Biomedical Science

Cancer Stream

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Item Errata Date
1.

The following streams have been suspended for 2021:

Master of Biomedical Science

  • Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics
  • Cancer

Graduate Diploma of Biomedical Science

  • Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics
  • Cancer
Graduate Certificate in Biomedical Science
  • Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics
  • Cancer
2/3/2021

Biomedical Science (Cancer)

Master of Biomedical Science

Students must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) the requirements of the stream they are enrolled in
(b) 12 credit points of core units of study, and
(c) 12 credit points of capstone selective units of study, and
(d) a minimum of 18 and maximum of 24 credit points of stream selective units of study, and
(e) a minimum of 0 and a maximum 6 credit points of elective units of study.

Graduate Diploma of Biomedical Science

Students must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) the requirements of the stream they are enrolled in
(b) 12 credit points of core units of study, and
(c) a minimum of 18 and maximum of 24 credit points of stream selective units of study, and
(d) a maximum 6 credit points of elective units of study.

Graduate Certificate of Biomedical Science

Students must complete 24 credit points, including:
(a) the requirements of the stream they are enrolled in
(b) 12 credit points of core units of study; and
(c) 12 credit points of stream selective units of study.

Cancer stream

Degree core
(a) Students in the Graduate Diploma and Masters complete 12 credit points of degree core units
(b) Students in the Graduate Certificate complete 6 credit points of degree core units
BMSC5001 Clinical Laboratory Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
There is growing demand in the medical research and health industries for graduates with the skills to understand and use a range of techniques and technologies, to interpret medical and research data, and to translate scientific and laboratory findings into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit of study you will hone and expand your skills and knowledge in analytical and clinical laboratory techniques that apply to a range of specialisations and workplace settings, including hospital, forensic and veterinary biotechnology laboratories and clinics, industrial research and medical biotechnology laboratories. Your learning will take place in state-of-the-art teaching laboratories utilising techniques and equipment relevant to your chosen area of specialisation. The skills you learn will equip you with the methods and theoretical underpinings of tools required in the analysis, detection, diagnosis, treatment and research of disease across a range of settings.
BMSC5901 Clinical Laboratory Science (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
There is growing demand in the medical research and health industries for graduates with the skills to understand and use a range of techniques and technologies, to interpret medical and research data, and to translare scientific and laboratory findings into clinical practice. As a student with experience in relevant settings, this unit of study will help you further develop and expand your skills ad knowledge in analytical and clinical laboratory techniques that apply to a range if specialisations and workplace settings, including hospital, forensic and veterinary laboratories and clinics, industrial research and medical biotechnology laboratories. Your learning will take place in state-of-the-art teaching laboratories utilising techniques and equipment relevant to your chosen area of specialisation. The skills you learn will further equip you with the methods and theoretical underpinnings of laboratory techniques and tools at the cutting edge if detection, diagnosis and treatment of disease across a range of settings.
Stream core
All students complete the following unit:
BMSC5005 Advanced Studies in Cancer Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Progress in our ability to cure or delay cancer is rapidly accelerating. The prospects of patients with cancer have been revolutionised by the genetic, molecular and cellular study of cancers in individual patients. This research is also enabling a more sophisticated understanding of how sub-cellular processes and the many different types of cells in the body interact to support human life. Together we will look at the molecular and cellular origins of the behaviours of cancers: what drives accelerated cancer cell replication, their resistance to cell death and their ability to induce angiogenesis, local invasion and metastasis. We will examine genomic instability, dysregulated cellular metabolism and the role of inflammation and the immune system. We will analyse these behaviours and their relevance to cancer therapy. You will work independently and in groups on face-to-face and online learning activities. You will deepen your knowledge of molecular and cellular biology and hone the intellectual and practical skills required to equip you to participate in the latest developments to improve survival and health for all cancer patients.
Stream selective
(a) Students in the Graduate Diploma and Masters complete a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 24 credit points of stream selective units
