Critical Care Medicine

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The Delivery Method for the following unit has changed. It should be:

CRIT5016 Major Trauma Management Delivery method: fully online, there is no face to face teaching session.

03/02/220

Critical Care Medicine

Master of Medicine (Critical Care Medicine)

Master of Science in Medicine (Critical Care Medicine) (admission suspended)

Students must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) 12 credit points of compulsory units of study; and
(b) 24 credit points of stream specific units of study; and
(c) 12 credit points of stream specific or general elective units of study.

Master of Medicine (Advanced) (Critical Care Medicine)

Master of Science in Medicine (Advanced) (Critical Care Medicine) (admission suspended)

Students must complete 60 credit points, including:
(a) 48 credit points of study as required for the Master of Medicine/Master of Science in Medicine
(b) 12 credit points of project units of study.

Graduate Diploma in Medicine (Critical Care Medicine)

Graduate Diploma in Science in Medicine (Critical Care Medicine) (admission suspended)

Students must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) 6 credit points of compulsory units of study; and
(b) 24 credit points of stream specific units of study; and
(c) 6 credit points of stream specific or general elective units of study.

Graduate Certificate in Medicine (Critical Care Medicine)

Graduate Certificate in Science in Medicine (Critical Care Medicine) (admission suspended)

Students must complete 24 credit points, including:
(a) 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.

Compulsory units

Compulsory unit – Graduate Diploma

CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis and screening; applicability of results to individual patients; and evidence-based use of health resources.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.

Compulsory units - Master of Medicine, Master of Medicine (Advanced)

CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis and screening; applicability of results to individual patients; and evidence-based use of health resources.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
CRIT5008 Evidence and Ethics in Critical Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Doug Elliott Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures, discussion groups (from week 5) Corequisites: CEPI5100 and 18 credit points of stream specific units of study from any of (CRIT5001, CRIT5002, CRIT5003, CRIT5004, CRIT5005, CRIT5006, CRIT5007, CRIT5009, CRIT5010, CRIT5011, CRIT5012, CRIT5014, CRIT5015, CRIT5016, CRIT5017, PAIN5021, CLNP5005, INTM5014, PAED5007) Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Clinical experience in a critical care discipline such as: emergency medicine, intensive care, anaesthesia, surgery or retrieval medicine. Assessment: 1 x 1000-1200 word ethics assignment (20%); 4 x ethics discussion board tasks (10%); 4x 300-1000 word evidence based medicine written assignments that inform a 1x 2500-4000 word written assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
This capstone unit for the Master of Medicine (Critical Care) degree aims to develop students' reflective ethical and critical thinking skills, required to inform best clinical practice. The unit is divided into two parts: an introduction to key ethical concepts and methods of ethical analysis; and an overview of evidence relevant to health care practice and research. Students initially apply ethical principles to examine a series of case studies. Students will then critically appraise the evidence base related to an area of practice in their workplace or a clinical guideline. This will require the development of a clinical question, a literature review, then an appraisal of the literature and application of evidence to individual patient care. Learning modules will include applying decision analysis to facilitate shared decision-making in practice, how to conduct a literature review, an example of how clinical practice and guidelines have changed based on changing evidence and review, and further refinement of clinical epidemiology and critical appraisal skills developed in CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology.
Textbooks
Online readings

