viable business/social venture concepts; and requires students to apply them. The unit requires students to engage with the disciplines and industries/sectors in which they are interested, where they actively search for and construct opportunities. Students are introduced to and work with the Business, Lean and Impact-Gap Canvas frameworks. At the completion of this unit, students have a 'bank' of business/social venture opportunities ready for further validation and development as well as an insights map of their own understanding and knowledge of their chosen discipline or industry
WORK1003 Foundations of Work and Employment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit draws on concepts from industrial relations and human resource management to examine the interests and strategies of workers, unions, managers, employers and the state. It explores the relationships between these parties as they seek to manage their environments and workplaces and to exercise control over each other. The unit enables students to understand how and why the organisation, regulation and management of work are changing in Australia and globally. As well as providing an introduction to all aspects of the study of the employment relationship, this a foundation unit the industrial relations and human resource management and management majors.
WORK1004 Foundations of Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: WORK2201 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This is a foundational unit in the Management and IR and HRM subject areas. An introductory overview of management methods and approaches is provided which forms the basis of study for an advanced specialisation in management. The unit examines management as a process of planning, organising, leading and controlling the efforts of organisational members and discusses how recent trends such as globalisation, economic change and the effects of new technology have led to profound changes in how organisations are managed. The unit explores these issues with respect to both large and small, public and private, and domestic and foreign organisations.

2000-level units of study

ACCT2011 Financial Accounting A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ACCT1001 or ACCT1005 or BUSS1030) and (ACCT1002 or ACCT1006) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit examines the accounting and reporting practices of reporting entities, particularly listed public companies. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate, the various regulatory requirements (professional and statutory) governing financial reporting. The unit commences with an overview of the financial reporting environment and theories that seek to explain the accounting policy choices of management. This framework provides a basis for examining a range of specific issues in financial accounting. The emphasis throughout the unit is on both the application of specific accounting techniques/rules and the conceptual/theoretical issues associated with alternative accounting methods.
ACCT2019 Management Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ACCT1001 or ACCT1005 or BUSS1030) and (ACCT1002 or ACCT1006) Prohibitions: ACCT2012 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with an introduction to the core knowledge requirements of management/cost accounting; it equips them with basic skills to use an industry-standard accounting system and management accounting information efficiently and effectively. Areas specifically covered include: cost terms and purposes, cost behaviour, cost - volume - profit analysis, cost estimation, basic and alternative product costing methods, detailed study of the mechanics of the budgeting process (master budgets, flexible budgets, standard costing and variance analysis, capital budgeting), decision making using relevant costs/revenues and cost allocation. This unit also exposes students to key topics linking to the value chain framework, management controls, Balanced Scorecards, strategy maps, responsibility accounting, transfer pricing and organisational structures.
BANK2011 Banking and the Financial System

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (BUSS1020 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points in MATH units including MATH1905) and (BUSS1040 or ECON1001 or ECON1002) Prohibitions: ECOS2004 Assumed knowledge: FINC2011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit covers money, commercial banking and central banking and the interactions with the other aspects of the financial system including the financial instruments that facilitate a transfer of resources from savers to investors and the financial markets that allow financial instruments to be traded efficiently. There is a concentration on understanding the financial institutions within the financial system that provide a wide-range of financial services including access to financial markets and the process of financial intermediation. Students are exposed to monetary policy implementation by central banks and the resultant economic impacts both nationally and internationally. Current regulatory settings and government regulatory agencies responsible for these and policy debates are also emphasised.
CLAW2202 Business Failure and Restructuring

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLAW2201 or CLAW1003 or CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Financial difficulty is an ever present reality for individuals and businesses. This unit addresses corporate insolvency and the bankruptcy of individuals and their consequences, and legal and commercial strategies for financial rehabilitation. The focus of the unit is corporate insolvency and the forms of external administration (receivership, voluntary administration, deeds of company arrangement, schemes of arrangements and winding up) designed to either rescue the corporation or, if this is not possible, to provide a fair and orderly process for dealing with its property. Particular emphasis is given to rescue and reconstruction under voluntary administration. Director's duties in the insolvency context, and corporate group and cross-border insolvency, are also discussed.
CLAW2205 Competition and Consumer Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLAW1001 or CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Competition and consumer law impacts on everyone and on every business. This unit examines provisions in the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (Cwth) that regulate a range of business activities, including, dealings between businesses and with consumers, pricing, advertising and unfair practices. The focus will be on current enforcement priorities of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and topics covered will include: cartel conduct, misuse of market power, vertical restraints on competition, anti-competitive acquisitions and key aspects of Australian consumer law including: product safety, consumer guarantees, unfair contract terms, unconscionable conduct and misleading or deceptive conduct. Students will analyse legal and business issues involving competition and consumer law arising from given fact situations and real-world contexts to increase awareness of legal risk situations in business and understanding of how these risks may be managed.
CLAW2207 Business, Ethics and the Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLAW1001 or CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Australian businesses operate in a complex regulatory environment that imposes legal obligations on business conduct. Society is increasingly demanding ethical and social responsibility from business, its managers and their professional advisers. This unit analyses the relationship between business, ethics and the law. This unit applies ethical philosophies to case studies in order to explore the types of decisions made by professionals and business managers. The unit examines the professional and legal obligations of accountants, auditors and lawyers and the interaction of these professionals with company officers. The unit aims to assist students to understand and apply ethics to their professional life and to governance in business.
CLAW2209 Intellectual Property for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Innovation is a key driver of business. This unit addresses the intellectual property regime - the statutory and common law mechanisms that recognise and protect creative effort and proprietary knowledge and reward innovation. The intellectual property rights available under the law are discussed but the focus is on the commercial implications of the IP regime. This unit covers not only the protection and enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights [IPRs] but also their commercialisation and their management. The unit outlines the key IPRs granted by the statutory IP regimes - trademarks, copyright, designs and patents - as well as the common law protection of confidential information and trade secrets. The protection of trade designations, branding and character merchandising through the statutory misleading or deceptive conduct action is also covered as is the protection of business goodwill through restraint of trade covenants. The ownership of IP, its protection internationally and its commercialisation through licensing and technology transfers are also discussed.
CLAW2211 Commercial Practice in China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
China is currently the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This Unit of Study addresses the frequently asked questions of what underpins commercial practice in China and how to do business with China. It explores China's unique business environment, which has resulted from its culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The Unit first outlines the Chinese business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of commercial practice in China such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW2212 Franchising

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Franchising is an increasingly popular business model in Australia and internationally which offers an effective strategy for expanding an existing business or entering an industry. It is rapidly becoming the dominating force in the distribution of goods and services. This unit examines the nature, development and operation of franchising and its growing influence in Australia and overseas. It addresses key legal and commercial issues in establishing, structuring and managing franchise systems as well as legal and commercial issues arising in the course of the continuing business relationship. Particular emphasis is placed on franchising development in the ASEAN countries.
CLAW2214 Business Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CLAW1001 or CLAW1003 or CLAW2201 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The entire fabric of commerce is woven from a complex legal regime which regulates all commercial activity. The dominant vehicle for this commercial activity is the limited liability company. A thorough understanding of key aspects of the legal and regulatory frameworks for business and the operation and governance of corporations is essential for business professionals and those who engage in business activity in Australia. The overall aim of this unit is to introduce students to the range of issues likely to be encountered in the contemporary commercial context and the legal implications of such conduct.
FINC2011 Corporate Finance I

