Table R - Higher Degree By Research

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. The following unit is now available in Intensive April 2021:

OLET5120 Understanding And Using ABS Data
27/1/2021

Table R - Arts and Social Sciences

This table lists Table R - Higher Degree by Research units of study
ARCO6003 Fieldwork Experience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4 x 1hr supervisions with their research supervisor(s) plus on-line consultation. Practical experience in the field for up to 60 hours/week. Total duration of fieldwork is defined by the research topic and the context/location. Assessment: 1x4500wd fieldwork report (75%), 1x1500wd seminar presentation and submission (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit is intended to enable students to gain additional insight from the experience of fieldwork by considering the intellectual purpose which it serves, the social context in which it occurs and the relationship between the work which was carried out and the research outcome which was produced. The aim is to consider the role of fieldwork, its effect on the researcher, on other participants and on the communities in which and/or with whom it is carried out.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CART7006 Art as Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar per week Assessment: Participation (50%) and presentation (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit introduces PhD students to a range of philosophical approaches to creative arts research, and conceptual issues concerning the production of new knowledge in practice-led research and also within research more broadly. Students will consider how different methodological approaches may be appropriate for particular interpretive research projects, keeping in mind the epistemological 'fit', and develop appropriate strategies for planning and writing.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ECMT6702 Econometric Applications A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECMT5002 or ECMT6002 Assessment: 1x1500wd equivalent Group project (25%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit illustrates how econometric methods can be applied to economic data to solve problems that arise in economics and business. Econometric theory provides the techniques needed to quantify the strength and form of relationships between variables. Applied econometrics is concerned with the strategies that need to be employed to use these techniques effectively; to determine which model to specify and whether the data are appropriate. Guidelines for undertaking applied work are discussed. Case studies drawn from economics, marketing, finance, and accounting are also discussed. The unit includes a major econometric modelling project.
ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5040 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5003 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1500wd (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
ECON6701 Microeconomics Analysis 1 A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON6001 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), 1x1000wd equivalent Take-home task (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an introduction to modern microeconomic theory and has three purposes: (i) to introduce students to the major ideas of modern microeconomics and to develop their understanding of these ideas; (ii) to develop students' facility with analytic economic models; and (iii) to develop students' ability to solve economic problems with the ideas, techniques, and models available to professional economists. Topics covered include (i) individual decision-making by economic agents, (ii) the determination of prices and resource allocation in competitive general equilibrium models, (iii) strategic behaviour by firms under imperfect competition, and (iv) contracting with imperfect information.
ECON6702 Macroeconomics Analysis 1 A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON6002 Assessment: xequivalent to 1000wd Problem Sets (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is aimed at providing students with a sound and comprehensive knowledge of modern macroeconomic theory, an ability to formulate and solve problems analytically, and a general appreciation of how policymakers can use the analysis in practice. Topics covered include (i) micro-foundations of macroeconomics, focusing on consumption, investment, money demand, and credit rationing; (ii) equilibrium macroeconomics, focusing on the conventional prototype as well as on recent stochastic macroeconomic models; and (iii) dis-equilibrium macroeconomics, concepts, issues, and models.
EDPC5012 Evaluating Learning Tech. Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week evenings Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignment (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is intended to help students acquire the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate ICT-enhanced learning innovations. It provides an introduction to the theory and practice of evaluations, drawing principles and methods from best practice in program evaluation and the areas of ICT-enhanced learning. Attention is paid to a holistic approach to evaluation, stressing the need to plan, design and implement evaluation in context. It is suitable for those with an interest in formal education, corporate training and professional development.
EDPC5021 Foundations of Learning Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week- evening Assessment: 4x2000wd group projects (65%) and 1x2000wd short individual assignment (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit we build on work in the learning sciences (psychology, education, cognitive and neurosciences) as we look at psychological models of learning, cognition and motivation, especially as they relate to multimedia and computer-supported learning. Contemporary educational technology use will be analysed from a number of perspectives, including classical information theory, psychological media and communication theories, activity theory, socio-cultural learning theory, constructivist and models of distributed cognition.
EDPC5025 Learning Technology Research Frontiers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 1x3000wd weekly contributions to debates and learning technology forecasts (50%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is designed for students interested in the newest research developments in the area of learning technology, and those who want to gain a deeper understanding of research methods and techniques, appropriate to the fields of the learning sciences and technologies. It is ideal for those students who want to explore the newest topics of their interest and simultaneously learn about research design in a collaborative peer-supported learning environment. Students will learn to assess critically emergingdomains of learning technology innovation, understand different kinds of research methods and choose appropriate research methods for carrying out empirical studies. Students will participate in debates, research projects. The unit is student-led and involves proactive individual and collaborative exploration of topics.
GCST5910 Health, Pleasure and Consumption

