Urban Studies Descriptions

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Table S - Urban Studies major

A major in Urban Studies requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units and 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units and 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary/project units; and
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Urban Studies minor

A minor in Urban Studies requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units and 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units; and
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary/project units or 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
DAAE1002 Introduction to Australian Urbanism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dallas Rogers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the foundational role land plays in urban development in Australia. This includes studying land management and city development over time. Students examine the evolution of the built environment professions in Australia in relation to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal land knowledge, law and practice. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will demonstrate an understanding of: different land management and city building practices; how built environment practices and city making dispossessed Aboriginal people of their land; and the implications of this city building history for contemporary built environment policy and practice in Australia.
DAAE1001 Living Cities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dallas Rogers Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: DECO1006 and DECO1012 and BDES1011 and AWSS1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study reviews the challenges involved in planning the contemporary urban environment. It covers a range of perspectives, including urban planning, urban design and heritage. Students will examine the evolution of towns and cities from the first settlements to the modern metropolis, and explore the cultural, economic, political and digital drivers that shape the urban environment. It asks, 'why did cities evolve?', 'what purpose do cities serve?', 'who is the city for?', and 'how are decisions made about cities?' The contemporary urban environment is explored as a dynamic and continually evolving 'living city' that is co-created by architects, planners, urban designers and other public and private stakeholders. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated an understanding of the importance of planning in shaping our towns and cities through time. They will have a basic knowledge of the key ideas that are needed for formulating planning and urban design proposals.
Textbooks
Course material, announcements and assessment submission will be available at www.canvas.sydney.edu.au

2000-level units of study

Core
DAAE2XXX International Urbanism - this core unit will be offered from 2022
This unit gives students an understanding of the complexity of urbanism globally with reference to the North/South divide and its colonial roots and post-colonial realities. The unit explores the complexities of urbanism specific to the Global South including but not limited to enormous rate of urban transformation and density, massive infrastructure gaps, ubiquitous informality, confronting inequalities and others. Students will unpack the upcoming urban challenges specific to the Global South including but not limited to devastating climate change; (climate and terrorism related) refugee crises, and others. It examines the historic, socio-economic, and geo-political setting behind the complexity of urban challenges and opportunities in unfamiliar geographies. Students will develop the transfer of learnings from the Global South to the local context and unpacks some of the growing concerns about widening inequities, infrastructure lags and others.
Selective
DAAE2XXX The City Imagined - this selective unit will be offered from 2022.
This unit introduces students to the ideal city as a product of imagination and political thought. The unit explores the ways in which people from a range of places and historical periods have envisaged future settlements and drawn on golden ages from the past to reform or recreate their own cities and towns, landscapes and campsites. Students will consider the physical forms of such imagined places as well as the political intentions of those who produced and promoted them. Among other things, the unit will focus on the religious and moral sources that underpinned early conceptions of suburbia, the radical politics of disurbanisation and the linear city, and the prevalence and meaning of company towns and other planned industrial settlements. Along with key texts and plans from the history of architecture and town planning the unit will draw on art, film and political theory to explore how real cities are structured and constrained by imaginary ones.
GEOS2123 The Geography of Cities and Regions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X02 or DAAE1001 Prohibitions: GEOS2923 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Two hours on average, including fieldtrips within Sydney Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How can we understand the ways that cities and regions change over time, and how these processes shape people's lives? This Unit of Study provides conceptual and practical material for exploring these questions. A program of lectures and tutorials in complemented by close study of Sydney, using GIS (census and satellite imagery) and a series of walking tours to different parts of the city. Assessment is tailored to projects in which students are required to integrate conceptual ideas about cities and regions with GIS mapping and field observations.
ANHS2606 The City of Rome: History and Landscape

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 6 Junior credit points in ANHS and 6 credit points in any of Ancient History, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Greek (Ancient) or Latin or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Archaeology Assessment: 1x500wd annotated bibliography (15%), 1x2000wd research essay (35%), 1x500wd oral tutorial presentation (15%), 1x1500wd final exercise (25%), tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
'The city, stick to the city, and live in its light.' (Cicero) This unit will explore the rich history of Rome's urban landscape from the middle Republic (c.200BCE) to the early fourth century CE. We will examine the ways in which the physical city interacted with and even affected the political, religious and cultural life of the Romans and how the great monuments of Empire were eventually destroyed, recovered and reinvented by later ages.
ANTH2625 Culture and Development

