Biological Design Descriptions

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The following unit has been cancelled for 2020:

BDSN2002 Designing for Cyber-Physical Systems

24/01/2020
2.

Prerequisites for the following unit have been re-worded to clarify the requirements. They now read:

PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv Prerequisities: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or 12cp from [(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01) or (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]}

10/02/2020

Table S - Biological Design major

A major in Biological Design requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level biology selective units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level design and engineering selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level design selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 2000-level biology and medical selective units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vii) 6 credit points of 3000-level or above selective units
(viii) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Biological Design minor

A minor in Biological Design requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level biology selective units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level design and engineering selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Biology selective units
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1008 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hong Dao Nguyen Session: Semester 1 Classes: This unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the Camperdown campus. These contact hours will comprise 2-3 hours of lectures per week; six 3 hour practical sessions; six 3 hour workshops/tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: post-module quizzes (10%), Living Data (25%), scientific report (20%), skills test (5%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Six 3 hour lab classes Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1908 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hong Dao Nguyen Session: Semester 1 Classes: This unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the Camperdown campus. These contact hours will comprise 2-3 hours of lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six 3-hour workshops/tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: post-module quizzes (10%), Living Data (25%), scientific report (20%), skills test (5%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Six 3 hour practicals Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1998 Human Biology (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalyn Gloag Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1908; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1996 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical report (25%), practical presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), pre laboratory quizzes (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The practical work syllabus consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Prohibitions: AGEN1002 Assessment: 2-hour exam (45%), field trip report (20%), group work presentation (25%), GIS reports (10%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
MEDS1001 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus, these contact hours will comprise lectures; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops and tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1901 Assessment: Written and oral communication, quiz, practical and workshop reports, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the medical sciences suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology and medical sciences. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in the medical sciences.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS1901 Human Biology (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus Prerequisites: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, assignment, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS coded units are only available to students in the Medical Science stream.
Design and Engineering selective units
DECO1014 Digital Media Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3 hrs/wk Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the principles of digital media production for online and screen-based applications. In studying this unit, students will develop an understanding of how to document design projects, concepts or processes through digital storytelling and video production. Key concepts covered in this unit include: video capture techniques, video editing, transitions, titles, colour grading, content and flow management. Using industry standard software for video production, students will learn how to conceptualise, record and edit video content.
DESN1000 Principles of Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: case study reports (60%), design exercise (30%) and quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study allows students to develop an understanding of the foundation of human factors upon which much successful design is based. Students learn about the basic physical and cognitive principles (ergonomics, heuristics, human-centredness) incorporated in successful designs across a wide variety of different sectors. Students are provided with the tools to evaluate existing designs according to widely accepted design principles. They learn to apply these principles in practice in order to improve the usability, clarity and overall quality of their own designs. Through a series of academically researched case studies they reflect upon how these principles are applied in existing designs. To further develop their understanding of the design principles, they then complete a small re-design exercise. The case studies are chosen to cover a range of different domains, including products, systems, organisations, and services.
BMET1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Yogambha Ramaswamy Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AMME1961 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: HSC Biology and HSC Chemistry. Summer bridging courses are available for students who did not complete HSC Biology or Chemistry
This biomedical engineering core junior unit of study provides an introduction to the relatively recent, and rapidly growing, biotechnology industry, with a focus on the current key commercial applications. In the 1990s, the word 'biotech' entered our lexicon as a synonym for overnight investment wealth. The biotechnology acronym GM (genetically modified) also entered our lexicon in the 1990s. Biotechnology can be broadly defined as the commercial exploitation of biological processes for industrial and other purposes. A significant focus for commercial activities has been GM technology: GM microorganisms, plants, animals, and even humans (gene therapy). The 'biotech industry' arose rapidly in the late 20th century, and is now one of the largest industries in the world, and is one of the cornerstones of the global biomedical industry which comprises three main sectors: Medical Devices, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotechnology. Significant global commercial biotechnology activity concerns the manufacture of therapeutic compounds from GM microorganisms using bioreactors, for example insulin. Another significant sector is agricultural: 'agri-biotech' which concerns GM higher lifeforms (plants and animals) primarily for the food industry, and also other industries such as the energy industry (biofuels). The third sector concerns therapeutic GM of humans, known as 'gene-therapy'. Some other important biotechnologies will also be explored including monoclonal antibodies, genome sequencing and personalised medicine, and RNA-interference technology (RNAi).

