Table R - Higher Degree By Research

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The following units were included in the Research Methods table in error, they are included in the Communications Skills table:

WRIT5001 Writing a thesis 1: Starting the thesis
WRIT5003 Writing a Thesis 3: Completing a Thesis

16/3/2021
2.

The following unit was included in the Research Methods table in error, it is included in the Engagement table:

OLET5702 Complex Problem Solving

16/3/2021
3.

The following unit was omitted from the table in error:

OLET5402 Basics of Quantitative Research Design

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tatjana Seizova-Cajic Session: Intensive June Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Description: All research questions are about variables and the building blocks of all studies are variables. This unit will help you think about variables in a disciplined and abstract manner regardless of your field of research. We will describe their types, based on several criteria (including level of measurement, role in the study, level of control over variables), and issues that arise when deciding how to measure variables. We will also introduce different terms used for the same basic concepts in different areas of study.
24/5/2021
4.

The following selective unit is now available in Semester 1 and Semester 2:

ARCO6001 Analytics

18/6/2021

Table R - Research Methods

This table lists Table R - Higher Degree by Research units of study
AFNR5502 Remote Sensing, GIS and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ENVX3001 and SOIL3004. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. We will review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management. This will be followed by practical training in RS techniques, augmented by land management project development and implementation based on integration of GIS and RS tools. The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
Syllabus summary: Lectures will cover: Overview of the basic principles of Geographical Information Science (GISc), Advanced principles of remote sensing, Land resource information and data capture using RS, Digital elevation modelling and terrain analysis using remote sensing; Image enhancement and visualization; Image classification and interpretation; RS data interpretation for land resource inventory; RS and GIS for land use and land cover change analysis; Coupling of models of land resource assessment with GIS and RS. Fifty percent of learning time will be devoted to the design and implementation of projects, which can be selected from GIS and RS applications in: agricultural land management, vegetation studies, water and catchment (hydrological) studies; land-cover and land-use change modelling, pesticide and herbicide environmental risk assessment, environmental impact analysis, land degradation modelling including soil salinity, soil erosion, etc.
Textbooks
Textbook: Jesen J. R. 2006. Remote sensing of the environment: an earth resource perspective. 2nd ed. Pearson Prentice Hall Upper Saddle, New Jersey
ARCF9001 Modes of Inquiry: Research and Scholarship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Permission required unless enrolled in a research degree. This unit is a probationary requirement for all MPhil and PhD students in the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning.
This unit is a seminar with mini-lectures, presentations by members of the academic staff about research and scholarship methods in which they are most expert, critical review of readings, discussions based on the seminar material, and research pre-proposals. Objectives and Learning Outcomes: To provide newly admitted research students with a fundamental understanding of the nature of inquiry through research, the philosophy of scientific research and interpretive scholarship and a range of fundamentally different epistemologies or 'modes of inquiry.' The modes of inquiry explored include (1) empirical, field-based epistemology used heavily in architectural science, urban planning and other field-based research, including experimental, quasi-experimental, survey, naturalistic, ethnographic and case study methods; (2) text-based, interpretive epistemology used heavily in architecture and the allied arts and other humanities, including archival, historical, theoretical, interpretative, discourse analysis and other text based methods; (3) computationally-based epistemology used heavily in design computing and other IT-based disciplines, including axiom and conjecture based, simulation, virtual reality, and prototype development methods; and (4) policy-oriented, communication-contingency and modelling epistemologies used heavily in urban and regional planning and other policy-based disciplines, including archival, strategic and evidence-based policy research, communications and morphological analyses and quantitative modelling; as well as (5) interdisciplinary combinations, triangulations and mixed modes.
ARCO6002 Approaches to Deep Time

