Bachelor of Applied Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Exercise and Sport Science)

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Exercise and Sport Science

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science)

Students complete 144 credit points, comprising:
(a) 12 credit points of core units of study from Table A
(b) a major (48 credit points) in Exercise Science
(c) a minor (36 credit points) in Physical Activity and Health
(d) optionally, a second minor (36 credit points) or second major (48 credit points)
(e) optionally, up to 12 credit points of elective units from Table O
(f) any additional elective units of study from Table A or Table S to satisfy a total of 144 credit points for the course.

Bachelor of Applied Science / Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Exercise and Sport Science)

Students must complete 192 credit points, comprising:
(a) 12 credit points of core units of study from Table A
(b) a major (48 credit points) in Exercise Science; and
(c) a minor (36 credit points) in Physical Activity and Health; and
(d) a second major (48 credit points) from this table (Table A) or Table S (Shared Pool) in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook
(e) 12 credit points of units of study from Table O (Open Learning Environment) in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook; and
(f) a minimum of 24 credit points at 4000-level from Table A or Table S (Shared Pool) in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook, including:
(i) a research, community, industry or entrepreneurship project (12 to 36 credit points); and
(ii) any additional elective units of study from Table A or Table S required to make up the 192 credit point total

Bachelor of Applied Science / Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Exercise and Sport Science) with Honours

Students complete the requirements for the pass degree, and
(a) at least 36 and a maximum of 48 credit points of additional Honours units at 4000 level or above, including:
(i) an Honours research project of at least 12 and a maximum of 36 credit points, and
(ii) at least 12 and a maximum of 36 credit points of Honours coursework, as required
(iii) Honours subject areas and units of study for honours within the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences are listed in Table A for the relevant faculty or Table S (Shared Pool) in the Interdiscplinary Studies Handbook.

1000-level units of study

Degree core
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan and A/Prof Leslie Nicholson (Semester 1), Dr Joanna Diong (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities (e.g. online video tutorials and practice quizzes) to supplement the lectures and practicals. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

