Table S Electives - Conservatorium of Music Descriptions

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.
 

Table S Electives - Conservatorium of Music

1000-level units of study

CMPN1000 Composition Through Improvisation 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin Hunt Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr weekly ensemble class Assessment: Weekly assignments (70%),final improvised performance (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: student should have 3-4yrs experience in playing music and with a passion to improvise.
Through performance and ensemble interaction, this unit helps students develop vital aural and improvisational skills that will significantly enhance their creative and compositional process. Students experience the wonders of ‘real-time’ creation of music without the aid of notation on their respective instruments and are encouraged to develop their intuition while learning to rely on their musical ideas. Class feedback and discussion of each in-class improvisation provides weekly opportunities for formulating individual compositional ideas regarding melody, harmony, rhythm, form and structure.
CMPN1003 Composition Through Improvisation 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin Hunt Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr weekly ensemble class Prerequisites: CMPN1000 Assessment: Weekly assignments (70%), final recorded composition (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: students should have 3-4yrs experience in playing music and with a passion to improvise.
This unit continues to develop through performance and investigation into experimental modes of presentation, to help students develop vital aural and improvisational skills which will significantly enhance their compositional process. As the student gains experience improvising, skills are developed for making informed 'split-second' decisions based on intuition and musical responsiveness. The ‘Sounds of Surprise’ performance provides a thrilling close to this essentially two semester experience of spontaneous music creation.
CMPN1010 Creative Vocal Ensemble

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Paul Stanhope Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 x 2 hr lectures; 5 x 2hr workshop/rehearsals; 2 x 2 hour workshop/rehearsals in Special Projects Week Prerequisites: CMPN1331 or CMPN1601 Assumed knowledge: Sight singing; basic choral skills required; familiarity with music notation and music notation software Assessment: 1 major composition or major work for 3 or more voices with or without accompaniment; (25%); Two short compositions based on Lecture-series topics and workshopped in class (25%). An essay of 2500wds based on Lecture topics is offered as an alternative (50%). Ensemble participation and performance: 50% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Sight singing; basic choral skills required; familiarity with music notation and music notation software highly recommended.
Musicians from diverse backgrounds work together towards the creation of new work manifested in compositions, arrangements and performances for vocal ensembles (e.g. choirs or smaller consorts of voices). Lecture focus on the analysis of compositional techniques found in early music through to the contemporary era, encompassing an eclectic range of styles. Students experience the performance of these styles in a workshop situation by forming a ‘resident ensemble’ where ideas based upon the analysed techniques are tried out in a workshop situation. Online multitrack recording is offered as an alternative delivery method to live workshop situation. Composition-focused students benefit from feedback of their new works in the workshops, while performer-focused students may experience the process of creating new compositions or arrangements for the first time. A selection of student work will be presented in an end of semester concert by the Creative Vocal Ensemble. Students will be able to take these skills developed in this course into future professional situations as composers, performers, conductors and arrangers.
CMPN1013 Creative Music Technology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lab/studio/wk Assessment: creative audio assignment (70%), formative skills assessment (20%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will be introduced to a range of music technologies and gain a basic proficiency in sound recording, editing and mixing. Students will learn to work with audio in a digital audio workstation, how to make good quality recordings with portable recording devices, and make use of these skills in service of a creative outcome. The unit will include an overview of software for notation/sequencing, as well as basic sound synthesis concepts. In the final assessment students will explore the creative possibilities of music technology by realising a sound work using either instrumental and/or environmental sound recorded and edited by them.
CMPN1014 Sound Recording Fundamentals