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture-seminar/week plus three supervisory meetings with the UOS coordinator equivalent to 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x4500wd paper (75%), 1x1000wd equivalent seminar presentation and submission (20%), 5x100wd lecture questions (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit outlines the issues of the key theoretical tools for approaching Deep Time in the Humanities and the Sciences and appraises the logical and analytic relationships between them. Theoretical tools such as Rationalism and Romanticism, multiscalarity and non-correspondence between scales, evolutionary theories in culture and biology, indeterminacy and uncertainty, and uniformitarianism both substantive and operational will be discussed. The course will assist researchers who are combining the Humanities and the Sciences in their theses and engages with the University's interdisciplinary focus.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ARCO6004 Morphometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 23hrs of lectures and 16hrs of workshops Assessment: 3x500wd morphometric analysis exercises (30%), 1x3000wd project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Researchers often employ shape differences to understand their subject matter. It may be an art historian evaluating the proportions of sculptures, a psychologist studying which figures appeal to humans, a historian measuring fortifications from different periods, or a biologist examining the difference between related plants or animals. All these scholars refer to the shape of things to answer questions. New techniques allow researchers to isolate shape, separating it from size or material, helping them to study differences in the shape of objects, people and spaces.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BUSS7901 Business Research Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The unit provides Business School HDR students with an understanding of research design as the foundation for effective and interesting research. It emphasises a systematic approach to developing rigour in research design, building theoretical and paradigmatic links from a research idea to the design of research methods.
BUSS7910 Philosophy of Business Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BUSS7909 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces students to contemporary philosophical thought concerning the nature of scientific knowledge and its generation. It presents an overview of philosophical issues underlying scientific inquiry in business research. The unit juxtaposes logical positivism, interpretivism, and critical theory by comparing the accepted assumptions within each of these traditions as they pertain to ontology, epistemology, and the nature of human beings. In doing so, the unit addresses a range of topics: the nature of scientific development; the relationship between theory and data; modes of scientific explanation; and the relationship between science and society. The unit is designed to promote critical thinking by encouraging students to discuss, debate, analyse, and synthesise the presented issues rather than accepting them at face value.
CEPI5205 Doing a Systematic Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Giovanni Strippoli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315 Assumed knowledge: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This project unit provides an opportunity to apply skills learnt in other units and further develop knowledge and skills by undertaking a systematic review (ideally including a meta analysis) in a topic area nominated by the student. The unit is student-driven with no direct supervision, but the student will have three chances to interact with the unit coordinator, to define the research questions, to discuss the selected methodology, and prior to submission. The assessment task is to undertake a systematic review of randomised trials and present the review in the form of a paper suitable for submission to a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5215 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christina Abdel Shaheed Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Prohibitions: CEPI5214 Assumed knowledge: Some basic knowledge of summary statistic is assumed Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will appeal to anyone wanting to write medical papers for conferences or journals, or to improve their paper writing skills. Students will work at their own pace through 9 modules covering research integrity, medical style, abstracts, presentations and posters, constructing a paper, data visualisation, manuscript submission, responding to reviewers' comments, post-publication research dissemination, and peer- reviewing a paper. This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, typical issues they may face, and link to resources to help them maintain integrity through their publishing careers. It will guide them to reliable evidence-based resources to improve their conference abstract, presentation and poster design, and manuscript style and writing. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, choosing a journal, keywords, improving tables and figures for manuscripts through open source software, copyright, writing cover letters and response letters to reviewers. Students will learn about measuring research impact and ways to improve research reach, dealing with the media and press releases, using social media in dissemination, digital archiving and basic skills needed to act as a peer-reviewer. This is an online unit, but those needing to study in block mode will do online study as well as a workshop.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5300 Research Grants: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Germaine Wong Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Prohibitions: CEPI5505 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In this unit of study, the student will develop his/her own research proposal, to a standard suitable for a peer-reviewed granting body. Each section of a grant proposal (Abstract, Aims, Background, Significance, Methods) will be discussed, with the student presenting and refining the corresponding section of his/her own proposal in a synchronous online workshop setting. This will be complemented by online presentations from experienced researchers on the practical aspects of clinical research. Topics include: observational studies, randomised controlled trials, diagnostic test evaluation, qualitative studies, economic evaluation, and process evaluation. The unit will conclude with a one-day, face-to-face, mandatory workshop where students will learn about budgeting, qualitative research, strategies and grant administration, research ethics and peer review of research grants.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