Stream Specific units

CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis and screening; applicability of results to individual patients; and evidence-based use of health resources.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
CRIT5001 Anatomy for Critical Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Croker Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lectures, discussions and/or webinars, and one compulsory workshop in an anatomy laboratory for 2 consecutive days. Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); clinical case discussion and quizzes (10%); post-workshop specimen tests (30%); online exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit of study covers the requirements of the anatomy syllabi of the primary examinations of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, the College of Intensive Care Medicine and the Australian College of Emergency Medicine. Students will learn anatomy relevant to the professional demands of each discipline, for example the anatomy relevant to venous access, airways and peripheral neural structures. There will be a focus on clinical relevance and application of anatomical knowledge, including imaging such as ultrasound, CT and MRI where relevant.
Textbooks
Required: Clinically Oriented Anatomy 7th edition 2013 Moore, Dalley, Agur (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins) McMinn's Clinical Atlas of Human Anatomy 7th edition 2013 Mosby.
CRIT5002 Pathology for Critical Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lydia Lozzi Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning including lectures and webinar tutorials and/or discussion boards Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); clinical cases (10%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); short answer questions (30%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study covers the syllabus requirements of the Primary or First Part examinations of the Australian College of Emergency Medicine, the College of Intensive Care Medicine and the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, with a focus on the syllabus of the Emergency Medicine first part exam. Topics include basic pathological processes (e.g. immunology, inflammation, neoplasia etc) and systems pathology (e.g. cardiovascular, respiratory, gastroenterology, neurology, rheumatology etc). The unit is presented by academic pathologists and specialist clinicians and focusses on clinical relevance and application of knowledge.
Textbooks
Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease 10th Ed (Kumar, Abbas, Fausto, Aster) Saunders Elsevier .
CRIT5003 Pharmacology for Critical Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Professor Ross MacPherson Session: Semester 2 Classes: online learning including lectures and discusion board and/or webinar tutorials Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); participation in online discussion forums (10%); short answer questions (30%); online exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students considering enrolling in PAIN5003 Pain Treatment and Management please note there is some content in common with this unit.
This unit will address the syllabus requirements of the Primary or First Part examinations of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, College of Intensive Care Medicine and the Australian College of Emergency Medicine. It includes basic pharmacology and clinical applications of relevant drugs and drug groups.
Textbooks
Basic and Clinical Pharmacology BG Katzung 14th ed McGraw - Hill Education 2017; Pharmacology and Physiology in Anesthetic Practice R K Stoelting and S C Hillier - 5th ed -Philadelphia : Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2014
CRIT5004 Physiology for Critical Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Louise Cole Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning including lectures and webinar tutorials and/or discussion boards Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); short answer questions (40%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Supplementary material and references are supplied with each module. Additional modules not directly covered during semester are available online. This supplementary and additional material is not assessed.
This unit addresses some of the Primary or First Part syllabus requirements of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, the College of Intensive Care Medicine and the Australian College of Emergency Medicine. It includes normal physiology, physiology of the elderly, obesity, physiological consequences of mechanical ventilation and common disease states in the critically ill. The unit has a clinical focus.
Textbooks
Principles of Physiology for the Anaesthetist/ I Power, P Kam- 3rd ed, CRC Press, 2015; Textbook of Medical Physiology / A C Guyton, J E Hall - 13th ed, Philadelphia, PA: W B Saunders, 2015;
CRIT5005 Clinical Reasoning and Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Renee Lim Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning and compulsory face to face workshop (1x 2 days) Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: 5 x 300-600 word clinical case study tasks (30%); participation in online discussion tasks (10%); online quizzes (10%); participation in 2 day communication skills workshop (30%); 1 x 1500-2000 word written assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Enrolments in this unit are limited and places will be allocated until the quota is reached.