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lect/wk, 1 hr lab class/wk Assessment: Stereo Recording (60%), Online Quiz (30%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will be introduced to a range of audio technologies and gain a basic proficiency in sound recording, editing and mixing. Students will experience working in the Conservatorium sound studios, and learn how to make good quality recordings with portable recording devices. This unit of study also examines microphone design, stereo microphone techniques and digital audio recording. Students will experience prac-based recording sessions to gain a comprehensive understanding of the recording technology on offer at the Sydney Conservatorium.
CMPN1611 Instrumentation and Orchestration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Carl Vine Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar/wk Assumed knowledge: Students enrolling in this unit of study are expected to be able to read and understand instrumental music notation of moderate complexity Assessment: short orchestration exercises (45%), score analysis presentation (20%), large ensemble arrangement (35%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Instrumentation and Orchestration, enhances students' knowledge of the modern orchestra while reinforcing core musicianship skills. Instrumentation study investigates the technical limitations and expressive potential of individual instruments. Orchestration examines a range of instrumental combinations in diverse styles and ensemble contexts, and requires that students learn best typographic practice and current conventions of notation and score layout. In examining instrumental characteristics the unit will also cover the fundamentals of acoustics and timbre perception, and will demand a thorough grasp of the harmonic series and its broader musical implications. Throughout the course students will be required to present their own arrangements and transcriptions.
CMPN1612 New Music, New Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Ricketson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Three assessment items: (1) essay (50%); weekly engagement in discussion and creative exercises (30%) and; (3) portfolio of three small creative works (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
New Music, New Thinking is designed to challenge the way in which students understand the music of our time. Through analyses of recent music and artistic themes, discussion and creative tasks, students will be exposed to a variety of compositional techniques, concepts and aesthetics. The content and assessment of this subject will enable students to further develop critical thinking concerning their future contribution to the world of new music be it in composition, performance, musicology or education.
CPNO1603 Practical Keyboard Skills 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof Jeanell Carrigan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 90 minute practical class (tutorial) per week; Students would be expected to practise for at least 4 hours per week Assessment: Sight Reading Module (25%); Transposition Module (25%); Score Reading/Clef Reading (25%); Figured Bass (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Must have keyboard skills and reasonable music reading skills.
This unit of study is designed to develop practical reading and playing skills for keyboard players without spending time learning difficult repertoire. The focus will be on building sight reading competence, transposition, clef reading, figured bass realisation and score reading, working on the keyboard and not from an only theoretical position.
CPNO1604 Practical Keyboard Skills 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof Jeanell Carrigan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 90 minute practical class (tutorial) per week; Students would be expected to practise for at least 4 hours per week Prerequisites: ACCP1603 or CPNO1603 Assessment: Sight Reading Module (25%); Transposition Module (25%); Score Reading/Clef Reading (25%); Figured Bass (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Must have keyboard skills (up to at least an AMEB 4th grade level) and reasonable music reading skills.
This unit is a continuation of ACCP1603/CPNO1603 and is designed to develop basic musical skills through the medium of a keyboard. The focus will be on building sight reading competence, working on transposition, clef reading, figured bass realisation and score reading using the keyboard and not from a theoretical standpoint.
ENSE1041 Choir 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Elizabeth R. Scott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs of rehearsals/wk Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehearsals prepare members for public concerts at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers oratorio and large choral works in association with the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra, the Sydney Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, or the Early Music Ensemble. No auditions required. (Rehearsals are usually held on Thursdays, refer to timetable for details).
ENSE1042 Choir 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Elizabeth R. Scott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE1041 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehearsals prepare members for public concerts at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers oratorio and large choral works in association with the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra, the Sydney Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, or the Early Music Ensemble. No auditions required. (Rehearsals are usually held on Thursdays, refer to timetable for details).
ENSE1601 Chamber Choir 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Stanhope Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5hrs of rehearsals/wk Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances in Choir (50%) and in Chamber Choir (30%). Online individual performance exam (10%) Online sight reading course (5%) Sight reading exam (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
Note: Audition required for entry in first week of each semester.
Rehearsals prepare the auditioned members of the Chamber Choir for a public concert(s) at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers compositions from Gregorian chant to the twenty-first century, and may include a baroque orchestra, or instrumental ensemble. Sight-singing skills, style and historical performance practice will be an emphasis in preparation for performances. Rehearsals include 2hrs pw (averaged over semester) with the Conservatorium Choir.
ENSE1602 Chamber Choir 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Paul Stanhope. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE1601 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances in Choir (50%) and in Chamber Choir. (30%). Online individual performance exam (10%) and written program notes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Audition required for entry in first week of each semester.
Rehearsals prepare the auditioned members of the Chamber Choir for a public concert(s) at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers compositions from Gregorian chant to the twenty-first century, and may include a baroque orchestra, or instrumental ensemble. Sight-singing skills, style and historical performance practice will be an emphasis in preparation for performances. Rehearsals include 2hrs pw (averaged over semester) with the Conservatorium Choir.
JAZZ1000 Jazz Large Ensemble 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
Note: Admission subject to audition.
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction. Enrolment is subject to audition.
JAZZ1001 Jazz Large Ensemble 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Prerequisites: JAZZ1000 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Admission subject to audition.
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction.
JAZZ1015 Jazz Ear Training 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers a systematic study of all simple intervals up to and including one octave, triadic harmony, four note chords in closed position and voice leading within these concepts, focusing on common harmonic movements that occur in the jazz repertoire.
JAZZ1016 Jazz Ear Training 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1015 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Ear Training 1, plus introducing compound intervals, open voicings, the addition of all upper extensions to all chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures.
JAZZ1019 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours per week Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), classwork tasks and participation (15%) , arranging tasks (55%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the study of the harmony of standard jazz repertoire both from a theoretical angle and through the process of arranging for small jazz combos. Students will learn to understand and use basic harmonic rules and standard harmonic devices, diatonic progression and chord patterns.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) 'Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band'; Nestico, Sammy 'The Complete Arranger'
JAZZ1020 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours per week Prerequisites: JAZZ1019 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), classwork tasks and participation (15%) , arranging tasks (55%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, voicing techniques for two to four horns, harmonisation of passing tones, clusters and other techniques will be introduced. The harmonic techniques explored are used as the theoretical basis for Jazz Improvisation.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy "The Complete Arranger"
MCGY1030 This is Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Assessment: tutorial participation (20%), 1 x 1000wd article analysis (25%), 8 x lecture responses (blog posts) and group presentation (25%), 1 x 2000wd final essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, History and Culture studies.
This course introduces students to the different ways of thinking about music that bind together our Conservatorium culture. It is a course concerned with 'big' questions: What exactly is a musical work? What do we hear when music is played? How do we go about making new music and how do we make old music new again? In grappling with these questions, students learn how to formulate persuasive arguments about the nature of music in general and the significance of musical works and artists in particular. The course is broken into four three-week episodes: Talking about Music, Making Music, Listening to Music and Learning about Music. Lectures from performers, composers, music educators and musicologists comprise each of these episodes and cover the wide variety of music genres and approaches to music making taught at the Conservatorium. As students hone their philosophical positions in relation to the course's 'big' questions, they are therefore simultaneously introduced to the constellation of ideas that constitute our musical world.
MCGY1031 Australian Musical Worlds

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1 x 2hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1 x 2000wd essay (40%), 1 x tutorial report (20%), 1 x listening test (20%), tutorial preparation and participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Embracing popular music, Indigenous music, classical music, and the music of multicultural communities in Australia, this unit offers an introduction not only to diverse musical traditions, but also to themes prevalent in the work of contemporary music scholars. These include gender and identity, ownership and appropriation, reception and transmission, colonialism and Empire, globalisation, modernity, representation, and music and place.
MUED1009 Psychology of Learning and Instruction

