Table R - Higher Degree By Research

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.

Table R - Engineering

This table lists Table R - Higher Degree by Research units of study
AERO8200 Advanced Aerodynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AERO5200 Assumed knowledge: BE in the area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering field with assumed knowledge in Aerodynamics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives/Expected Outcomes: To develop a specialist knowledge in the fields of computational, non-linear and unsteady aerodynamics. The develop familiarity with the techniques for predicting airflow/structure interactions for aerospace vehicles. Syllabus Summary: Advanced two and three dimensional panel method techniques; calculation of oscillatory flow results; prediction of aerodynamic derivatives. Pressure distributions for complete aircraft configuration. Unsteady subsonic flow analysis of aircraft; calculation of structural modes. Structural response to gusts; aeroelasticity; flutter and divergence. Solution of aerospace flow problems using finite element methods. Unsteady supersonic one-dimensional flow. Hypersonic flow; real gas effects. Introduction to the use of CFD for transonic flow.
AERO8750 Unmanned Air Vehicle Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AERO5750 Assumed knowledge: BE in the area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering field Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives/Expected Outcomes: To develop specialist knowledge and understanding of Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) systems. To be able to assess, evaluate and perform preliminary design analysis on complete UAV systems. Syllabus summary: This course will focus on understanding UAVs from a system perspective. It will consider a variety of key UAV subsystems and look at how these interact to determine the overall effectiveness of a particular UAV system for a given mission. Based on this understanding it will also look at the evaluation and design of a complete UAV system for a given mission specification. Some of the primary UAV subsystems that will be considered in this course are as follows. Airframe and Propulsion: The role of the basic airframe/propulsion subsystem of the UAV in setting operational mission bounds for different classes of UAVs, from micro UAVs, through to larger vehicles. Flight Control and Avionics: Typical UAV primary flight control systems; Sensor requirements to support different levels of operation (eg auto-land vs remote-control landing etc. , ); Redundancy requirements. Navigation: Navigation requirements; inertial navigation; aiding via use of GPS; strategies to combat GPS failures. Typical Payloads: Electro-Optical (EO); Infra-Red (IR); Electronic Warfare (EW); Electronic Surveillance (ES); Radar and others. Payload stabilization and pointing accuracy requirements. Air-Ground Communication Link: Typical Civilian and Military communication links. Range, Security, Bandwidth, Cost issues. Ground Control Station(GCS): Air-vehicle monitoring; payload monitoring; data dissemination; control of multiple vehicles. The course will also consider other general issues associated with modern UAV systems including multi-vehicle systems, certification of UAV systems and others. As part of the course students will spend 1 day operating a UAV system, with their own mission guidance/mission control software on board.
AMME5271 Computational Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Understanding of basic principles of Newtonian mechanics, physics and chemistry, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course introduces atomistic computational techniques used in modern engineering to understand phenomena and predict material properties, behaviour, structure and interactions at nano-scale. The advancement of nanotechnology and manipulation of matter at the molecular level have provided ways for developing new materials with desired properties. The miniaturisation at the nanometre scale requires an understanding of material behaviour which could be much different from that of the bulk. Computational nanotechnology plays a growingly important role in understanding mechanical properties at such a small scale. The aim is to demonstrate how atomistic level simulations can be used to predict the properties of matter under various conditions of load, deformation and flow. The course covers areas mainly related to fluid as well as solid properties, whereas, the methodologies learned can be applied to diverse areas in nanotechnology such as, liquid-solid interfaces, surface engineering, nanorheology, nanotribology and biological systems. This is a course with a modern perspective for engineers who wish to keep abreast with advanced computational tools for material characterisation at the atomic scale.
AMME5292 Advanced Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: MECH3261 OR MECH9261 OR CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612 OR AERO3260 OR AERO9260 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to cover advanced concepts in fluid dynamics, focusing particularly on turbulent flows, optical and laser based experimentation, and applied fluid dynamics in the context of engineering design. Specific topics to be covered will be: instability and turbulence, Reynolds decomposition, the Kolmogorov hypotheses, laser-based fluid flow measurement, and applied concepts such as multiphase flows, environmental flows, and biomedical flows. The project component of the unit will give students the opportunity to work on an advanced topical research or practical problem in fluid dynamics.
AMME5310 Engineering Tribology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302) AND (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (MECH3261 OR MECH9261 or MECH8261) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim is to teach students in the undergraduate and postgraduate levels basic concepts about friction, lubrication and wear applicable to design and operation of mechanical systems used in engineering, industrial, and modern applications. Examples of these systems are lubrication of internal combustion engines, gearboxes, artificial hip/knee joints, and micro/nano electromechanical systems.
AMME8101 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5101 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is suitable for any engineering discipline student who is interested in developing an understanding of analysis and design in energy, power generation, environment and relevant economic issues. The aim is to acquaint students with the methods engineers use to design and evaluate the processes used for the conversion of energy into useful work. This course concentrates on thermal energy conversion. It also assesses and deals with the environmental consequences of energy conversion. At the end of this unit students will be able to critically analyse technical, economic and societal impacts of energy conversion systems. A series of topics, each containing a series of lectures, will be covered in relation to energy. The course content will include: The Status of Energy Today; Energy for Electricity Generation; Nuclear Energy; Energy for Transportation; Future Energy Usage.
AMME8510 Vibration and Acoustics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5510 Assumed knowledge: BE with background knowledge in Mechanics of Solids, Fluids, Dynamics and Control Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study should prepare the student to be able to undertake vibration and acoustic measurement calculations for industry design situations. The unit aims to introduce a number of new concepts required for analysis of vibrations and acoustics. The response of structure under different dynamic forces, including human and aerodynamic, will be investigated. A number of hands-on experiments will be performed to allow an understanding of the concepts and applicability. The acoustics component will include: basic acoustics theory, sound generation and propagation, impedance, absorbing materials, industrial noise sources, isolation methods of noise control, enclosures, instrumentation and measurement, frequency analysis, noise regulations and computational acoustics.
AMME8520 Advanced Control and Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5520 Assumed knowledge: Strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces engineering design via optimisation, i. e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilise and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion. The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimisation frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with Dijkstra's algorithm, A*, and probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs), state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.
AMME9450 Design and Production

