Project Management Descriptions

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Project Management Major

Achievement of a major in Project Management requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units of study
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units of study
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level major core units of study
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units of study

Project Management Minor

Achievement of a minor in Project Management requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units of study
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units of study
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units of study

Units of study

The relevant units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
ENGG1860 Project Initiation and Scope

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects need to be set up to succeed from the start. This includes careful consideration of the purpose of the project and how this breaks down through work, deliverables and responsibility. This Unit of Study addresses the techniques required to design a successful project. It provides the foundation for more detailed planning and execution. Upon completion of this course, students will develop thinking and listening skills, while demonstrating initiative and drive to achieve project related outcomes.
ENGG1865 Project Time, Cost and Resources

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL3805 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project management requires complex planning decisions with regards to schedules, budgets and resources in both traditional and agile environments. This unit of study introduces students to tools, methods and approaches such as the work breakdown structure, milestone planning, precedence diagram, Gantt charts and critical pathways. These tools and techniques help project managers balance time, cost and resources; and understand the impact on the schedule, budget and resource allocation associated with potential risks.

2000-level units of study

Core
ENGG2855 Project Acceptance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Acceptance offers a specific, succinct, step-by-step project quality management process. It offers an immediate hands-on capability to improve project implementation and customer satisfaction in any project domain and will help maintain cost and schedule constraints to ensure a quality project. This unit introduces tools and techniques that implement the general methods defined in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge-Third Edition (PMBOK) published by the Project Management Institute (PMI), and augment those methods with more detailed, hands-on procedures that have been proven through actual practice. This unit is aimed at providing students an explicit step-by-step quality management process, along with a coherent set of quality tools organised and explained according to their application within this process that can be applied immediately in any project context. It further introduces a Wheel of Quality that codifies in one complete image the contributing elements of contemporary quality management. It also help in understanding the process for establishing a new quality tool, the pillar diagram, that provides a needed capability to identify root causes of undesirable effects.
PMGT2854 Executing Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ENGG1860 OR ENGG1850 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The heart of a project lies in its delivery. Good planning sets the foundation for good execution; however projects need to be actively managed to ensure they are successfully delivered. This Unit of Study explores project execution through a hands on simulation that allows students to experience the delivery of a project including start-up and closure, progress reporting, decision making and change control.

3000-level units of study

Major core
PMGT3850 Project Management Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [24 cp of 2000 or 3000 level units of study] Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of the course coordinator and School`s Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the the course coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
In this intensive PM capstone project, students are required to apply all of the skills necessary to successfully initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project. Working as part of a team mid-sized, high-priority project, student will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables, including the project charter, project plan, change control process, status reports and post-project reviews. Students will facilitate meetings, update the project plan with actuals and changes, present status to management, justify decisions to key stakeholders and determine the impacts of their actions on the project. Under the guidance of a project professional and their academic supervisor, students will be given direct feedback towards achieving project goals.
PM Capstone Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to project management. Students will generally work in groups, although assessment components such as reflective reports and participation are marked individually. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of PM Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
PM Capstone Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, PM Capstone Project A (PMGT3850) and PM Capstone Project B (PMGT3851). This particular unit of study, which must precede PMGT3851 PM Capstone Project B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete 'final year' project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT3851 Project Management Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [30 cp of 2000 or 3000 level units of study] AND PMGT3850 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this intensive PM capstone project, students are required to apply all of the skills necessary to successfully initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project. Working as part of a team on a simulated four-month, mid-sized, high-priority project, student will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables, including the project charter, project plan, change control process, status reports and post-project reviews. Students will facilitate meetings, update the project plan with actuals and changes, present status to management, justify your decisions to key stakeholders and determine the impacts of your actions on multiple projects. Under the guidance of a senior project manager and their academic supervisor, students will be given direct feedback and techniques to increase efficiency and effectiveness.
PM Capstone Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to civil engineering. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of reports will be done individually; i. e. , a separate report must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of PM Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
PM Capstone Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, PM Capstone Project A (PMGT3850) and PM Capstone Project B (PMGT3851). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by PMGT3850 PM Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the required project work. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT3850 PM Capstone Project A.
Selective
PMGT3611 Projects in Controlled Environments

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [30cp 1000 level of any UoS] and WAM >= 75 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Block mode
PRINCE2, developed by the UK Government initially for use in IT projects is now adapted for and widely used across many project types. It provides a robust framework for managing project governance and risk escalation. PRINCE2 is one of the most prevalent professional certifications in demand by employers. In this Unit students will develop a thorough understanding of the PRINCE2 methodology leading to the opportunity to gain certification.
PMGT3612 Agile Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PMGT1711 and [30cp 1000 level of any UoS] and WAM >= 65 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Agile project methodologies, were initially developed for small IT projects and gained popularity following the publication of the Agile Manifesto. With the demand for shorter delivery timescales and organisational agility, the popularity of agile approaches has rapidly increased across industries and project scales. This Unit provides students with a grounding in the SCRUM methodology, one of the most widely recognised approaches to Agile, leading to an option for industry certification.
PMGT3623 Scheduling

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [24 cp of BPM core 2000 level units] or [30 cp of any 2000 level units of study] Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects typically need to be delivered within a defined timescale. Providing robust estimates, monitoring and controlling project duration are crucial to understand the ongoing viability of the investment made in a project. This Unit provides students with a background in advanced scheduling and estimation techniques, supported by project management software.
PMGT3624 Change and Transformation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PMGT1711 and ([24 cp of BPM core 2000 level units] or [30 cp of any 2000 level units of study]) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All projects contain some element of organisational or behavioural change, from small aspects of retraining to complete transformation of organisational values and behaviours. Change management can be required at the strategic or operational level. It may be required to assist in achieving project outcomes or the primary focus of the project may be the implementation of change. This Unit covers the fundamentals of change management including consideration of the psychological impacts of change, change competencies and leading change methodologies.
PMGT3856 Sustainability and Knowledge Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility are gaining importance in our globalised economy. They have been increasingly influencing business and project objectives and it is becoming imperative that they are incorporated into the practice of project management.
This unit of study embraces this new reality by providing students with an expanded understanding of value creation and how this is delivered through projects. The emphasis is on using projects to deliver value not only in terms of economic capital but also developing social capital and preserving natural capital. These will be underpinned by an appreciation of the standards, principles and frameworks that exist, both in Australia and internationally, to govern the preservation of the environment and increase the development of social capital.
Case studies will be used to create learning processes as students consider and confront the dilemmas that project managers face as they strive to deliver shareholder value, whilst considering social and environmental impacts these projects may have. Cases discussed in this unit will allow students to explore both the opportunities and pitfalls companies and non-government organisations face in targeting sustainability issues and how their values and core assumptions impact their business strategies.
Concepts such as corporate responsibility, the triple bottom line, the business case for sustainability, supply chain management and responsible purchasing and knowledge management will be discussed and students will consider how these influence project delivery.
PMGT3857 International Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30cp of 1000 level units of study Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides specific guidelines for achieving greater international project success. It addresses the need for modern techniques in project management geared and suited to international projects. It provides opportunity to students to have orientation towards lessons learned from failures and problems in international projects, and suggest alternative solutions for project issues. The critical success factors for managing international projects together with management issues related to vendors and outsourcing across national boundaries are also discussed. It further deals with managing businesses effectively address cross- cultural, social, and political issues.
ENGG3800 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge. Required knowledge will vary by project. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real-world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.