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Jennifer Rowley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week Assessment: Collaborative Learning task (20%), Tutorial presentation (25%), Analysis Quiz (25%), Essay 1000 wds (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the study of the psychology to learning and instruction, presenting an overview of the historical relationships between education and psychology, and how cognitive research informs educational practices. It develops students' understandings of psychology's applicability to music education through discussion of relevant research, participation in class activities, and consideration of real-life situations. It aims to develop students' understanding of learners, the learning process, and how educators can optimise music instruction through adopting best practices based on research and understandings of psychology relevant to educational settings.
MUSC1501 Extended Fundamentals of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Aidan Rosa Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Assumed knowledge: HSC Music 2 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of musical styles including classical music (past and present), jazz, popular music and film music. The Written tutorials build on the topics covered in the lectures. The Aural tutorials develop the students ability to listen musically and critically.
MUSC1503 Fundamentals of Music 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to basic music literacy skills, including learning to read and write music, and an understanding of fundamental aspects of its structure and composition. The material covered in this unit of study concentrates upon the basics of music theory and listening to ensure that participants have a solid grounding for a firm understanding of music notation and organisation.
MUSC1504 Fundamentals of Music 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Aidan Rosa Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A more advanced exploration of music literacy skills than MUSC1503. The material covered in this unit of study ranges from the broad to the specific: from an examination of musical elements and the way they are used in a variety of musical genres through to specific compositional aspects such as four-part writing. Analysis and compositional craft regarding melody, harmony and rhythm in classical and contemporary popular music are a central focus of this unit of study. Critical listening skills are developed in this unit of study.
MUSC1506 Music in Western Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 hr tut/wk Assumed knowledge: The ability to follow a musical score while listening to the music and knowledge of elementary music theory Assessment: Tutorial work (25%), essay (40%), exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit surveys some of the major developments in the history of western classical music from the Medieval period to the present, and relates them to broader historical and artistic trends. In addition to analysing individual musical works, students will engage with historiography and the relationships between music, society, and the history of ideas.
MUSC1507 Sounds, Screens, Speakers: Music and Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 tut/wk Assessment: Article summary, 1000 words (25%); Media analysis of 1000 words (20%); Tutorial tests (15%); Final Project, 2,000 words(30%), overall participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Music has been dramatically shaped and reshaped by every major change in communications technology in the 20th century from vinyl discs to spotify. In this unit of study we will analyse such issues as the ways in which the early recording industry transformed jazz, the blues and country music, how the presentation of music on radio and television changed the ways the music industry created new musical celebrities, and the challenges the music industry faces as digital technology transforms the creation, distribution and consumption of music.
MUSC1604 Music, Health and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Helen Mitchell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr workshop per week Assessment: overall class participation including reading portfolios (30%), 1 x written research project proposal (40%), 1 x poster presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
So how do musicians achieve and maintain their health? This unit of study explores the science of music health and wellbeing through investigation of health promotion, a range of health issues (including mental health) and by giving students practical examples of how to incorporate healthy lifestyle and strategies into their everyday life. It includes a detailed exploration of age-old and millennium debates in the scholarly and practice-based fields of music and health. Topics include: mindfulness; music psychology; Alexander Technique/Yoga/Tai Chi; performance science; growth mindset programs; music therapy; mental health; work-place safety; physiotherapy.

2000-level units of study

CMPN2007 Sound Recording Advanced

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Blinkhorn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr studio, workshop, class and student group focused projects Prerequisites: CMPN2006 or CMPN1014 Assumed knowledge: Proficiency in an industry standard DAW and the ability to understand basic microphone and recording techniques Assessment: Class Attendance and Participation and presentation (20%), Recording Project 1 (35%), Recording Project 2 (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit follows on from Sound Recording Fundamentals with a variety of both theoretical and practical applications and aesthetics within the studio-based recording environment. Additional topics include frequency response/spectral range and shaping, dynamic range (to compress, or not to compress), DSP functionaility in pre- and post- production and analysis of audio mixdowns and concurrent mixing techniques.
CMPN2613 Comp Techniques: Number and Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter McNamara Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: CMPN1612 Assessment: Analytical essay (30%); original composition (50%); presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Strong music theory and notation skills are essential in this unit of study
Number and Process emphasises the study of important and innovative composition techniques that apply various mathematical processes emerging predominantly from the mid 20th century onwards. The focus is on key works of composers such as Webern, Stockhausen, Boulez, Xenakis and other influential composers of the late 20th century. The studied techniques will enable students to strengthen and expand their compositional repertoire and provide an understanding of how their work appears in a clear historical context.
CMPN2614 Comp Techniques: Tonality and Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter McNamara Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: CMPN2613 Assessment: Analytical essay (30%); original composition (50%); presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Strong music theory and notation skills are essential in this unit of study
Tonality and Process emphasises the study of important and innovative composition techniques that apply to various alternative processes using tonality emerging throughout the 20th century. The focus is on key works of various Russian composers, American minimalist composers, Louis Andriessen and other influential composers of the 20th century. The studied techniques will enable students to strengthen and expand their compositional repertoire and provide an understanding of how their work appears in a clear historical context.
CMPN2631 Electroacoustic Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Blinkhorn Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hr lab/studio class/week Prerequisites: MUED1002 or CMPN1013 or MUSC2653 Assumed knowledge: Proficiency in the usage of any industry standard DAW and attendant sound transformation and diffusion software Assessment: Composition demonstrating electroacoustic techniques (40%), electroacoustic composition drawing from any manner of materials discussed within the unit (60%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore past and concurrent techniques in electroacoustic composition through the completion of various tasks in sound transformation and by composing new electroacoustic works. Whilst analysing manifold aesthetics and attendant compositional techniques implicit in the creation of electroacoustic music, emphasis will be placed on students developing a working knowledge of existent and emergent trends within the electroacoustic repertoire, and will gain insights into numerous aesthetic, recording and composing processes leading to the creation of new musical compositions in the field of electroacoustics.
CMPN2632 Computer Music Fundamentals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lect/wk, 1 hr lab class. Prerequisites: MUED1002 or CMPN1013 or MUSC2653 Assessment: 2 programming assignments (2x25%), final project (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on computer based music composition utilising formal processes to create music with computers. This unit investigates an interactive graphical programming environment for music, audio and media called Max, allowing the composer to program and implement interactive music processes quickly and with varying levels of sophistication, thus encouraging the student to explore real-time creative possibilities of digital music technology.
EMUS2500 Historically Informed Style Workshop