(b) Students in the Graduate Certificate complete 12 credit points of stream selective units of study
BMSC5002 Advances in Disease Diagnosis and Treatment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Effective prevention and treatment of disease requires early, accurate and specific diagnoses. Biomedical advances in disease diagnosis and treatment are underpinned by the fundamentals of physics, cell biology and biochemistry. New imaging modalities for example, allow us to diagnose neurological diseases earlier and track the course of metastic cancers. New discoveries about how our genes contribute to disease enable design of novel intervention strategies that are leading to cures for some genetically-based diseases. And break-throughs in immunology mean we can now harness the power of our immune system to fight disease. In this unit, you will hear from clinician scientists at the frontier of biomedical research and translation. Working independently and in groups, you will deepen your knowledge and applicationn of the theory and technologies that underpin disease diagnosis and treatment. This will equip you to participate in the latest developments to diagnose and treat diseases.
GMED5001 Genomics in Clinical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ingrid Sinnerbrink and Dr Gladys Ho Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Recent major advances in understanding of the human genome and the relationship between genetic variation and disease have changed clinical practice. This unit provides contemporary knowledge of genetic disease, diagnosis, genomic testing, prognosis, management, inheritance and impact across a range of chromosomal, single gene and heterogeneous genetic conditions. You will study common conditions, such as intellectual disability, inherited cancer, and paediatric and adult-onset disorders, as well as genomic mechanisms and genetic variations which lead to human disease. A case based approach will be used to develop skills in interpretation of clinical, family history and genomic test results to formulate an appropriate diagnosis and accurate genetic risk information. Ethical issues in genomic medicine will also be considered. Advances in treatments for genetic diseases will be explored, along with possible uses and limitations of new technologies, including genome editing approaches. The RACP Clinical Genetics Advanced Training Committee has approved this unit to fulfill the Genetics University Course Requirement for advanced training in Clinical Genetics. It is suitable for all practitioners who require a working knowledge of genomics in clinical practice.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
GMED5004 Cancer Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Advances in genomics are impacting on many aspects of the diagnosis and management of cancer. This unit provides understanding of molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis, with particular reference to familial cancer conditions. It provides contemporary knowledge of familial cancer syndromes including their characteristic patterns of presentation, epidemiology, underlying causative genetic pathology and preventative management approaches. Case - based approaches will be used for the development of in-depth knowledge of familial breast, ovarian, bowel and endocrine malignancies. Other familial cancer syndromes explored will include the neurofibromatoses, and conditions such as Li-Fraumeni and Von Hippel Lindau syndromes. Review of other genetic conditions in which cancer risk is increased will be undertaken. Ethical issues in cancer genomics will be considered as well as advances in precision medicine applicable to familial cancer.
PGEN5001 Pathogen Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Vitali Sintchenko, Dr Verlaine Timms, Dr Rebecca Rockett, Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic understanding of microbiology or medical microbiology and genetics. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Genomics has revolutionised medicine, providing information on a scale not previously available. Pathogen Genomics is part of this revolution and the applications of this technology have provided crucial information on pathogen discovery, new drug development, control of outbreaks and antibiotic resistance. This unit of study will introduce students to analysis of bacterial and viral genomes and main applications of genomics for translational research, precision medicine and control of diseases with epidemic potential. Students will learn how DNA is sequenced in the laboratory and develop analytical skills in microbial genomics, using public databases and the University of Sydney's high­performance computing cluster. A combination of lectures delivered by domain experts and interactive practicals will provide detailed understanding of the key concepts of genomics utilized in research and clinical practice. Case studies will enable students to perform genomic analyses and apply the technological knowledge gained from the unit to examine virulence, drug resistance and evolution of pathogens with epidemic potential. This unit will equip students with knowledge and skills important for careers in biomedical research and healthcare.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Electives
(a) Students in the Graduate Diploma and Masters complete a maximum of 6 credit points of elective units.
HTIN5004 Integrated Approaches to Chronic Disease