2000-level units of study

Core
BDSN2001 BioDesign Fundamentals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Phillip Gough Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp completed from 1000-level units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of design methods and processes, and knowledge in biology, biomedical sciences, bioengineering or medical sciences. Assessment: design project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
BioDesign is an interdisciplinary approach that integrates human-centred design thinking methods with cutting-edge research from life sciences, to create innovative solutions to complex problems. In this unit you will learn the basic concepts of designing with science, to reinforce your own domain expertise and augment your existing skills with new approaches to problem-solving. This will develop your critical thinking, introduce you to considering multiple perspectives and open opportunities for new product ideas or startups. The unit will introduce you to prototyping for science and biology, evaluating ethical implications of designing with life, communicating scientific processes to justify biodesign choices, and supporting your peers with your own expertise.
Design selective units
BDSN2002 Designing for Cyber-Physical Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Phillip Gough Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp completed from 1000-level units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of design methods and processes, or knowledge in biology, biomedical sciences, bioengineering or medical sciences. Assessment: design project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Design, art, architecture and technology have long been inspired by nature. Future designs, art and technologies will use natural processes and systems to create the built environment. In this unit, you will learn how to design probable and possible futures that use the natural world as the input or output of computational systems. You will learn to apply design thinking methods that help you forecast future technological applications that inform design in the modern era and apply design thinking methods to the interactions between people and the natural world. This unit will give an introduction to intentionally designing with life as a component of computational systems. The design exercises you use will in develop your skills in critical design, physical computing prototyping and interdisciplinary problem solving
DECO2101 Fundamentals of Visual Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1015 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is for students who are not enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing. Students from the Bachelor of Design Computing should enrol in DECO1015.
This unit of study introduces students to the principles of visual design, including graphic design, colour theory and typography. Students will develop an understanding of how to successfully combine visual elements to effectively communicate an idea or concept, to describe a product, and to represent visual user interface elements in an interactive product. Using digital image manipulation tools, such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, students will learn how to develop design concepts and how to turn concepts into visual communication materials in the form of digital images.
DECO2016 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1006 Assessment: submitted work (70%), in-class assessments (10%) and quizzes (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Not available to students in the Bachelor of Design Computing and the Bachelor of Architecture and Environments.
This unit of study provides an introduction to design methods and their application in a human-centred design process. The unit structure follows the stages of a typical design process, which are: define, understand, ideate, prototype, evaluate and reflect. A series of lectures and tutorial sessions are dedicated to each of these stages, allowing students to gain a deep understanding of and experience with design thinking methods. Students will learn how to balance convergent and divergent thinking at various stages throughout the design process, and how to use these methods to respond to a design brief requiring both analysis and synthesis. Students will learn to build empathy with users, identify the problem space, develop value-driven design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.
DECO2102 Introduction to Web-based Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1016 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for students who are not enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing. Students from the Bachelor of Design Computing should enrol in DECO1016.
This unit introduces students to web design and modern web technologies for the purpose of designing and prototyping web-based user interface solutions. Students will learn about design principles and patterns for the web and apply them in practical exercises that involve designing and creating interactive user interfaces. The unit will introduce interface sketching and wire-framing tools and techniques. A variety of media and platforms, such as desktop computers and mobile devices, will be discussed, with a focus on interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of web technologies and their role in user experience and interaction design, including the use of web technologies for prototyping user interfaces. Prototyping techniques covered in this unit include interface sketching and wire-framing to develop dynamic content and interactive designs.
DECO2015 Design for Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assessment: analysis report (35%), project work (35%) and quizzes (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and/or DESN1000 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit of study introduces students to design strategies and techniques for developing alternative points of view and exploring multiple solutions iteratively. Through the analysis of real-world case studies students will develop an understanding for how to use design-thinking methods to tackle complex problems. The unit will discuss how design can be used as a method and as a way of thinking to drive innovation for products, services and processes. In the tutorial component, students will apply design strategies and techniques through small group exercises and develop a deeper understanding of them through the assessment items, which capture theory, analytical reflection and the practical application of methods.
Biology and Medical selective units
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), practical report (15%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2907 Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2007 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: exam (40%), project (25%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will explore these concepts in four modules: compartmentalisation, cell specialisation, communication between cells and responding to the environment. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Furthermore, specialised activities in physiological research will allow small group learning and interaction with staff. Workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