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Yeadon Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr workshop/seminar per week, 3 x 1.5hr individual reading per semester Assessment: 1 x 1000wd romantic style report (20%), 1 x 1000wd classical style report (20%), 1 x final lecture presentation (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study presents students with an opportunity to learn the theory and to experience the nuts and bolts of historically informed performance (HIP). Today's performers need to be able to navigate their way through a wide variety of styles, genres and modes of performance. HIP is a growth area globally, which influences the style of performance of period and modern instrument ensembles and vocalists. Here in Australia, for example, the ACO requires its members to have a keen awareness of HIP conventions in repertoire ranging from 1600-1900. Students will explore readings from primary and secondary written sources, recordings (including historical recordings) and will learn how to apply their findings to repertoire spanning the high-Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods. Mini-lectures are combined with demonstrations of HIP style, peer-led discussions and practical workshops.
ENSE2043 Choir 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Elizabeth R. Scott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE1042 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehearsals prepare members for public concerts at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers oratorio and large choral works in association with the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra, the Sydney Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, or the Early Music Ensemble. No auditions required. (Rehearsals are usually held on Thursdays, refer to timetable for details).
ENSE2044 Choir 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Elizabeth R. Scott Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE2043 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehearsals prepare members for public concerts at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers oratorio and large choral works in association with the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra, the Sydney Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, or the Early Music Ensemble. No auditions required. (Rehearsals are usually held on Thursdays, refer to timetable for details).
ENSE2603 Chamber Choir 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Paul Stanhope Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE1602 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances in Choir (50%) and in Chamber Choir. (30%). Online individual performance exam (10%) and written program notes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Audition required for entry in first week of each semester.
Rehearsals prepare the auditioned members of the Chamber Choir for a public concert(s) at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers compositions from Gregorian chant to the twenty-first century, and may include a baroque orchestra, or instrumental ensemble. Sight-singing skills, style and historical performance practice will be an emphasis in preparation for performances. Rehearsals include 2hrs pw (averaged over semester) with the Conservatorium Choir.
ENSE2604 Chamber Choir 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Paul Stanhope Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5hrs of rehearsals/wk Prerequisites: ENSE2603 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances in Choir (50%) and in Chamber Choir. (30%). Online individual performance exam (10%) and written program notes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Audition required for entry in first week of each semester.
Rehearsals prepare the auditioned members of the Chamber Choir for a public concert(s) at the end of each semester. The music chosen covers compositions from Gregorian chant to the twenty-first century, and may include a baroque orchestra, or instrumental ensemble. Sight-singing skills, style and historical performance practice will be an emphasis in preparation for performances. Rehearsals include 2hrs pw (averaged over semester) with the Conservatorium Choir.
JAZZ2002 Jazz Large Ensemble 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Prerequisites: JAZZ1001 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Admission subject to audition.
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction.
JAZZ2003 Jazz Large Ensemble 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Prerequisites: JAZZ2002 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction.
JAZZ2016 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1020 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30% total) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit concentrates on more complex harmonic material that forms the basis for Jazz Improvisation, as well as learning arranging techniques for five horns and more complex ensemble music. Methods of reharmonisation of existing jazz and standard compositions will be introduced. Students learn big band orchestration which includes ensemble scoring, sax soli, background writing, form and the related uses of counterpoint. There will be detailed analysis of scores of major composers and arrangers.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) 'Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band'; Nestico, Sammy "The Complete Arranger"
JAZZ2017 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ2016 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students learn big band orchestration including ensemble scoring, sax soli, background writing, form and the related uses of counterpoint. There will be detailed analysis of scores of major composers and arrangers. Selected arrangements may be rehearsed by a Big Band. Students may study contemporary techniques encompassing elements of polytonality, extended instrumental effects and textural voicings.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) 'Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band'; Nestico, Sammy "The Complete Arranger"
JAZZ2038 Jazz Ear Training 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1016 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Ear Training 1 and 2, plus introducing advanced chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures.
JAZZ2039 Jazz Ear Training 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ2038 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%),one 2 hour examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit consolidates all concepts from Jazz Ear Training 1, 2 and 3. By its conclusion, students will have systematically examined, over four semesters, aural concepts that are essential to creative musical interplay in jazz performance.
MCGY2601 Perception of Music Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Helen Mitchell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Seminar per week Assessment: Class participation in performances and discussions (10%); Poster presentation (30%); Development of a pilot study topic (20%); Written report (40% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Listening to music performance is an everyday occurrence, yet expert listeners possess tacit knowledge about performers' sound and little is known about how they process sensory information from a performer to conceptualise, recognise and verbalise the sound they hear. This unit of study will focus on recent empirical research studies and examine the ways in which we listen to music performers by sound and sight, how we assess music performance, and how we describe the sounds we hear.
MCGY2611 Music from the Middle Ages to Baroque

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alan Maddox Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2hr lecture/1hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Assessment: Tutorial preparation and participation (20%), essay (40%), exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores major topics in the history of Western art music from the 9th century to c. 1750 in a broad historical context. Beginning with Gregorian chant and the invention of music education notation, we investigate a wide range of genres and styles of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras, as well as innovations including the development of music printing, developments in musical instruments, and the emergence of opera, sonata and concerto. Musical works for analysis and discussion include examples by Hildegard of Bingen, Machaut, Dufay, Josquin, Palestrina, Gesualdo, Monteverdi, Frescobaldi, Corelli, Lully, Purcell, Vivaldi, Handel and J.S. Bach.
Textbooks
J. P. Burkholder, D. J. Grout and C. V. Palisca. A History of Western Music, 10th ed. (2019)
MCGY2612 Music in the Classical and Romantic Eras

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: The ability to read musical notation and basic knowledge of music theory Assessment: Essay (30%); Tutorial assignments and participation (30%); In-class tests (10%); 1 x 2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, History and Culture studies.
This unit will survey the main lines of musical development between 1750 and 1890, with primary focus on the composition of music, and how this relates to the social and aesthetic currents of the time. The overview given in the lecture series will be reinforced by detailed focus on individual works in the tutorials from both historical and analytical perspectives. Topics will include the emergence and codification of classical form and syntax; style and genre in the works of the first Viennese School; Beethoven's 'heroic' and 'late' styles; national opera traditions; symphonic poem and music drama; nationalism and exoticism; and the conflict between progress and tradition.
Textbooks
J.P. Burkholder; D.J. Grout; C.V. Palisca: A History of Western Music. 9th ed. (2014).
MCGY2613 Music in Modern Times

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1hr tut/week Assumed knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Assessment: essay (35%), in-class test (20%), tutorial preparation (10%), exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history and culture studies.
Traces the essential developments in Western art music from the very end of the 19th century to the start of the 21st, and relates them to broad socio-historical and artistic changes. The overview given in the lectures is reinforced by the analysis of key works in tutorials. Areas covered include Late Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Free Atonality, Rhythmic Innovation, Neo-classicism, Serial Music, Political Music, American Experimentalism, Electro-Acoustic Music, Chance composition, Textural Composition, Minimalism, influences from Popular Music, Collage and Polystylism, East-West Encounters, Neo-Romanticism, Post Modernism and Spectralism. Works analysed include compositions by Andriessen, Bartok, Cage, Debussy, Ligeti, Messiaen, Part, Schoenberg, Strauss, Stravinsky, Stockhausen and Webern.
Textbooks
Auner, J. Music in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries, New York: Norton 2013
MUSC2614 Composition Workshop