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME2450 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study will provide students with an overview of the engineering design and manufacturing/production processes, with a focus on advanced manufacturing. The unit is intended to attract students from any discipline within the University. The core pedagogical method used in this unit is the adoption of the "think make do" approach to engineering design and design thinking, with students experiencing the general engineering design cycle of; problem definition, requirements generation, solution generation/ideation and evaluation, prototyping, testing, refinement, production etc. Students will have access to the School of AMME's "Fablab" to enable students to create prototypes as part of their major project design project.
BMET5907 Orthopaedic and Surgical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH4902 OR MECH5907 Assumed knowledge: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901 OR AMME9901 OR BMET9901) AND (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921) Basic concepts in engineering mechanics - statics; dynamics; and solid mechanics. Basic concepts in materials science; specifically with regard to types of materials and the relation between properties and microstructure. A basic understanding of human biology and anatomy. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims and objectives of the UoS are: 1. To introduce the student to the details and practice of orthopaedic engineering; 2. To give students an overview of the diverse knowledge necessary for the design and evaluation of implants used in orthopaedic surgery; 3. To enable students to learn the language and concepts necessary for interaction with orthopaedic surgeons and the orthopaedic implant industry; 4. To introduce the student to the details and practice of other engineering applications in surgery, particularly in the cardiovascular realm.
BMET5911 Advanced Instrumentation for Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in calculus, linear differential equations, basic mechanics and electromagnetism. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers fundamental knowledge about the working principles of scanning probe microscopies, microsensors and other key instrumentation in nanotechnology with a focus on biophysical, biomedical and material science applications. Scanning probe microscopes work in a variety of environments ranging from vacuum to liquids, and are frequently used to study samples spanning from single atoms all the way up to live cells and tissues. Besides imaging, these technologies enable the manipulation of matter and the acquisition of many physical and chemical properties of samples up to the atomic scale. The knowledge provided in this UoS is intended to improve the competences of the students to understand, use and create technologies of great value in nanotechnology with applications across multiple disciplines.
BMET5931 Nanomaterials in Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5931 Assumed knowledge: [[(BIOL1xxx OR MBLG1xxx) AND CHEM1xxx AND PHYS1xxx] OR [(AMME1961 OR BMET1961)] AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901)]] AND (NANO2xxx OR AMME1362) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The application of science and technology at the nanoscale for biomedical problems promises to revolutionise medicine. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by applying nanotechnology to medicine. This course focuses on explaining the fundamentals of nanomedicine, and highlighting the special properties and application of nanomaterials in medicine. This course also reviews the most significant biomedical applications of nanomaterials including the recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, medical imaging, gene therapy, biosensors and cancer treatment.
BMET5933 Biomedical Image Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: An understanding of biology (1000-level), experience with programming (ENGG1801, ENGG1810, BMET2922 or BMET9922). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomedical imaging technology is a fundamental element of both clinical practice and biomedical research, enabling the visualisation of biological characteristics and function often in a non-invasive fashion. The advancement of digital scanning technologies alongside the development of computational tools has driven significant progress in medical image analysis tools that support clinical decisions and the analysis of data from biological experiments. The focus of this unit will be the development of fundamental computational skills and knowledge in biomedical imaging, including data acquisition, formats, visualisation, segmentation, feature extraction, and machine learning based image analysis. On completion of this unit, students will be able to engineer and develop solutions for different biomedical imaging tasks encountered across a variety of use cases: clinical practice (e.g., computerised disease detection and diagnosis), research (e.g., cell video analysis), and industry (e.g., fabrication of customised implants from patient image data).
BMET5944 Bioinspired Materials: Design and Fabrication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000-level materials science and mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
BMET5944 equips students with the state-of-the-art knowledge about the design and development of new generations of multifunctional materials by learning from nature. The unit covers: (a) the construction, deformation and failure behaviour of hard and soft natural materials which confer them with outstanding mechanical properties and multi-functionalities such as shape-morphing, self-healing and damage sensing, (b) the fabrication techniques to implement similar principles in engineering materials in order to improve their performance, (c) the theoretical and experimental approaches to study the mechanics of resulting materials, and (d) examples of bioinspired materials in industries, current challenges of the field and future perspectives.
BMET5953 Rehabilitation Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000-level mathematics and 1000-level biology Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehabilitation Engineering is a staple course of biomedical engineering programs worldwide. This unit focuses on rehabilitation devices, external and internal, for communication and mobility. Rehabilitation engineering is the application of engineering analysis and design expertise to overcome disabilities and improve quality of life with assistive technologies. The unit will cover the inclusive design or 'design for all' process with consumer engagement, human-computer interfaces, mobility and communication needs. All students will design a project that addresses an unmet need. There will be visits to disability services organisations and learn about the National Disability Insurance Scheme. The unit will be taught through lectures and the design lab including computational and hands on design. Communication skills will be tested through a project 'pitch' presentation. Some teaching will be provided by rehabilitation engineers working in industry.
BMET5957 Bioelectronic Medicine Circuits and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC2104 and BMET2922 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is focused on the emergent and highly interdisciplinary field of electroceuticals as an alternative to pharmaceutical therapeutics. Biomedical devices, circuits and systems employ electrical, magnetic, optical, ultrasound, or other pulses to modulate peripheral nerves for target- and organ-specific effects. We want to understand: What is electroceutical therapy? How bioelectronic medicine could replace drugs? What are the benefits and side effects of electroceuticals in terms of safety, efficacy, and cost compared with pharmaceutical therapeutics?, and How a future bioelectrician works with clinician and conventional clinical practice? This unit aims to build complementary capabilities in design and simulation of circuits and systems for bioelectronic medicine interfaces. Students review, learn, design, simulate and implement test platforms for circuits and systems that enable bioelectronic treatments. Students will be equipped with knowledge on how to make more targeted and personalised treatments for neurological based diseases and conditions with a focus on closed-loop control systems. Students are expected to perform research on circuit implementation for different applications such as pain relief, bionic eye, pace makers. The unit also provides a deep overview on the roadmap of technologies and future trends in bioelectronic medicine and electroceuticals.
BMET5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5958 Assumed knowledge: (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR BMET9921) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
BMET5962 Introduction to Mechanobiology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5962 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of 1000-level biology, 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry and 6 credit points of 2000-level physiology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mechanobiology has emerged as a new field of science that integrates biology and engineering and is now considered to have significant influence on the development of technologies for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. It is well known that tissues and cells are sensitive to their mechanical environment and changes to this environment can affect the physiological and pathophysiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms by which biological cells sense and respond to mechanical signals can lead to the development of novel treatments and therapies for a variety of diseases.
BMET5992 Regulatory Affairs in the Medical Industry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME4992 OR AMME5992 Assumed knowledge: MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 and 6cp of 1000-level Chemistry and 6cp of Biology units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Supply of medical devices, diagnostics and related therapeutic products is regulated in most jurisdictions, with sophisticated and complex regulatory regimes in all large economies. These regulations are applied both to manufacturers and designers and to biomedical engineers undertaking device custom manufacture or maintenance in clinical environments. This UoS will explore the different regulatory frameworks in the 'Global Harmonisation Task Force' group of jurisdictions (US, EU, Canada, Japan, Australia), as well as emerging regulatory practices in Asia and South America. Emphasis will be on the commonality of the underlying technical standards and the importance of sophisticated risk management approaches to compliance.
BMET5995 Advanced Bionics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5995 OR AMME5951 OR BMET5951 Assumed knowledge: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 OR BMET3921 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The field of 'bionics' is one of the primary embodiments of biomedical engineering. In the context of this unit, bionics is defined as a collection of therapeutic devices implanted into the body to restore or enhance functions lost through disease, developmental anomaly, or injury. Most typically, bionic devices intervene with the nervous system and aim to control neural activity through the delivery of electrical impulses. An example of this is a cochlear implant which delivers electrical impulses to physiologically excite surviving neurons of the auditory system, providing the capacity to elicit the psychological perception of sound. This unit primarily focuses upon the replacement of human senses, the nature and transduction of signals acquired, and how these ultimately effect neural activity.
BMET8790 Introduction to Biomechatronics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME4790 or AMME5790 or BMET5790 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in mechanical and electronic engineering; adequate maths and applied maths skills; background knowledge of physics, chemistry and biology; Some programming capability: MATLAB, C, C++, software tools used by engineers including CAD and EDA packages. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomechatronics is the application of mechatronic engineering to human biology, and as such it forms an important subset of the overall biomedical engineering discipline. This unit focusses on a number of areas of interest including auditory and optical prostheses, artificial hearts and active and passive prosthetic limbs and examines the biomechatronic systems (hardware and signal processing) that underpin their operation.
BMET9802 Biomedical Instrumentation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC3802 or ELEC8882 or BMET3802 Assumed knowledge: A knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology and electrical circuits is required: Ohm's law, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, basic circuit theory involving linear resistors, capacitors and inductors, operational amplifiers. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assumes a knowledge of basic principles in physics, mathematics, circuit theory and electronics. In particular, some understanding of the following is required: Thevenins and Nortons theorems, Fourier analysis, radiation, filtering, bipolar and field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. The following topics are covered. Biology of the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems, physiology of nerve and muscle cells, fundamental organization of the brain and spinal cord. Medical instrumentation. ElectrocardioGram and automated diagnosis. Heart pacemakers and defibrillators. The bionic ear. Apparatus for treatment of sleep disordered breathing(sleep apnoea). Medical imaging and signal processing This unit is descriptive and does not require detailed knowledge of electronics or mathematics, but does require an understanding of some key aspects of mathematical and electronic theory. The unit concentrates on some of the practical applications of biomedical engineering to patient diagnosis and treatment.
BMET9921 Biomedical Engineering Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 Assumed knowledge: 1000-level biology, 1000-level materials science and some engineering design Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to the field of biomedical engineering, from the point of view of the engineering and the global biomedical industry itself. After completion of this unit, students will have a clear understanding of what biomedical engineering is, both from the engineering perspective and the commercial/industry perspective.
CHNG5001 Process Systems Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000 level physics and mathematics (differential equations). Use of mathematical and/or computer-based modelling tools and techniques. Feedback control concepts and principles as taught in CHNG3802/CHNG9302 or similar courses. Students who are unsure about meeting these requirements should contact the unit coordinator for advice. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Whatever its purpose, any process requires some level of process monitoring and control to allow it to operate satisfactorily. Once a process is under control, the option exists to further improve performance via the implementation of some level of optimisation. This unit will develop skills in integrating process modelling, simulation, design, optimisation and control concepts. The aims of this unit are (i) to demonstrate that modelling, process control and optimisation are integral concepts in the overall consideration of industrial plants, (ii) to demonstrate that a unified approach allows a diversity of application fields to be readily handled, and (iii) to allow each student to achieve and demonstrate acceptable competency over the unit material through a range of individual and group-based activities.
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Completion of 72 cp in science, engineering or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5004 Particles and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that students have acquired knowledge equivalent to CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Particles and Surfaces: Mineral Processing. Aims and Objectives: Solid-solid and solid-liquid interactions are an important aspect in mineral processing. The aim of any mineral processing operation is the efficient extraction of the valuable metals or minerals (concentrate) from the waste materials in the ore (gangue). The goal of this course is to understand the various key steps and the corresponding principles required to achieve metal extraction from the ores.
Syllabus summary: This course will elucidate the principles in size reduction or comminution of the ore in liberating the valuable minerals, examine the microscopic details of solid-liquid, solid-gas and solid-solid interactions in mineral processing and their roles in macroscopic phenomena such as adhesion, wetting, adsorption, and mineral reactions such as reduction roasting and leaching. The general understanding of these factors will allow manipulation and improvement of performance in mineral beneficiation, dewatering of mineral slurries and extractive metallurgy.
By the end of this course students should develop a proficiency in characterisation of physical, surface and chemical properties of solids and metal aqueous streams; devising strategies to achieve extraction process objectives, within the constraints imposed by social, economic and physical environments, developing management strategies for treating liquid and solid effluents and becoming familiar with computer software packages in modelling aqueous and solid systems. This unit is an advanced Chemical Engineering elective.
CHNG5005 Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of mass and energy balances, mathematics, process design, biochemical processes, and particle mechanics at a level typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to material covered in CHNG1103 AND CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3804 AND CHNG3805. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Key learning objectives are to provide students with an overview of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used.
The key issues considered are: wastewater characterisation; the cost of wastewater treatment and disposal; the (Australian) regulatory framework; primary, secondary and tertiary treatment options; solids management and water reuse; process integration; an introduction to process simulation.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used (equivalent to CHNG5005) OR the principles of biochemical engineering and their application in engineering (equivalent to CHNG3804). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 12cp CHEM2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5601 Membrane Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Membrane Science" provides background in the physics and electrochemistry of a variety of synthetic membranes used in industry as well as cellular membranes.
The course aims to develop students' understanding of:
- membrane self-assembly and manufacture;
- membrane separation processes such as filtration, desalination, ion exchange and water-splitting;
- and techniques for membrane characterisation and monitoring.
CHNG5602 Cellular Biophysics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will be given a good background in the physics of biological processes. Students will understand the differences between thermodynamically closed and open systems and its relevance to cells and other biological systems. Students will be provided with an introduction to the thermodynamics of irreversible and evolutionary processes of relevance to biology. Students will be introduced to the statistical mechanics of self assembly and equilibrium structures and its relevance to biology at the molecular level.
CHNG5603 Advanced Industrial Modelling and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students have a general knowledge of mathematics typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering, equivalent to MATH1021 AND MATH1023 AND (CHNG2802 OR MATH2XXX). This unit is for postgraduate students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year undergraduate students. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year students. Some lectures my be given by a guest lecturer.
This course will give students an insight into the use of (computer-based) statistical techniques in extracting information from experimental data obtained from real life bio-physical systems. The issues and techniques required for mathematical modeling as well as monitoring and/or control scheme for bio-physical systems will be discussed and implemented in diverse range of bioprocesses, including biomaterials and fermentation products.
We will review statistical distribution; tests based on z, t, F variables; calculation of confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; linear and nonlinear regression; analysis of variance; principal component analysis; and use of computer-based statistical tools. The issues associated with dynamic response of bio-physical processes; inferred or estimated variables; control system design and implementation; introduction to model-based control; use of computer-based control system design and analysis tools will be elaborated.
When this course is successfully completed you will acquire knowledge to choose the appropriate statistical techniques within a computer based environment, such as Excel or MATLAB, for a given situation. The students will also obtain potential for monitoring/control scheme based on the key dynamic features of the process. Such information would be beneficial for any future career in Bio-manufacturing companies. Students are encouraged to promote an interactive environment for exchange of information.
CHNG5604 Advanced Membrane Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: The physics and electrochemistry of synthetic and cellular membranes. Knowledge of membrane manufacture, membrane separation processes and membrane characterisation and monitoring. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to CHNG5601. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a practical unit of study where students apply the theoretical concepts of membrane science to engineering practice via a series of laboratory experiments. The students will gain practical insights into mass transport processes through various membranes. Students will understand the construction and functional properties of synthetic separation membranes and also will explore experimentally the various factors affecting the performance of membranes.
CHNG5605 Bio-Products: Laboratory to Marketplace

