Table S Electives - Engineering

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.
 

Table S Electives - Engineering

1000-level units of study

AMME1362 Materials 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL2110 or CIVL1110 or AMME2302 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
AMME1362 is an introductory course in engineering materials. The unit aims to develop students' understanding of the structures, mechanical properties and manufacture of a range of engineering materials as well as how the mechanical properties relate to microstructure and forming and treatment methods. The unit has no prerequisite subject and is therefore intended for those with little or no previous background in engineering materials. However the unit does require students to take a significant degree of independent responsibility for developing their own background knowledge of materials and their properties. The electrical, magnetic, thermal and optical properties of materials are a critical need-to-know area where students are expected to do most of their learning by independent study.
AMME1802 Engineering Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL1802 or ENGG1802 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The unit aims to provide students with an understanding of and competence in solving statics and introductory dynamics problems in engineering. Tutorial sessions will help students to improve their group work and problem solving skills, and gain competency in extracting a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Emphasis is placed on the ability to work in 3D as well as 2D, including the 2D and 3D visualisation of structures and structural components, and the vectorial 2D and 3D representations of spatial points, forces and moments. Introduction to kinematics and dynamics topics includes position, velocity and acceleration of a point; relative motion, force and acceleration, momentum, collisions and energy methods.
BMET1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME1961 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: HSC Biology and HSC Chemistry. Summer bridging courses are available for students who did not complete HSC Biology or Chemistry
This biomedical engineering core junior unit of study provides an introduction to the relatively recent, and rapidly growing, biotechnology industry, with a focus on the current key commercial applications. In the 1990s, the word 'biotech' entered our lexicon as a synonym for overnight investment wealth. The biotechnology acronym GM (genetically modified) also entered our lexicon in the 1990s. Biotechnology can be broadly defined as the commercial exploitation of biological processes for industrial and other purposes. A significant focus for commercial activities has been GM technology: GM microorganisms, plants, animals, and even humans (gene therapy). The 'biotech industry' arose rapidly in the late 20th century, and is now one of the largest industries in the world, and is one of the cornerstones of the global biomedical industry which comprises three main sectors: Medical Devices, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotechnology. Significant global commercial biotechnology activity concerns the manufacture of therapeutic compounds from GM microorganisms using bioreactors, for example insulin. Another significant sector is agricultural: 'agri-biotech' which concerns GM higher lifeforms (plants and animals) primarily for the food industry, and also other industries such as the energy industry (biofuels). The third sector concerns therapeutic GM of humans, known as 'gene-therapy'. Some other important biotechnologies will also be explored including monoclonal antibodies, genome sequencing and personalised medicine, and RNA-interference technology (RNAi).
CHNG1103 Conservation of Mass and Energy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The students should develop an understanding of and competence in the formulation and solution of material and energy balance problems in engineering; develop competence in using basic flowsheet analysis and appropriate computational tools; improve their group work and problem solving skills; gain an ability to extract a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation.
Mass conservation related topics include: unit systems and unit conversions; properties of solids, fluids and gases; mass balance calculations on batch and flow systems; balances on multiple units processes, balances on reactive systems, recycle, bypass and purge calculations; equilibrium compositions of reacting systems; vapour pressure and humidity. Energy conservation includes the following topics: apply the first law of thermodynamics to flow and batch systems in process industries; understand thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy and heat capacity; conduct energy balances for sensible heat changes, phase transformations and reactive processes for practical industrial systems; understand the applications of psychrometry, refrigeration, heat of formation and combustion in industry.
CHNG1106 Engineering for a Sustainable Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG1103 Prohibitions: CHNG2805 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of mass and energy balance concepts equivalent to content of CHNG1103 or CHNG9103 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit involves the study of the fundamental concepts which underpin sustainable development, including technical and economic efficiency, environmental stewardship and social responsibility. The unit examines both the material and non-material economies from an engineering perspective. Tools such as life-cycle assessment, input-output analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis are examined and implications for resource and energy consumption, pollution and waste generation are analysed. A number of governing sustainability frameworks are discussed to determine their suitability within the context of chemical and biomolecular engineering. A range of approaches and tools for determining the environmental impact of human activities on small and large scale are introduced as part of a sustainability framework. Energy production and use, and product design are investigated from a sustainability perspective.
CHNG1108 Introduction to Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or CIVL1900 or MECH1560 or AERO1560 or AMME1960 or BMET1960 or MTRX1701 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 or ELEC1005 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and Chemistry Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will introduce students to the profession of chemical engineering. It will give students an appreciation of the variety of the chemical and process industries, their history, the economic importance and the scale of their operations both in Australia and globally.
The unit will make use of virtual process plants and industrial leaders as guest speakers.
CIVL1110 Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME1362 or CIVL2110 Assumed knowledge: CIVL1802 (or equivalent) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Materials are an important part of the civil engineers' work. Indeed, civil engineers who are concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of facilities need to understand the behaviour and performance of the materials used. And as it happens, mechanical properties- which are essential and basic for civil engineers- are highly dependent on the structure of materials at various scales. Therefore, it is important that a student in Civil Engineering possesses a fundamental knowledge in materials science. This unit of study aims to provide students with the tools necessary to select the adequate material for a particular application and to assess its mechanical behaviour while in use. This unit will focus mainly on materials for civil engineering and construction applications, i.e. metals, concrete and soils.
CIVL1802 Statics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1802 OR AMME1802 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Unit will focus on Engineering Statics, covering topics such as resolution of forces and moments, free body diagrams, support reactions, equilibrium in rigid bodies, trusses frames and machines, method of sections, method of joints, centroids, distributed forces, vibrations and friction. There will be extensive use of both 2D and 3D examples and solution methods by either resolution in the principle axes or by using vectors. Its main aim is to prepare students for 2nd year civil units such as Structural Mechanics.
CIVL1810 Engineering Construction and Surveying