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Amanda Cole Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour workshop per week Prerequisites: 18 credit points of 1000-level units Assessment: Contribution in classes and concerts (20%), concert composition (60%), written assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Composition Workshop is designed as an opportunity for students from all musical backgrounds to play, write and perform music together. Each student will write a new piece for an ensemble of classmates that will be performed in an end of semester concert. Set topics studied in this course include: Creative and Resourceful Instrumentation (body percussion, mobile phones as instruments, the human voice and found percussion instruments), Soundscape, Indeterminacy and Loops. The first four weeks of the course are spent exploring these topics through lectures and creative group composition exercises. Students will also look notating their music using one-page scores, graphic notation, time-space notation and text scores. From Week 5 onwards, students will workshop and rehearse their own concert piece for an ensemble of musicians from their class.
MUSC2638 Jazz Riots and Revolutions

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture per week; 1 x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: Tutorial Participation/Demonstrated Knowledge of Required Reading (20%); Annotated Bibliography (30%); Research Essay Introduction (20%); Research Essay Body (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course examines the powerful link between jazz and moments of social revolution in the United States. It illuminates the central role jazz musicians like Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Charles Mingus and Max Roach played in changing hearts, minds and social structures during four distinct historic periods: the Harlem Renaissance, the post-War 1940s, the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and the Black Nationalist movement of the 1960s. Its central focus is on how music can both ride and resist the political energies that charge particular historic moments.
MUSC2644 Introduction to the Philosophy of Music

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Essay (60%); Examination (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to philosophical questions about music and to thinking about music with philosophical methodology. The course visits some of the questions which have perplexed musicians and philosophers alike: How are beauty and music related? What does music tell us about time? What is a musical work? How do we listen? Is music related to language? This course enables all students of music and the liberal arts to understand music as a philosophically distinctive phenomenon.
MUSC2645 Psychology of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Helen Mitchell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Readings, Summaries and Class Discussion Participation (30%); Key Question Identification and Project Design Poster Presentation (30%); Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Psychology of Music examines music cognition and behaviour to explore the way music is created, produced and perceived. This unit will introduce recent interdisciplinary research as a way to explore music as a social activity. It will consider the methods used by sociologists and psychologists to investigate music and encourage students to think conceptually about their own musical activities.
MUSC2648 Words and Music : Song Across Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Myfany Turpin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 credit points of 1000-level units Assessment: reading presentation and participation (20%), song analysis assignment (30%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students aquire skills in how to analyse the forms and functions of songs in diverse cultures and genres. We examine lyrics, music and the different ways they combine; and how the language we speak shapes the way words are put to music. Student learn about the different roles song plays in societies and consider why singing is a universal human activity. Students will gain experience in song analysis and have the opportunity to apply these skills to their own song writing.
MUSC2653 Introduction to Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damian Barbeler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lecture/demonstration/wk Assessment: Sound recording and editing assignment (30%); creative assignments (60%); online assessments, attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to the use of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a practical course in which students are introduced to tools of sound creation and manipulation. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. In addition, participants will be exposed to a number of approaches to electroacoustic music across the 20th and 21st centuries.
MUSC2654 Popular Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hrs/week Assessment: Two critical analyses 1,000 words each (20% each); tutorial test 1000 words (20%); major essay 3,000 words (30%); class participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How did early American blues and country music develop in tandem? How was punk different in the US, the UK and Australia? What are the origins of the DJ culture? This unit of study presents a thematic overview of a wide variety of styles, movements and spectacles. It examines major genres of popular music, their stylistic features and historical antecedents as well as modes of reception and the role of popular music in everyday life. No formal music training is necessary.
MUSC2666 Global Sound: Drum and Bass, Rhythm and Soul

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: Critical Interpretation of 1500 words (25%), Musical analysis of 1500 words (25%), Final Project of 3000 words (40%), Participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How did the music of enslaved and marginalised people eventually become a dominant force in contemporary popular culture? This unit will examine the local reinvention of a wide variety of African American music in communities around the world. From soul and funk in West Africa to ska and reggae in the Caribbean, we will examine how music moves around the world and within local communities to make new forms of meaning.
MUSC2672 Australian Popular Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lecture + 1 hr tut/week Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations 25%. Essay 25%. Final research project 50%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The history of Australian popular music presents us with a long and complex heritage. It reflects, in its very constitution, the lives of those who create it and is underscored by the dynamic relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australia. This unit of study will explore the continuing experience and influence of a wide range of music made in Australia, from songlines to bush ballads and dance anthems, Countdown and Rage. We will examine hillbilly music of the 1930s, surf rock of the 60s, pub rock of the 70s, reggae, punk and indie rock of the 80s and 90s as well as the emergence of Australian dance music, hip hop and the multiplicity of styles and expressions that mark the contemporary music scene.
MUSC2675 History of the Musical

This unit of study does not have Data Audit Committee approval

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Narelle Yeo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial per week Assessment: 2 essays (1, 500 words each) (70%); Online multi-modal journal (eq. 1, 000 words) (20%); Participation (eq. 500 words) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will survey the history and development of the musical (the combination of song, dialogue, dance and acting onstage) from its antecedents including operetta, singspiel, musical comedy, cabaret and revue to the present day, including Broadway/West End/international, book musicals, epic, through-composed, jukebox and rock influenced, political, didactic, biographical, dance, film and tv. Students will analyze the specific mechanics of the musical (i.e., music, lyrics, book, design, etc.) and the major historical movements from the nineteenth to twenty-first century as contextualized in particular musicals. Students will become familiar with key historical repertoire from 1850 to the present. Students will consider how the musical has interacted with, reflected and influenced social and political culture across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
MUSC2693 Fundamentals of Music 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Aidan Rosa Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prerequisites: MUSC1504 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of musical styles including classical music (past and present), jazz, popular music and film music. The Written tutorials build on the topics covered in the lectures. The Aural tutorials develop the students ability to listen musically and critically.
MUSC2695 Popular Music Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture, 1 x 1hr written tutorial, 1 x 1hr aural tutorial Prerequisites: MUSC1503 or MUSC1504 or MUSC1501 or MUSC2693 or MCGY1009 or JAZZ1621 or JAZZ1019 Assessment: Weekly assignment tasks (30%), 1 x Composition and Analysis final project (40%), weekly auralia tests (10%), 1 x mid-semester aural exam (5%), 1 x final aural exam (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The culmination of the Fundamentals of Music series, this unit of study is an exploration of musical language used in contemporary popular, film and world music repertoire from ca. 1960 to the present. The focus is on compositional techniques, analytical tools and workflow that relates to contemporary music practitioners. Lectures will examine the given topic for that week with references to examples drawn from a list of repertoire for that topic. These examples will be discussed further in the written tutorials and supported by weekly homework. An important outcome of this unit of study is the final assignment, in which students apply the knowledge accrued over the semester in an original composition, which they also analyse. Aural Tutorials will draw on these topics to develop skills relating to the student's ability to perceive and interpret musical elements and procedures.
PERF2604 Chinese Music Ensemble 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr group lesson (or equivalent) per week; 6 x 1hr seminars per semester; 1 x 1hr rehearsal per week in weeks 5-12 (some additional rehearsals may be arranged prior to concerts); participation in 1 or 2 concerts. Assessment: Seminar tasks and participation (25%); concert report (15%); instrument study and performance (60%) Mode Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit students will receive small group tuition on one traditional Chinese musical instrument (provided on loan). They will be guided in playing the instrument in an ensemble, and will participate in ensemble performances. Through seminar-style discussions of four selected readings and of at least one concert of Chinese music attended during the semester, they will begin to develop a broad understanding of Chinese traditional musical instruments, ensembles, and musical structures, thus enhancing their knowledge of China's thousands of years of recorded musical history and its extensive and diverse musical traditions.
PERF2605 Chinese Music Ensemble 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr group lesson (or equivalent) per week; 6 x 1hr seminars per semester; 1 x 1hr rehearsal per week in weeks 5-12 (some additional rehearsals may be arranged prior to concerts); participation in 1 or 2 concerts. Prerequisites: PERF2604 Assessment: Group presentation (20%); practical examination (30%); instrument study and performance (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students continue their previous study of one Chinese instrument in both small group and ensemble settings. They are encouraged to build on technical capacity developed in their first semester's study, and to perform a wider range of pieces. They will also engage with a range of recordings and live performances of Chinese music to further develop their understandings of traditional and contemporary Chinese music, and of how Chinese musical instruments have featured in a variety of musical contexts.