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year students.
The objectives of the course are to provide students with an overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical industry. It will give students an insight into drug delivery systems and formulation; how therapeutic drugs work; and a general overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical marketing. The design and management of clinical trials, which are key factors for development of any new therapeutic agent will also be covered in the course. The challenges for commercialisation of innovative methods and/or biochemical and pharmaceutical products and aspects of intellectual property protection will be elaborated. Ultimately the aspects of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and international legislation for marketing pharmaceutical products will be illuminated.
Lectures in this course will be delivered by both University of Sydney staff and by a number of visiting professional representatives from industry and government agencies. We will also arrange a site visit for a bio-manufacturing company as warranted.
When you successfully complete this course you acquire knowledge about drug formulation, pharmaceutical processing including physical processes, legislation governing the bio-manufacturing and commercialisation of biochemicals and pharmaceuticals. The information would be beneficial for your future career in pharmaceutical manufacturing companies.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information. This course will be assessed by quizzes, assignments, oral presentation and final report. This unit of study is offered as an advanced elective unit of study to final year undergraduate students. Students may be required to attend lectures off-campus.
CHNG5606 Advanced Food Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of fluid mechanics and mathematics at a level typical of an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering. Assumed knowledge is equivalent to CHNG2801 (or AMME2261 or AMME2200 or CIVL2611 or CIVL3612 or CIVL9612) AND CHNG2802 (or AMME2000 or MATH2021 or MATH2061 or MATH2921). This unit is for postgraduate students and also is offered as an elective for fourth year undergraduate students. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Working at an advanced level in the food processing industry requires an ability to independently familiarise yourself with new and emerging challenges and technologies, to recognise the potential and limitations of new tools and methods, and to devise innovative solutions. Students in this unit will critically examine a range of issues and technologies in food processing technologies particularly in the areas of energy requirements, product design and process design. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through seminars and projects in three parts. In the first part, students will evaluate a range of processes based on their energy requirements. In the second part students will investigate particulate food processing and product design. In the third part of the course students will be tasked with devising and justifying their own optimum solution for a selected food processing challenge.
CIVL5351 Geoenvironmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Geoenvironmental Engineering is an applied science concerned with the protection of soil and aquifers from human activities. It can be divided into 2 main branches: waste containment and treatment of pollution sites. The former is usually a preventative activity, whereas the latter is corrective, i.e., it occurs after pollution has taken place. Geoenvironmental Engineering draws on fundamental science, especially fluid flow and contaminant migration in soil and the physics and chemistry of low-permeability material such as clay. The goal of CIVL5351 is to introduce you to the science behind Geoenvironmental Engineering and develop your skills at designing barrier systems for groundwater protection.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Analyse flow regime in saturated and unsaturated soils using Darcy¿s Law; 2. Analyse contaminant migration in soil using coupled flow and reactive diffusion-advection equations; 3. Describe the main processes of clay-water interactions and their influence on behaviour of barrier systems; 4. Design a contaminant barrier system satisfying groundwater quality requirements; 5. Assess the feasibility of waste-to-energy conversion; 6. Conduct research on a geoenvironmental topic; 7. Build simulation models and appraise quality of their predictions.
Syllabus Summary: introduction to geoenvironmental engineering; integrated waste management and life cycle assessment; soil composition and mineralogy; types and characteristics of contaminants; theory of water seepage in saturated and unsaturated soils; theory of reactive contaminant transport in soil including molecular diffusion, mechanical dispersion and advective flow; analytical and numerical solutions of reactive diffusion advection equation; design of barrier systems; geosynthetics and geomembranes; defects and leakage rates; methane generation in landfills and waste-to-energy potential.
CIVL5460 Particle Mechanics for Geotechnics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit are to demonstrate how the granular structure of soil materials controls their engineering behaviour; translate particle micromechanics to improve macroscopic engineering predictions; and establish the intimate connection of geotechnical engineering to other disciplines where granular materials play a pivotal role, including mining engineering, bulk materials handling, and geophysics. Similarly, this course will cohesively connect geotechnical engineering with fluids engineering principles, as well as enhance students' background in materials science. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand and use Discrete Element Method to evaluate and solve geotechnical problems such as rockfall interactions with surrounding terrain. They will also critically analyse pile penetration and silo discharge in light of granular mechanisms; apply soil rheology to carry out parametric study of landslide flows; and understand and use dimensionless analysis principles to predict resistive forces on obstacles. Strong focus will be dedicated for communicating students' results using written methods appropriate for professional engineers.
CIVL5701 Transport Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: CIVL2700 OR CIVL9700 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to the intersections of theory and applications in Transport Networks, Geography, and Land Use. It describes how to characterize networks, (topology, hierarchy, morphology), and how that affects the use of those networks. The course is a mix between a lecture and a student-led seminar, with students responsible for researching and presenting on a number of the topics, as well as developing a course text in a wikibook format. Students will learn the basics of networks and how transportation systems function on them.
CIVL5999 Advanced Research and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2201 OR CIVL9201) AND (CIVL2611 OR CIVL9611) AND (CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit requires students to use a number of advanced experimental tools and techniques which they learn through project-based learning as well as a structured theoretical lecture program. It will be very useful as co-requisite study for students engaged in an experimental honours thesis topic. It also covers issues of basic electronic circuitry and signal processing, various analysis techniques using both simple and advanced statistics, and advanced data processing methods such as PIV and Fourier filtering. It will also prepare students for further research in industry or academia.
CIVL6257 Concrete Structures - Prestressed Concrete