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL2810 Assumed knowledge: CIVL1900. Some statistical awareness is an advantage and co-enrolment in MATH1005 Statistics is advised. HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or completion of (MATH1001 or MATH1021) and MATH1002 are sufficient for non-statistical maths preparation Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Construction: Fundamental understanding of construction materials and techniques underpins Civil design and complements a rigorous analysis covered in other units such as Structural Mechanics and Soil Mechanics. In this unit students will be introduced to the realities of on-site civil construction. For many students this comes as a completely foreign experience and the methods they need to use to succeed in this unit rely on the student building his or her own awareness of the construction world and how it operates. This will be guided by the lectures and on-line material, but will not be spoon-fed to the students.
This unit presents concepts introducing students to engineering construction including:
- design, control, management, measurement and construction methods for excavation, embankments and other earthworks, hauling and associated operations;
- conceptual and formative exposure to building construction methods and materials, including reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber;
- drilling and blasting.
Surveying: The unit also introduces Engineering Survey topics, where the aims are:
- give an overall view of the functions of surveying and it's service role in Civil construction;
- become acquainted with selected specific surveying techniques, such as: (a) to provide basic analogue methods of distance, angle and height measurement and, (b) to provide an understanding of three dimensional mapping using basic total station electronic field equipment with associated data capture ability, and;
- to give an insight into future trends in the use of GPS and GIS systems.
Students should develop basic competency in earthwork engineering and awareness of costing issues in formulating building proposals (through simplified examples). Economic optimisation is investigated, and how this impinges on decisions of construction, including proposing and analysing systems and methods, estimation of probable output, unit cost and productivity evaluation. Students should have a basic knowledge of vertical construction in reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber. Students should also develop proficiency in the design and implementation of mapping systems in Civil Engineering, using analogue and electronic field equipment and associated software packages.
The tutorial exercises give practise for students to implement what they have learned from lectures and their own research about the framework under which construction projects are formulated and analysed; construction engineering fundamentals; construction systems related to excavation, hauling and embankment construction, including selection and evaluation of plant and methods as well as the expected output and cost; introduction to construction operations management, introduction to engineering surveying, distance measurement, angle measurement, levelling, traversing, topographic surveys, electronic surveying equipment, future surveying technologies.
While prior exposure to an actual construction site would be beneficial, in any case the key for success in this unit is for the student to develop a hungry curiosity for the world of construction and the professionals and personalities which form the intricate patchwork of talent which sees complex projects through to successful completion.
CIVL1900 Introduction to Civil Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or CHNG1108 or MECH1560 or AERO1560 or AMME1960 or BMET1960 or MTRX1701 or ENGG1960 or ELEC1004 or ELEC1005 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The objective of this unit of study is to introduce students to the field of civil engineering and its areas of specialisation: structural engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, construction management, transportation engineering, and humanitarian engineering. The unit will cover basic physics concepts relevant to civil engineering. The unit will equip students with knowledge of foundational civil engineering tools and techniques such as the identification and calculation of loads on structures, structural systems, and load paths in structures. The unit covers design and construction issues related to the use of standard materials such as steel, concrete, and timber. The unit includes several design tasks and a design project with an emphasis on issues associated with the impact of civil infrastructure on the natural environment, the economy, and social and humanitarian outcomes. The topics will provide a sound foundation for the further study of civil infrastructure design, analysis, construction, and maintenance.
DATA1002 Informatics: Data and Computation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1902 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e.g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model.
DATA1902 Informatics: Data and Computation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1002 Assumed knowledge: This unit is intended for students with ATAR at least sufficient for entry to the BSc/BAdvStudies(Advanced) stream, or for those who gained Distinction results or better, in some unit in Data Science, Mathematics, or Computer Science. Students with portfolio of high-quality relevant prior work can also be admitted Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e. g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model. This unit includes the content of DATA1002, along with additional topics that are more sophisticated, suited for students with high academic achievement.
ELEC1004 Practical Intro to Electrical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or CHNG1108 or MECH1560 or AERO1560 or BMET1960 or MTRX1701 or ELEC1005 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics and Mathematics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study aims to expose the students with fundamental (basic) concepts of different specializations within electrical engineering and give them hands on experience to develop the required engineering skills. The unit is based on extensive laboratory work covering Measuring skills using basic electrical instruments, Soldering skills to make electronic circuits and test them, Computer programming skills including real time programming and simulation programming, Use of internet technology, Wireless technology, Renewable energy technology.
ELEC1005 Introduction to Software Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1800 or CHNG1108 or MECH1560 or AERO1560 or BMET1960 or MTRX1701 or ELEC1004 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study will introduce student to the field of software engineering. It will expose the students to fundamental (basic) concepts of key areas within software engineering including Requirement Engineering, Software Design (Architecture and Modeling), Software Quality Engineering, and Software Process Engineering. This unit also provides students with practical experience to start to develop the required engineering skills through case studies of authentic open-source software projects and hands-on development experience of software projects in a group, as well as communication, documentation, and presentation skills. The unit will provide students with a sound foundation for the further study of software engineering.
ELEC1103 Fundamentals of Elec and Electronic Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, and PHYS1003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study aims to develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. This is a foundation unit in circuit theory. Circuit theory is the electrical engineer's fundamental tool.
The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of electronics, instrumentation, electrical machines, power systems, communication systems, and signal processing.
Topics: a) Basic electrical and electronic circuit concepts: Circuits, circuit elements, circuit laws, node and mesh analysis, circuit theorems, energy storage, capacitors and inductors, circuits with switches, transient response, sine waves and complex analysis, phasors, impedance, ac power. ; b) Project management, teamwork, ethics; c) Safety issues
ELEC1601 Introduction to Computer Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics extension 1 or 2 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study introduces the fundamental digital concepts upon which the design and operation of modern digital computers are based. A prime aim of the unit is to develop a professional view of, and a capacity for inquiry into, the field of computing.
Topics covered include: data representation, basic computer organisation, the CPU, elementary gates and logic, machine language, assembly language and high level programming constructs.
ENGG1000 History and Philosophy of Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
ENGG1000 is a unique course that aims to provide students with an understanding of the historical development of Engineering with relation to societal expectations of the period. Engineering as a field of study and profession has developed over millennia from simple (yet significant) advances in technology such as the lever and wheel, to modern day examples such as advanced computers, nanomaterials and space flight.
Interaction between human society and Engineers has helped develop and guide the advancement of engineering technology; with society posing problems for Engineers to solve and Engineers developing new technology that changed the course of human history, and helped shape the world we live in.
The general philosophy behind Engineering is that Engineers work to fulfill the needs of society (water, electricity, technological improvements etc. ), and as such Engineers are expected to act ethically towards society. The role of Engineers in society will be analysed and discussed from a humanistic perspective, with relation to the current Engineers Australia code of ethics. Other relevant philosophical analyses of Engineering as a skill and profession will also be examined such as, aesthetics, creativity, the epistemology of Engineering and more.
This course will use online resources extensively and help develop research and communication skills of students, whilst providing an overview of the historical significance of Engineers in society, and what it means to be an Engineer.
ENGG1111 Integrated Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1803 or ENGG1061 or ENGG2112 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: Note: Dalyell Scholars may enrol in ENGD1000 in place of ENGG1111. They may also replace ENGG2111 + ENGG3111 + ENGG4111 (3 x 2 cp) with another 6 cp ENGDXXXX (Engineering Dalyell) unit.
Integrated Engineering 1 provides students with an understanding of the nature and diversity of engineering practice and begins the development of a set of intellectual tools for integrating their ongoing personal, academic, and professional development.
An open-ended design project is used to highlight foundational engineering and professional practice skills, and the application of these skills to real world projects and workplace practice. The project demonstrates the role that various professional and academic competencies play in the ability to manage contemporary professional engineering issues.
Through developing their knowledge of the engineering discipline, students enhance their capacity for lifelong learning through critical reflection and self-assessment, creating and monitoring career goals as well as building a sense of responsibility for their learning. Through case studies, design projects and challenges, students expand their communication skills, develop competency in team-based problem solving and creating innovative solutions, as well as apply critical thinking and inquiry. These activities also develop student's research skills and enable them to experience the engineering design process, manage projects, and appreciate the significance of ethics, safety and sustainability.
Dalyell students may enrol in ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World in place of ENGG1111.
ENGG1800 Introduction to Engineering Disciplines

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL1900 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit gives a brief introduction to a range of specialisations in Engineering including Aeronautical, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical and Information Engineering. First-year students have the opportunity to experience aspects of each engineering stream and thus be able to better select which area they wish to pursue in their future studies.
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering enables students to gain an appreciation of the methods in transforming raw materials to value-added products. Students gain an insight into the application of the basic principles of chemistry, mathematics, material and energy balance in assessing and designing processes, operations and maintenance and safety requirements and procedures. This is achieved through a project based activity that involves a paper-based study of a process followed by construction and testing of performance.
School of Civil Engineering. Introductory lectures in Engineering Economics and Construction Planning, Foundation Engineering, Structural Engineering, Materials, Environmental Engineering. Each student is involved in the erection and dismantling of several Scaled Model Structures in the Civil Engineering Courtyard. Preliminary lectures related to the models include safety issues, loading, static analysis, foundation calculations, construction management, engineering drawings and detailing, geometric calculations, and survey measurements. Exercises related to these issues are performed before assembly and disassembly of the models.
School of Electrical and Information Engineering. Overview of Electrical Engineering, Basic circuit analysis: circuits, currents and voltages: Power and Energy; Ohms law, KCL, KVL. Resistive circuits: Resistance in series and parallel; voltage divider and current divider circuits. Introduction to digital systems: Basic logic circuit concepts, Synthesis of logic circuits, Sequential logic circuits. Microcomputers: Computer Organisation, Memory types, Digital process control, assembly language and programming. There are laboratory exercises based on the above topics.
School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (AMME). AMME has three degree streams: Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronics. Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering are closely related. A model wind turbine generating electrical power is tested considering aerodynamic parameters, overall efficiency and mechanical stresses. Mechatronics covers software control of machines, including basic electronic knowledge with examples, concepts of software and hardware integration. Group based activity is to implement a simple mechatronics system onto the wind turbine.