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x1400wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x1-hr multiple-choice exam (15%), 12xweekly 50wd reading notes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The 1949 speech by US president, Harry Truman, declared his country's commitment to the 'development' of the Third World, and began what many consider to be development as an institutional approach to non-Western societies. Anthropology, well established in its study of non-Western societies, was able to offer a rich ethnographic insight into the developing world. Combining ethnographic detail with social science concepts, this unit covers topics such as food crisis, land, environment, cities, fair trade, migration, nation-state, NGOs, poverty and informal economy.
ECOP2012 Foundations of Modern Capitalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Political Economy Prohibitions: ECOP2002 Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (25%),1x2000wd major essay (40%),1x1.5hr exam (35%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the ways in which economic activity is `embedded¿ within broader social structures beyond simply the separation of the `state¿ and the `market¿. Social and economic relations, including those linked to capital; class; race; ecology; social reproduction linked to households and the family; and the spatial structures of the state are all studied, among others. The unit considers the conflict, contradiction and cohesion inherent in these relationships andprocesses of capital accumulation.
DECO2016 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: DECO1006 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Not available to students in the Bachelor of Design Computing and the Bachelor of Architecture and Environments except by special permission. Students who do not successfully complete DECO1006 may take DECO2016 as a replacement.
This unit of study provides an introduction to design thinking and its application in a human-centred design process. Students carry out a semester-long project that follows the typical phases of an iterative design process; consisting of user-centred research, ideation, prototyping and evaluation. Hands-on tutorial exercises develop their experience in appropriately applying design thinking methods, against the theoretical background offered by lectures. Students will learn to build empathy with users, identify the problem space, develop design concepts driven by user needs, and persuasively communicate design proposals using visual storytelling.
BADP2005 City Design and Urban Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 1000-level units including DAAE1001 Assumed knowledge: It will be assumed that students have a basic awareness of social, environmental and political circumstances surrounding climate change, urban development and the concepts of sustainability. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Global change and population growth present significant challenges to the resilience of urban landscapes. Planning and design of urban development is the most powerful tool to meet these challenges. This unit of study provides students with an understanding of the principles and practices of sustainable urban development and the legacy of design at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Students will develop a toolbox for embedding ecological and physical principles in urban design to maximise the functionality of green infrastructure for a range of purposes. This unit will provide an understanding of the interacting physical processes between urbanisation and the local environment as well as issues in global sustainability such as certification of materials and utility of urban land use types. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to articulate the principles of sustainable design within the context of social, political and economic constraints at a range of spatial/temporal scales. Students will develop conscientious approaches to improve the sustainability and resilience of domestic and international urban landscapes.
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
ICLS2633 Cities of the World

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level from any of the following majors: Arabic Studies or Chinese Studies or English or European Studies or French Studies or Germanic Studies or International and Comparative Literature and Translation Studies or Modern Hebrew or Indonesian Studies or Italian Studies or Japanese Studies or Korean Studies or Modern Greek and Byzantine Studies or Spanish and Latin American Studies or History or CHNS2601 or CHNS2001 or CHNS3601 or CHNS3000 Assessment: 1x1000wds equivalent in-class oral presentation (10%), 2x2500wd research essays (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The 'city' is a diverse and controversial theme in world literature. It touches upon past and present, alienation and fulfillment, luxury and poverty, success and failure, anonymity and fame. There are modern and old cities, cosmopolitan and 'holy' cities. By examining how the cultural and historical transformation of urban living has been approached by writers of different cultural and national backgrounds, this unit of study offers a journey to different geographic locations but also a journey through time.
ANTH2626 Urban Anthropology

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorail/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd short essay (35%), 1x2500wd summative essay (45%), 5x100wd weekly responses (10%), participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A majority of the world's population live in cities and anthropologists seek to understand urban life and culture. This unit focuses on ethnographic studies of urbanism around the world, including walled cities, slums, urban migrations, environmental transformations and other recent topics in anthropology. Lectures discuss ethnography as research method in urban environments.
Textbooks
readings will be available at the University Copy Centre
HSTY2631 Sin City? A History of Sydney

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-legal Studies Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd Research essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Research essay outline (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From its beginnings as a convict colony, Sydney had to deal with an unsavoury reputation. This course explores the history of the city we live in, its people and its places. Distinct communities and neighbourhoods emerged as battles were fought over who belonged in Sydney, and how they should behave. Topics include Aboriginal resistance, convict scandals, poverty and plague, the 'Razor Gang Wars', Mardi Gras protests, the 'Emerald City' excesses of the 1980s, and the Croa riots.
CIVL2700 Transport Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND MATH1005 AND ENGG1801. Basic statistics through regression analysis, differential and integral calculus, computer programming. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to transport systems and is assumed knowledge for fourth year units on traffic engineering, transport planning, and city logistics. Topics include: the role of accessibility as the reason for transport; the history of transport technologies in Australia and globally; the characteristics of the principle modes of transport; factors behind the demand for mobility; qualitative choice modeling; agent-based modeling; predicting travel demands; the mechanics of queueing and traffic flow; intelligent transport systems; the microscopic and macroscopic fundamental diagrams; highway capacity and level of service; the design of transport junctions.