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Poon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce the student to the strategy of the Charles Perkins Centre to ease the burden of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While other approaches would focus on these diseases as purely medical conditions this unit will challenge the student to focus on an interdisciplinary approach, bringing together medicine, biological science, psychology, economics, law, agriculture and other disciplines to understand how real world solutions for these diseases might be developed. Students will be exposed to the world-renowned researchers based in the Charles Perkins Centre and will gain insight into the research strategy of the Centre. Students will also have the opportunity to develop a new interdisciplinary project node for the Centre in collaboration with one of our research leaders.
PCOL5101 Drugs and Devices: R and D to Registration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hui Xin Ong and Dr Rania Salama Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides a broad overview of the processes involved in translating a new drug, formulation and/or medical device from a laboratory setting to an approved product. It is targeted at people interested in or already working in the pharmaceutical or medical device industries, and advisors in the regulatory sector. Three core areas are covered: (1) the regulatory organisation, (2) requirements during drug discovery and device conception, manufacture and clinical trials, and (3) post-registration pharmacovigilance and pharmacoeconomics . Students will gain knowledge of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) and guidelines for the registration and regulation of medical devices and medicines. Students will also learn the importance of international regulations, harmonisation and application to the Australian market. The unit covers R and D; manufacturing and clinical trial requirements; the concepts of good laboratory and manufacturing practices (GMP, GLP) and quality by design (QbD); as well as regulator accepted laboratory methodologies used for submission of product dossiers and medical device documentation. The basics of clinical trial design will be analysed, as well as concepts of pharmacokinetics, dynamics, pharmacoeconomics and clinical endpoints for registration of new products using case studies and online tutorials. Special requirements for the registration and testing of generic medicines will also be part of the unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PCOL5102 Modern Therapeutics and Medical Devices