DENT6000 Research Methods in Dentistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shanika Nanayakkara Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Research Methods in Dentistry is a postgraduate course designed to provide fundamental knowledge and skills in clinical research design and Evidence­Based Dentistry for students intending to undertake research at the Faculty of Dentistry. All course material is provided through eLearning via the University of Sydney's website. A detailed series of modules and resources are included in the study material. Students are required to complete one tutorial exercise/assignment each week and a final assignment at the end of the course.
Topics covered include introduction to Evidence­Based Dentistry, epidemiologic study design, and basic biostatistics. Considerable attention is paid to critical appraisal of journal articles which is an indispensable tool in the pursuit of clinical practice founded on Evidence­Based Dentistry. An introduction into conducting literature search, diagnostic test studies and systematic reviews is also provided.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
ECOP6031 Research in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x4000wd Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on conducting research in political economy. Weekly seminars examine a range of topics including research design, literature review, data collection and analysis, and writing a research proposal. The seminars provide an opportunity for critical discussion to identify, debate and reflect on the nature and challenge of undertaking research. The assessment is structured to assist the progressive development of a research proposal. Completion of this Unit of Study is a pre-requisite for a Masters dissertation.
EDPJ5022 Research Methods in Language Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1 x1000wd assignment 1 (25%); 1x2000wd assignment 2 (35%);1x3000wd assignment 3 (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces a range of approaches to research in the area of languate studies. The unit provides frameworks with which students can review and critique previous research as well as framework for writing a research proposal. This is a required unit of study for students who wish to include a Dissertation in their MEd TESOL degree.
Textbooks
Paltridge, B. and A. Phakiti (eds) (2015). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. London: Bloomsbury.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x4 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on developing skills for critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. Research strategies, sampling and design issues and various methods of data collection and analysis are examined. Students explore both quantitative and qualitative research approaches. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.
EDPZ5003 Thesis Proposal Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Research proposal part 1 (50%), 1x3000wd Research proposal part 2 (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to support PhD, EdD, DSW and MPhil students as they prepare their thesis proposals for formal review and approval, through a program of workshops organised around issues in thinking, reading and writing about research design and practice. Workshops explore a range of approaches to writing about research practice and emphasise the common logic of the research process, and the importance of rigorous and systematic approaches to writing about design and analysis in all research traditions.
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
ENVI5904 Methods in Applied Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Applied ecologists and managers need a good understanding of quantitative methods for assessing environmental impacts and the effectiveness of management and conservation strategies particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. This unit is for those without a quantitative ecology background. It will introduce you to quantitative methods in the context of three ecological topics that are globally relevant: (1) Impact assessment where the perturbation is unreplicated, (2) Food security in marine ecosystems, and (3) Conservation and restoration in terrestrial ecosystems. The main question we address is how do we test whether any management action has been effective? Describing and understanding uncertainty will be explained in the context of precautionary principles. Issues about measuring biodiversity and the spatial and temporal problems of ecological systems will be introduced.
GOVT6139 Research Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Proposal (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students with the fundamentals for constructing and conducting effective research projects in the social sciences. An overview of social science inquiry will be presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used in research. This will include a focus on both primary research, using interviews and questionnaires, and secondary research, using statistical databases, content analysis and textual analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be covered in the unit, as will an overview of ethical practices associated with research design. The assessment will be based around constructing practical research projects that can be utilised in both university and workplace-based research.
INFO5993 Computer Science Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: INFO4990 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will provide an overview of the different research methods that are used in IT. Students will learn to find and evaluate research on their topic and to present their own research plan or results for evaluation by others. The unit will develop a better understanding of what research in IT is and how it differs from other projects in IT. Students will learn research ethics. This unit of study is required for students in IT who are enrolled in a research project as part of their Honours or MIT/MITM degree. It is also recommended for students enrolled or planning to do a research degree in IT and Engineering.
INFO5994 Advanced Topics in Computer Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will cover recent topics of active and cutting-edge research within Computer Science and its related areas. The content of this unit may vary depending on the academic staff member's research expertise and/or opportunities such as a distinguished researcher visiting the University.
MCGY5604 Researching Creative Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Coady Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar per week Assessment: Tutorial Participation/Demonstrated Knowledge of Required Reading (20%); Seminar Presentations (30%); Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide students with an overview of the intellectual and methodological trends underpinning artistic research in music - a field composed of both practice-based and practice-led research projects. Participating in this course will enable students to participate productively in artistic research by increasing their familiarity with current debates surrounding research integrity, the strengths and weaknesses of various methodological approaches and the narrative strategies artists employ in order to demonstrate research significance to a spectrum of stakeholders.
OLET5616 Experimental Design for Life Sciences