School of Biomedical Engineering. Biomedical engineering provides a hands-on design project to develop a joint replacement concept. The design process captures inputs such as joint range of motion considerations, biomaterials selection, manufacturing route, design risk analysis
ENGG1810 Introduction to Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG1801 or INFO1110 or INFO1910 or INFO1103 or INFO1903 or INFO1105 or INFO1905 or COSC1003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive February
This unit is an essential starting point for engineers to learn the knowledge and skills of computer programming, using a procedural language.Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, and functions. Studentswill learn to translate a general engineering problem into a computer program. This unit trains students in the software development process, which includes programming, testing and debugging.
ENGG1850 Introduction to Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Project management is a rapidly growing profession applied across all industries. This subject provides an overview of project management and its relationship to program and portfolio management and the broader business context. The Unit introduces students to variations in project management as interpreted and applied in different industries. It will cover the nature of the project management profession, project career paths and the graduate qualities sought by employers. It introduces the primary professional standards and project management terminology..
ENGG1860 Project Initiation and Scope

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Projects need to be set up to succeed from the start. This includes careful consideration of the purpose of the project and how this breaks down through work, deliverables and responsibility. This Unit of Study addresses the techniques required to design a successful project. It provides the foundation for more detailed planning and execution. Upon completion of this course, students will develop thinking and listening skills, while demonstrating initiative and drive to achieve project related outcomes.
ENGG1863 Effective Project Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Project management is a rapidly growing profession applied across all industries. This subject provides an overview of project management and its relationship to program and portfolio management and the broader business context. The Unit introduces students to variations in project management as interpreted and applied in different industries. It will cover the nature of the project management profession, project career paths and the graduate qualities sought by employers. It introduces the primary professional standards and project management terminology. Projects are constructed and progressed through communication. Effective communication can save a poor project just as much as poor communication can undermine previously successful implementation. This Unit of Study covers the essential skills of effective project communication and sets students up to exercise influence through interpersonal skills and construct patterns of communication suitable to the demands of different projects. This unit will help students develop critical thinking and source and use information in their decision making. Students will focus on personal integrity and reliability as well as self awareness.
ENGG1865 Project Time, Cost and Resources

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL3805 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Project management requires complex planning decisions with regards to schedules, budgets and resources in both traditional and agile environments. This unit of study introduces students to tools, methods and approaches such as the work breakdown structure, milestone planning, precedence diagram, Gantt charts and critical pathways. These tools and techniques help project managers balance time, cost and resources; and understand the impact on the schedule, budget and resource allocation associated with potential risks.
INFO1110 Introduction to Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1910 or INFO1103 or INFO1903 or INFO1105 or INFO1905 or ENGG1810 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.
INFO1113 Object-Oriented Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR ENGG1810 Prohibitions: INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Object-oriented (OO) programming is a technique that arranges code into classes, each encapsulating in one place related data and the operations on that data. Inheritance is used to reuse code from a more general class, in specialised situations. Most modern programming languages provide OO features. Understanding and using these are an essential skill to software developers in industry. This unit provides the student with the concepts and individual programming skills in OO programming, starting from their previous mastery of procedural programming.
INFO1910 Introduction to Programming (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO1110 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assumed knowledge: ATAR sufficient to enter Dalyell program, or passing an online programming knowledge test, which will be administered during the O-week prior to the commencement of the semester Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The focus of this unit will cover the ground up programming components necessary for study in the computer science discipline. Students will engage with procedural programming using two related programming languages. Students will further their understanding of internal operations as well as reasoning about processing, memory model and conventional programming practices. As an advanced offering, all the course contents of INFO1110 will be covered and there will be additional teaching materials and assessments.
MTRX1702 Mechatronics 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC1101 or ELEC2602 or COSC1902 or COSC1002 Assumed knowledge: MTRX1701 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study aims to provide a foundation for the study of systems and embedded programming for the degree in Mechatronic Engineering.
It is based around a systems engineering approach to requirements capture, software design, implementation, debugging and testing in the context of the C programming language. Problem definition and decomposition; the design process; designing for testing and defensive coding methods; modular code structure and abstract data types; best practice in programming. Programming in teams; documentation and version control.
The C language: Preprocessor, tokens, storage classes and types; arithmetic, relational and bit manipulation operators; constructs for control flow: if, switch, for, do and while; arrays; pointers and character strings; dynamic memory allocation; functions and parameter passing; derived storage classes: structures and unions; file I/O.
MTRX1705 Introduction to Mechatronic Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to the basic hardware elements of mechatronic systems.
Basic electrical theory: Ohms law, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws, passive component characteristics (resistors, capacitors and inductors).
Number systems and codes; Logic gates and Boolean algebra, universal (NAND) logic gates; Digital arithmetic: operations and circuits, Two's complement addition and subtraction, overflow; Combinational logic circuits; Flip-flops and related devices; Counters and registers, shift register applications; sequential circuits, designs of synchronous, cascadable counters (BCD and binary). Integrated circuit logic families and interfacing; practical issues including, fan out, pull-up/down, grounds, power supplies and decoupling; timing issues, race conditions. Tri-state signals and buses; MSI logic circuits, multiplexers, demultiplexers, decoders, magnitude comparators; Introduction to programmable logic devices.
Brushed DC Motors: Introduction to characteristics and control, motor specifications, torque-speed characteristics, power and efficiency, thermal considerations.
Introduction to BJTs and FETs as switches. PWM control of DC motors; half- and full-bridge configurations; Feedback and operational amplifiers; selected op-amp applications circuits with an emphasis on sensor and actuator interfacing.
The unit of study will include a practical component where students design and implement logic and linear circuits. Purchase of a basic laboratory tool kit as described in classes will be required.
PMGT1711 Systems Thinking in Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Projects exist as and within complex systems of human activity. Systems thinking enables us to understand the patterns of interconnection both within projects and their dependencies to contextual forces. This Unit introduces students to a variety of systems thinking techniques which will help in responding to the interconnectedness of all things and taking action in face of uncertainty and ambiguity. Upon completion of the course, the students will learn to think and question critically, while building skills to deliver projects that align with organisational strategic objectives. This unit will help student understand how to manage change while exercising empathy and learn to listen effectively.
PMGT1852 Facilitation and Stakeholder Engagement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ENGG1850 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
All projects exist within a network of stakeholders including senior management, customers, users, team members and many others. Ability to facilitate the interactions within this network allows us to better identify, assess and prioritise stakeholder needs and concerns in order to achieve project outcomes. This Unit of Study covers facilitation techniques, influence, stakeholder engagement and project teamwork.

2000-level units of study

AERO2703 Aircraft Performance and Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923) and (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810) Assumed knowledge: AERO1560 or ENGG1800, Familiarity with fundamental Aerospace concepts Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit aims to develop in students an understanding of the fundamental concepts involved in the operation and performance of aircraft. The students will acquire an ability to make accurate and meaningful measurements of take-off, climb, cruise, turn, descent and landing performance; to perform weight and balance calculations; to understand the use of aerodynamic derivatives and their impact on aircraft performance. Students will be shown methods to optimise performance for specific missions. It will also cover modern issues such as airport congestion, noise restrictions, aviation certification requirements for the use of different aircraft categories and novel methods solving these problems.
AMME2000 Engineering Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923 or MATH1907 or MATH1933) and (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810 or INFO1103 or INFO1903 or INFO1110 or INFO1910 or DATA1002 or DATA1902) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems including; Conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The focus will be on real problems, deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables; Fourier series and Fourier transforms; Laplace transforms; scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches.
AMME2200 Introductory Thermofluids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME2261 or AMME2262 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923 or MATH1907 or MATH1933). Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Thermofluids is made up of the components Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer and Thermodynamics and it reaches into all areas of Engineering including issues of human comfort, power generation and environment. A broad range of essential topics is covered in this unit, suitable for students who have not already completed similar component units. The emphasis is on analysis and problem solving (detailed calculations) by application of the relevant basic principles to typical engineering problems.
Fluid Mechanics
Properties: viscosity, surface tension, cavitation, capillarity. Hydrostatics: manometers, forces and moments on submerged surfaces, centre of pressure, buoyancy, vessel stability. Flow: Streamlines, turbulence, continuity, Bernoulli, venturi meter, pitot tube, head, loss coefficients, pumps, turbines, power, efficiency. Fluid momentum, drag, thrust, propulsive efficiency, wind turbines, turbomachinery, torque, power, head, Francis, Pelton, Kaplan turbines. Dimensional analysis, similarity, scale modelling, Reynolds No., pipe flow, pressure drop, Moody chart.
Heat Transfer
Conduction: thermal circuits, plane, cylindrical, conduction equation, fins. Heat Exchangers: LMTD and NTU methods. Unsteady Conduction: lumped capacity, Bi, Fo, Heissler charts. Convection (forced), analytical Nu, Pr correlations. Convection (natural) Ra, Gr. Radiation spectrum, blackbody, emissivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, Stefan-Boltzmann, Kirchhoff Laws, selective surfaces, environmental radiation.
Thermodynamics:
1st Law of Thermodynamics, Properties, State postulate. Ideal gases, 2-phase properties, steam quality. Turbines, compressors. thermal efficiency and COP for refrigerators. 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, Kelvin-Planck, Clausius statements. Carnot engine. Entropy; increase of entropy principle, entropy and irreversibility. Isentropic processes, T-s diagrams, isentropic efficiency. Some power and refrigeration cycle analysis, characteristics of main power cycles. Psychrometry, air-conditioning, thermal comfort basics.
AMME2261 Fluid Mechanics 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923 or MATH1907 or MATH1933) Prohibitions: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit covers the fundamentals of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic equations governing the statics and dynamics of fluids; the ability to analyze and determine the forces applied by a static fluid; the ability to analyse fluids in motion. The course will cover both inviscid and viscous fluid flow. The course will introduce the relevant parameters for fluid flow in internal engineering systems such as pipes and pumps and external systems such as flow over wings and airfoils. Course content will cover the basic concepts such as viscosity, density, continuum, pressure, force, buoyancy and acceleration; and more detailed methods including continuity, conservation of momentum, streamlines and potential flow theory, Bernoulli equation, Euler equation, Navier-Stokes equation. Experiments will introduce flow measuring devices and flow observation.
AMME2262 Thermal Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923 or MATH1907 or MATH1933) Prohibitions: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit aims to teach the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer; The ability to analyze the thermodynamics of a simple open or closed engineering system. The basic knowledge to analyse and design 1D thermal circuits. Course content will include concepts of heat and work, properties of substances, first law of thermodynamics, control mass and control volume analysis, thermal efficiency, entropy, second law of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, isentropic efficiency, power and refrigeration cycles, heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, 1D thermal circuits and transient heat transfer.
AMME2301 Mechanics of Solids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME1802 or ENGG1802) and (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923 or MATH1907 or MATH1933) Prohibitions: CIVL2201 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Equilibrium of deformable structures; basic concept of deformation compatibility; stress and strain in bars, beams and their structures subjected to tension, compression, bending, torsion and combined loading; statically determinate and indeterminate structures; energy methods for bar and beam structures; simple buckling; simple vibration; deformation of simple frames and cell box beams; simple two-dimensional stress and Morh's circle; problem-based applications in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering.
AMME2450 Design and Production