3000-level units of study

CMPN3634 Interactive Media and Sound Installations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Benjamin Carey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lect/wk Prerequisites: CMPN1013 or MUSC2653 Assessment: Sound Apparatus Project Presentation (25%), Relation Agents Group Project Presentation (25%), Final Project Public Presentation/Performance (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The unit makes use of interactive programming techniques and other technical skills taught in CMPN2631/2632. Enrolling concurrently in one of these subjects alongside CMPN3634 is recommended.
This unit will focus on electronic music composition involving new paradigms brought about by real-time performance, installations, network technology, human computer interaction, gestural control and integration with visual arts and video animations. This unit of study will also investigate the available literature on topics such as multimedia, interactive and installation work in the context of contemporary sound art practice.
CMPN3635 Writing Music for the Moving Image

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Blinkhorn Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6 x 1 hour lectures for the first six weeks; 6 x 2 hour tutorials thereafter Prerequisites: MUED1002 or CMPN1013 or MUSC2653 or MUED4002 Assessment: Written paper (20%), Presentation (30%), Final Music (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides a practical introduction into the creation of, and aesthetics for music and
moving image. Topics for discussion will include, but are not be limited to: relationships
between image and sound, diegetic and non-diegetic sound, thematic development,
partnerships between composers, directors and other such collaborations within the creative
sector, sound design, music for games and animation, and non-commercial applications of
music for image (audiovisual art, cymatics etc). The unit seeks to enable
students the ability to develop a skillset within their own studio spaces for the creation and
dissemination of their projects; both at a sector ready, as well as a technically proficient level.
Importantly, students will be presented with a variety of possible projects and collaborations
with industry partners across differing creative sectors.
JAZZ3002 Jazz Large Ensemble 5

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Prerequisites: JAZZ2003 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students. Entry to these ensembles is by audition held during the week before classes commence in semester 1. Contact Unit Coordinator for day and time.
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction.
JAZZ3003 Jazz Large Ensemble 6

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Elective Jazz Orchestra or 3hr Big Band class Prerequisites: JAZZ3002 Assessment: A final grade will be compiled from continual assessment of professional demeanour and ensemble skills demonstrated during rehearsals and performances (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz degree students. Entry to these ensembles is by audition held during the week before classes commence in semester 1. Contact Unit Coordinator for day and time.
This unit of study covers all aspects of professional and creative ensemble performance, including: reading, improvisation, dynamics, tone, intonation, articulation, swing, time-feel, style and ensemble interaction.
MCGY3602 Understanding East Asian Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr Seminar per week Assessment: Academic blog based on class activity (15%); In-class presentation (15%); Academic blog based on set reading (10%); Major essay (60%) M Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will learn about, discuss and play different musical forms from East Asia - ranging from ancient guqin music to contemporary K-Pop. They will develop an understanding of key aesthetic concepts, musical instruments and musical features of the music cultures in this region. Students will be encouraged to develop awareness of the diversity of East Asian musics and cultures, and of music's interrelation with and great significance to East Asian societies both in the past and today.
MCGY3604 J.S. Bach and his World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alan Maddox Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar per week Assessment: Critical Reading Assignments (20%); Class Presentation (20%); Essay (50%); Seminar Preparation and Class Presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
More than 250 years after his death, J.S. Bach remains one of the most revered musicians in the Western tradition. What influences formed Bach's style? What makes his music embedded in its time and place, yet distinctive and instantly recognisable? This unit investigates the music of this iconic composer in its historical context, considering his training, cultural and religious environment, stylistic influences and ongoing legacy, and allows students to explore their own research interests relating to Bach's music.
MCGY3629 Romanticism and the Fantastic

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour seminar per week Assumed knowledge: It is expected that students will have some knowledge of harmonic and formal practices up to 1850. Assessment: Essay (40%); Critical/ analytical assignment (15%); Listening and score-based tests (20%); Presentation (15%); seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the fantastic as a central aspect of romanticism in its various manifestations, including the uncanny, the daemonic and the alienated. In music, this meshes fruitfully with the fantasy as a genre, which is similarly dependent on the imagination and the evasion of clear boundaries. A range of Lieder, operas, symphonic and solo works by composers such as Schumann, Berlioz, Liszt, Mendelssohn and Schubert will be studied against the backdrop of literary and artistic innovations by Goethe, Hoffmann, Byron, and Friedrich. Theories of the fantastic by Todorov, Freud and others will also be examined.
MCGY3630 New Germans: Wagner and Liszt 1848-76