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: {(BUSS1020 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001) or [(MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115)] or 6 credit points in MATH units including MATH1905)} and (BUSS1040 or ECON1001 or ECON1002) Assumed knowledge: BUSS1030 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and their application to (1) valuation of risky assets including stocks, bonds and entire corporations, (2) pricing of equity securities, and (3) corporate financial policy decisions including dividend, capital structure and risk management policies. Emphasis is placed on the application of the material studied and current practices in each of the topic areas.
FINC2012 Corporate Finance II

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit builds on FINC2011 Corporate Finance I, by extending basic concepts in corporate financing, investing and risk management. The unit presents current theories of corporate financing and their practical application in corporate investment and capital budgeting. The unit also examines securities and securities markets with an emphasis on pricing, investment characteristics and their use by corporations to manage risk. The securities examined include: bonds and related fixed income products; futures and options. The goal of the unit is to broaden students' knowledge of corporate finance in preparation for further study in finance in 300 level courses.
IBUS2020 Chinese Economy and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides an overview of the economic foundations of China's global business expansion and examines the core facets of China's economic and business system, including China's market transition, the role of government, the rural and urban economy, labour markets, the financial system, the knowledge-based economy, international trade and investment and questions of sustainability. The unit is designed for students interested in gaining a basic understanding of modern China business as well as a wide range of challenges in doing business in/with China in today's global environment.
IBUS2101 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study aim to understand how multinational enterprises strategize and operate in global competition. Major topics include the International Business Environment (e.g. the differences in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments); International Business Strategy (e.g. International expansion strategy, entry mode choices, cross-border strategic alliances, and mergers and acquisitions); and International Business Management (e.g. design, structure and control of international operations; and foreign subsidiary management). The emphasis of the unit is on the application of contextual knowledge about international business and strategic management theories as tailored to the Asia Pacific, to analyse and make decisions faced by companies operating in the Asia Pacific region.
IBUS2103 International Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: IBUS1102 or IBUS2102 Prohibitions: IBUS3102 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces students to the nature of risk management, particularly the identification and analysis of risk and the consequences for international business actors. Emphasis is placed on surveying some of the environments that can potentially generate risk for global companies, identifying how these risks can impact various aspects of market composition and market participation, and analyzing the impacts of these risks on profitability and firm viability. The business environments surveyed include the international financial system, government and regulation of business activity, compliance risk, corporate social responsibility and activism, as well as issues associated with country and political risk.
IBUS2104 Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In order to be a successful entrepreneur, it is necessary to have knowledge of several fundamental business processes. The most effective way to master the critical skills and concepts of entrepreneurship is by developing a pitch and a business plan which simulates, as much as possible, the real world processes of starting a business. In this unit, students learn how to investigate customer needs and markets to generate an innovative idea for a start-up. Students also participate in the realistic simulation of the creation of a start-up from the best student-submitted ideas and develop these ideas into a business model. All students join a team that remains together for the duration of the unit, creating and pitching sections of a business plan as well as drafting the final version. This unit brings together skills acquired across other disciplines of study and requires active participation.
INFS2010 Managing Information in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Organisations need to systematically manage their information and knowledge resources to compete effectively in today's digital economy. In this unit, students develop an understanding of the main issues businesses face when they develop and implement information management initiatives. Students are introduced to the tools and systems that enable organisations to acquire, store, distribute, analyse, and leverage information and knowledge resources. By focusing on the theoretical and practical principles that link people, information, and organisations, this unit builds understanding of the processes of generating, communicating, and using information in organisations, and the way these can be integrated with business strategy and information technology.
INFS2030 Digital Business Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit will provide you with a detailed overview of the concepts and models used in doing business digitally via the Internet. These concepts and models will enable you to evaluate, synthesise and implement Internet-enabled business models. The unit will provide the critical link between the firm's performance and modern Internet technologies, such as e-Commerce platforms, Social Media and Social Networking. Emphasis will be put on the utilisation of Internet technologies to enable new forms of digital business, rather than on the technologies themselves. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2040 Working in High-Performing Project Teams

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO3402 or ENGG1850 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFS1020 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Projects are a common way of managing organisational transformation and change, the development of new products and the implementation of Information Technology (IT) in business. Information Systems (IS) business analysts will work in projects and need an understanding of both project management and the project environment. This unit will introduce you to the end-to-end project management lifecycle as described in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). You will learn how to successfully manage projects from initiation through execution to completion. The focus of this unit will be on the management, execution, and coordination of project activities. To this end, you will learn hands-on project management techniques and gain first-hand experience with a modern online project management platform, including an introduction to agile project management methodologies.
INFS2050 Data Governance and Technology Assurance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFS3010 or INFS3030 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Data governance is a major imperative for organisations in effectively managing, using, protecting and leveraging their critical data assets. This unit introduces students to key concepts, processes, technologies and stakeholders related to the design and implementation of a data governance program. The unit takes an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach that examines standards, frameworks and methodologies for managing data quality, protecting critical and sensitive information, supporting business analytics and meeting compliance obligations. In examining different stages of the data lifecycle, students also learn about legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, policy implications, required skill sets and accountabilities.
MKTG2112 Consumer Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit examines the psychological, social, and cultural aspects of consumer behaviour on the marketing decisions of public and private organisations. Concepts and principles are drawn from disciplines such as cognitive psychology, social psychology, sociology, anthropology, and demography to discover and understand various aspects of consumer behaviour. Specific topics of study include: cultural, demographic and psychographic influences; reference group influences; household decision processes and consumption behaviour; consumer perception and learning; motivation, personality and emotion; consumer attitudes; and purchase decision processes.
MKTG2113 Marketing Insights