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME9450 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening Faculty: Engineering
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study will provide students with an overview of the engineering design and manufacturing/production processes, with a focus on advanced manufacturing. The unit is intended to attract students from any discipline within the University. The core pedagogical method used in this unit is the adoption of the "think make do" approach to engineering design and design thinking, with students experiencing the general engineering design cycle of; problem definition, requirements generation, solution generation/ideation and evaluation, prototyping, testing, refinement, production etc. Students will have access to the School of AMME's "Fablab" to enable students to create prototypes as part of their major project design project.
AMME2500 Engineering Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923 or MATH1907 or MATH1933) and (AMME1802 or ENGG1802) Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with the MATLAB programming environment Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study will focus on the principles governing the state of motion or rest of bodies under the influence of applied force and torque, according to classical mechanics. The course aims to teach students the fundamental principles of the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles, rigid bodies, planar mechanisms and three-dimensional mechanisms, covering topics including kinematics in various coordinate systems, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy principles, impulse and momentum (linear and angular), gyroscopic motion and vibration. Students will develop skills in analysing and modelling dynamical systems, using both analytical methods and computer-based solutions using MATLAB. Students will develop skills in approximating the dynamic behaviour of real systems in engineering applications and an appreciation and understanding of the effect of approximations in the development and design of systems in real-world engineering tasks.
AMME2700 Instrumentation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AERO1560 or MECH1560 or MTRX1701 or ENGG1800 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills, 1st year maths skills, familiarity with fundamental Engineering concepts Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit aims to develop in students an understanding of the engineering measurements and instrumentation systems. The students will acquire an ability to make accurate and meaningful measurements. It will cover the general areas of electrical circuits and mechanical/electronic instrumentation for strain, force, pressure, moment, torque, displacement, velocity, acceleration, temperature and so on.
BMET2400 Biomechanical Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH2400 Assumed knowledge: (ENGG1810 or ENGG1801) and (AMME1802 or ENGG1802). HSC Maths and HSC Physics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The ability to design within the context of biomedical engineering requires cross-disciplinary knowledge and an appreciation and application of professional engineering standards and ethics. This unit provides students the opportunity to experience the design process and to develop good engineering skills. Students will build on skills and knowledge developed in prerequisite units and be introduced to standards and creative tools relevant to biomedical applications. The importance of standard engineering drawings in the communication and definition of parts and assemblies, the use of a CAD package to create them, and the importance and deeper understanding of standard components will be integral to the learning in this unit. Students will also learn and use the design process from initial idea to finished product, and practice various methods used to generate creative solutions.
BMET2903 Biomedical Physics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12cp of 1000-level MATH units of study Prohibitions: BMET9903 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit offers essential knowledge of physics for applications in biomedical engineering, medicine and medical sciences. The unit will cover fundamentals concepts of electromagnetism, optics and quantum physics - these concepts are becoming rapidly relevant and vital with new and emerging technologies in the biomedical and health sector. It is imperative for the next generation of biomedical engineers and healthcare providers to develop a strong foundational knowledge in these concepts in the context of biomedicine. The knowledge provided by this unit is intended to prepare the students to be able to understand pivotal technologies used in medical research and the medical clinic, such as fluorescence based imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetotherapy.
BMET2922 Computational Analysis for Biomedical Signals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET9922 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of basic biomedical engineering principles (BMET1960) and basic programming (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810 or INFO1110) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Biomedical engineering is being deeply reshaped by the advancements in computational tools and the utilisation of rich data. This unit will explore the processes involved in designing and building systems to perform computational analysis on biological signals, using microcontrollers and desktop or server computing. The main teaching activities will focus on the theory and practical skills for data capture, cleaning, communication, storage, and analytics. The purpose is to ensure that students develop the skills necessary to design systems that can be used for monitoring of patients, where the data can be used for analytics, e.g. prediction of an adverse event. This is relevant to a number of applications in modern healthcare such as continuous and remote monitoring devices. The unit will develop core skills in programming, solution design, sensor interfacing, and data analysis.
BMET2925 AI, Data, and Society in Health

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET9925 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with general mathematical and statistical concepts. Online learning modules will be provided to support obtaining this knowledge Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Unprecedented growth in computing power, the advent of artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning technologies, and global data platforms are changing the way in which we approach real-world healthcare challenges. This interdisciplinary unit will introduce students from different backgrounds to the fundamental concepts of data analytics and AI, and their practical applications in healthcare. Throughout the unit, students will learn about the key concepts in data analytics and AI techniques, and obtain hands-on experience in applying these techniques to a broad range of healthcare problems. At the same time, they will develop an understanding of the ethical considerations in health data analytics and AI, and how their use impacts society: from the patient, to the doctor, to the broader community. A key element of the learning process will be a team-based Datathon project where students will deploy their knowledge to address an open-ended healthcare problem, in particular developing a practical solution and analysing how it's use may change things in the healthcare domain. Upon completion of this unit, students will understand and be able to enlist data analytics and AI tools to design solutions to healthcare problems.
BMET2960 Biomedical Engineering 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) Prohibitions: AMME2960 Assumed knowledge: (AMME1960 OR BMET1960) AND (AMME1961 OR BMET1961) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2 is the third of the four Biomedical Engineering foundational units. The first (AMME1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A) introduces students to the discipline of biomedical engineering, covering the key concepts of biomedical technology, design, biomechanics, and the important systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective. The second (AMME1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B) is an introduction to Biotechnology. The fourth (MECH2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers) provides a hands-on anatomy and physiology study of the key systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective and includes cadaver laboratories. This unit (AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2) is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems, including conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The mathematical tools covered in the lectures include: deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches. There is a strong emphasis in both the lectures and tutorials on applying these mathematical methods to real biomedical engineering problems involving electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical mechanisms in the human body. Specific examples include heat regulation, vibrations in biological systems, and the analysis of physiological signals such as ECG and EEG.
CHNG2801 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed CHNG2802 or MATH2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course covers the principal concepts and methods of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. The topics covered include dimensional analysis, fluid properties, conservation of mass and momentum, measurement of flow, and flow in pipes. The course provides an introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics for the solution of flow regimes.
CHNG2803 Heat and Mass Transfer