ANAT2011 Fundamentals of Human Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Lal Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr anatomy lecture, 1hr histology lecture, 2hrs anatomy prac, 2hrs histology prac, 6hrs private study per week. Prohibitions: MEDS2005 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: in-semester online quizzes (25%), practical exam (35%), theory exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Where is your pancreas? What about your pituitary gland? How do we pack nine meters of intestines into our body? ANAT2011 is designed for students who are studying human anatomy for the first time, as well as those who have been introduced to human anatomy in biological sciences. In laboratory classes using human cadavers you will gain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy of the brain and nerves; the anatomy of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and digestive systems, and musculoskeletal anatomy. The laboratory classes are interwoven with lectures, tutorials and discussion groups, as well as on-line quizzes and self-directed learning modules. The course teaches the language of anatomy, as well as knowledge and practical skills in human anatomy, preparing you for many applied anatomical settings. The hands-on laboratory sessions will require you to work together in teams to engage the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will also consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This unit contains assumed knowledge for entry into the graduate medical program at the University of Sydney, and is also suitable for graduate programs in dentistry, nursing, physical therapies, forensic sciences.
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2930 Botany (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2030 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), advanced project report (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Practical field work: null Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to inform biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frameworks in plant identification, and plant physiology, morphology and anatomy. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. The Advanced Botany unit of study requires engagement at a high standard of academic rigour and affords opportunities to engage with core aspect of Botany at depth and to create new knowledge. In partnership with academic staff advanced students will undertake an independent research project, which will develop skills in research and communication.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (45%), practical exam (20%), lab book (15%), oral presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman, C.P., Keen, S.L., Larson, A., Eisenhour, D.J., I'Anson, H. and Roberts, L.S. (2017) Integrated Principles of Zoology 17th ed. (McGraw Hill, New York)
BIOL2921 Zoology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, one tutorial/lecture and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2021 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (45%), practical exam (20%), lab book (15%), oral presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2921 will be based on BIOL2021 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman, C.P., Keen, S.L., Larson, A., Eisenhour, D.J., I'Anson, H. and Roberts, L.S. (2017) Integrated Principles of Zoology 17th ed. (McGraw Hill, New York)
BIOL2029 Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01 Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BIOL2929 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), report (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell Biology is one of the most dynamic areas in science today. In both plants and animals, cell to cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory program, provides you with hands on training in key techniques such as cell culture, cell signal transduction, mitochondrial physiology, drug discovery in marine organisms, digital microscopy and tissue specific gene expression. These skills will prepare you for a research pathway and/or a career that includes cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2929 Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01) Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 orBIOL2029 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), advanced report (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell biology is one of the most dynamic areas of modern research. In both plants and animals, cell-to-cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory training will provide you with hands on experience with key equipment and techniques. The advanced program, will provide you with an opportunity to complete an authentic research project in a specialized area of cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2033 Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical sessions a weekly basis Prohibitions: ENTO2001 Assessment: Practical test (10%), insect collection (30%), insect display (30%), final exam (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects are the most abundant and diverse group of animals on earth; beetles alone account for 25% of animal life. Insects impact almost every facet of the ecosystem and our lives. Many insects play valuable and essential roles in pollinating different plant species, in predating and controlling insect pests and in recycling nutrients. Other insects are harmful and are the vectors for major diseases such as plague, malaria and recently emerged viral disease Zika. This unit will provide students with a broad introduction to entomology including insect evolution, ecology, anatomy and physiology. Students will learn applied entomological topics such as sustainable insect management in agricultural ecosystems, medical and veterinary entomology, insect-inspired technologies, and insects as a future food source for both livestock and humans. This theoretical background will be complemented by training in how to use and evaluate a range of identification tools such as lucid and traditional dichotomous keys that enable you to identify and classify major groups of insects. Practical classes will allow you to develop your identification, classification and preservation skills though examination of boxes of 'mystery insects' and through creating a museum-quality insect collection. Students will also learn procedures for caring and rearing live insects. By the end of the unit you will be well prepared to work in fields that require entomological skills.
Textbooks
Info will be made available via Canvas. Keys will be available in practical classes and in the lab Manual