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hui Xin Ong and Dr Rania Salama Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study develops knowledge in current state­ of ­the ­art therapeutic technologies. The principles of mode of action are investigated, along with methods of manufacture and registration. The unit is targeted at people already in or interested in the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries, and advisors in the regulatory sector. It covers 4 core areas of regulation in Australia: (1) biologicals and personalised medicine, (2) cell based products, (3) medical devices and (4) classical formulations. The principles that underpin these innovative therapies are covered in terms of development, targeting and manufacture along with the application of genomics in personalised medicine. Classical formulations (i.e. oral, respiratory and injectable dosage forms) will be covered and advances within the field such as regulation of nanotechnology will also be discussed. Students will investigate the processes of manufacture, verification and validation testing to ensure regulations are met. The emerging area of cellular immunotherapy for cancer treatment will be discussed. Students will gain knowledge of the different types of therapies within this space. Case studies will be evaluated, including the challenges associated with bringing these therapies and devices to market.
Classical formulations (i.e. oral, respiratory and injectable dosage forms) will be covered and advances within the field such as regulation of nanotechnology will also be discussed.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CLTR5001 Trial Design and Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rebecca Asher, Adrienne Kirby Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will focus on the strengths and weaknesses of different clinical study designs. Designs considered will include cohort (retrospective and prospective), cross-sectional, case-control and randomized controlled designs. The different phases of clinical trial designs in the development of therapies will also be examined including phase I (first in man), phase II/pilot and phase III comparative designs. Extension and adaptation of randomized designs will also be covered including cluster and factorial designs and adaptive pilot studies. Students will gain the skills necessary to choose between these designs for best practice. Types of outcomes (continuous, categorical, time-to-event) will be discussed. Methods of allocating participants to interventions (randomization), as well blinding and allocation concealment will be covered together with aspects of protocol development. On completion of this unit, the student will be familiar with the differences between study types and study designs, as well as the principles and practice of randomisation. It is also expected that the candidate will be able to develop stratified randomisation schemes for their own studies.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CLTR5004 Advanced Trial Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rachel O'Connell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CLTR5001 and CLTR5007 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Candidates will be taught skills to design and interpret equivalence trials, non-inferiority trials and cluster randomised trials. Specialised designs including enrichment and discontinuation designs will be discussed and special aspects relating to cross-over studies will be taught. Techniques to validly incorporate composite, co-primary and surrogate endpoints will be covered. Distinctions between event and chronological time directed outcomes will be discussed. Skills to incorporate sub-studies into clinical research projects will be covered in this unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
COMP5424 Information Technology in Biomedicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Experience with software development as covered in SOFT2412 or COMP9103 (or equivalent UoS from different institutions). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Information technology (IT) has significantly contributed to the research and practice of medicine, biology and health care. The IT field is growing enormously in scope with biomedicine taking a lead role in utilising the evolving applications to its best advantage. The goal of this unit of study is to provide students with the necessary knowledge to understand the information technology in biomedicine. The major emphasis will be on the principles associated with biomedical digital imaging systems and related biomedicine data processing, analysis, visualisation, registration, modelling, retrieval and management. A broad range of practical integrated clinical applications will be also elaborated.
Capstone Selective
(a) Students in the Masters must complete 12 credit points of capstone selective units of study, choosing either:
Research Project
BMSC5106 Biomedical Research Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Steain Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ICPU5001 and ICPU5002 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: BMSC5X01 plus 12 credit points of stream selective units must be successfully completed before enrolling in BMSC5106
Undertaking the biomedical research project is your first step toward becoming an independent research scientist. You will be immersed in a research environment and work towards solving an important issue related to your area of specialization and in a field of interest to you. You will design and carry out experiments and communicate your findings through a thesis. Successfully completing the research project capstone will prepare you for undertaking higher degree research (e.g. a PhD) or a variety of careers in the medical sciences.
BMSC5107 Biomedical Research Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Steain Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ICPU5001 and ICPU5002 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: BMSC5X01 plus 12 credit points of stream selective units must be successfully completed before enrolling in BMSC5107
Undertaking the biomedical research project is your first step toward becoming an independent research scientist. You will be immersed in a research environment and work towards solving an important issue related to your area of specialization and in a field of interest to you. You will design and carry out experiments and communicate your findings through a thesis. Successfully completing the research project capstone will prepare you for undertaking higher degree research (e.g. a PhD) or a variety of careers in the medical sciences.
OR
Industry Project
ICPU5001 Industry and Community Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Hinton Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: BMSC5106 and BMSC5107 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit of study you will work collaboratively on authentic, complex problem-based projects developed with the University's external Partners and driven by industry and community needs. You will work in teams to identify a unique issue or opportunity wthin a broader problem relating to your areas of interest, bringing your disciplinary knowledge to real-world problems in biomedical sciences and health. You will engage in self-directed, inquiry-based research and problem solving with the support of a Project Supervisor. Your Project Partner will provide valuable insights into the industry as well as access to information that will assist you with your investigation and provide context for your final recommendations. In addition to deepening your understanding around project-related issues, you will further develop your skills in critical reflection, collaboration, complex problem solving and interdisciplinary effectives through evidence-based teaching approaches and workshop. By undertaking the industry and community project as your capstone experience in your current program you will be equipped with the adaptability and agility to successfully navigate contemporary issues in your area of specialisation.
ICPU5002 Industry and Community Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Hinton Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: BMSC5106 and BMSC5107 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit of study you will work collaboratively on authentic, complex problem-based projects developed with the University's external Partners and driven by industry and community needs. You will work in teams to identify a unique issue or opportunity wthin a broader problem relating to your areas of interest, bringing your disciplinary knowledge to real-world problems in biomedical sciences and health. You will engage in self-directed, inquiry-based research and problem solving with the support of a Project Supervisor. Your Project Partner will provide valuable insights into the industry as well as access to information that will assist you with your investigation and provide context for your final recommendations. In addition to deepening your understanding around project-related issues, you will further develop your skills in critical reflection, collaboration, complex problem solving and interdisciplinary effectives through evidence-based teaching approaches and workshop. By undertaking the industry and community project as your capstone experience in your current program you will be equipped with the adaptability and agility to successfully navigate contemporary issues in your area of specialisation.