Cell and Developmental Biology Descriptions

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Cell and Developmental Biology major

A major in Cell and Developmental Biology requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units
(vii) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Cell and Developmental Biology minor

A minor in Cell and Developmental Biology requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
Selective
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)

2000-level units of study

Core
BIOL2029 Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01 Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BIOL2929 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell Biology is one of the most dynamic areas in science today. In both plants and animals, cell to cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory program, provides you with hands on training in key techniques such as cell culture, cell signal transduction, mitochondrial physiology, drug discovery in marine organisms, digital microscopy and tissue specific gene expression. These skills will prepare you for a research pathway and/or a career that includes cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2929 Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01) Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 orBIOL2029 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell biology is one of the most dynamic areas of modern research. In both plants and animals, cell-to-cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory training will provide you with hands on experience with key equipment and techniques. The advanced program, will provide you with an opportunity to complete an authentic research project in a specialized area of cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
Selective
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and/or in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.

3000-level units of study

Core
BIOL3026 Developmental Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The advent of multicellularity represents one of life's great transitions in complexity, ultimately paving the way to the evolution of complex organisms such as humans. This unit focuses on how such complex multicellular systems are constructed using both animal and plant systems in a comparative way that reveals common strategies and striking contrasts. The course will cover the multidisciplinary nature of approaches used, including classical embryology, biochemistry, genetics, transcriptomics, live-imaging, cell biology, physiology and computer simulation. Topics will include fundamental concepts, morphogens, establishing body axes, cell polarity, differentiation and commitment, evolution in the context of development, mechanics and morphogenesis with examples from model systems, stem cells and cancer. Practical work includes experiments addressing gene expression, organ identity and homeotic conversions, and uses CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to demonstrate approaches to the study of developmental biology. The practical classes complement the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in developmental biology.
BIOL3926 Developmental Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002 or BIOL2X29 or BCMB2X02) and a mark of 75 or above in (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Biology. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
Interdisciplinary Project
BIOL3888 Biology Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 72cp of units of study, including 12cp from (BIOL2XXX or IMMU2X11 or GEGE2X01 or MICR2X31) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: to be advised Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will participate in one of a range of biology projects that will traverse cells to ecosystems, applying your understanding of biological mechanisms to problems that are big challenges for the 21st century. In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in future.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real¿world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.
Selective
BCMB3004 Beyond The Genome

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001) Prohibitions: BCHM3X92 or BCMB3904 Assumed knowledge: Biochemistry, genetics, cell and/or molecular biology concepts at 2000-level units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The sequencing of the human genome was a landmark achievement in science and medicine, marking the 'Age of Genomics'. Now we can access the blueprints for life, but need to uncover how those blueprints work, allowing organisms to respond to internal and external environmental changes, and how we can utilise this plethora of DNA sequence information to improve human and planetary health. This unit will investigate the function of the genome by examining the proteome, metabolome and beyond. You will investigate links between the central dogma of molecular biology and the complexities of living genomes - from modifications that massively increase diversity to the dynamic metabolome. You will explore fundamental cellular processes and discover how they are shaped by the proteome via gene expression, post-translational modification and protein complex formation. These processes will be examined in the context of human health and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders (e. g. type 2 diabetes) to demonstrate how global approaches can define, diagnose and help develop treatments for disease. You will practice methods employed in the post-genome era, including the 'Multi-omics' approaches that provide a global view of living systems, and discover how they are applied to solve problems in biology, biomedicine and agriculture. By the end of the unit students will understand why global 'omics approaches are needed in the post-genome era and know how best to apply such tools to given biological and biomedical problems.
BCMB3904 Beyond The Genome (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in 12 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001) Prohibitions: BCHM3X92 or BCMB3004 Assumed knowledge: Biochemistry, genetics, cell and/or molecular biology concepts at 2000-level units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The sequencing of the human genome was a landmark achievement in science and medicine, marking the 'Age of Genomics'. Now we can access the blueprints for life, but need to uncover how those blueprints work, allowing organisms to respond to internal and external environmental changes, and how we can utilise this plethora of DNA sequence information to improve human and planetary health. This unit will investigate the function of the genome by examining the proteome, metabolome and beyond. You will investigate links between the central dogma of molecular biology and the complexities of living genomes - from modifications that massively increase diversity to the dynamic metabolome. You will explore fundamental cellular processes and discover how they are shaped by the proteome via gene expression, post-translational modification and protein complex formation. These processes will be examined in the context of human health and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders (e. g. type 2 diabetes) to demonstrate how global approaches can define, diagnose and help develop treatments for disease. You will practice methods employed in the post-genome era, including the 'Multi-omics' approaches that provide a global view of living systems, and discover how they are applied to solve problems in biology, biomedicine and agriculture. Beyond the Genome (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BCMB3004 but focuses on a more advanced level of practical work, data analysis and interpretation, using cutting-edge technologies. By the end of the unit students will understand why global 'omics approaches are needed in the post-genome era and know how best to apply such tools to given biological and biomedical problems.
BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks, Practicals 1 x 3hr practical/week for 13 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or BCMB2X0X or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002 Assessment: Laboratory eNotebook - (Week 5 x 5% + Week 13 x 5%, total = 10%), Research paper (2500 words, 20%), Oral presentation (20%), Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Having diverged from animals prior to the evolution of multicellularity, plants also provide us with a unique opportunity to discover how environmental adaptability and productivity features are enabled at the molecular level. This unit of study explores the molecular mechanisms that give rise to plant form and function, focussing on higher plants. By examining current literature, students will advance their knowledge of how plants grow, develop and adapt, in the context of the molecular mechanisms that plants use to drive, form, function and responses to the environment. There is a focus on how this knowledge is being used to improve plant performance and better manage ecosystems. The new tools available to biologists are giving us an unprecedented capacity to understand the fundamentals of life. The skills developed in this unit will enable you to play a role in designing better ways to manage plants and ecosystems.
Textbooks
Schumann GL and Darcy CJ. 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA.
HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Lovicu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Early developmental processes including fertilisation, cleavage, and gastrulation leading to the formation of the primary germ layers and subsequent body organs are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
HSTO3004 Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katie Dixon Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: An annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year and 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This advanced unit of study complements HSTO3003 (Cells and Development: Theory) and is catered to provide students with laboratory research experience leading to Honours and higher degrees. It will primarily cover the design and application of experimental procedures involved in cell and developmental biology, using appropriate molecular and cellular techniques to answer developmental questions raised in HSTO3003. This unit of study will promote hands on experience, allowing students to observe and examine developing and differentiating tissues at the macroscopic and microscopic level. The main emphasis of this unit of study will concentrate on practical approaches to understanding the mechanisms that control animal development. Some projects may examine early developmental processes such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers and tissues. The parts played by stem cells and inductive cell and tissue interactions in differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation can also be examined at cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] Prohibitions: PHSI3910 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and re-activation of developmental processes in adult disease. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or 12cp from [(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01) or (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3010 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology. Students enrolling in PHSI3910 complete a separate laboratory class centered on stem cell differentiation to replace the problem-based learning exercises in PHSI3010.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science