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5257 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Objectives: To develop an advanced understanding of the behaviour, analysis and design of prestressed concrete structures.
Outcomes: Students will develop skills in the analysis and design of prestressed concrete beams, columns and slabs, to satisfy the serviceability and strength provisions of the Australian Concrete Structures Standard.
Syllabus Summary: The behaviour and design of prestressed concrete structures and structural elements, including beams and slabs. Topics covered will include steel and concrete materials, prestress losses, flexural and shear behaviour at service loads and ultimate loads, short and long term deflections, load balancing, anchorage zones (including strut and tie modelling of anchors), dynamic response of post-tensioned floors, and sustainability considerations for prestressed concrete structures.
CIVL6264 Composite Steel-Concrete Structures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5264 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Students will understand the basic principles for the design of composite steel-concrete structures. In particular, they will develop an understanding of the procedures required for the design of composite beams, slabs and columns. Design guidelines will reflect requirements of the Australian Standards and international codes.
CIVL6267 Steel Structures - Adv Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5267 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This Unit covers: a) Principles of the design of cold-formed steel structural members, where reference is made to the Australian Standard AS/NZS4600, explaining the underlying theory for its provisions; and b) The behaviour of steel columns under transverse impact loads, where reference is made to design procedures established in the research literature. The objectives are to provide students with advanced knowledge of steel structural design and confidence to apply the underlying principles to solve a wide range of structural steel problems.
This Unit will provide students with the following knowledge and skills: An understanding of the basic principles of reliability based design on steel structures; An understanding of the relationship between structural analysis and design provisions; An understanding of the background to the design provisions for cold-formed steel structures; Proficiency in applying the provisions of AS/NZS4600 to columns and beams; An understanding of the behaviour of steel columns under transverse impact; Proficiency in performing structural analyses of steel columns subjected to transverse impact loads.
Syllabus Summary:
Limit states design philosophy and approaches, Loading standards, Methods of analysis, Interrelationship between analysis and design, Flexural members section and member capacity, Compression members section and member capacity, Plastic collapse mechanisms and Impact resistance, of structural steel members.
CIVL6268 Structural Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5268 Assumed knowledge: Students are assumed to have a good knowledge of fundamental structural analysis, which is covered in the courses of Structural Mechanics, Introduction to Structural Concepts and Design, Structural Analysis, and Finite Element Analysis. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces the fundamental concepts and theory of dynamic analysis. In a first step, free vibrations are studied and the problem of determining the natural frequency of a system is addressed. This is followed by the study of harmonically excited vibrations. While initially systems with a single degree of freedom (SDOF) are considered, the theory is generalized to cover multi-degree of freedom systems. The theory is applied to explain how structures are designed against earthquake actions with specific reference to Parts 4 of the Australian loading standard AS1170 for determining earthquake loads. This unit will provide students with the following knowledge and skills: Understanding of the fundamental concepts and definitions used in structural dynamics; Ability to calculate the natural frequency of a system using equilibrium or energy methods; Ability to determine the effect of viscous damping on the response of a freely vibrating system; Ability to determine the response of a system to a harmonic excitation; Ability to apply AS1170 Part 4 in structural design against earthquake actions; Understanding of the fundamental concepts of earthquake engineering
CIVL6450 Analysis and Design of Pile Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5450 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Objectives: To develop an understanding of the modern principles of design of pile foundations and the application of those principles to practice.
Outcomes: Students should gain an advanced understanding of the types of pile foundations used in practice, and the procedures for analysis of pile foundations under various types of loading, and gain experience in carrying out pile design for real geotechnical profiles.
Syllabus summary: Types of piles and their uses, effects of pile installation, axial capacity of piles and pile groups, settlement of pile foundations, ultimate lateral capacity, lateral deformations, analysis of pile groups subjected to general loading conditions, piled raft foundations, piles subjected to ground movements, pile load testing, code provisions for pile design.
CIVL6454 Rock Engineering

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Guien Miao Session: Semester 1 Classes: Project Work - in class, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL5454 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate geology and soil mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Objectives: to develop an understanding of the behaviour and design of engineering structures in rock masses.
Outcomes: Students will have learnt how to classify and characterise rocks and rock masses for engineering purposes and developed an understanding of basic rock mechanics, etc.
Syllabus summary: Introduction to rock mechanics and rock engineering. Index properties and engineering characterisation of rocks and rock masses. Planes of weakness in rock masses. Rock material strength and rock mass strength. Rock deformability. In situ stress conditions in rock masses. Underground openings. Rock slopes.
CIVL6455 Engineering Behaviour of Soils

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5455 Assumed knowledge: [CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410] AND [CIVL3411 OR CIVL9411]. A knowledge of basic concepts and terminology of soil mechanics is assumed. Experience with geotechnical practice in estimating parameters from field and laboratory data would be useful but not essential. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This is an advanced soil mechanics course. It is concerned with the mechanical stress, strain, strength behaviour and the application of this knowledge in geotechnical engineering. The course includes an introduction to critical state soil mechanics, which is used to assist with the interpretation of soil data, and to enable prediction of ground behaviour. The course uses the critical state framework to provide a firm basis for an understanding of the stress, strain, strength behaviour of all soils, and to enable a rational approach to the selection of parameters for use in geotechnical design.
CIVL6456 Energy Geotechnics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: [CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410] AND [CIVL3411 OR CIVL9411] Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This is an advanced course on geotechnical engineering. The Unit of Study will focus on the design and analyses of geotechnical applications related to energy and sustainability. This course covers essential geotechnical design concepts related to some of the current and emerging energy projects, starting from the governing mechanisms controlling heat and mass transfer, to designing geothermal foundations and geological storage facilities, as examples. Other energy geotechnical problems include the design and analyses of offshore foundations for oil and gas platforms, which must sustain unique and harsh loading conditions, and carbon geosequestration facilities subjected to high temperatures, pressures and hydrological conditions. The course concerns with the constitutive behaviour of soils, including stress, strain, heat and mass transfer, and the application of this knowledge in practical engineering problems. Theme topics related with these materials will be discussed with specific emphases on the areas of energy and environmental engineering. This course aims to develop theoretical and numerical skills for students interested in structural and geotechnical engineering.
CIVL6665 Advanced Water Resources Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5665 Assumed knowledge: CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The objective of this unit of study is to introduce students and professionals to water resources engineering. The aim of this unit is to provide an understanding of one or more aspects related to: hydrologic cycle from the broadest perspective, physical, chemical and biological characterization of water, how to change the water quality parameters, water quality control and management, water quality in the environment, nutrient and contaminant cycling and removal, water treatment methods for drinking, wastewater and groundwater, conservation/reuse/treatment techniques, desalination, stormwater, bioremediation and phytoremediation techniques. The topics mentioned above may be covered in both a qualitative and quantitative aspect depending on the subject of the project in this year. A basic level of integral and differential calculus is required as well as knowledge and use of calculation software such as Excel and Matlab, and micro-controlling systems and boards.
CIVL6666 Open Channel Flow and Hydraulic Structures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5666 Assumed knowledge: Advanced knowledge of fluid mechanics is necessary for this UoS Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study will review the principles of uniform flow in open channels. These will be extended into a study of the principles of slowly varying and rapidly varying flow, the calculation of backwater curves and hydraulic jumps. These principles will then be applied to the design of gutters, inlets, culverts and piers, using existing commercially available software packages commonly used in engineering practice.
This unit will provide students with a strong back ground in open channel flow hydraulics, and the basis for the calculation of stream and hydraulic structure performance. Students will gain experience in the use of currently available commercial software for the design of culverts and other structures.
CIVL6669 Applied Fluid Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL5669 Assumed knowledge: CIVL3612 or CIVL9612 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The objective of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and skills in solving thermal fluid flow problems relevant to Civil and Environmental Engineering applications. Students will also gain experience in using a state-of-the-art commercial CFD package and advanced understanding of a range of engineering problems through working on projects.
COMP5045 Computational Geometry

