Table R - Higher Degree By Research

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.

Table R - Ethics

This table lists Table R - Higher Degree by Research units of study
BETH5202 Research Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diego Silva Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BETH5208 Assumed knowledge: A three-year undergraduate degree in science, medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, law, history, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study critically examines research ethics in its wider context, from how research is structured to its dissemination. It explores the ethical underpinnings of a variety of research methods and their uses in
humans and non-human animals including the justifications for engaging in research, key concepts in research ethics and research integrity. The unit also briefly examines the history of research and the impact of research abuse on participants, both human and non-human animal.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
MEDF5005 Health Research Methods and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christina Abdel Shaheed Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study introduces students to the fundamental skills that are required for postgraduate research in medicine and health. Students will learn how to conduct research that is scientifically and ethically sound, and be able to critically appraise and review literature. Students will understand the strengths and limitations of common study designs and develop simple but important statistical analysis skills, including how to present and interpret data, basic data management skills, and how to determine the required sample size for a study. Obtaining ethics approval is necessary for any study involving the collection or analysis of data involving humans, animals or their tissues. Hence, this unit will also cover ethics in research and when and how to apply for ethics approval. These fundamental skills promote a scholarly attitude towards knowledge and understanding, and are essential for engagement with the research community.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OLET5618 History of Human Research Ethics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive October Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding about current methods for conducting scientific and medical research, the ethical challenges that could potentially affect investigators while they are conducting their research, presenting their research publicly, or advising government bodies or private business about the outcomes of their research. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
During the twentieth century, significant and influential debates about the ethical requirements for conducting scientific research have been conducted, specifically in medicine, biology, and physics. After the horrors of Nazi medical experimentation and the lethal potential of nuclear weapons became known, scientists started to discuss the social responsibilities they had and the principles that should govern research. In this OLE, we trace the history of these debates and the way they shaped current ideas about research ethics. Special attention will be paid to the protections that should be given to vulnerable populations, and to individuals and populations in developing nations. In this unit you will reflect on the ethical responsibilities of scientists and other researchers and how the current principles of of research ethics are influenced by this history and, in turn, what it means to be an ethical researcher.
SSPS6004 Social Research Ethics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG6902 or SCLG3003 Assessment: 1x1500wd ethics response (30%), 1x1500wd reflective assignment (30%), 1x3000wd research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to key issues, debates and ethical questions in human research, enabling them to acquire knowledge and develop skills for research degrees and funding applications. It examines values and principles of research ethics, and encourages students to reflect on these in relation to research with human subjects. The unit offers practical support to higher degree research students developing, or planning to develop, a human research ethics application.