Electives

Electives for the degree may be selected from Table A (below) or Table S
BIOS1167 Foundations of Biomedical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damian Holsinger Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This is an entry level unit of study designed to give students an overview of the biological and biochemical processes that are fundamental to life. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to general chemistry or biochemistry units of study. Knowledge gained in this unit will enable students to understand the key principles of health and disease and the scientific basis for many of the professional practices they will undertake in their careers. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of the following topics: key concepts of body chemistry, important biological molecules, the structure and function of cells, the genetics of health and disease, growth and development, communication, metabolic processes, homeostasis, and the impacts of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit and to apply their knowledge to the relevance of these fundamental principles to health care practices.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOS2171 or BIOS2103 or ANAT2X10 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the sensory systems and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied. Successful completion of practical class pre-tutorial quizzes is compulsory.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS1172 Biological Aspects of Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Peter Knight Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study examines the physiological changes associated with the normal processes of ageing and the decrease in functional capacity which occurs as a result. It will include a physiological explanation of ageing in relation to the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, nervous, musculoskeletal, renal and endocrine systems and the skin. An understanding of the normal processes of ageing will help health professionals to interpret the ageing experience from the point of view of the client, understand the functional limitations which result from ageing, and differentiate 'normal' from 'abnormal' ageing. This is an entry level unit designed to give students an overview of topics relevant for professional practice. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to specialist clinical units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS1173 Disease in Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Peter Knight Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study examines the disease processes and other physical health issues, which are important as people age. Students will study the factors which are responsible for the increased incidence of disease in the aged, the role of environmental factors in the development of disease, the relationships between disease and functional limitation, and the measures which can be taken to minimise the development and biological impact of disease. Students will also examine the relationships between the biomedical effects of ageing and sexuality. There will be in-depth consideration of one common disease of the aged, and its management in terms of prevention, treatment and residual disability. This is an entry level unit designed to give students an overview of topics relevant for professional practice. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to specialist clinical units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS2115 Embryology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Helen Ritchie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Biology Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study aims to develop an understanding of the embryological processes occurring to form the human body - from fertilisation to birth. Topics also to be discussed are: infertility, abnormal development, artificial reproductive technologies and fetal surgery.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS3063 Project Design and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Peter Knight Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study examines the principles and factors involved in the design and management of services, programs, and projects. Students will develop skills in planning, developing, implementing and evaluating projects as well as be given an introduction to financial management. This is an introductory level that aims to develop generic skills relevant to project management. It is not a specialist project management unit. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of project management. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include two laboratory classes in which human cadavers will be available for study; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS3066 Current Issues in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Hegedus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces students to selected developments that are impacting, or are likely to impact, on the practice and management of the health care in Australia. Because health care is driven by a multitude of forces, the scope of the developments studied is broad. Topics to be covered will be drawn from the basic sciences applicable to health care, and health management. Examples of the topics under consideration include a critical analysis of complementary and alternative medicine, advances in assisted reproductive technologies and emerging diseases and infections. Material will be presented in lectures, with use of self-directed learning and individual or group activities.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS1039 Introduction to Body Composition Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Measurement or estimation of body composition is frequently undertaken in clinical practice, research studies and sports performance settings. An in depth understanding of the scientific rationale of body composition methodologies and their applications would assist exercise scientists and exercise physiologists to more capably support their clients. This unit would cover laboratory (e. g. air displacement plethysmography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and field methods (e. g. bioelectrical impedance analysis/spectroscopy and anthropometry) of body composition, body composition across the lifespan/gender differences/ethnicity differences, and body composition in health and disease. Anthropometry is the measurement of body dimensions, proportions and composition, and has particular application in health professions such as dietetics and sports science and will be a focus of this unit of study. Along with technical skills, students will also learn about uses and Interpretation of body composition data.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS1040 Introduction to Strength and Conditioning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This introductory unit will provide students with fundamental skills and understanding of strength and conditioning practice. Students will learn how to safely and effectively supervise strength and conditioning activities, and to design, implement and evaluate a basic strength and conditioning program.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS1041 Fundamentals in Bioenergetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: EXSS1036 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The aim of this unit of study is to introduce students into energy metabolism in living systems. The specific focus will be on transformation of energy during exercise and recovery with an exploration of how energy from food influences exercise bioenergetics.
EXSS2036 The Body Clock and Athletic Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This Unit will examine the effects of circadian rhythm on athletic performance. It will discuss the relationship between personal best performance and circadian phenotypes by examining the predictors of peak performance time and of optimal performance. It will emphasise the importance of sleep cycle to peak athletic performance; the negative effects of sleep disruption when travelling across time zones and related behavioural strategy/ exercise/ pharmacological treatment; and recovery of athletes in the phase of resynchronisation.
EXSS2037 Advanced Strength and Conditioning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: EXSS1040 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an advanced understanding of strength and conditioning, preparing students to capably assess, program and monitor athletes over a full playing season. This unit will cover the physiological basis of advanced assessment and programming techniques, including the instruction of advanced lifts, use of both novel and advanced training methods and the implementation of technology in program delivery and athlete monitoring. A focus of Advanced Strength and Conditioning is the practical application of physiological constructs in the design and delivery of real-life programs, which students will experience throughout the teaching and assessment structure of this unit.
HSBH3013 FHS Indigenous Communities