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joachim Gudmundsson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Project Work Assumed knowledge: Experience with data structures and algorithms as covered in COMP9103 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In many areas of computer science- robotics, computer graphics, virtual reality, and geographic information systems are some examples- it is necessary to store, analyse, and create or manipulate spatial data. This course deals with the algorithmic aspects of these tasks: we study techniques and concepts needed for the design and analysis of geometric algorithms and data structures. Each technique and concept will be illustrated on the basis of a problem arising in one of the application areas mentioned above.
COMP5046 Natural Language Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of an OO programming language Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces computational linguistics and the statistical techniques and algorithms used to automatically process natural languages (such as English or Chinese). It will review the core statistics and information theory, and the basic linguistics, required to understand statistical natural language processing (NLP). Statistical NLP is used in a wide range of applications, including information retrieval and extraction; question answering; machine translation; and classifying and clustering of documents. This unit will explore the key challenges of natural language to computational modelling, and the state of the art approaches to the key NLP sub-tasks, including tokenisation, morphological analysis, word sense representation, part-of-speech tagging, named entity recognition and other information extraction, text categorisation, phrase structure parsing and dependency parsing. You will implement many of these sub-tasks in labs and assignments. The unit will also investigate the annotation process that is central to creating training data for statistical NLP systems. You will annotate data as part of completing a real-world NLP task.
COMP5048 Visual Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Experience with data structures and algorithms as covered in COMP9103 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Visual Analytics aims to facilitate the data analytics process through Information Visualisation. Information Visualisation aims to make good pictures of abstract information, such as stock prices, family trees, and software design diagrams. Well designed pictures can convey this information rapidly and effectively. The challenge for Visual Analytics is to design and implement effective Visualisation methods that produce pictorial representation of complex data so that data analysts from various fields (bioinformatics, social network, software visualisation and network) can visually inspect complex data and carry out critical decision making. This unit will provide basic HCI concepts, visualisation techniques and fundamental algorithms to achieve good visualisation of abstract information. Further, it will also provide opportunities for academic research and developing new methods for Visual Analytic methods.
COMP5313 Large Scale Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Algorithmic skills gained through units such as COMP2123 or COMP2823 or COMP3027 or COMP3927 or COMP9007 or COMP9123 or equivalent. Basic probability knowledge. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The growing connected-ness of modern society translates into simplifying global communication and accelerating spread of news, information and epidemics. The focus of this unit is on the key concepts to address the challenges induced by the recent scale shift of complex networks. In particular, the course will present how scalable solutions exploiting graph theory, sociology and probability tackle the problems of communicating (routing, diffusing, aggregating) in dynamic and social networks.
COMP5318 Machine Learning and Data Mining

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: INFO2110 OR ISYS2110 OR COMP9120 OR COMP5138 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Machine learning is the process of automatically building mathematical models that explain and generalise datasets. It integrates elements of statistics and algorithm development into the same discipline. Data mining is a discipline within knowledge discovery that seeks to facilitate the exploration and analysis of large quantities for data, by automatic and semiautomatic means. This subject provides a practical and technical introduction to machine learning and data mining.
Topics to be covered include problems of discovering patterns in the data, classification, regression, feature extraction and data visualisation. Also covered are analysis, comparison and usage of various types of machine learning techniques and statistical techniques.
COMP5415 Multimedia Design and Authoring

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Experience with software development as covered in SOFT2412 or COMP9103 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides principles and practicalities of creating interactive and effective multimedia products. It gives an overview of the complete spectrum of different media platforms and current authoring techniques used in multimedia production. Coverage includes the following key topics: enabling multimedia technologies; multimedia design issues; interactive 2D and 3D computer animation; multimedia object modelling and rendering; multimedia scripting programming; post-production and delivery of multimedia applications.
COMP5424 Information Technology in Biomedicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Experience with software development as covered in SOFT2412 or COMP9103 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Information technology (IT) has significantly contributed to the research and practice of medicine, biology and health care. The IT field is growing enormously in scope with biomedicine taking a lead role in utilising the evolving applications to its best advantage. The goal of this unit of study is to provide students with the necessary knowledge to understand the information technology in biomedicine. The major emphasis will be on the principles associated with biomedical digital imaging systems and related biomedicine data processing, analysis, visualisation, registration, modelling, retrieval and management. A broad range of practical integrated clinical applications will be also elaborated.
COMP5426 Parallel and Distributed Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Experience with algorithm design and software development as covered in (COMP2017 or COMP9017) and COMP3027 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is intended to introduce and motivate the study of high performance computer systems. The student will be presented with the foundational concepts pertaining to the different types and classes of high performance computers. The student will be exposed to the description of the technological context of current high performance computer systems. Students will gain skills in evaluating, experimenting with, and optimising the performance of high performance computers. The unit also provides students with the ability to undertake more advanced topics and courses on high performance computing.
COMP5427 Usability Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Skills with modelling as covered in ISYS2110 or ISYS2120 or COMP9110 or COMP9201 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Usability engineering is the systematic process of designing and evaluating user interfaces so that they are usable. This means that people can readily learn to use them efficiently, can later remember how to use them and find it pleasant to use them. The wide use of computers in many aspects of people's lives means that usability engineering is of the utmost importance.
There is a substantial body of knowledge about how to elicit usability requirements, identify the tasks that a system needs to support, design interfaces and then evaluate them. This makes for systematic ways to go about the creation and evaluation of interfaces to be usable for the target users, where this may include people with special needs. The field is extremely dynamic with the fast emergence of new ways to interact, ranging from conventional WIMP interfaces, to touch and gesture interaction, and involving mobile, portable, embedded and desktop computers.
This unit will enable students to learn the fundamental concepts, methods and techniques of usability engineering. Students will practice these in small classroom activities. They will then draw them together to complete a major usability evaluation assignment in which they will design the usability testing process, recruit participants, conduct the evaluation study, analyse these and report the results
CSYS5010 Introduction to Complex Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Globalisation, rapid technological advances, the development of integrated and distributed systems, cross-disciplinary technical collaboration, and the emergence of "evolved" (as opposed to designed) systems are some of the reasons why many systems have begun to be described as complex systems in recent times. Complex technological, biological, socio-economic and socio-ecological systems (power grids, communication and transport systems, food webs, megaprojects, and interdependent civil infrastructure) are composed of large numbers of diverse interacting parts and exhibit self-organisation and/or emergent behaviour. This unit will introduce the basic concepts of "complex systems theory", and focus on methods for the quantitative analysis and modelling of collective emergent phenomena, using diverse computational approaches such as agent-based modelling and simulation, cellular automata, bio-inspired algorithms, and game theory. Students will gain theoretical knowledge of complex adaptive systems, coupled with practical skills in computational simulation and forecasting using a range of modern toolkits.
CSYS5020 Interdependent Civil Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Our modern day civil infrastructure includes transport networks, telecommunications, power systems, financial infrastructure and emergency services, all of which are growing more and more interconnected. Moreover, the behaviour of the modern infrastructure is not dependent only upon the behaviour of its parts: complex civil systems (such as modern power grids), communication and transport systems, megaprojects, social and eco-systems, generate rich interactions among the individual components with interdependencies across systems. This interdependent behaviour brings about significant new challenges associated with the design and management of complex systems. Cascading power failures, traffic disruptions, epidemic outbreaks, chronic diseases, financial market crashes, and ecosystem collapses are typical manifestations of these challenges, affecting the stability of modern society and civil infrastructure. This unit will develop an understanding of how interdependent systems perform under stress, how to improve resilience and how best to mitigate the effects of various kinds of component failure or human error, by more accurate analysis of interdependent cascades of failures across system boundaries. The studied topics will include dynamical analysis of complex interdependent networks, local and global measures of network structure and evolution, cascading failures, as well as predictive measures of catastrophic failure in complex adaptive systems, and the tools that enable planning for resilient infrastructure. This unit will equip future professionals with sufficient expertise and technical know-how for the design of efficient prevention and intervention policies, and robust crisis forecasting and management. This unit will equip future professionals with sufficient expertise and technical know-how for the design of efficient prevention and intervention policies, and robust crisis forecasting and management.
CSYS5030 Information Theory and Self-Organisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Competency in 1st year mathematics, and basic computer programming skills are assumed. Competency in 1st year undergraduate level statistics (for example, covering probabilities, conditional probabilities, Gaussian distribution, correlations, statistical significance/hypothesis testing and p-values). An exposure to linear algebra would be useful but not mandatory. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The dynamics of complex systems are often described in terms of how they process information and self-organise; for example regarding how genes store and utilise information, how information is transferred between neurons in undertaking cognitive tasks, and how swarms process information in order to collectively change direction in response to predators. The language of information also underpins many of the central concepts of complex adaptive systems, including order and randomness, self-organisation and emergence. Shannon information theory, which was originally founded to solve problems of data compression and communication, has found contemporary application in how to formalise such notions of information in the world around us and how these notions can be used to understand and guide the dynamics of complex systems.
This unit of study introduces information theory in this context of analysis of complex systems, foregrounding empirical analysis using modern software toolkits, and applications in time-series analysis, nonlinear dynamical systems and data science. Students will be introduced to the fundamental measures of entropy and mutual information, as well as dynamical measures for time series analysis and information flow such as transfer entropy, building to higher-level applications such as feature selection in machine learning and network inference. They will gain experience in empirical analysis of complex systems using comprehensive software toolkits, and learn to construct their own analyses to dissect and design the dynamics of self-organisation in applications such as neural imaging analysis, natural and robotic swarm behaviour, characterisation of risk factors for and diagnosis of diseases, and financial market dynamics.
CSYS5040 Criticality in Dynamical Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Mathematics at first-year undergraduate level. Some familiarity with mathematical and computational principles at an undergraduate university level (for example, differential calculus or linear algebra). Familiarity with a programming language at a beginners level for data analysis. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Criticality is one of the most important properties of Complex Systems. Criticality occurs in two related but distinct ways: 1. when a system unexpectedly collapses from one state to another, very different, state and 2. when a system is in a state with wild fluctuations and it is highly sensitive to small changes in behaviours. In the first case we call it a 'Tipping Point' and in the second case a 'Continuous Critical Transition'. There are many practical examples of these types of behaviour: Financial markets are often in a continuous critical transition and they can also quickly collapse, diseases that are transferred through a social network can suddenly explode into a pandemic, and a local power outage in an electricity network can cause entire cities to blackout. We will also look at selforganised criticality, where a system evolves to be near one of these 'dangerous' critical points, this is one of the most exciting emergent phenomena in modern applied sciences, engineering and business and we will cover present several real-world applications in this area. This unit will study a range of important examples in which criticality plays a key role and we will show what the underlying causes are for these uncontrolled collapses and wild dynamics. We will use a combination of software examples (Matlab) and mathematical techniques in order to illustrate when and how such interactions might occur and how to simulate their dynamics. It will cover crossdisciplinary concepts and methods based on nonlinear dynamics, including elements of chaos theory and statistical physics, such as fractals and percolation.
DATA5207 Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive December,Intensive February
Data science is a new, rapidly expanding field. There is an unprecedented demand from technology companies, financial services, government and not-for-profits for graduates who can effectively analyse data. This subject will help students gain a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of quantitative research, and acquire practical skills using different methods and tools to answer relevant social science questions.
This subject will offer a nuanced combination of real-world applications to data science methodology, bringing an awareness of how to solve actual social problems to the Master of Data Science. We cover topics including elections, criminology, economics and the media. You will clean, process, model and make meaningful visualisations using data from these fields, and test hypotheses to draw inferences about the social world.
Techniques covered range from descriptive statistics and linear and logistic regression, the analysis of data from randomised experiments, model selection for prediction and classification tasks, to the analysis of unstructured text as data, multilevel and geospatial modelling, all using the open source program R. In doing this, not only will we build on the skills you have already mastered through this degree, but explore different ways to use them once you graduate.
ELEC5203 Topics in Power Engineering