3000-level or above units of study

Core
BDSN3001 BioDesign Studio

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Phillip Gough Session: Semester 1 Classes: studio 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: BDSN2002 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of design methods and processes, and knowledge in biology, biomedical sciences, bioengineering or medical sciences. Assessment: design project (60%) and presentations (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The 21st Century is the century of biology, where living machines will disrupt industries-from medicine to transport, textiles and food. This requires biologists, medical scientists, biomedical engineers and designers to collaborate. In this unit, students will learn how to use design as a framework for developing novel product concepts, to draw on emerging biotechnology and biomedical science in the design of products and systems, to iteratively prototype and validate ideas, and to create solutions that demonstrate impact on human and planetary health. You will work in an interdisciplinary team of students in a design studio, bringing domain expertise to contribute to the conceptualisation, investigation, design and prototyping of innovative solutions that are based on biological systems. Your team will combine scientific theory with design practice, working closely with academic staff who can provide expert advice and support. At the conclusion of the unit of study, you will present your design solutions to an expert panel. Subject to funding and the quality of submissions, one team may subsequently be invited to present their project at the Museum for Modern Art in New York as part of the global Biodesign Challenge.
Selective
DESN3000 Design Thinking for Health and Medicine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/fortnightly; tutorial 4 hrs/fortnightly Assessment: case study (20%), design project (60%) and tutorial activities (20%) Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and/or DESN1000 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to human-centred design methods, specifically in the context of future challenges of the type you will face in careers health and medicine. You will learn design principles and practices through evaluating current health and medical devices, processes and systems. Through the analysis of real-world case studies, you will apply design thinking methods to address the complex health and medical issues facing society. The unit will also introduce you to how design-led strategies can support healthy behaviour or be used to improve medical technologies and processes. You will develop your skills by using design exercises to demonstrate the strategic and practical applications of such methods and approaches.
DESN3001 Health and Medicine Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/fortnightly; tutorial 5 hrs/fortnightly Prerequisites: DECO1006 or DECO2016 or DESN3000 Assessment: case study report (30%), design exercise (30%) and health design project (40%) Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the development of design solutions for the complex needs of a healthy society into the future. Through weekly teaching of design in the health and medical contexts, you will be exposed to various methods, techniques and approaches to achieve patient-centric solutions. You will apply your skills to address a health or medical challenge by creating a project based on translating a discovery into a device or process in the real world. The project will require you to work in multi-disciplinary teams to allow you to harness the relevant skill sets that are required to best navigate multifaceted challenges prevalent in health and medical sectors. All solutions designed and developed in this unit of study are expected to take the form of either a product, service, or system. You will learn how to identify problems, how to use ideation for developing patient-centric solutions and how to translate ideas into prototypes. Along this journey you will also navigate disciplinary boundaries and communicate with various stakeholders, including the health and medical professions. This will allow you to assess and test your solutions on your target audience.
BIOL3046 Animal Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3946 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3946 Animal Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3046 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3046 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3004 Terrestrial Plant Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: The general weekly schedule comprises 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 3 hour practical session. A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: ENSY3003 or ENSY3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial. Assessment: Assessment tasks include two in-class quizzes (10% each); field report (20%); 2000w group-based land management plan (35%); 500w individual component to the land management plan (15%); group-based oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian native vegetation is a unique resource for diversity, ecosystem services and public use. The objective of this unit is to provide a broad understanding of three major plant terrestrial ecosystems that are found across Australia: forests, heathlands and grasslands and how they are managed. While the focus will be on native plant systems in an Australian setting, their importance at a global level will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the characteristics of key plant ecosystems, including where they are found and their main ecophysiology features. Each of the ecosystems described has the potential to be affected (positively or negatively) by a range of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. They include fire, climate change (drought and temperature), changes in nutrient flows and more broadly human-induced disturbances such as logging, mining, urban development and agricultural management. The impact of these disturbances along with mitigation via conservation and associated management changes will also be covered. Finally, government policy around conservation/management of these ecosystems will be examined. At the completion of this unit you will have developed an understanding of the environmental and economic importance of forests, heathlands and grasslands, their vulnerability to a range of external factors and the extent that these can be mitigated.
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester, practical or library project Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] Prohibitions: PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and re-activation of developmental processes in adult disease. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester, practical or library project Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3010 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam,stem cell laboratory class (2 presentations), 3 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology. Students enrolling in PHSI3910 complete a separate laboratory class centered on stem cell differentiation to replace the problem-based learning exercises in PHSI3010.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
BMET3921 Biomedical Design and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ashnil Kumar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, presentations Prerequisites: (AMME2302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901) AND (MECH2400 OR BMET2400 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR ENGG1800) Prohibitions: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 OR BMET9921 Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of human physiology and anatomy and an understanding of the engineering design process. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an understanding of the Australian and International biomedical industry and in the development, manufacture and uses of biomedical engineering products in therapeutic, rehabilitation and clinical settings. Students will gain an understanding of the process of biomedical regulation in Australia and other major international markets as well as the entire process of creating a new biomedical engineering product, from design through to marketing and monitoring of the product. Students will design a biomedical device including the preparation of a detailed design brief. This will be done as a team project. Each team will work on a specific biomedical design project following formal design protocols, including design control, regulatory considerations, and commercialisation/IP considerations.
BMET4990 Biomedical Product Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Colin Dunstan Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: MECH2901 OR BMET2901 Prohibitions: AMME4990 Assumed knowledge: 1000-level chemistry, 2000-level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the 1000-level, and preferably at the 2000-level. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This UoS will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.
Interdisciplinary project
ARCH3108 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Wendy Davis Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: seminars, online contact and group work Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge Assessment: Group work 2500wd plan (10%); Group Presentation (20%); Evaluative/Reflective Task (20%); Group Project 5000wd Report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for third year students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of a team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.