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 and MKTG1002 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Fundamental to marketing is a requirement to understand the environment and how to establish an on-going connection with customers in order to meet ever-changing needs and wants more effectively. Marketing insights address such dynamism and interplay in the marketplace by engaging in applied research to generate insights and conveying them in a meaningful and useful way to aid marketing decisions. This unit equips students with the practical knowledge and technical skills necessary to see through the entire research process involving project planning, collecting and analysing data, and generating insights. Particular focus is given to the use of different qualitative and quantitative research strategies for data collection, including: secondary data collection, observation and projective techniques, questionnaire design, and experimental design.
QBUS2310 Management Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Students commencing from 2018: QBUS1040; Pre-2018 commencing students: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905 Prohibitions: ECMT2620 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The ability to understand and mathematically formulate decision problems is a fundamental skill for managers in any organisation. This unit focuses on basic management science modelling techniques used in capacity planning, production management, and resource allocation. Students learn to approach complex real-life problems, formulate appropriate models and offer solution procedures to ensure optimal use of resources. Methods include linear programming, integer programming, non-linear programming, and goal programming.
QBUS2810 Statistical Modelling for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Students commencing from 2018: QBUS1040; Pre-2018 continuing students: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905 Prohibitions: ECMT2110 Assumed knowledge: This unit relies on mathematical knowledge at the level of the Maths in Business program, including calculus and matrix algebra. Students who do not meet this requirement are strongly encouraged to acquire the needed mathematical skills prior to enrolling in this unit Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Statistical analysis of quantitative data is a fundamental aspect of modern business. The pervasiveness of information technology in all aspects of business means that managers are able to use very large and rich data sets. This unit covers a range of methods to model and analyse statistical dependencies in such data, extending the introductory methods in BUSS1020. The methods are useful for detecting, analysing and making inference about patterns and dependences within the data so as to support business decisions. This unit offers an insight into the main statistical methodologies for modelling statistical dependence in both discrete and continuous business data. This provides the information required for a range of specific tasks, e.g. in financial asset valuation and risk measurement, market research, demand and sales forecasting and financial analysis, among others. The unit emphasises real empirical applications in business, finance, accounting and marketing, using modern software tools.
QBUS2820 Predictive Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: QBUS2810 or ECMT2110 or DATA2002 Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes mathematical knowledge at the level of the Maths in Business program (including calculus and matrix algebra) and basic computer programming skills at the level of QBUS2810 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Predictive analytics are a set of tools to enable managers to exploit the patterns found in transactional and historical data. For example major retailers invest in predictive analytics to understand, not just consumers' decisions and preferences, but also their personal habits, so as to more efficiently market to them. This unit introduces different techniques of data analysis and modelling that can be applied to traditional and non-traditional problems in a wide range of areas including stock forecasting, fund analysis, asset allocation, equity and fixed income option pricing, consumer products, as well as consumer behaviour modelling (credit, fraud, marketing). The forecasting techniques covered in this unit are useful for preparing individual business forecasts and long-range plans. The unit takes a practical approach with many up-to-date datasets used for demonstration in class and in the assignments.
SIEN2001 Validating Ideas and Building Ventures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: IBUS2104 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In order to be a successful innovator or entrepreneur, it is necessary to have knowledge of several fundamental business and organizing processes. The most effective way to master the critical skills and concepts of innovation and entrepreneurship is by developing a pitch and a business/social venture plan which simulates, as much as possible, the real world processes of launching a business or social venture. In this unit, students learn how to investigate customer/user needs as well as stakeholder concerns to generate an innovative idea for a start-up or social innovation initiative. Students also participate in a realistic simulation of the creation of a start-up/social innovation initiative, selected from the best student-submitted ideas, and develop these ideas into a responsible, sustainable business model. All students join a team that remains together for the duration of the unit, creating and pitching sections of a business plan as well as drafting the final version. This unit brings together skills acquired across other disciplines of study and requires active participation.
SIEN2210 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 40 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2210 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit explores how strategy is formulated, implemented and evaluated. Strategic management concepts, frameworks and tools are applied to organizational case studies. Current debates in strategic management are evaluated for their relevance to strategists in a range of organizational contexts.
WORK2203 Work and Industrial Relations Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit points of 1000-level units of study Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The aim of this unit of study is to provide an understanding of the institutions and processes underpinning government policies and regulations relating to work, industrial relations and labour markets. The current intensity and importance of policy debates make it all the more important to develop understandings of work and industrial relations policy which are evidence-based, intellectually rigorous and historically informed. This unit is framed by these considerations. Particular topics may include: the development of policy; the workings of parliaments, government departments and agencies, tribunals and courts; wage determination; the influence of lobby groups such as business groups, think-tanks and trade unions; gender, work and family policies; productivity; immigration and skills policies; contemporary policy such as climate change, the gig economy, workforce insecurity and unemployment; and the outcomes and implications of policy change.
WORK2205 Strategic Human Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit points of 1000-level units of study Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit examines the strategic nature of human resource management (HRM) within organisations, building on the foundational coverage of HRM issues and concepts introduced in WORK1003. A central theme explored in this unit is how organisations can best and strategically manage their human resources for the mutual, long-term benefit of both employers and employees. The unit highlights the interplay between strategic focus of HRM and day-to-day processes and practices, including attraction and selection; retention and development; managing performance and rewards; diversity and inclusion; workplace health and well-being; and conflict management. Students in this unit are asked to consider and evaluate many of the ‘big’ people management challenges facing organisations in a rapidly changing economic and social context.
WORK2218 Managing Organisational Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 24 Junior credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit aims to give students the ability to understand how organisations operate. As an introductory organisational behaviour unit, it covers key debates across a range of social science disciplines including business, management, psychology, sociology, and communication studies. Key topics explored include job attitudes, power, team and team processes, organisational design, organisational culture and organisational change.