3000-level units of study

Core
GEOS3520 Urban Citizenship and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOS2X21 or GEOS2X23 or GOES2X15 or GEOS2X11 or LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3920 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
More than half the world's population now live in cities. The contemporary growth of cities, however, is attached to profound political and environmental questions about what it means to be urban, what 'being urban' means for the planet, and how we might produce more just and sustainable urban spaces and experiences. This Unit provides grounding to these crucial questions by examining urban environments from the dual perspectives of citizenship and sustainability. The Unit has three modules. Module 1 examines the intersection of urban environmental change with questions of citizenship and justice. Module 2 considers key urban environmental issues such as energy, transport and food, and how cities and citizens might address stresses and shocks in these systems. Module 3 studies new models for governing emergent urban environmental challenges. Throughout the semester, a Practical Project will involve a research project with real-world partners to introduce key skills related to working in collaboration with external organisations.
Selective
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 2000-level units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. This unit provides an introduction to environmental regulation. We investigate key environmental issues through an examination of environmental policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics. The aim of this Unit is to enable students to understand the broad principles of environmental law and ethics and to apply this understanding to contemporary environmental problems.
MGRK3605 Greek Modernity and its Others

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the Modern Greek major or MGRK2603 or MGRK3002 or MGRK3607 Prohibitions: MGRK2501 or MGRK2622 Assessment: 4000wd Essay (70%), 2000wd Tutorial presentation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course aims to examine the marginalised attempts to modernise Greek literature of the beginning of the 20th century as an alternative to what is considered to be the dominant discourse of Greek modernism, i.e the so-called generation of the 1930s. This will involve the study of C. P. Cavafy, K. G. Karyotakis and some of the minor poets of the same period as well as new trends in Greek criticism put forward by younger critics such as T. Agras and Kl. Paraschos.The course will also attempt to draw parallels to the appropriate European context and to take into account relevant developments in Greek political life.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or AVBS2XXX or ENSC2001)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
ENVI3114 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 2000-level units Prohibitions: ENVI3001 or PHYS3600 Assumed knowledge: Junior Physics units or Intermediate Environmental Science units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers many aspects of energy and the environment: energy resources and use; electrical power generation including fossil fuelled and alternate methods; environmental impacts of energy use and power generation including greenhouse gas emissions; transportation and pollution; energy management in buildings; solar thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind power and nuclear energy; embodied energy and net emissions analysis and, importantly, socio-economic and political issues related to energy provision.
GCST3630 Everyday Life: Theories and Practices

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Cultural Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Gender Studies Prohibitions: GCST2613 Assessment: 1x1000wd close reading task (20%), 1x1500wd (equivalent) fieldwork presentation (40%), 1x2000wd case study essay (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our knowledge of everyday life is often taken for granted and yet cultural studies has developed some fascinating approaches to critically and creatively exploring the ordinary and extraordinary details that make up everyday life. Through case studies of everyday practices, spaces and experiences (waste, fashion, dreaming, eating, shopping, 'selfies') the unit explores key thinkers of the everyday as well as a range of research and writing methods (observation, thick description, close reading) that have helped to illuminate everyday life.
MUSC3629 Music and Everyday Life

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture/week Assessment: 1 x 3000wd fieldwork project paper (40%), 1 x 1000wd description of a musical event (20%), 2 x 1000wd critical response papers (30%), overall class participation (10%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a requirement for Honours in the BA.
What can we learn from non-textual approaches to understanding music? The primary goal of this unit of study is to study music not as a composer, producer, performer, listener or audience member, but as an ethnographer. That is, analysing music through an observational, experiential and intellectual understanding of how people make and take meaning from music.
DAAE3XXX International Urbanism Advanced - this selective unit will be offered from 2023. This unit is an international field trip in block mode to either India or China

Interdisciplinary/project units

DAAE3XXX Urban Studies Project - this unit will be offered from 2023 as part of Living Lab
ARCH3108 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 72 credit points Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex
problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable
experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry
partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by
working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience
allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real¿world problem, and to
build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry
experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.