Critical care medicine is practised in highly charged and stressful settings and requires many decisions to be made quickly with limited information and resources. There are also many 'players' and confusion and miscommunication can easily occur. The hierarchical nature of hospital based practice and tribal differences between professions bring their own challenges. This unit of study aims to help clinicians develop decision making and high level communication skills in order to effectively care for patients, engage carers and relatives and perform optimally as a team member or leader. The unit is built around complex clinical cases and includes simulations with actors and experts.
Textbooks
Online readings
CRIT5006 Retrieval Med - Operational Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Burns, A/Prof Cliff Reid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Face to face workshop (1x 2 days compulsory) plus self-directed online learning Assessment: online exam (20%); 1x 1,500 word essay (30%);, 2x online discussions (30%); online quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Retrieval medicine is an emerging specialty area within the broader field of critical care medicine. This unit of study has four modules: Scene Management and Safety; Aeromedical Environment; Retrieval Transportation; and Special Rescue Settings. On successful completion of this unit students will have gained: an understanding of the theory that underpins the operational environment of retrieval medicine including safety systems, clinical governance and human factors. Through case study presentations and discussion, students will analyse the conditions that impact on patient and retrieval crew outcomes and critique the application of best practice in different retrieval situations.
Textbooks
ABC of Prehospital Emergency Medicine ed by T Nutbeam and M Boylan 1 ed; Wiley-Blackwell (2013); ABC of Transfer and Retrieval Medicine ed by A Lowe and J Hulme 1 ed Wiley-Blackwell (2013); Aeromedical Transportation: A Clinical Guide T Martin 2nd ed; Ashgate Publishing Limited; (2006); Cases in Pre-hospital Retrieval Medicine M Hooper; Harcourt Publishers Group (Australia) Pty.Ltd (2009); ASTNA Patient Transport: Principles and Practice(Air and Surface Patient Transport: Principles and Practice) RS Holleran; Mosby; 4th edition (2009);
CRIT5007 Clinical Retrieval Medicine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cliff Reid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Face to face workshop (1x 2 days compulsory) plus self-directed online learning Prerequisites: CRIT5006 Assessment: 1x 60 minute online exam (20%); 1x 1500 word essay (30%);, 2x online discussions (30%); online quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit follows on from CRIT5006 and aims to equip students to practice in this exciting field of retrieval medicine. The unit of study has three major areas: prehospital trauma care; critical care transport; and special patient groups (obstetric, neonatal and paediatric, bariatric, mechanical cardiorespiratory support). On successful completion of this unit students will be able to analyse and critique: appropriate prehospital trauma care; critical care issues specific to different transport modes; and issues regarding special groups that are increasingly encountered in retrieval medicine. Students will also gain an understanding of equipment and monitoring in retrieval medicine.
Textbooks
ABC of Prehospital Emergency Medicine ed by T Nutbeam and M Boylan 1 ed; Wiley-Blackwell (2013); ABC of Transfer and Retrieval Medicine ed by A Lowe and J Hulme 1 ed Wiley-Blackwell (2013); Aeromedical Transportation: A Clinical Guide T Martin 2nd ed; Ashgate Publishing Limited; (2006); Cases in Pre-hospital Retrieval Medicine M Hooper; Harcourt Publishers Group (Australia) Pty.Ltd (2009); ASTNA Patient Transport: Principles and Practice(Air and Surface Patient Transport: Principles and Practice) RS Holleran; Mosby; 4th edition (2009);
CRIT5009 Teaching with Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical A/Prof Leonie Watterson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lectures; readings; appraisal of media; discussion groups and tutorials; compulsory 2 day simulation workshop (8.30 am-5pm) conducted in a simulation centre. Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: participation in online discussion (10%); 1200 word essay (20%); 4x simulation workshop activities (30%); portfolio of written assignments (short answer questions or other activities) (30%); post-course reflection (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: This unit is available to Clinical Neurophysiology students by special permission. Enrolments in this unit are limited and places will be allocated until the quota is reached.
Simulation is now a required learning and skill maintenance tool in critical care medicine. This unit will provide students with the skills and knowledge to: construct a challenging, yet safe learning environment with realistic simulation scenarios; manage the technology and the learning environment; and provide effective debriefing and productive feedback. The unit of study will also aim to enhance the student's skills as a teacher in a busy clinical setting, improving supervision and feedback and creating effective teams.
Textbooks
(Recommended) Manual of Simulation in Healthcare 2nd Edition, 2016, Riley R.H(Ed), Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-871762-1
CRIT5010 Point of Care Ultrasound