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive May Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: It is expected students have had exposure to introductory statistics from prior learning. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
This Open Learning Environment unit of study is targeted at students undertaking a research degree, but other students may find the material of value. The development of a design is crucial for the scientific and statistical validity of research in the life sciences. These are needed for a range of situations from controlled laboratory studies where we are comparing specific drug treatments to field-based studies where we are surveying a particular bird species. No matter the context there are fundamental concepts common to all types of designs that all life scientists should know, and these form the basis for deeper knowledge. This unit will initially reinforce these fundamental concepts with a focus on both laboratory and field research with an emphasis on experimental and sampling designs. You will learn the vocabulary used in designing experiments and how this relates to their scientific and statistical validity. Using a series of published papers and ongoing research projects you will engage with the different types of designs and when and why they are used. Online modules and optional workshops will offer you the opportunity to gain experience in designing experiments and analysing the datasets they generate. By doing this unit you will develop the ability to describe and critique the key features of sampling and experimental designs, analyse the data they generate and use this knowledge to generate your own designs in your future career.
OLET5620 Good Science, Bad Science

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Scientific research should be reproducible. A reproducible study is one for which the methods are described in enough detail for others to follow, the analyses of the data are straightforward to re-run, and conducting the study again (where possible) yields results that support the claim of the original report. In areas of science where reproducibility has been evaluated, such as cancer biology and experimental psychology, replication success rates have generally been lower than 50%, and in clinical medicine, published outcomes show substantial biases. Bad and irreproducible research is rife. In this unit, examples are drawn from biology, health science, social science, education, and engineering. You will learn the principles of reproducible science. Building on your basic knowledge of statistics, you will understand the practices and statistical issues that lead to irreproducible science, such as poor statistical power and questionable research practices. You will also become familiar with practices that foster robust results, practices that are increasingly embraced or even required by journals and research funders. You will apply this knowledge to your own research or some other work that you choose.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OLET5702 Complex problem-solving