3000-level units of study

ACCT3011 Financial Accounting B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ACCT2011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces students to accounting for investments in entities that are controlled, significantly influenced, or jointly controlled by the investor. The unit starts by assessing whether an investment should be consolidated, the process of consolidation, the preparation of consolidated financial statements for corporate groups, including the treatment of goodwill, intra-group transactions and non-controlling interests. Other aspects of group accounting, such as equity accounting, segment disclosures, related party disclosures, and foreign currency translation are investigated. A critical analysis of group accounting is then undertaken, including a consideration of the outcomes of related processes, and the impacts on users. The unit also critically evaluates current issues in accounting regulation and practice, and the politics of the standard-setting process. Accounting issues regarding financial instruments are further developed focusing on hedge accounting as a special case. Finally, voluntary disclosures for social and environmental reporting are considered. This unit aims to further develop students' written communication skills and critical and analytic skills within the context of corporate group activities.
ACCT3013 Financial Statement Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ACCT2011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Although the appropriate 'form' of financial analysis depends largely on the specific context (e.g. equity investment, credit extension, analysis of supplier/customer health, competitor analysis, regulatory overview or intervention, valuation for takeover/restructuring), many of the techniques of financial analysis are common to each. A primary purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of these techniques, as well as the inherent difficulties in their application. Specific issues addressed include the analysis of business performance and disclosure, the analysis of earnings quality, cash flow assessment, credit worthiness and accounting-based valuation methods.
ACCT3015 Data Analytics for Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ACCT2011 and (ACCT2012 or ACCT2019) Assumed knowledge: Completion of INFS3110 (or INFS2001) is desirable Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides an overview of data analytics for accounting. Traditional accounting techniques and practices were developed in the industrial era (a low information environment) and have changed very little since. Financial reports tend to be historical and financial in nature, heavily aggregated, static and paper based. This unit considers how the mega-trend of 'Big Data', artificial intelligence and robotics is impacting and shaping current accounting, financial reporting and auditing practices and their likely impact on future practices. This UoS also explores how Big Data and artificial intelligence is currently used in accounting practice; and the potential of these techniques to shape future practices in specific areas such as accounting measurement and forecasting, audit sampling and the timing and frequency of reporting (as examples). The unit also introduces students to current accounting research in the field of Big Data and artificial intelligence.
ACCT3016 Sustainability Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ACCT2011 and (ACCT2012 or ACCT2019) Assumed knowledge: Completion of the stated prerequisites will be sufficient for students to perform at the expected academic level for a 3000 level UoS Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit explores the theory and practice of organisational sustainability, focusing specifically on the role of accounting techniques and accountants. Statements from an organisation that it is addressing 'sustainability' may reflect a diversity of concerns, initiatives, and impacts. Organisational sustainability may include initiatives focused on climate change, carbon pollution, water, waste, rethinking the product-base, along with initiatives targeted to employees, customers, investors and/or the broader community. Consideration is initially given to what sustainability can mean, specifically framed within the context of accounting. As such, the unit reviews issues such as sustainability reporting, management control and accounting of sustainability related impacts, assurance of sustainability reporting, and investor analysis. The unit engages closely with published academic research, considering the theory of sustainability accounting, and contrasting this with empirical insights into the realities and challenges in practice. In so doing, the unit encourages a critical lens to explore questions including how accounting tools might enhance control and decision making, and more fundamentally, how can or should organisations and accounting contribute to a more sustainable planet.
ACCT3020 Consulting for Management Control Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ACCT2011 and (ACCT2012 or ACCT2019) Assumed knowledge: Completion of the Unit Prerequisite should equip students with the necessary knowledge and competency to undertake this Unit Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In this unit, students learn to identify different forms of management control across a range of businesses and evaluate how they contribute to a variety of strategic objectives. Using case studies sourced from real businesses and contemporary research, Consulting for Management Control Systems develops students’ understanding of how controls are used differently by various groups within a business – sometimes at the detriment of strategic goals – and challenge students to provide and critically assess recommendations for business problems. This unit is intended for students who are interested in the behavioural implications of using management controls, who wish to develop both oral and written communication skills, and who favour analytical and critical approaches to addressing business issues. Consulting for Management Control Systems is aimed at preparing students for a career in consulting and other professional services.
ACCT3031 International Corporate Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ACCT2011 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to have an understanding of the key principles and rules of specified accounting standards and be able to apply them in the context of business scenarios. Students are also expected to comprehend the form and content of published financial statements and be able to explain their function Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit examines the evolving view of corporate governance from an international perspective, with reference to Australian principles. Corporate governance from a narrow view is concerned with how a corporation is controlled, to the establishment of sets of arrangements affecting the conduct of an organisation and its relationship with stakeholders. Specific issues examined in this unit include the legal framework; control and culture of the modern corporation; operations of a Board; role of board sub-committees; Boards and the development or endorsement of strategies; measuring and rewarding performance; corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure; corporate governance and the audit process; governance within the global financial crisis.
BANK3011 Bank Financial Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BANK2011 or ECOS2004 or FINC2011 Prohibitions: FINC3018 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The objective of the unit is to expose students to the management of financial risks in banks. The unit examines how financial markets impact on the management of commercial banks and the risks they are exposed to, together with the techniques and approaches used in the measurement and management of these risks. Topics covered include the theory and practice of banking from a financial management perspective, interest rate and foreign exchange market risks, credit risk, liquidity risk, financial management, interest rate and credit derivatives, investment and loan management strategies and portfolio modelling, liability and deposit management, performance analysis, and industry developments.
BANK3012 Bank Supervision

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BANK2011 or ECOS2004 or FINC2011 Assumed knowledge: BANK3011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides undergraduate students with knowledge and a greater understanding of the central issues and principles underpinning recent developments in the global regulation and supervision of banking/financial institutions. The concept of financial stability as the goal of public policy and the rationale for prudential regulation and supervision of banks is discussed first. Students are then exposed to a range of concepts and issues pertaining to the measurement, management and prudential regulation of key risks in banking (i.e. market risk, credit risk, operational risk, liquidity risk). Other elements in the unit entail discussion and examination of issues relating to the concept of capital adequacy and risk-based capital ratios with particular reference to Basel Capital Accords; the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision; different national approaches to regulation and supervision of banks; government financial safety nets (i.e.'Lender of Last Resort' and depositor protection schemes); post-crisis structural banking reform proposals.
BANK3013 International Banking Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BANK2011 or ECOS2004 or FINC2011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit covers various theoretical and applied issues for the international financial markets in which international banks operate in. Topics covered include theories of international banking; internationalisation of banking - US, Japan and Chinese experience; competitiveness strategies; international banking and debt crises; Euro currency markets; financial secrecy and money laundering; and the role of foreign banks in emerging markets.
BANK3014 Private and Investment Banking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BANK2011 or ECOS2004 or FINC2011 Assumed knowledge: BANK3011 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The central objective of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the activities of private and investment banks, the regulation of these industries and the developments and challenges facing them. The unit examines private banking from the perspective of clients, services and the business model employed. Investment banking activities examined include investment banking financing activities, advisory services, trading and asset management. Topics covered include: the theory and practice of private and investment banking and their roles within the financial systems of modern economies, M and A advisory, corporate restructuring, syndicated lending, underwriting, securitization, private banking, trading in debt, foreign exchange and equity markets, asset management and the implications of regulatory and other industry developments.
CLAW3201 Australian Taxation System