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gwynn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr introduction session (to be completed before enrolment), 5x2-hr workshops,1x2-hr debriefing session, and online learning activities Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre-fieldwork preparation paper 1000wd (30%), participation and contribution to on-line learning activities and discussion (10%), Fieldwork critical reflection report (60%) Practical field work: approximately 4 weeks working in an Indigenous community Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience
This unit provides theoretical and practical knowledge about relevant models of community development in Aboriginal communities in New South Wales. Students will gain experience in working with Aboriginal communities in a health services setting, participating in an approximately 4 week placement in a local Aboriginal community. Students participate in a community identified development project and will document and report on their experiences in working with the local Aboriginal community. Students will be required to demonstrate project management skills including time management and reporting abilities. Students are required to attend briefing and debriefing activities and complete on-line learning activities in addition to their field experience.
HSBH3021 Environmental Stress and Physiological Strain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ollie Jay Session: Intensive March Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: EXSS1032 or EXSS2027 or BIOS1170 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and first-hand experience (through laboratory practicals) of how the human body responds to extreme environmental stressors (i.e. high altitude, hyperbaria, extreme heat, extreme cold), and how these conditions alter the capacity of humans to perform physical and mental tasks. Special attention will also be given to the theoretical basis of how these stressors can lead to decrements to human health in the form of injury (e.g. frostibite, heat exhaustion) and illness (e.g. pulmonary/cerebral oedema, actue mountain sickness, 'the bends'). This unit will also focus on how this information can be used to develop therapeutic, pharmacological, and/or technological interventions to improve human functioning in extreme environments and reduce the risk of illness and injury. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies and short practical assignments.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
HSBH3025 Bodily Senses in Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tatjana Seizova-Cajic Session: Semester 2a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Introductory neuroscience Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Sensory input allows us to connect to the world and experience varied states of our own body. Understanding how senses work is important for basic science, esp. neuroscience and psychology, and applied areas such as health and engineering. This unit focuses on the sensory processes that underlie perception of one's own body and its actions. Sensory functioning in both healthy and disease states are considered, including the following topics: proprioception or sense of position and movement of body parts, vestibular system, touch, role of vision, brain plasticity, disorders of sensory processing (agnosias, neglect , phantom limbs, vertigo) and most recent experimental developments in rehabilitation and brain-computer interface. Tutorial assessment includes in-depth analysis of a topic of your choice and running your own experiments. NB: This unit does not teach about treatments taught in the core units of professional health science degrees.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
HSBH3026 Industry and Community Project

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: blended learning, (online material, face-to-face seminars and group work) Prerequisites: A minimum of 72 credit points Assessment: group plan (20%), group presentation (10%), individual reflection statement (20%), group report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through this unit, undergraduate students will participate in an interdisciplinary group project, working with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner, applying their disciplinary expertise and gaining valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In working on authentic problems, students will encounter richly contextualized issues that will require input from people with a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and experiences. Developing solutions to complex problems requires students to work effectively in interdisciplinary groups. The unit will provide the opportunity for students to integrate their developing knowledge and experience, and apply them in circumstances of the kind they can expect to encounter in professional life. Interdisciplinary group work will provide the opportunity to build the skills to work across disciplinary, cultural and/or professional boundaries. . For more information please see: https://sydney.edu.au/students/industry-and-community-projects.html.
REHB3064 Alcohol and Drug Misuse Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Danielle Resiak Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (HSBH1006 and (HSBH1007 or HSBH2007) and HSBH1008 and HSBH1009) or 48 credit points of previous study. Prohibitions: REHB3061 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces students to issues pertaining to a major public health concern; the use of alcohol and other drugs (licit and Illicit). Both harm minimisation and zero tolerance philosophies are covered with respect to; the development of health policy, national drug strategies, treatment best-practice, guidelines and standards for services aimed at supporting people who use alcohol and or other drugs. The unit commences with an introduction to public health policy approaches relating to rehabilitation and treatment services for people who use drugs. Specific attention is paid to vulnerable and marginalized population groups inclusive of; people who inject drugs (PWID), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups, those with a dual-diagnosis, women and adolescents, and drug use in sport. Students will study the major therapeutic approaches to treatment and community-based services inclusive of; Anonymous groups, Transactional Analysis, group therapy oriented approaches, Behavioural Therapies, Therapeutic Communities, Opioid Substitution, Needle and Syringe Exchange programs and Medically Supervised Injecting Centers/Drug Consumption Rooms. Upon completion of the unit students will be familiar with the nature of services offered, the role of various health professionals in these services and the nature of effective treatment and rehabilitation outcomes. Engagement with this unit of study will provide students with practical and accessible resources useful for professional practice. Students will be required to engage in weekly tutorial discussion boards, complete two online quizzes and submit an essay covering specified learning objectives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
REHB3065 PTSD and Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48 credit points Prohibitions: REHB3059 or REHB5063 or REHB5034 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Exposure to traumatic events such as natural disasters, assaults and road accidents are relatively common in Australia. This unit introduces the clinical entity of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Students will learn about the nature of traumatic stressors and the course of posttraumatic reactions. Evidence-based approaches to treatment and rehabilitation of PTSD are examined with interventions for both acute and persistent forms of the disorder being presented. The impact of a range of barriers to social and economic participation of people with PTSD will be explored and the legal and compensation issues associated with the disorder will be considered.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units