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 or MATH1021 or MATH1901 or MATH1921 or MATH1931) and (MATH1002 or MATH1902) and (MATH1003 or MATH1023 or MATH1903 or MATH1923) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905 or BUSS1020) and (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810) and CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed: CHNG2801 or equivalent, and (CHNG2802 or MATH2XXX) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study teaches principles of heat and mass transfer required for chemical and biomolecular engineering. It covers steady and transient conduction and diffusion, convective transport of heat and mass, and radiative heat transfer.
It runs concurrently with CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics) to provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle engineering problems related to transport phenomena.
This unit of study also includes project-based study components including a research project on heat transfer phenomena in biological systems and a lab session on mass transfer.
Students will develop a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and gain the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance.
CHNG2804 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 AND (CHEM1101 OR CHEM1111 OR CHEM1901 OR CHEM1911) Assumed knowledge: Calculus, linear algebra, numerical methods, computational tools (Matlab, Excel), basic mass and energy balances, heat transfer, mass transfer, momentum (from fluid mechanics), reaction balances Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This is a core unit within the curriculum. Chemical Engineering requires an understanding of material and energy transformations and how these are driven by molecular interactions. The rate of such transformations is dependent on driving forces and resistances, and these need to be defined in terms of fundamental physical and chemical properties of systems. This course seeks to provide students with a sound basis of the thermodynamics of chemical systems, and how these, in turn, define limits of behaviour for such real systems. The thermodynamic basis for rate processes is explored, and the role of energy transfer processes in these highlighted, along with criteria for equilibrium and stability. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of physical properties of chemicalsystems in terms of state variables. The course delivery mechanism is problem-based, and examples from thermal and chemical processes will be considered, covering molecular to macro-systems scale. The course builds naturally from the second year first semester course in heat and mass transfer, and prepares students fundamentally for the third year course in design of chemical and biological processes, which deals fundamentally with reaction/separation systems, and considers phase and chemical equilibria.
CHNG2805 Engineering for a Sustainable Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: Mass and energy balances, physical chemistry, physics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course involves the study of the fundamental concepts which underpin sustainable development, including technical and economic efficiency, environmental stewardship and social responsibility.
The course examines both the material and non-material economies from an engineering perspective. Tools such as life-cycle assessment, input-output analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis are examined and implications for resource and energy consumption, pollution and waste generation are analysed.
A number of governing sustainability frameworks are discussed to determine their suitability within the context of chemical and biomolecular engineering. A range of approaches and tools for determining the environmental impact of human activities on small and large scale are introduced as part of a sustainability framework. Energy production and use, and product design are investigated from a sustainability perspective.
CHNG2806 Separation Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students will be concurrently enrolled in or have already completed CHNG2804 or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will cover the general principles and the development of quantitative models of separation processes based on equilibrium and rate processes. Concepts of phase equilibria, transport phenomena and mass and energy balance will be used to model the separation units. Understanding of these principles will provide the basis for analysis and preliminary design calculations of large scale separation units of importance to manufacturing industries. The principles will be applied to units operations of distillation (binary, multicomponent), solvent extraction, absorption, adsorption and membrane processes
CIVL2010 Environmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL3010 Assumed knowledge: MATH1023 AND (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810). Strong calculus knowledge from 1000 level MATH, as well as the ability to program. Basic understanding of structural mechanics (CIVL2201) is also an advantage Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit introduces students to the role of civil engineers and the historical development of the profession, and relates this to the Code of Ethics - Engineers Australia; impact of engineering on the human and natural environment; energy consumption, resourcing and renewal, dealing with variability in climate; definitions and practice of sustainability; environmental assessment tools and life-cycle analyses. As graduates, students may expect to find themselves in a position which touches upon a wide variety of Engineering fields (including legal, institutional, and environmental considerations). In both small and large firms they could be acting as agents and managers of technology-driven change which has social and environmental impact. Engineering decision-making and problem-solving are made more complex by technical, economic, environmental, social and ethical constraints. The goals of this unit are to introduce students to major problems of environmental deterioration and engage students in active reflection on the role of civil engineers in addressing these issues; to develop the students skills at quantifying the impact of engineering decisions within the broader economic, environmental and socio-cultural contexts; to develop communication skills through participation in group discussions, video production and written report writing. Lectures, group discussions, case problems and projects are all used in teaching and learning in this unit of study.
CIVL2110 Materials

This unit of study is not available in 2022

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME1362 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1802 or CIVL1802 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Materials are an important part of the civil engineers' work. Indeed, civil engineers who are concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of facilities need to understand the behaviour and performance of the materials used. And as it happens, mechanical properties- which are essential and basic for civil engineers- are highly dependent on the structure of materials at various scales. Therefore, it is important that a student in Civil Engineering possesses a fundamental knowledge in materials science.
This unit of study aims to provide students with the tools necessary to select the adequate material for a particular application and to assess its mechanical behaviour while in use. This course will focus mainly on materials for civil engineering and construction applications, i. e. metals, concrete and soils.
CIVL2201 Structural Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CIVL1802 OR AMME1802 OR ENGG1802 Prohibitions: AMME2301 Assumed knowledge: From (CIVL1802 or AMME1802 or ENGG1802); students should be competent in the following areas. 1. The concept of force and momentum equilibrium in two and three dimensions. 2. Drawing free body diagrams. 3. Establishing and solving the equations of equilibrium from the FBD. 4. Setting out solutions logically; clearly and neatly. Students should be competent in certain mathematical skills. 1. Solving algebraic equations. 2. Differentiation and integration (including double integrals). 3. Drawing graphs of polynomials (especially) and other mathematical function. 4. Trigonometry Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The primary objective of this unit is to understand internal actions (forces and moments) in structures (deformable objects) under loads in three key areas: how structures resist external loads by internal actions; the distribution of internal actions within structures; and the deformations, stresses and strains associated with the internal actions. At the end of this unit, students should be able to understand the basic methods of load transfer in structures - tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion (internal actions); apply the equations of equilibrium to determine the distribution of internal actions in a simple structure by drawing BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; understand the significance and methods of calculation of the geometric properties of structural sections (I, Z, S, J, etc.); understand the effect of internal forces and deformations of bodies through the concept and calculation of strains and stresses; appreciate the behaviour of structures by analysing structures without numerical calculations; display a knowledge of basic material properties, combined stresses and failure criteria; and demonstrate their hands-on experience of the behaviour of structural members via experiments and the ability to prepare written reports on those experiments. Emphasis in the assessment scheme will be placed on understanding structural behaviour and solving problems, rather than remembering formulae or performing complex calculations. The course seeks to utilise and improve the generic skills of students, in areas such as problem solving, neat and logical setting out of solutions, report writing, and team work. The syllabus comprises introduction; equilibrium; internal actions: BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; elasticity, stress and strain, and basic material properties; axial forces: tension and compression; elastic bending of beams; shear force and shear stresses in beams; torsion; deflection of beams; pipes and pressure vessels; trusses; material properties, combined stresses and yield criteria; advanced bending; introduction to buckling and instability.
CIVL2410 Soil Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND GEOL1501 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802). An understanding of simple statics, equilibrium, forces and bending moments, and of stress and strain and the relationship between them. This is covered by University of Sydney courses CIVL1802 Statics (or ENGG1802 Engineering Mechanics), CIVL2201 Structural Mechanics. Familiarity with the use of spreadsheets (Excel, Mathcad) to obtain solutions to engineering problems, and with the graphical presentation of this data. Familiarity with word processing packages for report presentation. Familiarity with partial differential equations, and their analytical and numerical solution Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course provides an elementary introduction to Geotechnical Engineering, and provides the basic mechanics necessary for the detailed study of Geotechnical Engineering. This course aims to provide an understanding of: the nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes; the importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement; methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.
CIVL2611 Introductory Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021). Students are expected to have a strong understanding of fundamental physics, statics, equilibrium, forces, and dimensional analysis. Familiarity with simple calculus, partial differential equations, and the analytical and numerical solutions Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The objective of this unit of study is to develop an understanding of basic fluid concepts for inviscid and incompressible fluids. Topics to be covered will include: basic fluid properties, hydrostatics, buoyancy, stability, pressure distribution in a fluid with rigid body motion, fluid dynamics, conservation of mass and momentum, dimensional analysis, open channel flow, and pipe flow.
This core unit of study together with CIVL3612 forms the basis for further studies in the applied areas of ocean, coastal and wind engineering and other elective fluid mechanics units which may be offered.
CIVL2700 Transport Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND MATH1005 AND (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810). Basic statistics through regression analysis, differential and integral calculus, computer programming Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to transport systems and is assumed knowledge for fourth year units on traffic engineering, transport planning, and city logistics. Topics include: the role of accessibility as the reason for transport; the history of transport technologies in Australia and globally; the characteristics of the principle modes of transport; factors behind the demand for mobility; qualitative choice modeling; agent-based modeling; predicting travel demands; the mechanics of queueing and traffic flow; intelligent transport systems; the microscopic and macroscopic fundamental diagrams; highway capacity and level of service; the design of transport junctions.
CIVL2812 Project Appraisal