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 Power Engineering and ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Drives. Familiarity with basic mathematics and physics; competence with basic circuit theory and understanding of electricity grid equipment such as transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling; and fundamentals of power electronic technologies. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an in depth understanding of modern power electronic equipment supporting the intelligent grid of the future and the associated electronic control. Electronic power systems rely on a complex system of methods and equipment for controlling the voltage levels and for maintaining the stability and security of the supply. It covers recent findings in the fundamental theory and the massive change of modern power electronic equipment and methods supporting the electricity grids. It also looks at the huge influence of computer-aided analysis of electric power systems and the effects of the deregulation of the industry.
The specific topics covered are as follows: Introduction to power electronic systems and applications in the electrical grid, power semiconductors, reactive power control in power systems, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), high-voltage direct-current transmission (HVDC), static reactive power compensator, dynamic voltage restorer, unified-power flow controller, line-commutated converters, thyristor-controlled equipment, phase-angle regulators, voltage-source converter based power electronic equipment, harmonics, power quality, passive and active filters, distributed generation, grid-interconnection of renewable energy sources, intelligent grid technologies.
ELEC5204 Power Systems Analysis and Protection

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734). The unit assumes basic knowledge of circuits, familiarity with basic mathematics, competence with basic circuit theory and an understanding of three phase systems, transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling and operation of such equipment. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the basis for the analysis of electricity grids using symmetrical components theory. Such analysis theory is the basis for the understanding of electrical faults and the design of protection strategies to safeguard the electrical equipment, and maintain safety of the plant at the highest possible level.
The following specific topics are covered: The types and causes of power system faults; balanced faults and short circuit levels; an introduction to fault current transients in machines; symmetric components, sequence impedances and networks; the analysis of unsymmetrical faults. Review of the impact of faults on power system behaviour; issues affecting protection scheme characteristics and clearance times; the security and reliability of protection schemes; the need for protection redundancy and its implementation as local or remote backup; zones of protection and the need for zones to overlap; the analysis and application of over-current and distance relay protection schemes with particular reference to the protection of transmission lines.
ELEC5207 Advanced Power Conversion Technologies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3204 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to cover advanced topics in power electronics and it applications. In particular, the power electronics interface design and implementation for microgrid, smart grids and modern power systems which have received tremendous attention in recent years. Many countries including Australia are developing different power electronics technologies such as integrating renewable energy sources into the grid, managing charging and discharging of high power energy storage system, controlling the reactive power of power electronics interfaces for grid stability, and adding communication capability to power electronics interfaces for smart meter implementation. The unit assumes prior fundamental knowledge of power electronics systems and applications, including the ability to analyse basic power converters for all four conversions (ac-ac, ac-dc, dc-ac, and ac-dc), and design and implement various applications, such as motor drive and battery charger, with the consideration of electrical characteristics of semiconductors and passive elements. This unit will cover advanced technologies on power electronics interfaces for smart grids and microgrid implementation, which include dynamic voltage restorer, active power filter, reactive power compensation, energy storage management, hybrid energy sources optimisation, multilevel inverter and control, D-STATCOM, etc. To analyse these advanced power conversion systems, some analytical techniques will be introduced. This includes resonant converters, soft-switching technique, ac equivalent circuit modeling, converter control and input/output filter design.
ELEC5208 Intelligent Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Electricity Networks, Control Systems and Telecommunications Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an introduction to the planning and operation of modern electricity grids, also known as "smart" grids. Traditional power networks featured a small number of large base-load plants sending power out over transmission lines to be distributed in radial lower voltage networks to loads. In response to the need to reduce carbon impact, future networks will feature diverse generation scattered all over the network including at distribution levels. Also there will be new loads such as electric vehicles and technologies including energy storage and lower voltage power flow control devices. The operation of these new networks will be possible by much greater use of information and communication technology (ICT) and control over the information networks.
The unit will cover recent relevant developments in energy technologies as well as important components of 'smart grids' such as supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), substation automation, remote terminal units (RTU), sensors and intelligent electronic devices (IED). Operation of these electricity grids requires a huge amount of data gathering, communication and information processing. The unit will discuss many emerging technologies for such data, information, knowledge and decision processes including communication protocols and network layouts, networking middleware and coordinated control. Information systems and data gathering will be used to assess key performance and security indicators associated with the operation of such grids including stability, reliability and power quality.
ELEC5211 Power System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732. The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is a deep understanding on circuit analysis and its applications in power system steady state analysis. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit deals with power systems modelling, analysis and simulation under dynamic conditions.
The unit will cover the following topics: The links between power system steady state analysis and transient analysis; Basics of dynamic system in general and stability analysis methods; Analysis of power systems subject to electromagnetic and electromechanical transients. Power system modelling for stability analysis and electromagnetic transients analysis: Synchronous machine modelling using Park's transformation; Modelling of excitation systems and turbine governors; Modelling of the transmission system; Load modelling. Simulation of interconnected multi-machine systems; Stability analysis- Transient stability, Small signal stability, Voltage stability; Power system control: Voltage control, Power system transient stability control, Power system dynamic stability control, Emergency control; The unit is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power and Electrical) and ME (Power and Electrical). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power).
ELEC5212 Power System Planning and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732. The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is power system steady state analysis Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Deregulation of the electricity industry has fundamentally changed the power systems operation paradigm. The focus has shifted from central planning of vertically integrated utilities to market driven operation. Traditional electric energy producers and consumers play new roles in a power market environment and their behaviors are affected by the economic incentives to a large extent. Nevertheless, electric energy is a special commodity and cannot be traded as the other common goods. So a power market design has many special considerations compared with a conventional commercial market design. Knowledge of the power market mechanisms has become a necessary part in fully understanding the whole power system operations. To equip students with necessary skills to address the challenges of modern power systems, the unit will cover the following topics:
-Overview of the traditional electricity industry structure and operation: Economic dispatch, Power system operation states and respective reliability requirements.
-Drivers for the restructuring of the electricity industry.
-Electricity market design: Market structures (spot, bilateral, hybrid); Energy market; Ancillary services market; Key components in an electricity market.
-Electricity market participants and their roles in a market.
-Electricity economics: Power market from suppliers' view (Supply curve) and from demands' view (Demand curve); Market mechanism; Price and its elasticity; Cost and supply; Market power and monopoly.
-Cost of capital: Time value of money; Project evaluation methods from investments' point of view; Risk and return.
-Operation mechanisms of various designs of power markets.
-Power market practices around the world.
-Power system expansion planning: Fundamental knowledge of power system planning considerations, procedures and methods; Transmission planning; Generation planning; Power system adequacy assessment.
ELEC5212 is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power) and ME (Electrical and Power). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power). This unit focuses on the power market principles and practices. Based on the knowledge of the power market operation, the power system planning procedures and methods will also be discussed.
ELEC5304 Intelligent Visual Signal Understanding

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g. probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces basic and advanced concepts and methodologies in image processing and computer vision. This course mainly focuses on image processing and analysis methods as well as intelligent systems for processing and understanding multidimensional signals such as images, which include basic topics like multidimensional signal processing fundamentals and advanced topics like visual feature extraction and image classification as well as their applications for face recognition and object/scene recognition. It mainly covers the following areas: multidimensional signal processing fundamentals, image enhancement in the spatial domain and frequency domain, edge processing and region processing, imaging geometry and 3D stereo vision, object recognition and face recognition.
ELEC5306 Video Intelligence and Compression