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLAW1003 or CLAW2201 or CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit is an introduction to Australia's taxation law. It commences with an overview of the Australian tax system, discusses contemporary tax issues and then deals with specific topics, including: the basis of liability to Australian income tax, concepts of residence and source of income, concepts of ordinary and statutory income (including capital gains tax), tax accounting, taxation of fringe benefits, and allowable deductions. It concludes with a study of the general anti-avoidance sections. The taxation of companies, partnerships and trusts, and international taxation are studied in depth in CLAW3202 which, together with this unit, is a solid basis to prepare students for an important aspect of professional accounting practice.
CLAW3202 Business Tax Strategy in Digital Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The digital economy provides new challenges as well as planning opportunities for multinational enterprises to design their tax strategies. This unit provides an overview of the international tax issues arising from the digital economy, discusses the underlying principles and rules, and analyses the tax strategies commonly adopted by multinational enterprises in the digital economy, including case studies of real life examples of major companies including Amazon, Apple and Google. This unit also analyses government responses to these challenges and tax tactics.
CLAW3206 Regulation of Mergers and Acquisitions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLAW1003 or CLAW2201 or CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Mergers, acquisitions and takeovers are increasingly important strategies for Australian companies which raise significant legal issues. This unit aims to give students a sound understanding of the legal issues involved in mergers and acquisitions from both corporations law and competition law perspectives and their impact on commercial strategies. Competition issues under the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (Cth), as well as corporate governance issues under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth), are explored. Bid planning (including tactics involved in initiating a takeover bid and defensive strategies and tactics), directors duties, prohibited market conduct and the role of ASIC and the Takeovers Panel are also covered. This unit also considers mergers using schemes of arrangement.
CLAW3207 Legal Regulation of Employment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study including CLAW1001 or CLAW2214 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The regulation of employment affects every business enterprise. Compliance with the laws impacting on employment is a vital component of business management. The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the legal and regulatory frameworks that underlie all employment practices (employee management, treatment and performance, as well as hiring and dismissals). The unit is designed to develop students' awareness of regulatory compliance issues that arise from employment practices and is taught in the context of the challenges faced by modern businesses in managing employees. The unit focuses on key areas of substantive employment regulation including Anti-Discrimination Law, termination of employment, freedom of association, and employment privacy. Discussion topics include: indirect discrimination, workplace harassment (including sexual harassment), bullying, and unfair dismissal; as well as various sports and entertainment case-studies. International employment law standards, public sector employment, and employment ethics are also addressed.
CLAW3209 The Environment, Law and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The relationship between the natural environment and business practice is deep and complex, and a multiplicity of regulatory initiatives have been employed in an attempt to manage and influence their interaction. This unit of study aims to demystify environmental regulation as far as it is relevant to the running of a business. It begins with an analysis of the contemporary institutional framework surrounding the interaction between business and the environment with particular reference to the historical conditions which have given rise to it, before introducing major stakeholders in the development of environmental and business regulation (including nation states, international organisations and other non-state actors) and their respective roles. The unit then discusses international environmental regulation and situates Australian regulation within it in order to explain its impact on Australian businesses. The effectiveness of different regulatory styles in this area is assessed together with the argument that business can and should take ownership of problematic elements of their interactions with the natural environment. Different strategies developed to 'manage' a business' relationship with the environment and issues surrounding liability for environmental damage are also considered.
CLAW3210 Banking and Financial Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: CLAW2204 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Banks and financial institutions are central to the stability, efficiency and wealth of modern economies and businesses. This unit focuses on the impact of national and international financial regulation on banking contracts, bank secrecy, money laundering and fraud. Students become familiar with legal risks in commercial and investment banking, by examining the complex relationships and legal duties of the various parties engaged in modern finance. Topics covered include electronic banking, international trade finance and securitisation. The unit assists students to understand how the law is applied in practice through the use of case studies. Special emphasis is placed on how banking disputes may be resolved.
CLAW3888 Law and Regulation of Fintech

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Fintech is an essential component of the Third Industrial Revolution, particularly in relation to lowering costs, increasing efficiency and making financial services more accessible. Students are equipped with an understanding of innovation in the financial system, and how these developments interact with current laws and regulations in the global markets. This unit provides students with insights into a wide range of topics, including smart contracts, privacy law and big data, virtual currencies and mobile payments, investor protection and crowd funding, property law and cryptosecurities.
FINC3011 International Financial Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Markets are increasingly globalised. There are very few businesses or industries that are not required to deal with issues such as foreign currency, foreign competition and direct investment. This unit is designed to allow students to extend their understanding of basic principles in finance to an international environment. Globalisation of markets introduces risks but also opens up profitable opportunities. Topics covered include: foreign currency valuation and markets; international parity conditions; measuring and managing foreign exposure; international portfolio management; capital budgeting and foreign direct investment; international tax management and international financing strategy.
FINC3012 Derivative Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Options, futures and swaps are derivatives of underlying securities such as commodities, equities and bonds. These types of securities are increasingly used to manage risk exposure and as a relatively low-cost-way of taking a position in a security or portfolio. They are also being used as part of senior management compensation as a way of attempting to align the interests of shareholders with that of management. This unit is designed to provide an introduction to this important area of finance without requiring too high a level of mathematical sophistication. However, strong quantitative skills are an advantage in this subject.
FINC3013 Mergers and Acquisitions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assumed knowledge: Calculation of free cash flows, trading multiples, discounted cash flow valuation methodology, valuation sensitivities, regression analysis Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Mergers and acquisitions are a fundamental component of the corporate landscape. Students enrolling in this unit will study the economic and strategic drivers of corporate restructuring activity and their use in the design and analysis of restructuring transactions; evaluate the outcomes from restructuring transactions, both the theory-based explanations and the empirical tests of the theories; learn to identify and value synergies in a restructuring transaction using several valuation methods; develop a detailed understanding of the design and economic impacts of deal structures used to effect corporate restructuring transactions; and analyse the process of merger arbitrage and its contribution to the outcome of restructuring transactions. This unit will, where possible, integrate learning outcomes in an academic and applied context, and develop an appreciation of the regulatory environment for restructuring transactions and the impact of these regulations on the process and outcomes of restructuring transactions.
FINC3014 Trading and Dealing in Security Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit is concerned with the processes which turn orders into trades in securities markets, and the forces which mould and affect both order flow and order execution. The unit provides an introduction to some fundamental ideas about market design and structure. At the end of the unit, students should be able to understand (1) how the international markets for foreign exchange, swaps, bonds and equities are organised, (2) how trading is conducted in these markets and how these transactions are cleared, (3) how the markets are regulated, if they are supervised and what risks different counterparties face in these markets. The unit aims to equip students to independently analyse international investment and financing alternatives and to estimate expected returns and costs taking into account liquidity risk, price volatility and credit risk.
FINC3015 Financial Valuation: Case Study Approach