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL3812 Assumed knowledge: MATH1005 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit aims to introduce students to project valuations using present-value cash flow theory, taxation and probabilities, and the role of these valuations in the decision-making process. Students are taught techniques for making an analysis of issues involved in project appraisal by various methods and these are applied to businesses, non-profit organisations, and governments. At the end of this unit, students should be able to comprehend and relate to real-life examples the fundamental concepts in project appraisal (e. g. the meaning of time value for money, equivalence); calculate common financial indicators for a given project and explain the relevance of each to the appraisal of the project; rank projects by combining both financial and non-financial indicators (e. g. environmental and social); understand how risks and uncertainties affect evaluation outcomes and be able to deal with uncertainties and risks in analysis; apply techniques to account for the effects of inflation/deflation and exchange rates in analysis; understand the concept and mechanisms for depreciation and carry out pre-tax as well as post-tax analysis; understand the assumptions, pros and cons of each evaluation method and be able to explain why a particular method is appropriate/not appropriate for a given project. The syllabus covers the following concepts: time value of money, cost of capital, simple/compound interest, nominal/effective interest, cost/benefit analysis of projects; equivalence, net present worth (value), future worth (value), annual worth (value), internal rate of return, external rate of return, payback period; cost-benefit analysis, cost-utility analysis, identifying and quantifying non-financial benefits/externalities; Other influencing factors: price changes and exchange rates, depreciation, taxation; Capitalisation and valuation studies, replacement of assets, real option, project risk analysis, decision-tree analysis, WACC, MARR, equity capital, debt. This unit of study is a second-year core unit for students enrolled in Civil Engineering (any major), and is a possible elective in other schools of engineering.
COMP2017 Systems Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1103 Corequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2129 OR COMP9017 OR COMP9129 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
In this unit of study, elementary methods for developing robust, efficient, and re-usable software will be covered. The unit is taught in C, in a Unix environment. Specific coding topics include memory management, the pragmatic aspects of implementing data structures such as lists and hash tables and managing concurrent threads. Debugging tools and techniques are discussed and common programming errors are considered along with defensive programming techniques to avoid such errors. Emphasis is placed on using common Unix tools to manage aspects of the software construction process, such as version control and regression testing. The subject is taught from a practical viewpoint and it includes a considerable amount of programming practice.
COMP2022 Models of Computation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Prohibitions: COMP2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969) AND (INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computing. The main aims are to introduce and compare different models of computation based on state-machines, grammars and algebra, and logic.
COMP2123 Data Structures and Algorithms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2823 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
COMP2823 Data Structures and Algorithms (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction level results in (INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903) Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
COMP2922 Models of Computation (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction level result in (INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113) Prohibitions: COMP2022 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969) AND (INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computing. The main aims are to introduce and compare different models of computation based on state-machines, grammars and algebra, and logic.
DATA2001 Data Science, Big Data and Data Variety

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103 or ENGG1810 Prohibitions: DATA2901 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry.
Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, eg. , social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The course will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'.
DATA2901 Big Data and Data Diversity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 75% or above from (DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103 or ENGG1810) Prohibitions: DATA2001 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry. Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, eg. , social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The course will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'. This unit is an alternative to DATA2001, providing coverage of some additional, more sophisticated topics, suited for students with high academic achievement.
ELEC2103 Simulation and Numerical Solutions in Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: COSC1001 or COSC1901 Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103. Understanding of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits and aspects of professional project management, teamwork, and ethics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Objectives: How to apply the software package Matlab to achieve engineering solutions; Critical assessment of various computer numerical techniques; Professional project management, teamwork, ethics.
This unit assumes an understanding of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. As well as covering the specific topics described in the following paragraphs, it aims to develop skills in professional project management and teamwork and promote an understanding of ethics.
Basic features of Matlab. The Matlab desktop. Interactive use with the command window. Performing arithmetic, using complex numbers and mathematical functions. Writing script and function m-files. Matrix manipulations. Control flow. Two dimensional graphics. Application of Matlab to simple problems from circuit theory, electronics, signals and systems and control. Investigation of the steady state and transient behaviour of LCR circuits.
Matlab based numerical solutions applicable to numerical optimization, ordinary differential equations, and data fitting. Introduction to symbolic mathematics in Matlab. Applications, including the derivation of network functions for simple problems in circuit analysis. Introduction to the use of Simulink for system modelling and simulation.
ELEC2104 Electronic Devices and Circuits

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103. Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws; action of Current and Voltage sources; network analysis and the superposition theorem; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; inductors and capacitors, transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits; the ability to use power supplies, oscilloscopes, function generators, meters, etc Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Modern Electronics has come to be known as microelectronics which refers to the Integrated Circuits (ICs) containing millions of discrete devices. This course introduces some of the basic electronic devices like diodes and different types of transistors. It also aims to introduce students the analysis and design techniques of circuits involving these discrete devices as well as the integrated circuits.
Completion of this course is essential to specialise in Electrical, Telecommunication or Computer Engineering stream.
ELEC2302 Signals and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND MATH1002 AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023). Basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, differential equations, and linear algebra Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit aims to teach some of the basic properties of many engineering signals and systems and the necessary mathematical tools that aid in this process. The particular emphasis is on the time and frequency domain modeling of linear time invariant systems. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of communication, control, power systems and signal processing. A basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, differential equations, and linear algebra is assumed.
ELEC2602 Digital Logic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601. This unit of study assumes some knowledge of digital data representation and basic computer organisation Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The purpose of this unit is to equip students with the skills to design simple digital logic circuits which comprise modules of larger digital systems.
The following topics are covered: logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, number systems (integer and floating point), combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, simple CAD tools for logic design, and the design of a simple computer.
ENGG2850 Project Cost and Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGG1850 OR [ENGG1865 AND (30cp of any 1000 level units of study)] Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This is a theory and case study based unit providing students with a unified approach to the analysis of project value, supported by explicit methods for ranking and selection of projects on the basis of returns and sensitivity. The unit uses "Project Finance" as a vehicle for descibing the fundamentals of project management financing and contrasts it with "Direct Financing", a more traditional approach to funding projects.
ENGG2851 Project Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGG1860 OR {ENGG1850 AND [(MATH1021 OR MATH1002 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1005) OR (MATH1011 OR MATH1013 OR MATH1014 OR MATH1015)]} Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Project data analysis is required to inform decision making. This becomes increasingly significant as project becomes larger and more complex.This subject introduces students to a variety of fundamental analytical techniques used in project management including consideration of their assumptions, limitations, how and when they should be applied.
ENGG2855 Project Acceptance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Projects are initiated to deliver specific objectives.This Unit of Study builds on material introduced in Project Initiation and Scope focusing on fitness for purpose and organisational benefits.It is concerned with the practices required to ensure that specific project objectives are met, the project is successfully delivered and is accepted by key stakeholders.
ISYS2110 Analysis and Design of Web Info Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO2110 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organisations use to determine how they should conduct their business, with a particular focus on how web-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way business is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analysing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, web-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.
ISYS2120 Data and Information Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1003 OR INFO1903 OR DECO1012 Prohibitions: INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR COMP5138 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The ubiquitous use of information technology leaves us facing a tsunami of data produced by users, IT systems and mobile devices. The proper management of data is hence essential for all applications and for effective decision making within organizations.
This unit of study will introduce the basic concepts of database designs at the conceptual, logical and physical levels. We will place particular emphasis on introducing integrity constraints and the concept of data normalization which prevents data from being corrupted or duplicated in different parts of the database. This in turn helps in the data remaining consistent during its lifetime. Once a database design is in place, the emphasis shifts towards querying the data in order to extract useful information. The unit will introduce the SQL database query languages, which is industry standard. Other topics covered will include the important concept of transaction management, application development with a backend database, and an overview of data warehousing and OLAP.
ISYS2160 Information Systems in the Internet Age