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic understanding of digital signal processing (filtering, DFT) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces digital image and video compression algorithms and standards. This course mainly focuses on fundamental and advanced methods for digital video compression. It covers the following areas: digital video fundamentals, digital image and video compression standards, and video codec optimization.
ELEC5307 Advanced Signal Processing with Deep Learning

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g., probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces deep learning for a broad range of multi-dimensional signal processing applications. It covers deep learning technologies for image super-resolution and restoration, image categorization, object localization, image segmentation, face recognition, person detection and re-identification, human pose estimation, action recognition, object tracking as well as image and video captioning.
ELEC5507 Error Control Coding

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Fundamental mathematics including probability theory and linear algebra. Basic knowledge on digital communications. Basic MATLAB programming skills is desired. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit deals with the principles of error control coding techniques and their applications in various communication and data storage systems. Its aim is to present the fundamentals of error control coding techniques and develop theoretical and practical skills in the design of error control encoders/decoders. Successful completion of this unit will facilitate progression to advanced study or to work in the fields of telecommunications and computer engineering. It is assumed that the students have some background in communications principles and probability theory.
The following topics are covered: Introduction to error control coding, Linear algebra, Linear block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Solomon codes, Applications of block codes in communications, Convolutional codes, Viterbi algorithm, Applications of convolutional codes in communications, Soft decision decoding of block and convolutional codes, LDPC codes, Turbo codes, MIMO and rateless codes.
ELEC5509 Mobile Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3505 AND ELEC3506. Basically, students need to know the concepts of data communications and mobile communications, which could be gained in one the following units of study: ELEC3505 Communications, ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet, or similar units. If you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study serves as an introduction to communications network research. The unit relies on a solid understanding of data communications and mobile networks. It introduces some of the currently most debated research topics in mobile networking and presents an overview of different technical solutions. Students are expected to critically evaluate these solutions in their context and produce an objective analysis of the advantages/disadvantages of the different research proposals. The general areas covered are wireless Internet, mobility management, quality of service in mobile and IP networks, ad hoc networks, and cellular network architectures.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to wireless and mobile Internet. Wireless cellular data networks. Cellular mobile networks. Mobile networks of the future. Quality of service in a mobile environment. Traffic modelling for wireless Internet. Traffic management for wireless Internet. Mobility management in mobile networks. Transport protocols for mobile networks. Internet protocols for mobile networks.
ELEC5510 Satellite Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of error probabilities, analog and digital modulation techniques and error performance evaluation studied in ELEC3505 Communications and ELEC4505 Digital Communication Systems, is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Satellite communication systems provide fixed and mobile communication services over very large areas of land, sea and air. This unit presents the fundamental knowledge and skills in the analysis and design of such systems. It introduces students to the broad spectrum of satellite communications and its position in the entire telecommunications network; helps students to develop awareness of the key factors affecting a good satellite communications system and theoretical and practical skills in the design of a satellite communications link.
Topic areas include: satellite communication link design; propagation effects and their impact on satellite performance; satellite antennas; digital modem design, speech codec design; error control for digital satellite links.
ELEC5511 Optical Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3405 OR ELEC9405) AND (ELEC3505 OR ELEC9505). Basic knowledge of communications, electronics and photonics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Optical telecommunications has revolutionized the way we receive information and communicate with one another. This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of optical fibre communication systems. It commences with a description of optical fibre propagation characteristics and transmission properties. We will then consider light sources and the fundamental principles of laser action in semiconductor and other lasers including quantum well lasers, tunable lasers and fibre lasers, and also the characteristics of optical transmitters based on semiconductor and electro-optic modulation techniques. The characteristics of optical amplifiers will also be discussed. On the receiver side, the principles of photodetection and optical receiver sensitivity will be presented. Other aspects such as fibre devices and multiple wavelength division multiplexing techniques will also be discussed. Finally, the complete optical fibre communication system will be studied to enable the design of data transmission optical systems, local area networks and multi-channel optical systems.
ELEC5512 Optical Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of digital communications, wave propagation, and fundamental optics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds upon the fundamentals of optical communication introduced in ELEC3405 (Communications Electronics and Photonics). It focuses on photonic network architectures and protocols, network design, enabling technologies and the drivers for intelligent optical network.
Students will learn how to analyse and design optical networks and optical components.
Introduction, photonic network architectures: point to point, star, ring, mesh; system principles: modulation formats, link budgets, optical signal to noise ratio, dispersion, error rates, optical gain and regeneration; wavelength division multiplexed networks; WDM components: optical filters, gratings, multiplexers, demultiplexers, wavelength routers, optical crossconnects, wavelength converters, WDM transmitters and receivers; Wavelength switched/routed networks, ultra high speed TDM, dispersion managed links, soliton systems; broadcast and distribution networks, multiple access, subcarrier multiplexed lightwave video networks, optical local area and metropolitan area networks; protocols for photonic networks: IP, Gbit Ethernet, SDH/SONET, FDDI, ATM, Fibre Channel.
ELEC5514 Networked Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3305 AND ELEC3506 AND ELEC3607 AND ELEC5508 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aim to teach the fundamentals concepts associated with: Networked Embedded Systems, wireless sensor networks; Wireless channel propagation and radio power consumption; Wireless networks, ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc. ; Sensor principle, data fusion, source detection and identification; Multiple source detection, multiple access communications; Network topology, routing, network information theory; Distributed source channel coding for sensor networks; Power-aware and energy-aware communication protocols; Distributed embedded systems problems such as time synchronization and node localisation; Exposure to several recently developed solutions to address problems in wireless sensor networks and ubiquitous computing giving them a well-rounded view of the state-of the-art in the networked embedded systems field.
Student involvement with projects will expose them to the usage of simulators and/or programming some types of networked embedded systems platforms.
Ability to identify the main issues and trade-offs in networked embedded systems; Understanding of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area; Based on the above understanding, ability to analyse requirements and devise first-order solutions for particular networked embedded systems problems; Familiarisation with a simulator platform and real hardware platforms for network embedded systems through the students involvement in projects.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5517 Software Defined Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce an emerging networking paradigm- Software Defined Networks (SDNs). By separating the control logics from the physical networks, the software defined networks allow an automated and programmable software program to logically control and manage the network. This unit introduces the basic principles of software defined networks, its architecture, abstraction, SDN programming, programmable control plane and data plane protocols, network update, network virtualisation, traffic management as well as its applications and implementations. Student will learn and practice SDN programming, testing and debugging on SDNs platforms through experiments and group projects. It is assumed that the students have some knowledge on data communications and networks.
ELEC8608 Computer Architecture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC3608 or ELEC9608 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of microprocessor systems (embedded systems architecture, design methodology, interfacing and programming) is required. Knowledge of digital logic (logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, number systems, combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, design of a simple computer, and using hardware description languages such as VHDL or Verilog) is required. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the design of a computer system at the architectural and digital logic level. Topics covered include instruction sets, computer arithmetic, performance evaluation, datapath design, pipelining, memory hierarchies including caches and virtual memory, I/O devices, and bus-based I/O systems. Students will design a pipelined reduced instruction set processor.
ELEC9405 Communications Electronics and Photonics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5738 Assumed knowledge: A background in basic electronics and circuit theory is assumed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to the fundamental operation and design of transmitter and receiver subsystems for two broad classes of communications systems: those based on electronic transmission and those based on optical transmission.
In the area of electronic communication subsystems, the course presents transmitter and receiver design. Topics relating to the transmitter comprise electronic oscillator sources, tuned electronic amplifiers, and modulators. Topics relating to receiver design comprise RF and IF frequency selective amplifiers, mixers, demodulators, phase-lock loops, feedback amplifiers, and high frequency RF and microwave communication amplifiers. In the area of optical communication subsystems, the course presents photonic transmitters and receivers. On the transmitter side this focuses on the principles of light generation in optical sources such as semiconductor lasers and light emitting diodes, electro-optic modulation of light, and optical amplifiers. On the receiver side, photodetectors, optical receivers, and front-end circuits are discussed. The principles and design of these subsystems are considered with reference to a basic optoelectronic communication link.
ELEC9505 Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5739 Assumed knowledge: ELEC9302 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an intermediate unit of study in telecommunications following on the general concepts studied in earlier units such as Signal and Systems and leading on to more advanced units such as Digital Communication Systems. Student will learn how to critically design and evaluate digital communication systems including the elements of a digital transmission system, understand the limitations of communications channels, different analog and digital modulation schemes and reasons to use digital techniques instead of analog, and the effect of noise and interference in performance of the digital communication systems. On completion of this unit, studentss will have sufficient knowledge of the physical channel of a telecommunications network to approach the study of higher layers of the network stack.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to communications systems, random signals and stochastic process, components, signals and channels, sampling, quantization, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM), pulse code modulation (PCM), quantization noise, time division multiplexing, delta modulation. Digital communications: baseband signals, digital PAM, eye diagram, equalization, correlative coding, error probabilities in baseband digital transmission, bandpass transmission, digital amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK), phase shift keying (PSK) and quadrature shift keying (QPSK), error probabilities in bandpass digital transmission, a case study of digital communication systems. Introduction to information theory: fundamental limits in communications, channel capacity and channel coding, signal compression.
ELEC9506 Data Communications and the Internet