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Khanh Nguyen Session: Semester 1 Classes: two day compulsory workshop ( 8.00am - 5.30pm), online lectures and webinar tutorials and/or discussion forums Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); short answer questions (30%); ultrasound scans with written reports (60%). Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Students must have access to an ultrasound machine as well as live patients to complete scans. Students will also need written approval from their workplace supervisor prior to commencement of this unit. Enrolments in this unit are limited and places will be allocated until the quota is reached.
Point of care ultrasound is used routinely in the assessment and management of critically ill patients. This unit of study will introduce students to ultrasound physics and knobology. Students will learn how to perform scans including e-FAST, AAA, vascular access, DVT studies, renal, hepatobiliary, basic echo, lung and early pregnancy. This unit satisfies the coursework required by the Australasian Society for Ultrasound Medicine (ASUM) for the Certificate of Clinician Performed Ultrasound (CCPU).
Textbooks
Emergency Ultrasound Made Easy (2011) edn 2 J Bowra and R McLaughlin, Elsevier Health Sciences, Ma and Mateer's Emergency Ultrasound, 2nd ed, Ma, O. John, Mateer, James R., Blaivas.
CRIT5012 Mechanical Ventilation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex Yartsev Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures and case discussions. Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: online quizzes (20%); generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); case-based discussion boards (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students who have not completed CRIT5004 Physiology for Critical Care may need to undertake some revision. This unit is available to Clinical Neurophysiology students by special permission.
Mechanical ventilation is a common supportive therapy in the critical care environment. Students in this unit of study will become familiar with mechanical ventilator design and function, learn to interpret ventilator waveforms and measured data, and develop an understanding of the physiological consequences of mechanical ventilation. Commonly used models of mechanical ventilators are discussed and students will have the opportunity to become acquainted with their performance characteristics. Case-based discussions will be used to explore common strategies for ventilation in different clinical scenarios, including the operating theatre, the emergency department, and in the ICU.
Textbooks
Pilbeam's Mechanical Ventilation: Physiological and Clinical Applications; Mosby (2012)
CRIT5014 Resource Limited Critical Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Cox Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, podcasts, readings and case discussions. Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: 2000 word essay (30%); graded discussions (4x 500 words) (40%); online graded short answer scenario based questions (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Critical care practitioners in Australia often volunteer or are involved in crisis responses, educational interventions or providing clinical care for patients in low or middle income countries. This unit of study examines appropriate health care interventions (clinical care, education and research) in these resource limited settings. Experienced critical care practitioners working in Australia, Asia- Pacific and African regions will guide students understanding of the ethical, logistical, clinical, educational and research challenges of working in these environments.
CRIT5015 Extracorporeal Life Support