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Prohibitions: FINC3005 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit applies all aspects of finance theory to the general problem of valuing companies and other financial assets. This requires a synthesis of the concepts of present value, cost of capital, security valuation, asset pricing models, optimal capital structures and some related accounting concepts. The subject aims to reach a level of practical application that allows students to understand both the theoretical frameworks and institutional conventions of real-world corporate valuations.
FINC3017 Investments and Portfolio Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assumed knowledge: Introductory statistics, calculus and microeconomics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit is designed to provide a comprehensive analytical approach to the modern theory of investments. Topics covered include: mean-variance analysis; Markowitz type portfolio analysis; portfolio construction; asset pricing theories; market efficiency and anomalies; hedge funds and investment fund performance evaluation. Although analytical aspects of investments theory are stressed, there is also an equal amount of coverage on the practical aspects of portfolio management. Current research on investments is emphasised in the course.
FINC3019 Fixed Income Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit is designed to provide a thorough grounding in fixed income securities, bond portfolio analysis and the use of closely related financial instruments in risk management. The unit begins with the basic analytical framework necessary to understand the pricing of bonds and their investment characteristics (introducing fundamental concepts such as duration, yield and term structure). This provides the building blocks for analysis of more complicated corporate and derivative securities. Sectors of the debt market, including treasury securities, corporate bonds, mortgage-backed securities, and convertible bonds are analysed. The use of derivatives and a selection of special topics in fixed income are also discussed.
FINC3020 Financial Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Assumed knowledge: FINC3017 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Risk is an integral part of financial decisions. Financial risk management is increasingly important and financial analysts must be prepared to assess the level of risk in the marketplace. This course explores the basic concepts of modelling, measuring and managing financial risks within the regulatory framework. Topics covered include market risk (value-at-risk and expected loss), credit risk (single name, portfolio, ratings and market-based models, and credit derivatives), liquidity risk and operational risk. The course relies heavily on practically based computer laboratory exercises with emphasis on simulations, real-life examples and case studies.
FINC3301 Applied Portfolio Management A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC2012 Corequisites: FINC3015 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note: Entry to this unit is a competitive process students must apply application https://business.sydney.edu.au/students/applied-portfolio-management, only approved students may apply via Department permission.
Applied Portfolio Management is a two-semester program that enables undergraduate students to apply their academic knowledge and acquire practical skills by managing a portfolio of Australian equity securities using real money in real time. Students gain exposure to the world of asset management by assuming the role of analysts and are responsible for construction, monitoring and management of the University of Sydney Student Managed Fund. Analysts are divided into industry teams and begin with an evaluation of the existing investments. Following thorough economic, industry and company research and analysis, each team of analysts is required to identify opportunities in their industry and present an investment thesis to highlight undervalued stocks that may offer superior investment performance. Students make presentations on potential investments to academics, industry professionals and other analysts, who perform the role of an investment committee. Students report to the investment committee and advisory board and produce an annual report of the fund's activities. There is an emphasis on team-based learning and interaction with industry professionals who act as mentors to students.
FINC3302 Applied Portfolio Management B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: FINC3301 Corequisites: FINC3017 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note: Entry to this unit is a competitive process students must apply application https://business.sydney.edu.au/students/applied-portfolio-management, only approved students may apply via Department permission.
Applied Portfolio Management is a two-semester program that enables undergraduate students to apply their academic knowledge and acquire practical skills by managing a portfolio of Australian equity securities using real money in real time. Students gain exposure to the world of asset management by assuming the role of analysts and are responsible for construction, monitoring and management of the University of Sydney Student Managed Fund. Analysts are divided into industry teams and begin with an evaluation of the existing investments. Following thorough economic, industry and company research and analysis, each team of analysts is required to identify opportunities in their industry and present an investment thesis to highlight undervalued stocks that may offer superior investment performance. Students make presentations on potential investments to academics, industry professionals and other analysts, who perform the role of an investment committee. Students report to the investment committee and advisory board and produce an annual report of fund activities. There is an emphasis on team-based learning and interaction with industry professionals who act as mentors to students.
IBUS3101 International Business Alliances

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 36 credit points of 1000-level units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The formation and implementation of successful global business strategies involves alliances with a range of stakeholders including international customers and suppliers, overseas agents, international franchisors and franchisees, international joint venture partners, and international merger relationships. The aim of this unit of study is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the motivations underlying international alliances, the alternative approaches to alliance formulation and development, and the problems involved in promoting effective alliance management. Major topics include the motivations for international business alliances, analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of different types of alliances, factors influencing the choice of alliance arrangements, alliance structure issues, partners selection and relationship management, the reasons why alliances succeed or fail, and the management of alliance processes.
IBUS3104 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Following the completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organizations.
IBUS3106 International Business Special Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The special project in International Business provides students with an opportunity to undertake a supervised research project on an approved topic.
IBUS3109 Strategy and Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: IBUS2101 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Emerging economies are rapidly changing the global business landscape as they present tremendous growth opportunities for the developed world. At the same time, their rise as a new competitive force has strategic implications for global managers. This unit focuses on four of the most prominent emerging economies, namely Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC nations), to develop strategic tools to win in the new global competitive environment. Drawing on current insights from International Business Strategy, a two-pronged approach is used to analyse competition in emerging economies: multinational enterprises from developed economies attempting to leverage emerging economies and enterprises from BRIC nations as they transform into multinationals to compete globally.
IBUS3110 Managerial Cognition and Int'l Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study is structured to equip students with the concepts, tools and techniques to understand managerial cognition and how that can be leveraged to achieve competitive advantage in international business. The unit of study covers attention, heuristic and managerial capital to elaborate the role of managerial cognition in achieving competitive advantage in international business. The unit builds on understanding the concepts of global strategy taught in global business units and provides students an opportunity to advance their knowledge in application of strategic management in international business. The unit uses a variety of learning methods such as case discussion, role play and real life analysis.
INFS3040 Enterprise Systems and Integrated Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with an in-depth understanding of the way in which implementation and use of large scale integrated Enterprise Systems change the nature of organisational capabilities, processes, and roles. Students will gain an understanding of the strategic role of Enterprise Systems in providing a platform for improved business operations and designing information infrastructures. In this unit, students will gain considerable hands-on experience with an enterprise-wide system, such as SAP, concentrating on the way in which such systems support integrated business processes. Through a combination of discussion and practical work, students will gain a strong knowledge in both the organisational and technical aspects of Enterprise Systems. Students will also explore the emergence and implications of cloud-based Enterprise Systems and the implementation process. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS3050 Business Intelligence for Managers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
To gain or maintain their competitive edge, more than ever before, organisations need to rely on high-quality information to support decision making processes at all organisational levels. Business Intelligence (BI) is now being recognised as one of the top business priorities world-wide. While in the past, the term BI was used to describe a very broad range of software applications, the latest thinking in this field emphasises IS support for human intelligence, in the context of business decision making. In this unit, students learn how BI helps information discovery and how to analyse multidimensional data. Students gain hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform. These practical skills, combined with in-depth analytical skills enable students to assist any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data, improve its performance and ultimately, compete on analytics. Issues are explored from the business rather than the technology perspective. This unit does not require prior programming experience.
INFS3080 Implementing Agile Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 and INFS2040 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit covers advanced topics in project management with an emphasis on contemporary issues in the delivery of complex Information Systems solutions for businesses. The topics include alternative project management methodologies and techniques, the human and organisational aspects of project management, the importance of project governance, the changing nature of project management in the digital era, as well as the evolving role of the project manager in the global business environment.
INFS3110 Information Systems for Accountants

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFS2001 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit demonstrates how accounting information systems (AIS) can improve business performance relating to the conduct of accounting based transactions. It provides students with the skills necessary to identify and assess opportunities for business improvement, by looking at both conceptual and physical AIS and to understand the varied ways in which the business must assess risks, controls, costs and benefits in relation to the implementation of an AIS. From an end-to-end systems perspective, students gain knowledge of approaches and methodologies related to the design, implementation and operation of an AIS. Through graphic representations, visual thinking can be applied to analyse, assess and improve the conceptual AIS with a view to its physical implementation. Students learn the importance of an integrated approach to managing business cycles including expenditure, conversion and revenue where multiple competing requirements often need to be balanced. Students develop expertise in business analysis, a foundation skill for accountants, auditors, project managers and business analysts.
INFS3120 Business Process Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFS2020 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides an in-depth understanding of the role of business processes in effectively and efficiently managing business operations. Students gain essential skills of the entire Business Process Management (BPM) lifecycle, from process identification and design to process monitoring, including process modelling, analysis, redesign, and automation required to achieve high performance and deliver the strategy in a service-oriented environment. Students also gain highly sought after practical skills of using BPM tools to recommend improvements by documenting and simulating current and new processes.
MKTG3110 Digital Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit explores how marketing campaigns are designed, conceptualised and executed digitally. Particular attention is given to techniques unique to digital technologies and the networked nature of social media platforms. Their applications to marketing strategy specifically to do with brand building, target audiences, public relations and communications are covered with an aim to equip students to understand the digital consumer journey.
MKTG3112 Marketing Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study offers an introduction to an overview of current theory and practice in marketing communications. It will include aspects of advertising in the main media (television, radio, print, outdoor, cinema), sales promotion, personal selling and new media, such as the Internet. It will provide students with a sound theoretical/conceptual foundation as well as the strategic/practical perspectives of Marketing Communications planning and implementation.
MKTG3114 New Products Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 or SIEN1000 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. The goal is to help students learn how to develop and market new products and services in both the private and public sectors. A product development assignment is carried out to reinforce the material covered and to provide realistic examples of how new products are designed, tested and launched.
MKTG3116 International Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces students to international marketing using the marketing concept. It firstly considers environmental factors and then studies how marketing strategies are affected by those environmental factors. It gives students an awareness and understanding of international marketing concepts and highlights their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Additionally, the unit develops students' skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international contexts.
MKTG3118 Marketing Strategy and Planning