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Martin Tomitsch Session: Intensive July Classes: workshop 7 hrs/wk Assessment: online quizzes (35%), in-class activities (35%) and reflective statement (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, you will learn practical techniques for addressing complex problems and the role of interdisciplinary perspectives in developing innovative strategies. Complex problems, sometimes referred to as being ¿Wicked¿, include concerns of global dimension that deeply impact on the lives of people, such as climate change, mass urbanisation, world poverty and food security. Through examples, you will develop an understanding of what constitutes complex problems. You will be taken through scenarios, enabling your insights into the use of techniques across a range of practical situations. Through exercises and practice techniques you will integrate your disciplinary expertise with perspectives from other disciplines. Building on this understanding, you will assess and reflect on how problem-solving techniques can lead to innovative strategies that address complex challenges in research projects.
PERF5600 Graduate Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Helen Mitchell Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour seminar/week or equivalent Prohibitions: MCGY5111 and MCGY5112 Assessment: Assignments include research statement, literature review, seminar/poster presentation and, written project proposal (or other written task agreed with lecturer) (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to prepare students for undertaking their own research projects in music. It will introduce and develop students' awareness of recent musical scholarship and research methodologies and equip students with skills to design and conduct research across a wide variety of musical topics. Students will begin exploration of the topic area that is the intended focus for their research during their degree. Students will situate their performance/composition research in the current field and present their research proposals to students and staff for discussion.
PHAR6000 Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Edwin Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The Research Methods unit of study prepares students for postgraduate studies. Generic research skills are developed through coursework, assignments, reports and presentations. The Unit of Study covers topics such as framing a research question, conducting systematic reviews, critical appraisal of research studies, study design and protocol development, data management, scientific writing and publication, presentations, basic statistics and other topics necessary for candidates to successfully complete the Master of Philosophy.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHYS5020 Computation and Image Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: PHYS5007 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit normally undertaken as part of the Masters of Medical Physics degree or the Graduate Diploma in Medical Physics, Monte Carlo modelling of radiation transport is covered, along with the theory of image formation, concepts of computing, numerical methods and image processing, including techniques such as enhancement, registration, fusion and 3D reconstruction, radiomics and an introduction to Machine Learning techniques.
SCWK6902 Social Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Offered either in block (1x4 hr seminar/week x 6 weeks) or normal semester 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd qualitative task (20%), 1x1500wd quantitative task (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent participation tasks (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study introduces students to a range of research methods and focus on quantitative and qualitative methods. Many other research issues in developing a research proposal will be addressed through the semester. It is intended that, at the conclusion of this unit, students will have developed a research project able to implement through either further study or in workplaces.
WRIT5001 Writing a thesis 1: Starting the thesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 9x1hr lectures, 8x1hr tutorials, 2x2hr workshops, 1x2hr Library skills session, 1x1hr forum with supervisors and students Assessment: 1x1500wd draft of chapter section (35%), 1x2500wd expanded chapter draft and revision (45%), 5x400wd short written tasks (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course aims to foster the writing and English language skills of postgraduate Arts and Social Sciences thesis writers. It will support students with their own thesis writing, specifically with the writing of the Research Proposal, Introduction chapter and Literature Review as well as sections of chapters. The course will be particularly useful for students who need to develop their English language proficiency and/or understanding of the requirements of thesis writing in English.
WRIT5003 Writing a Thesis 3: Completing a Thesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x2hr seminars, 6x2hr workshops/writing groups Assessment: 1x500wd table of contents (8%), 1x1500wd introduction chapter (25%), 1x250wd revise consistency of chapter arguments (9%), 1x250wd abstract (8%), 1x2000wd main chapter (25%), 1x1500wd conclusion chapter (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit aims to foster the thesis writing and English language skills of Arts and Social Sciences students who are writing postgraduate theses. As the sequel to 'Writing a thesis chapter 1: Starting a thesis' and 'Writing a thesis chapter 2: The Middle chapters', it further supports students with their own writing by focusing on the completion of the thesis, including the Introduction and Conclusion chapters, Front Matter (including abstracts), the argument of the thesis and proofreading and editing. The course will be particularly useful for students who need to develop their English language proficiency and/or understanding of the requirements of English thesis writing.
WRIT6000 Professional Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd analysis (20%), 1x2000wd case study (30%), 1x1000wd project (20%), 1x2000wd proposal (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces theories of professional writing with a specific focus on composing in the workplace. Students will develop abilities in analysing, writing, revising, and delivering workplace texts, both print and multimedia. By examining and discussing a range of actual workplace documents, from emails to websites, students will gain a broader understanding of the rhetorical principles and ethical responsibilities inherent in professional writing practice. They will improve their ability to negotiate the relationships, tensions, and politics that influence workplace writing contexts.
WRIT6001 Professional Editing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Individual Analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Group Analysis (30%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces practical techniques for editing workplace documents for increased clarity and effectiveness. Applying theories and principles of visual rhetoric, students will learn how to improve the readability and reception of workplace texts according to audience conventions and expectations. By analysing actual workplace documents, students will develop their critical reading abilities and gain a better understanding of how to edit texts for word economy, improved design and layout, and inclusive language. Editing print texts for digital or oral presentation will also be emphasised.