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: MCGY2612 Assumed knowledge: It is expected that students will have some knowledge of harmonic and formal practices up to 1850 Assessment: 1 x research essay (50%); 2 x in-class tests (20%); 1 x in-class presentation (20%); Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The New German School was a controversial term coined in 1859 to legitimise the self-consciously progressive art of figures such as Wagner and Liszt. This course explores the music and aesthetic theories of these two composers against the backdrop of contemporary debates and reception politics. Their personal relationship will also be scrutinized in detail. Works to be studied include selections from Liszt's symphonic poems and piano works, Wagner's Tristan, Die Meistersinger and Ring tetralogy.
MCGY3636 Mozart's World: Music in the Age of Reason

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Essay (2, 500-3, 000 words) (50%), Seminar presentation (30%), critical reading assignments (1, 000 words) (20%) Assumed knowledge: It is strongly recommended that students have completed MCGY2612, or have a sound knowledge of the Viennese Classical repertoire. Assessment: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr seminar per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Dr Alan Maddox
Since the early 20th century, the period c.1750-1830 has been associated with the idea of Classicism in European music, but it was also a period of rapid development and transformation in both music and society. This unit offers an in-depth examination of the music of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and their contemporaries in this historical context, and provides an opportunity to explore topics that will deepen and extend students' understanding of this highly significant period. Students will explore important repertoire, become acquainted with scholarly and performance issues associated with the style by studying a selection of critical writings about the period, and choose one topic to research in depth.
MCGY3639 Modernism in Austria and Germany 1889-1914

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: MCGY2612 Assessment: Essay (40%); Critical/analytical assignments (15%); Listening and score-based tests (20%); In-class presentation (15%); Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Between 1889 and 1914, certain Austro-Germanic composers played a crucial role in the emerging modernist movement. Richard Strauss, Mahler and Schoenberg engaged with past musical traditions and contemporary trends in visual art, literature and philosophy to produce a distinctively new type of music. Works to be studied include Strauss's tone poems, Mahler's symphonies and Schoenberg's chamber music, as well as Lieder and stage works. Among the issues which will be explored are the way in which traditional formal structures were invoked and destabilised, the changes the musical language underwent and how music was conceptualized in this era of change and crisis.
MUSC3603 Advanced Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damian Barbeler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hr lecture/demonstration/wk Prerequisites: MUSC2653 or CMPN1013 Assessment: Creative assignments (80%), Weekly review and presentation of work (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an advanced exploration of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a subject in which students are expected to make sophisticated use of sound creation and manipulation tools in pursuit of their own musical ideas. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
MUSC3609 Musicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr seminar/wk Assessment: Written assessments (50%), weekly summaries of readings (30%), participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a requirement for Honours in the Arts Music unit.
What do we study when we study music? What kinds of stories do we tell about the history of music? What are the central issues, questions, and concerns that drive the study of music? This unit of study begins to answer these questions and provides an overview of musicology as an academic discipline. The readings cover the field of musicology from its beginnings in the 1880s up to the present day.
MUSC3610 Musical Traditions and Globalization

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour seminar per week Assessment: Academic Blog - Musical Tradition (20%); In-class Presentation (15%); Academic Blog - Musical Piece (15%); Major Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Every musical form worldwide exists within a tradition, and globalization has been crucial in shaping those traditions in the contemporary era. This course explores different ways that musical traditions and globalization intersect. It introduces key theoretical approaches to both globalization (including postcolonial perspectives) and the concept of musical tradition, and explores case studies including social media and music in the Pacific Islands, East African hip-hop, understanding globalization's influence on indigenous Australian musical traditions and historically informed Western art music performance.
MUSC3629 Music and Everyday Life

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture/week Assessment: 1 x 3000wd fieldwork project paper (40%), 1 x 1000wd description of a musical event (20%), 2 x 1000wd critical response papers (30%), overall class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a requirement for Honours in the BA.
What can we learn from non-textual approaches to understanding music? The primary goal of this unit of study is to study music not as a composer, producer, performer, listener or audience member, but as an ethnographer. That is, analysing music through an observational, experiential and intellectual understanding of how people make and take meaning from music.
MUSC3630 Popular Music and the Moving Image

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1 x 1000wd musical analysis (20%), 1 x 1000wd industrial critique (20%), 1 x listening and viewing test (20%), 1 x 3000wd final project (30%), overall participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The range of media channels through which we experience, popular music has prolifereated in recent years. The emotive power of music is used to tell stories, sell products and connect people to one another. This unit will analyse the use of popular music in a broad range of multimedia forms from film and television to video games and the use of digital media to disseminate a multitude of musical multimedia productions.
MUSC3631 Music in Public: Performance and Power

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2 x 500 wd performance reports (15%), 1 x 1500wd performance genre analysis (25%), 1 x 1000wd performance analysis (20%), 1 x 3000wd essay (30%), overall seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The act of performing music creates a multitude of social relationships between listeners, audiences, musicians, performers, and the industries and institutions that surround them. This subject will ask students to study acts of performance historically, theoretically, and observationally. They will examine a wide range of situations and circumstances and try to work out how the expression of music is also an expression, affirmation, and contestation of social power. This subject will appeal to those who wish to study subjects such as music, performance studies, sociology, anthropology, and gender and cultural studies. It cuts across all of these areas of inquiry in the attention that is paid to the complexity and subtlety of how music is perceived and experienced across multiple social scenes and communities. This subject is not about performance practice or assessment. Instead, it seeks to allow students to gain some insight into the experience of performance as multifaceted and perspectival.
MUSC3639 Music Journalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/week. Assessment: Exercises in music journalism and reviewing 4,000 words (50%), final paper 2,000 words (30%), participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Even as the 'Age of Newspapers' seems to be coming to an end, human beings' need for authoritative commentary on music remains as strong as ever. Along with surveying the history of music journalism from the early eighteenth century up to the present day, this unit of study offers participants the chance to try their hands at various forms of music journalism.
MUSC3641 Music, Environment and Climate Change