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit focuses on strategic and managerial aspects of marketing. It covers the development of innovative business models; segmentation, targeting and positioning; and key aspects of managing, organising and measuring marketing activities. The central theme is how marketing strategy and its management can create superior and sustainable value for both customers and shareholders. Assessment reflects this strategic decision-making approach, requiring students to take on the roles of marketing advisors and managers.
MKTG3120 Building and Managing Brands

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 or SIEN1000 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The most important intangible asset of any organisation is its brand or portfolio of brands. Marketers use an array of internal and external communications approaches to deliver the brand's overall value proposition and experience to its key stakeholders and target customers, and thereby build brand equity. Names, symbols, and slogans along with their underlying associations, perceived quality, brand awareness, customer base and related proprietary resources form the basis for brand equity. Most brands fail because of the lack of proper market research and analysis that enables the brand's core values to be articulated, accurate positioning strategies to be developed, and complete alignment to be achieved between internal and external brand building communications. This unit helps students understand the concept of brand equity and the management of brand assets by learning how to strategically create, position, develop and sustain brand equity.
MKTG3121 Advertising: Persuasive Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
All advertising is about changing people’s behaviour. The more effectively and efficiently brands can change consumer behaviour, the better the advertising. Therefore, this unit on advertising takes the approach of dissecting the psychological principles behind persuasion to change behaviour and then talking through how advertisers use each technique. The unit draws heavily on real-world advertising ideas. The unit first discusses how to define and then understand the dynamics of behaviour change, before looking at how to change behaviour using a variety of techniques. There is not just one way to change behaviour and the techniques act as a toolkit for creating behaviour change.
MKTG3122 Marketing and Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: This unit relates directly to how Marketing relates to implementing the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals such as poverty, climate change, gender equality and hunger (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300). The goal is to facilitate the development of responsible marketing leaders
Marketing plays a critical boundary spanning role between the for-profit firm and its various stakeholders. Marketing is also a critical consideration in developing business strategy. As debates continue on the purpose of for-profit business, specifically the shift from a focus solely on shareholders to various stakeholders (e.g., suppliers, customers, employees and broader society), including calls for responsible business and marketing leaders that tackle grand challenges facing the world (e.g., poverty, gender inequality and climate change), it is important that marketers are proactive in shaping these debates and facilitating changes in marketing practice. This unit is designed to critically evaluate the role of marketing theory and practice in engaging with grand challenges as highlighted by the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (e.g., ending poverty, tackling climate change and addressing gender inequality), at a profit. This unit adopts a holistic perspective of marketing and theories from both consumer behaviour and marketing strategy are used to understand how marketers can engage in facilitating the implementation of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals within marketing strategy.
QBUS3310 Advanced Management Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: QBUS2310 Prohibitions: ECMT3610 or ECMT3710 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit gives guidelines for the formulation of management science models to provide practical assistance for managerial decision making. Optimisation methods are developed, and the complexity and limitations of different types of optimisation model are discussed so that they can be accounted for in model selection and in the interpretation of results. Linear programming methods are developed and extended to cover variations in the management context to logistics, networks, and strategic planning. Other topics may include decision analysis, stochastic modelling and game theory. The unit covers a variety of case studies incorporating the decision problems faced by managers in business.
QBUS3320 Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ECMT2640 or QBUS2330 or QBUS2350 or QBUS3340 or QBUS3350 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The supply chain is the network of companies or organisational components that together deliver a product or service to the final customer. The objective of supply chain management is to effectively coordinate the flows of materials, information and capital in supply chains. This unit will introduce the important concepts and tools used in Supply Chain management. The topics covered may include: Inventory management and risk pooling; supply chain dynamics; network planning; supply chain integration; and global logistics. In addition, the unit will discuss the design of contracts within the supply chain to achieve good outcomes.
QBUS3330 Methods of Decision Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905 Prohibitions: QBUS2320 or ECMT2630 or ENGG1850 or CIVL3805 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This introductory unit on decision analysis addresses the formal methods of decision making. These methods include measuring risk by subjective probabilities; growing decision trees; performing sensitivity analysis; using theoretical probability distributions; simulation of uncertain events; modelling risk attitudes; estimating the value of information; and combining quantitative and qualitative considerations. The primary goal of the unit is to demonstrate how to build models of real business situations that allow the decision maker to better understand the structure of decisions and to automate the decision process by using computer decision tools.
QBUS3340 Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905 Prohibitions: QBUS2330 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit covers the fundamentals of operations management, an exciting area that has a profound effect on the productivity of both manufacturing and services. The techniques of operations management apply throughout the world to virtually all productive enterprises (i.e. offices, hospitals, restaurants, department stores and factories) - the production of goods and services requires operations management. The efficient production of goods and services requires the effective application of the concepts, tools, and techniques introduced in this unit. These include quality management, capacity planning, location and layout strategies, supply chain management and inventory control.
QBUS3350 Project Planning and Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: QBUS2350 Assumed knowledge: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Project management provides organisations with a powerful set of tools to improves their ability to plan, implement, and manage activities to accomplish specific organisational objectives. Project management is more than just a set of tools; it is a results-oriented management style that places a premium on building collaborations among a diverse cast of characteristics. This unit introduces students to the planning and management of projects by focusing on a variety of practical topics including project network, PERT, resource scheduling, learning curves, cost and time management in projects, and the use of project management support systems. It also discusses the organisational, leadership, cultural, technological challenges that project managers might face.
QBUS3820 Machine Learning and Data Mining in Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/unit Prerequisites: QBUS2820 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/unit
Advances in information technology have made available rich information data sets, often generated automatically as a by-product of the main institutional activity of a firm or business unit. Data Mining deals with inferring and validating patterns, structures and relationships in data, as a tool to support decisions in the business environment. This unit offers an insight into the main statistical methodologies for the visualisation and the analysis of business and market data, providing the information requirements for specific tasks such as credit scoring, prediction and classification, market segmentation and product positioning. Emphasis is given to empirical applications using modern software tools.
QBUS3830 Advanced Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: QBUS2810 or DATA2002 or ECMT2110 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit is designed to equip students with advanced tools for estimation and testing in relevant business statistical models. In particular, the unit covers maximum likelihood, Bayesian estimation and inference, and hypothesis testing. The unit acknowledges the importance of learning computing skills as helpful for job applications and special emphasis is made throughout the unit to learn numerical methods such as Monte Carlo simulations and Bootstrapping. Special topics in advanced statistical modelling, such as nonlinear estimators and time series regression, are also covered. The materials taught are essential as preparation for honours in Quantitative Business Analysis.
QBUS3840 Choice Modelling