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ISYS2140 Assumed knowledge: INFO1003 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide a comprehensive conceptual and practical introduction to information systems (IS) in the Internet era. Key topics covered include: system thinking and system theory, basic concepts of information systems, internet and e-commerce, e-payment and m-commerce, online marketing and social media, information systems for competitive advantage, functional and enterprise systems, business intelligence, information systems development and acquisition, information security, ethics, and privacy
MECH2400 Mechanical Design 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET2400 Assumed knowledge: (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810) and (AMME1802 or ENGG1802); HSC Maths and Physics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Aim: For students to experience a realistic the design process and to develop good engineering skills.
Course Objectives- To develop an understanding of: 1) The need for and use of standard drawings in the communication and definition of parts and assemblies to AS1100; 2) Efficient use of a CAD package; 3) Creativity; 4) The design process from initial idea to finished product; 5) Methods used to analyse designs; 6) Appreciation and analysis of standard components; 7) An understanding of power transmission elements.
MECH2401 Human-Centred Engineering Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: MECH1560 and MECH1400 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
MECH2401 aims to integrate various less technical aspects of industrial design, with a focus on designing for humans.
Elements of human ergonomics, industrial design, creativity, problem solving, critical thinking, team project work, marketing and product development form the basis for the unit of study.
The unit is predominantly delivered in a studio learning environment, with involvement of industry practitioners and a major team project based on the creative design of products for human use.
Group based problem solving and a project based studio learning environment form the core basis for student learning.
MTRX2700 Mechatronics 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MTRX1702 and MTRX1705 Prohibitions: ELEC2601 or ELEC3607 Assumed knowledge: MTRX1701 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to microprocessor and microcomputer systems, emphasising assembly language programming and building on the digital logic foundations from first year. In particular, the following subjects are addressed:
Introduction to microprocessors, stored-program computer architecture, instruction codes and addressing modes, instruction execution cycle; Memory devices. Computer architecture and assembly language programming. Microprocessor and microcontroller systems, memory and IO interfacing, interrupts and interrupt handling. Serial and parallel communications. System design, documentation, implementation, debugging and testing.
MTRX2700 is the introductory course in the basics of real Mechatronic systems. This course builds on knowledge obtained in the courses ENGG1801, MTRX1701, ELEC1103 and MTRX1702, MTRX1705. This course extends this knowledge by introducing students to their first practical applications in Mechatronic Engineering. By passing this subject, the student will have obtained the necessary skills to undertake Mechatronics 3 (MTRX3700).
PMGT2711 Critical Thinking for Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Critical questioning is important in all project communication and action. This unit explores ways of testing assumptions, and challenging the logical validity of arguments. The ability to critically question is a fundamental competency for effective project management, whether that be exploring the finer points of contracts, constructing an argument to win a bid or challenging project decisions.
PMGT2821 Project Conflict Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PMGT1852 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
All projects exist in the context of conflicting priorities. Conflict can start from the point of inception when there may be different ideas about what should be achieved in a project. It can continue through negotiation of contracts to deliver the work, to robust discussion as to what counts as acceptable upon delivery. This Unit develops students' ability to anticipate, understand and ameliorate conflict, reaching negotiated agreements that are acceptable to all parties. Unexpected conflict crises also arise requiring project managers to mediate an outcome that allows the project to move forward. This unit helps students understand multiple perspectives of stakeholders, build interpersonal skills and integrity to resolve conflicts in a constructive manner.
PMGT2822 Reframing Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGG1863 OR PMGT1852 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The possibilities inherent in any project are constrained by the assumptions that we, and other stakeholders, bring to it. This Unit of Study focuses on techniques, such as design thinking, for reframing our understanding of what is possible in any given project in order to enhance value. Upon the completion of this course, students will develop skills to think diversely, take action in ambiguity and ensure projects deliver value to all stakeholders.
PMGT2854 Executing Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGG1860 OR ENGG1850 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Engineering
The heart of a project lies in its delivery. Good planning sets the foundation for good execution; however projects need to be actively managed to ensure they are successfully delivered. This Unit of Study explores project execution through a hands on simulation that allows students to experience the delivery of a project including start-up and closure, progress reporting, decision making and change control.
SOFT2201 Software Construction and Design 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO3220 OR COMP9201 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit introduces the foundations of software design and construction. It covers the topics of modelling software (UML, CRC, use cases), software design principles, object-oriented programming theory (inheritance, polymorphism, dynamic subtyping and generics), and simple design patterns. The unit aims to foster a strong technical understanding of the underlying software design and construction theory (delivered in the lecture) but also has a strong emphasis of the practice, where students apply the theory on practical examples.
SOFT2412 Agile Software Development Practices

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP9412 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit builds students skills to follow defined processes in software development, in particular, working in small teams in an agile approach. Content covers the underlying concepts and principles of software processes, their analysis, measurement and improvement. Students will practice with a variety of professional-strength tool support for the practices that ensure quality outcomes. The unit requires students to enter already skilled in individual programming; instead this unit focuses on the complexities in a team setting.

3000-level or higher units of study

CHNG3804 Biochemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CHNG2801, CHNG2802, CHNG2803 AND CHNG2806 or equivalents Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Biochemical engineering is increasingly playing an important role in technology to modern society. The engineers with knowledge of various aspects of biochemical processes are tremendously valuable. The course will examine cutting edge examples of biochemical technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical engineering. The specific objectives of this course are to understand the history and scope of the biotechnology industry; examine the role of biochemical engineering in the industrial application of biotechnology and its development. We will provide an understanding of the major fundamental aspects of biochemical engineering and implementing the knowledge acquired to some selected industrial applications.
At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of biochemical engineering and the ability to apply these skills to new and novel situations. The students will be able to critically analyse different types of biochemical engineering processes and to improve these processes consistent with the principles of biochemical engineering.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information and develop problem-solving skills for successfully handling challenging engineering situations. This course will be assessed by projects, an interview and a final exam.
CHNG3808 Engineering Macromolecules and Nanocomposites

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CHNG2801 and 12 cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Macromolecules and composite materials find a wide range of applications from construction, food to biomedical engineering. A significant number of engineers are employed by the related industries. This unit of study will facilitate engagement with a broad spectrum of modern engineering principles that range from the synthesis of such materials to design of products and processes for a range of industries with an innovative approach. The unit will also enable an understanding of developing sustainable technologies with the materials for producing goods used within industries or by consumers. The industrial applications will range from chemical, biomedical to electronics and nanotechnology. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through workshops, seminars, class work and project-based learning.
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Completion of 72 cp in science, engineering or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5606 Advanced Food Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of fluid mechanics and mathematics at a level typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to CHNG2801 (or AMME2261 or AMME2200 or CIVL2611 or CIVL3612 or CIVL9612) AND CHNG2802 (or AMME2000 or MATH2021 or MATH2061 or MATH2921). This unit is for postgraduate students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year undergraduate students Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Working at an advanced level in the food processing industry requires an ability to independently familiarise yourself with new and emerging challenges and technologies, to recognise the potential and limitations of new tools and methods, and to devise innovative solutions. Students in this unit will critically examine a range of issues and technologies in food processing technologies particularly in the areas of energy requirements, product design and process design. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through seminars and projects in three parts. In the first part, students will evaluate a range of processes based on their energy requirements. In the second part students will investigate particulate food processing and product design. In the third part of the course students will be tasked with devising and justifying their own optimum solution for a selected food processing challenge.
COMP3027 Algorithm Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2007 OR COMP2907 OR COMP3927 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit provides an introduction to the design techniques that are used to find efficient algorithmic solutions for given problems. The techniques covered include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and adjusting flows in networks. Students will extend their skills in algorithm analysis. The unit also provides an introduction to the concepts of computational complexity and reductions between problems.
COMP3109 Programming Languages and Paradigms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (COMP2017 or COMP2129) and (COMP2022 or COMP2922) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of programming languages and their implementation. The main aims are to teach what are: semantics, programming paradigms and implementation of programming languages.
COMP3221 Distributed Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO1105 OR INFO1905) OR ((INFO1103 OR INFO1113) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823)) Prohibitions: COMP2121 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide broad introduction to the principles of distributed computing and distributed systems and their design; provide students the fundamental knowledge required to analyse, design distributed algorithms and implement various types of applications, like blockchains; explain the common algorithmic design principles and approaches used in the design of message passing at different scales (e.g., logical time, peer-to-peer overlay, gossip-based communication).
COMP3308 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: COMP3608 Assumed knowledge: Algorithms. Programming skills (e.g. Java, Python, C, C++, Matlab) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all about programming computers to perform tasks normally associated with intelligent behaviour. Classical AI programs have played games, proved theorems, discovered patterns in data, planned complex assembly sequences and so on. This unit of study will introduce representations, techniques and architectures used to build intelligent systems. It will explore selected topics such as heuristic search, game playing, machine learning, neural networks and probabilistic reasoning. Students who complete it will have an understanding of some of the fundamental methods and algorithms of AI, and an appreciation of how they can be applied to interesting problems. The unit will involve a practical component in which some simple problems are solved using AI techniques.
COMP3419 Graphics and Multimedia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit provides a broad introduction to the field of graphics and multimedia computing to meet the diverse requirements of application areas such as entertainment, industrial design, virtual reality, intelligent media management, social media and remote sensing. It covers both the underpinning theories and the practices of computing and manipulating digital media including graphics / image, audio, animation, and video. Emphasis is placed on principles and cutting-edge techniques for multimedia data processing, content analysis, media retouching, media coding and compression.
COMP3520 Operating Systems Internals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (COMP2017 OR COMP2129) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide a comprehensive discussion of relevant OS issues and principles and describe how those principles are put into practice in real operating systems. The contents include internal structure of OS; several ways each major aspect (process scheduling, inter-process communication, memory management, device management, file systems) can be implemented; the performance impact of design choices; case studies of common OS (Linux, MS Windows NT, etc.).
COMP3530 Discrete Optimization