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Sean Scott, Dr. Steve Morgan, Dr Peter McCanny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x day compulsory face-to-face workshop plus self-directed online learning, online lectures and tutorials. Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Assessment: case based discussion boards (15%), 1500 word essay (25%), workshop skills assessment (20%), online exam 40% Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS) is a rapidly developing field with applications in prehospital and retrieval medicine, emergency medicine, anaesthesia and intensive care. It has an expanding set of indications including cardiac arrest, cardiogenic shock, severe respiratory failure and organ support for high-risk procedures. Students will gain an understanding of extracorporeal support modalities including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R), ventricular assist devices (VAD) and Impella. The learning modules will introduce essential aspects of the management of ECLS patients including common indications, contraindications, ECLS physiology and technology. A compulsory face-to-face workshop will provide hands on familiarisation with ECLS equipment, procedures and troubleshooting.
Textbooks
ECMO in the Adult Patient (Core Critical Care) A Vuylsteke, D Brodie, A Combes, J Fowles and G Peek. Cambridge University Press (2016). Extracorporeal Life Support for Adults. G Schmidt Ed. Humana Press (2015). Extracorporeal Life Support: The ELSO Red Book 5th edition. T Brogan, L Lequier, R Lorusso, G MacLaren, G Peek (2017).
CRIT5016 Major Trauma Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gerard Moynihan Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures and podcasts, online discussion plus reading 2 x days face to face workshop (compulsory) Assessment: online quizzes (10%); generation and peer review of assessment items (20%); short answer questions (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Trauma is a major cause of mortality and morbidly. Critical care practitioners asses and manage trauma patients in both the initial stabilisation phase and during their stay in hospital. This unit is designed to provide students with a solid grounding in the basic concepts of trauma resuscitation and management. It addresses numerous key aspects of trauma including trauma systems and epidemiology. It covers the identification and management of injuries specific to each organ system and gives an overview of how to treat the sick trauma patient holistically.
CRIT5017 Introduction to Clinical Toxicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Khanh Nguyen, Professor Nicholas Buckley, Professor Andrew Dawson Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures Assessment: online quizzes (10%); generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); case-based discussion boards (10%); short answer questions (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Clinical toxicology is concerned with the risk assessment and management of drugs, chemicals and venoms in humans. This unit introduces students to common poisonings and envenomations in Australia and provides a framework for the initial resuscitation and risk assessment of the affected patient. Principles of supportive care, decontamination, enhanced elimination and specific antidotes will also be explored.
Textbooks
Therapeutic Guidelines: Toxicology; Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies Robert S. Hoffman, Mary Ann Howland, Neal A. Lewin, Lewis S. Nelson, Lewis R. Goldfrank; wikitox.org
CLNP5005 Neuromonitoring in Anaesthesia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical A/Prof Adam Hastings Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Short essays (20%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups (15%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (15%); online exam (50%). Students must score a minimum of 50% in the exam to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Critical Care students may request special permission to enrol in this unit of study.
This unit of study examines the techniques available to monitor the function and wellbeing of the brain and nervous system during anaesthesia and surgery. Despite their widespread use, the effect of general anaesthetic agents on the brain and spinal cord is still poorly understood. There is wide interpatient variability in responses to these agents, and intraoperative haemodynamic fluctuations and underlying disease processes are all threats to the central nervous system which may be mitigated by careful monitoring.
INTM5014 Cardiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Kozor and Dr Clare Arnott Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, discussion boards, and podcasts Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is available only to registered medical practitioners with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting. It assumes theoretical and practical knowledge of cardiology at least at the level of a registered medical practitioner. Assessment: on-line exam (50%), 1x 1000 words case study (20%), online quizzes (10%), participation in online discussion forums (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
The Cardiology syllabus is designed to meet the needs of medical practitioners who are either trainee physicians or have a special interest in the practice of cardiology. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common cardiologic conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important cardiologic conditions.
Textbooks
Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, Eleventh Edition
PAED5007 Paediatric Emergencies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Browne, Dr Nicholas Cheng Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online. Students will spend about 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, including online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. Assessment: 1x1500 word written assignment (or its equivalent) (30%); online quizzes (30%); and short answer questions in online discussion forum (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in even numbered years
This unit of study is relevant to trainees in intensive care, paediatric and emergency medicine, and other clinicians providing frontline care to critically ill children. Medically and surgically based clinical scenarios are presented with a focus on the initial management of critically ill children in the emergency department and consideration of preparation for transport. Principles of ongoing management in the intensive care setting will be addressed.