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: QBUS2810 or DATA2002 or ECMT2110 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
How do business analysts model firm or consumer behaviour quantitatively How do analysts model brand choice in marketing or travel mode choice in transport These questions are answered by modelling choices with statistical tools designed for qualitative or discrete data such as logistic regressions rather than the standard linear regression models This unit investigates various quantitative modelling techniques relevant for choice modelling through business cases in marketing transport research strategy economics and other relevant business fields This unit also explores models that pool observations on a crosssection of households countries firms etc over several time periods This is known as panel data models which are increasingly relevant in all areas of Business with the growing availability of new sources of data
QBUS3850 Time Series and Forecasting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: QBUS2820 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Time series and dynamic modelling is a fundamental component of modern business practice. Further, forecasting is a required component of business decision making. This unit provides an introduction to the time series models used for the analysis of data arising in different business areas including finance, accounting, marketing, economics and many other disciplines. It then considers methods for point and interval forecasting, testing and sensitivity analyses, in the context of these models. Topics include: the properties of time-series data; Seasonal Exponential smoothing and ARIMA models; Vector Autoregressions; modelling and forecasting conditional volatility, via ARCH and GARCH; forecasting risk measures such as Value at Risk and Expected Shortfall; dynamic factor models. Emphasis is placed on applications involving the analysis of many real business datasets. Students are encouraged to undertake hands-on analysis using appropriate software.
SIEN3001 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 48 credit points Prohibitions: IBUS3108 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with the opportunity to learn how to apply their business knowledge and skills to address complex social and environmental problems. Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission and rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. At the intersection of business and not-for-profit organisations, these social entrepreneurs are now visible and having an impact on a global scale. This unit is structured around engaged inquiry-based learning, proving students with the opportunity to learn from theory and practice. Topics include critically reviewing concepts, challenges of growing a social enterprise, frameworks for understanding, sourcing funds from a variety of stakeholders, understanding and reporting social impact, as well as collaboration and leadership.
SIEN3107 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: IBUS3107 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The purpose of this unit is to build students' understanding of the theory of negotiation as it is practised in a variety of strategic settings. The aim is to build students' confidence with the negotiation process. The unit is relevant to the broad spectrum of negotiation problems that are faced by managers and specific examples from international strategy such as M and A and joint ventures are used. The unit provides participants with an opportunity to develop skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks. Considerable emphasis is placed on role-playing exercises and case studies. This unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the final grade, requires time-pressured reading of material in class.
SIEN3204 Managing Organisational Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2219 or WORK3204 Assumed knowledge: WORK1004 or WORK2201 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Managing organisational sustainability is critical for effective, contemporary managers. This unit focuses on how to conceptualise and to practice sustainability in its broadest sense. Topics covered include the ethical aspects of management and organisational practice, corporate social responsibility, governance models in organisations and managing in diverse environments. Students are encouraged to enhance their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of management and the impact of organisations on stakeholders including staff, government and community.
WORK3201 International Human Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2217 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit considers the opportunities and challenges associated with managing employees in international and cross-cultural contexts, with specific emphasis on international recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, management development, performance management, reward and remuneration in the international, multi-national and trans-national corporation. Within the context of global labour markets, the unit considers the implications of internationalisation and globalisation for human resource management (HRM), the difference between domestic and international HRM, and the challenges of cross-cultural management. This unit provides students with a theoretical understanding of IHRM and cross-cultural management, as well as a practical understanding of the issues and challenges associated with managing employees in international, global and cross-cultural contexts.
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations, including people at the beginning of their career. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and provides a range of leadership case studies. Further, this unit of study challenges students to engage in self-reflection on their own leadership values, strengths and areas for development. Finally, this unit helps students to develop their skills in perspective-taking, problem-solving, decision-making and having influence, and to effectively leverage these skills at the outset of their career.
WORK3203 Gender, Diversity and Inclusion at Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The unit explores the strategies and initiatives implemented at the workplace and corporate level to manage a diverse workforce with a particular focus on the impact of gender on individuals' experiences of the world of work. While drawing on the intersecting elements of gender and other diversity dimensions (such as cultural diversity; LGBTIQ+; indigeneity; people with disabilities; age), the unit seeks to introduce students to a number of gender perspectives, highlighting how each perspective conceptualizes the issue of gender; provides a different lens to accounting for gender inequality and proposes different "solutions" to the "problem of gender diversity" in organizations. The unit takes a multi-level and multi-disciplinary approach to examining the management of gender and diversity, focusing on live case studies and practical examples.
WORK3205 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2221 Assumed knowledge: WORK1004 or WORK2201 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Note: The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in Semester 2.
Communication is integral to many organisational processes; for instance, effective planning, decision-making, negotiation, conflict management, change management and leadership all rely upon effective communication by organisational actors. At the same time, organisational communication has become more complex due to increasing levels of diversity in the workplace and an increasing reliance on emergent and rapidly changing communication technologies. Drawing on communication research models, theories and case studies, this unit provides students with insight into how to manage the complexities of contemporary organisational communication. The unit focuses primarily on internal organisational communication and examines communication processes at various levels: interpersonal (dyadic), group and organisation.
WORK3206 Workplace Law and Regulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2227 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study examines the regulatory framework that exists around paid work in Australia. It examines the development of employee and employer rights and responsibilities through the employment contract and labour law. It focuses on both individual and collective regulation of work in Australia paying particular attention to the industrial sphere, as well as discrimination and termination of employment. Both the aim and purpose of industrial regulation and the impact of this regulation on workplace relations is analysed.
WORK3210 Climate Change and Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 and (WORK1004 or WORK2201) and WORK2203 and WORK2205 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Climate change presents fundamental challenges to the organisation of work and industrial relations. Beginning with the British industrial revolution and then through the long and continued reliance on fossil fuels and carbon-intensive production methods in industry, supply chains and transportation systems, work-based actions have changed the climate. Recognizing the impacts of climate change, some workplaces are shifting to low-carbon and sustainable forms of production, and new 'renewable' industries are emerging. These developments are prompting a re-thinking and re-evaluation of work. To explain these issues, this unit explores theories of work, capitalism and nature, exploring concepts such as the Anthropocene, just transition, green jobs, and the 'green new deal'. It goes on to examine the relationships between business, government and civil actors like trade unions, and community groups in both resisting and driving changes in work amid the climate crisis. It does so attentive to the differences within and between countries in how work, industrial relations and climate change itself are experienced and understood.