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x4000wd essay (60%), 1x2000wd case study (30%), participation exercises (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Pleasure is often thought to make everyday life worthwhile, but it is also commonly positioned as the antithesis of health. In this unit we explore how key strands of cultural studies have approached this paradox with reference to specific examples: Drug use, sex, consumption, leisure activities are possibilities. By considering how authorities have attempted to govern these practices, and with what effects, students will develop new associations between conceptual innovation, cultural intervention and policy impacts.
GCST6905 Gender in Cultural Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd critical paper (25%), 1x300wd oral presentation of final paper (15%), 1x3000wd final paper (50%), 1x200wd in-class presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is the relation between femininity, masculinity and culture? Does sexual difference affect our identity and, if so, how and in what circumstances? Does it affect our relations with others? Is there any link between cultural and racial difference and sexual difference? What contexts may shape such links? Where does equality fit into all this? Drawing on the work of major cultural theorists and feminist thinkers this unit examines various theoretical conceptualizations and popular representations of gender; the issue of embodiment; and how sex and race are articulated within gendered conceptual frames.
HSTY7003 Becoming a Historian

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd feedback (peer review) (10%), 1x15min (1500wd equivalent) presentation and submission (30%), 1x4000wd research proposal (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This seminar-based unit will equip you with the conceptual and practical skills that are essential to every major research project regardless of field. You will advance your professional development as a historian in seminars that address: how to devise and plan a program of research; how to frame clear questions and engage with diverse forms of evidence; how to collate, sort and process information in ways that support your project and which will assist in the transition from research to writing. Via readings, workshops and structured peer review you will develop a formal research proposal for discussion in your preliminary progress review.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHIL6110 Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: PHIL4110 Assessment: 1x6000wd essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The philosophy of science is concerned with the nature and limits of scientific knowledge. How can we explain the ability of the sciences to consistently produce powerful and reliable knowledge? Are there any fundamental differences between the physical, biological and social sciences? Philosophers increasingly recognise that different philosophical issues arise in different sciences, and in any particular year the course will focus on issues raised by one or more individual sciences such as quantum physics, evolutionary biology, genetics, ecology, mathematics, neuroscience, or economics.
PRFM5901 Critical Theory and Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd performance description (15%), 1x500wd essay plan (15%), 1x draft essay part 1 (5%), 1x draft essay part 2 (5%), 1x4500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The discipline of Performance Studies has drawn upon a wide range of theoretical positions and resources, from semiotics to New Historicism, cultural studies, feminism, psychoanalysis, discourse theory, deconstruction, phenomenology and hermeneutics. This unit functions as an advanced reading seminar in which you will consider some key theoretical texts and examine how they have been applied to the analysis of performance.
PRFM5902 Rehearsal Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd journal (responses to readings) (40%), 1x2500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The 'hidden world' of rehearsal is typically off-limits to outsiders but the exceptional creativity of performance-makers makes it a compelling focus for research. Approaching the study of rehearsal through ethnographic theory, we read and apply key texts on participant-observation fieldwork to rehearsal observation and workshop exercises.
WMST6902 Arguing the Point

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd skills exercise (30%), 1x2000wd peer-learning task (30%), 1x2500wd long essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to some practices, methods, writing styles and forms of argumentation relevant to research in Gender and Cultural Studies. Through the study of different examples, students are encouraged to develop their own research practices and writing skills. The unit caters to students in the early stages of thesis conception and development. Students who have already begun writing their thesis will be encouraged to experiment with different ways of arguing and writing their research. Students who are just starting will have the opportunity to develop their ideas.
WMST6904 Modernist Cultural Studies

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x Seminar presentations, written + oral (30%) and 1x5000wd final research paper, developed from a presentation (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines modernism, modernity and postmodernism through a range of 20th century concepts, practices and movements, including the avant-garde, feminism and modernism, the 'everyday', mass culture and technology, cinema and visual technologies, ethnography and the invention of 'culture' and the emergence of postcolonial thought. The unit will provide an important foundation for some of the key intellectual ideas and approaches of cultural studies.