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1 hour lecture per week; 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Assessment: Academic blog post (20%), class participation (30%), major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Climate change is one of the most important global issues of our era, and one which is destined to have a major influence on the lives of subsequent generations. It is especially dependent upon our understandings of the environment, our place within it, and our views of our environmental responsibilities. In this unit, students will explore some of the incredible range of ways in which music, the environment and climate change and interwoven. They will be guided through lectures from musicians and researchers involved in the connection between music and the environment across the fields of ethnomusicology, composition, digital music technology, jazz and contemporary music, as well as by lectures and a workshop with Indigenous Australian cultural custodians. Through this unit, students will understand not only the ways that, for millennia, music has a central role in the way that humans record, transmit and promote understandings of many different aspects of the environment, but also how it functions today and how it may help in solving environmental problems of the future.
MUSC3699 Understanding Music: Modes of Hearing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/wk Assessment: Brief essays eq. 1,500 words (30%), final paper 3,000 words (50%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: A good working knowledge of musical terminology and vocabulary is required.
This unit of study deals with the different ways in which we comprehend music and with the different ways in which that comprehension might be explained. It deals with modes of hearing and musical analysis for the purpose of leading students towards a deeper knowledge of how music in various genres (ranging from the classical mainstream to the twentieth-century avant-garde, from Tin Pan Alley songs to punk rock and hip-hop) is understood. This is a required unit of study for a music major in an Arts degree.
PERF3606 Chinese Music Ensemble 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr group lesson (or equivalent) per week; 6 x 1hr seminars per semester; 1 x 2hr rehearsal per week in weeks 5-12 (some additional rehearsals may be arranged prior to concerts); participation in up to 3 concerts. Prerequisites: PERF2605 Assessment: Seminar tasks and participation (25%); report or presentation on a Chinese music performer or composer (15%); instrument study and performance (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit allows students to further develop proficiency on one Chinese instrument in both small group and ensemble settings, and to continue to perform with the ensemble. Students will gain a deeper understanding of Chinese music by conducting an interview with a performer or composer of Chinese music, and by exploring selected readings concerning orchestraparticular themes relating to the repertoire under study.
PERF3607 Chinese Music Ensemble 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr group lesson (or equivalent) per week; 6 x 1hr seminars per semester; 1 x 2hr rehearsal per week in weeks 5-12 (some additional rehearsals may be arranged prior to concerts); participation in up to 3 concerts. Prerequisites: PERF3606 Assessment: Individual presentation (30%); practical exam (20%); instrument study and performance (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit allows students to further develop proficiency on one Chinese instrument in both small group and ensemble settings, and to continue to perform with the ensemble. Students are also encouraged to take an increasingly active and independent role in engaging with Chinese music. In particular, they are guided and supported in small group collaborations focussing upon developing, rehearsing, recording and publicly performing a range of works for Chinese instruments. Students are also encouraged to engage more deeply with Chinese music through enhancing their understanding of the various philosophical and ideological principles that have had a significant influence upon key aspects of Chinese music, both in the past and today.
PERF3608 Chinese Music Ensemble 5 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hour class per week; 1 x 2 hour rehearsal per week in weeks 5-13; 1-3 public performances; 3-4 research seminars Prerequisites: PERF3607 Assessment: Study of an ensemble performance on a traditional Chinese instrument (60%), individual research project (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit allows students to further develop proficiency on one Chinese instrument in both small group and ensemble settings, and to continue to perform with the ensemble. Students will gain a deeper understanding of Chinese music by taking a more independent role in performing Chinese music, and completing their own Chinese music research project. This unit will provide students with a further opportunity to study non-Western musical performance and to have further engagement with analytical and conceptual approaches drawn from ethnomusicology. It will incorporate and further develop the performance skills that students have gained in previous study in earlier units, and promote the creation of a comprehensive performance-research based ethnomusicology pathway at the undergraduate level. It will help students from all specializations develop greater understanding of musical cultures outside the Western musical mainstream that usually forms the primary focus of their Conservatorium music studies. Some students taking this ensemble may be encouraged to undertake musicology units in the ethnomusicology pathway, or to consider honours proposals that have a focus on non-Western music.
PERF3609 Chinese Music Ensemble 6 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Ingram Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hour class per week; 1 x 2 hour rehearsal per week in weeks 5-13; 1-3 public performances; 3-4 research seminars Prerequisites: PERF3608 Assessment: Study of and ensemble performance on a traditional Chinese instrument (40%), individual practice-based research portfolio (40%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit allows students to further develop proficiency on one Chinese instrument in both small group and ensemble settings, and to continue to perform with the ensemble. Students will gain a strong foundation in Chinese music performance, and be supported to develop their own Chinese music practice-based research portfolio. This unit will provide students with a further opportunity to study non-Western musical performance and to have further engagement with analytical and conceptual approaches drawn from ethnomusicology. It will incorporate and further develop the performance skills that students have gained in previous study in earlier units, and promote the creation of a comprehensive performance-research based ethnomusicology pathway at the undergraduate level. It will help students from all specializations develop greater understanding of musical cultures outside the Western musical mainstream that usually forms the primary focus of their Conservatorium music studies. Some students taking this ensemble may be encouraged to undertake musicology units in the ethnomusicology pathway, or to consider honours proposals that have a focus on non-Western music.
PERF3640 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ian Whitney Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Corequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Assumed knowledge: upper-level disciplinary knowledge Assessment: 1 x group presentation (10%), 1 x group plan (20%), 1 x group project (50%), 1x individual statement (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a realworld problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.

4000-level units of study

CMPN4666 Advanced Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gerard Brophy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hr seminar/lecture per week Assessment: Class presentation (1000 words) (15%), Composition analysis (20%), Weekly readings reports (15%), Research Project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to equip students with a working knowledge of current music theory and analysis practice, impart analytical skills that can be applied across a broad spectrum of activities and different musical genres and types, and develop an understanding of related concepts such as what analysis actually is, different types of analysis (functional, descriptive, surface, aural/perceptual vs. score based) and an understanding of working at different levels of abstraction.
MUSC4214 Musicology Workshop Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alan Maddox Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours/week including attendance at SCM Musicology Colloquium Series (1 hour/fortnight) Assessment: 1 x reflective journal (20%); 1 x 15-20min presentation (20%); 1 x 3000wd essay (50%); overall participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Musicology Workshop Advanced provides a forum for discussion of musicological work and provides experience in the presentation of ideas and research. It also provides a broadening of students' experience in the field through attendance at the Conservatorium's fortnightly Musicology Colloquium Series lectures, presented by SCM staff and visiting national and international scholars speaking on a wide range of topics, as well as through class activities exploring areas such as research and writing skills, music criticism, visits to local libraries or archives, and conference attendance and reporting. Honours students also have the opportunity to build skills in leadership and influence by mentoring undergraduates taking Musicology Workshop 1 and 2.
Textbooks
Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Edited by Wayne C. Booth et. al. 9th edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2018.