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5740 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students undertaking this unit should be familiar with fundamental digital technologies and representations such as bit complement and internal word representation. Students should also have a basic understanding of the physical properties of communication channels, techniques and limitations. Furthermore, students should be able to apply fundamental mathematical skills.
The unit will cover the following specific material: Communication reference models (TCP/IP, ATM and OSI). Circuit switched and packet switched communication. Network node functions and building blocks. LAN, MAN and WAN technologies. ATM systems. Protocols fundamental mechanisms. The TCP/IP core protocols (IP, ICMP, DHCP, ARP, TCP, UDP etc. ). Applications and protocols (ftP, Telnet, SMTP, HTTP etc. ).
ELEC9515 Digital Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5744 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The lecture starts with an overview of major components of a digital communication system and current technology. Then the following knowledge will be covered: efficient coding/representation of information source, channel coding of information to combat noise and interference, optimal received design, principles of incoherent systems, error probability calculations, solutions to problems caused by transmitting a signal through a bandlimited channel and caused by multipath, and spread spectrum systems. The lecture concludes with a discussion of future directions of digital communication systems.
ELEC9607 Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC5741 Assumed knowledge: Logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, data representation, number operations (binary, hex, integers and floating point), combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, simple CAD tools for logic design, basic computer organisation, the CPU, peripheral devices, software organisation, machine language, assembly language, operating systems, data communications and computer networks. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to teach students about microprocessors and their use. This includes architecture, programming and interfacing of microcomputers, peripheral devices and chips, data acquisition, device monitoring and control and communications.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5204 Engineering Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Competences and experience in engineering obtained during an accepted engineering degree Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide graduate engineers studying for a Master of Professional Engineering degree with an introduction to the professional engineering skills necessary to practice as an engineer.
These include the various elements of engineering practice, an understanding of the role of the engineer in industry, basic knowledge of the law of contracts and legal responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, an understanding of the professional responsibilities of engineers, competence in verbal communication and presentations and in reading and writing reports, and an understanding of ethical considerations. The material, learning and assessment is tailored for graduates from Australian and overseas universities.
ENGG5214 Management of Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to develop competence in the management of technology. It will address all aspects of the management of technology, the nature and importance of technological change and innovation, within the context of the global knowledge economy, the management of the new product development process, the role of technology in manufacturing and service competitiveness, the role of IT in logistics management, supply chain strategies, and communication, and the characteristics of high technology markets.
ENGG5215 International Eng Strategy and Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management and globalisation Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce students to the global context of much of contemporary engineering and the consequent strategic and operational issues. It will address the nature, characteristics and variety of risks of global businesses, the opportunities and pressures for effective strategies, and the many management challenges in international business. In particular it will focus on Australian consulting, logistics and construction engineering firms that are operating on a global basis.
INFO5060 Data Analytics and Business Intelligence

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Poon Session: Intensive January,Intensive July Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Presentation, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of information systems as covered in COMP5206 or ISYS2160 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The frontier for using data to make decisions has shifted dramatically. High performing enterprises are now building their competitive strategies around data-driven insights that in turn generate impressive business results. This course provides an overview of Business Intelligence (BI) concepts, technologies and practices, and then focuses on the application of BI through a team based project simulation that will allow students to have practical experience in building a BI solution based on a real world case study.
ISYS5070 Change Management in IT

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kam Kuan Session: Intensive January,Intensive July Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Presentation, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of information systems as covered in (INFO6007 and COMP5206) or (ISYS2160 and INFO3333) (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study presents the leading edge of research and practice in change management and focuses on theories, frameworks and perspectives that can guide your work as a change agent in the IT industries. The unit will cover a range of approaches, methods, interventions and tools that can be used to successfully manage change projects that relate to the implementation of new technologies.
The globalisation of markets and industries, accelerating technological innovations and the need of companies to remain at the forefront of technological developments in an increasingly competitive, globalised industry have resulted in a significant increase in the speed, magnitude, and unpredictability of technological and organisational change over the last decades. Companies who have the competencies required to navigate change and overcome the inevitable obstacles to success gain a much-needed competitive edge in the marketplace. Increased globalization, economic rationalism, environmental dynamics and technological changes mean that companies, more than ever before, need to be highly flexible and adaptable to survive and thrive. Yet, a large percentage of IT projects fail to achieve the intended objectives, go over time or over budget. The capability to successfully manage organisational and technological change has become a core competency for IT professionals, business leaders and project managers.
This unit has been specifically developed for IT professionals, project managers, and senior managers to equip them with the knowledge and tools needed to ensure that IT projects remain on track to achieving the intended objectives on time and on budget. The course presents the key theories, concepts and findings in the context of academic research and change management practice. The objective is to allow participants to critically assess academic theories and methodological practice and devise interventions and actions that allow the successful management of IT initiatives.
MECH8265 Combustion

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH5265 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to teach the basic principles of combustion highlighting the role of chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, and molecular transport in determining the structure of flames. Students will become familiar with laminar and turbulent combustion of gaseous and liquid fuels including the formation of pollutants. They will also be briefly introduced to various applications such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, furnaces and fires. This unit will cover equilibrium compositions, flammability limits, simple chemically reacting systems, detailed chemical kinetics, and the basic theory underlying laminar and turbulent combustion for both premixed and non-premixed cases. There will be an introduction to droplet combustion, the concept of mixture fraction for non-premixed flames, combustion in engines and gas turbines as well as the formation of pollutants. Fire ignition, growth and spread will also be covered with respect to safety in buildings including the hazards related to the formation of smoke and toxic products.
MECH8720 Sensors and Signals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH4720 or MECH5720 Assumed knowledge: Strong MATLAB skills, and assumed knowledge of RADAR and SONAR systems and signal processing Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Syllabus Summary: This unit starts by providing a background to the signals and transforms required to understand modern sensors. It goes on to provide an overview of the workings of typical active sensors (Radar, Lidar and Sonar). It provides insight into basic sensing methods as well as aspects of interfacing and signal processing. It includes both background material and a number of case studies. The unit covers the following topics: a) SIGNALS: Convolution, The Fourier Transform, Modulation (FM, AM, FSK, PSK etc), Frequency shifting (mixing) b) PASSIVE SENSORS: Infrared Radiometers, Imaging Infrared, Passive Microwave Imaging, Visible Imaging and Image Intensifiers c) ACTIVE SENSORS THE BASICS: Operational Principles, Time of flight (TOF) Measurement and Imaging of Radar, Lidar and Sonar, Radio Tags and Transponders, Range Tacking, Doppler Measurement, Phase Measurement d) SENSORS AND THE ENVIRONMENT: Atmospheric Effects, Target Characteristics, Clutter Characteristics, Multipath e) ACTIVE SENSORS: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES: Probability of Detection, Angle Measurement and Tracking, Combined Range/Doppler and Angle Tracking, Frequency Modulation and the Fast Fourier Transform, High Range Resolution, Wide Aperture Methods, Synthetic Aperture Methods (SAR) Objectives: The unit aims to provide students with a good practical knowledge of a broad range of sensor technologies, operational principles and relevant signal processing techniques. Expected Outcomes: A good understanding of active sensors, their outputs and applicable signal processing techniques. An appreciation of the basic sensors that are available to engineers and when they should be used.
MTRX8700 Experimental Robotics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MTRX5700 Assumed knowledge: A demonstrated programming ability, familiarity with concepts in sensing and control systems and a background in either CS, Mechatronics or Electrical/Electronic Engineering. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to present a broad overview of the technologies associated with industrial and mobile robots. Major topics covered are sensing, mapping, navigation and control of mobile robots and kinematics and control of industrial robots. The subject consists of a series of lectures on robot fundamentals and case studies on practical robot systems. Material covered in lectures is illustrated through experimental laboratory assignments. The objective of the course is to provide students with the essential skills necessary to be able to develop robotic systems for practical applications. At the end of this unit students will: be familiar with sensor technologies relevant to robotic systems; understand conventions used in robot kinematics and dynamics; understand the dynamics of mobile robotic systems and how they are modeled; have implemented navigation, sensing and control algorithms on a practical robotic system; apply a systematic approach to the design process for robotic systems; understand the practical application of robotic systems in manufacturing, automobile systems and assembly systems; develop the capacity to think critically and independently about new design problems; undertake independent research and analysis and to think creatively about engineering problems. Unit content will include: history and philosophy of robotics; hardware components and subsystems; robot kinematics and dynamics; sensors, measurements and perception; robotic architectures, multiple robot systems; localization, navigation and obstacle avoidance, robot planning; robot learning; robot vision and vision processing.