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR COMP2007 OR COMP2907 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit introduces students to the algorithmic theory and applications of discrete optimisation. The main aims of this unit are: Learn how to model various practical problems as abstract optimisation problems; Learn the theory underlying efficient algorithms for solving these problems; Learn how to use these tools in practice.
Specific topics include: Linear and integer programming, polyhedral theory, and approximation algorithms.
COMP3608 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction-level results in at least one 2000 level COMP or MATH or SOFT unit Prohibitions: COMP3308 Assumed knowledge: Algorithms. Programming skills (e.g. Java, Python, C, C++, Matlab) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Note: COMP3308 and COMP3608 share the same lectures, but have different tutorials and assessment (the same type but more challenging).
An advanced alternative to COMP3308; covers material at an advanced and challenging level.
COMP3888 Computer Science Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (COMP2123 OR COMP2823) AND COMP2017 AND (COMP2022 OR COMP2922) Prohibitions: INFO3600 OR COMP3600 OR COMP3615 OR COMP3988 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practise the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of designing and building a substantial software development system in diverse application domains including life sciences. Working in groups for an external client combined with academic supervision, students will need to carry out the full range of activities including requirements capture, analysis and design, coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the XP methodology and make use of professional tools for the management of their project.
COMP3988 Computer Science Project (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (COMP2123 OR COMP2823) AND COMP2017 AND (COMP2022 OR COMP2922) with Distinction level results in at least one of these units Prohibitions: INFO3600 OR COMP3615 OR COMP3600 OR COMP3888 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practise the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of designing and building a substantial software development system in diverse application domains including life sciences. Working in groups for an external client combined with academic supervision, students will need to carry out the full range of activities including requirements capture, analysis and design, coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the XP methodology and make use of professional tools for the management of their project.
COMP3927 Algorithm Design (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction level results in (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905) Prohibitions: COMP2007 OR COMP2907 OR COMP3027 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit provides an introduction to the design techniques that are used to find efficient algorithmic solutions for given problems. The techniques covered include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and adjusting flows in networks. Students will extend their skills in algorithm analysis. The unit also provides an introduction to the concepts of computational complexity and reductions between problems.
DATA3404 Scalable Data Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: DATA2001 OR DATA2901 OR ISYS2120 OR INFO2120 OR INFO2820 Prohibitions: INFO3504 OR INFO3404 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes that students have previous knowledge of database structures and of SQL. The prerequisite material is covered in DATA2001 or ISYS2120. Familiarity with a programming language (e.g. Java or C) is also expected Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit of study provides a comprehensive overview of the internal mechanisms data science platforms and of the systems that manage large data collections. These skills are needed for successful performance tuning and to understand the scalability challenges faced by when processing Big Data. This unit builds upon the second' year DATA2001 - 'Data Science - Big Data and Data Diversity' and correspondingly assumes a sound understanding of SQL and data analysis tasks.
The first part of this subject focuses on mechanisms for large-scale data management. It provides a deep understanding of the internal components of a data management platform. Topics include: physical data organization and disk-based index structures, query processing and optimisation, and database tuning.
The second part focuses on the large-scale management of big data in a distributed architecture. Topics include: distributed and replicated databases, information retrieval, data stream processing, and web-scale data processing.
The unit will be of interest to students seeking an introduction to data management tuning, disk-based data structures and algorithms, and information retrieval. It will be valuable to those pursuing such careers as Software Engineers, Data Engineers, Database Administrators, and Big Data Platform specialists.
DATA3406 Human-in-the-Loop Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (DATA2001 OR DATA2901) AND (DATA2002 OR DATA2902) Assumed knowledge: Basic statistics, database management, and programming Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit focuses on methods and techniques to take into consideration the human elements in data science. Humans can act as both sources of data and its interpreters, introducing a range of complexities with regards to analysis. How do we account for the unreliability in data collected from humans? What can be done to address the subjects' concerns about their data? How can we create visualisations that facilitate understanding of the main findings? What are the limitations of any predictions? The ability to consider human factors is essential in any loop that involves people gathering, storing, or interpreting data for decision making.
On completion of this unit, students will be able to identify and analyse the human factors in the data analytics loop, and will be able to derive solutions for the challenges that arise.
ENGG3216 Management of Technological Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENGG4061 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of engineering and project management Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Technological Innovation is a primary driver of industrial, economic and social development. The processes, practices and products of technological innovation influence the nature and trajectory of organisational and social change. This UoS examines the nature of, and approaches to, technological innovation both theoretically and practically. The commercial, social and cultural implications of technological innovation are analysed to determine the external environmental and internal organisational factors impacting upon successful innovation.Students will experience the nature of innovation processes and organisational change management through the learning experience and assessment in this UoS. The educational experience within this unit will include: understanding the processes of technological innovation and its relationship with the management of organisational change; the practical application of innovation and change management frameworks and techniques in organisations and teams; the management of complexity and uncertainty in the development of innovation and change; strategic environmental scanning to determine potential technological and business opportunities; and the development of group teamwork, communication and motivation for effective collaboration.
ISYS3401 Information Technology Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (INFO2120 OR ISYS2120) AND (ISYS2140 OR ISYS2160) Assumed knowledge: MATH1005 OR MATH1905 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
Information Systems (IS) professionals in today's organisations are required to play leadership roles in change and development. Your success in this field will be aided by your being able to carry out research-based investigations using suitable methods and mastery over data collection and analysis to assist in managing projects and in decision making. Practical research skills are some of the most important assets you will need in your career.
This unit of study will cover important concepts and skills in practical research for solving and managing important problems. This will also provide you with the skills to undertake the capstone project in the IS project unit of study offered in Semester 2 or other projects. It will also provide hand-on experience of using Microsoft Excel and other tools to perform some of the quantitative analysis.
ISYS3888 Information Systems Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (INFO2120 OR ISYS2120) AND (ISYS2140 OR ISYS2160) Prohibitions: INFO3600 OR ISYS3207 OR ISYS3400 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practise the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of a substantial information systems research or development project and to experience in a realistic way many aspects of analysing and solving information systems problems. Since information systems projects are often undertaken by small teams, the experience of working in a team is seen as an important feature of the unit. Students often find it difficult to work effectively with others and will benefit from the opportunity provided by this unit to further develop this skill.
SOFT3202 Software Construction and Design 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: SOFT2201 Prohibitions: INFO3220 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit is a sequel of Software Construction and Design I (SOFT2201). It introduces advanced concepts which build on the topics of SOFT2201. SOFT3202 covers topics including software validation and verification, the theory of testing, and advanced design patterns. The unit has a strong focus on the theoretical underpinning of software design. In the labs the theory is applied with contemporary tools with concrete examples.
SOFT3410 Concurrency for Software Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: COMP2017 OR COMP2129 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
The manufacturing industry has experienced a radical shift in the way they design computers, with the integration of multiple processors on the same chip. This hardware shift now requires software developers to acquire the skills that will allow them to write efficient concurrent software. Software developers used to wait for manufacturers to increase the clock frequency of their processors to see increases in the performance of their programs, the challenge is now to exploit, in the same program, more and more processing resources rather than faster processing resources. In this unit, you will learn how to tackle the problems underlying this challenge, including developing and testing concurrent programs, synchronizing resources between concurrent threads, overcoming fairness issues and guaranteeing progress, and ensuring scalability in the level of concurrency.
SOFT3888 Software Development Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [18CP 2000-level or above units from SOFT or COMP or INFO] Prohibitions: SOFT3413 Assumed knowledge: SOFT3202 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practice the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of designing and building a substantial software development system in diverse application domains including life sciences. Working in groups for an external client combined with academic supervision, students will need to carry out the full range of activities including requirements capture, analysis and design, coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the XP methodology and make use of professional tools for the management of their project.