General elective units

CEPI5215 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 self-paced modules each comprising: course notes, lecture, demonstrations, exercises, quizzes Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Prohibitions: CEPI5214 Assumed knowledge: Some basic knowledge of summary statistic is assumed Assessment: quizzes (30%), assignment 1 (20%), assignment 2 (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students without the pre-requisites are encouraged to contact the Unit Coordinator to discuss their motivation and experience.
This unit of study will appeal to anyone wanting to write medical papers for conferences or journals, or to improve their paper writing skills. Students will work at their own pace through 9 modules covering research integrity, medical style, abstracts, presentations and posters, constructing a paper, data visualisation, manuscript submission, responding to reviewers' comments, post-publication research dissemination, and peer- reviewing a paper. This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, typical issues they may face, and link to resources to help them maintain integrity through their publishing careers. It will guide them to reliable evidence-based resources to improve their conference abstract, presentation and poster design, and manuscript style and writing. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, choosing a journal, keywords, improving tables and figures for manuscripts through open source software, copyright, writing cover letters and response letters to reviewers. Students will learn about measuring research impact and ways to improve research reach, dealing with the media and press releases, using social media in dissemination, digital archiving and basic skills needed to act as a peer-reviewer. This is an online unit, but those needing to study in block mode will do online study as well as a workshop.
Textbooks
Fayers P, Machin D. Quality of Life: The Assessment, Analysis and Reporting of Patient-reported Outcomes, 3rd Edition. 3 ed. Chichester, UK: Wiley Blackwell; 2016
HAEM5001 Thrombosis and Haemostasis in Acute Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Curnow Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures and case discussions, video tutorials, podcasts of experts discussing controversies Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of haemostasis is an advantage. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); case-based discussion boards (10%); short answer questions (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Thrombosis and haemostasis affect all areas of clinical practice. This unit of study will familiarise students with normal and pathological haemostasis, interpretation of coagulation laboratory tests, and practical management of bleeding and clotting disorders in the perioperative and critical care setting. Case-based discussions will explore strategies for diagnosis, investigation and management in theatres, ICU and the emergency department to assist in making optimal clinical decisions.
Textbooks
Consultative Hemostasis and Thrombosis; Kitchens, Kessler and Konkle 2013 (Pub:Elsevier)
IMAG5042 Essential Imaging for Clinicians

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sally Ayesa Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures Prohibitions: SURG5011 Assessment: online quizzes (10%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), 4x case discussions (40%); final online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study provides students with a practical and clinically relevant overview of imaging in medicine. The fundamentals of imaging modalities are described, considering risks and benefits and implications for clinical decision making. Topics are organised by system, and clinically relevant cases are used to illustrate key concepts. Assessments reflect clinical practice and focus on the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of clinical scenarios, and the role of medical imaging in the broader medical landscape. On completion of the unit, students will recognise common and important cases and improve their ability to appropriately order and interpret commonly used tests.
INTM5004 Basic Respiratory Medicine

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joe Duncan Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, discussion boards and podcasts Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is available only to registered medical practitioners with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting. Assessment: on-line exam (50%), 1 x 1000 words case study (25%), online quizzes (10%), participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
The Basic Respiratory medicine syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common respiratory conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important respiratory conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016; West's Respiratory Physiology: The Essentials 10th edition, Wolters Kluwer;
INTM5009 Basic Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Siddhartha Mahanty Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, discussion boards and podcasts Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is available only to registered medical practitioners with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting. Assessment: online exam (50%); 1 x 1000 word case study (25%); online quizzes (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); particpation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
The Basic Infectious Diseases syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The unit is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common infections and the essentials of management of these conditions. The learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important infections.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th edition, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th edition Oxford Medicine Online 2016; Mandell, Douglas and Bennett: Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 8th Edition, 2015.
MBHT5001 Diabetes Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Rudland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lectures and podcasts. Practical on campus half day workshop (attendance is strongly encouraged) and 3x90 minute live online webinars. It is compulsory that all of these sessions be attended or viewed.. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity related to the workshop. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study tasks of 500 words (3 x 10%), 1 x 1500 word literature review (20%), online exam (30%), online quizzes (10%), participation in online discussion forum (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This practical unit of study is ideal for clinicians looking to develop, update and advance their diabetes management skills. You will learn how to effectively manage diabetes mellitus. Current evidence and concepts in epidemiology, classification, pathogenesis and screening for diabetes and its complications will be addressed. The focus is on patient-centred management of diabetes, including patient engagement, lifestyle interventions, bariatric surgery, medication options and regimens, new technology and monitoring. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as prediabetes and diabetes in pregnancy will be explored with a personalised, case-based approach. Different health care delivery methods in diabetes and team based approaches to care will be discussed.
Textbooks
Endocrinology Expert Group. Therapeutic Guidelines: Endocrinology. Version 5. Melbourne: Therapeutic Guidelines Limited; 2014. ISBN9780980825374 National evidence-based clinical care guidelines for type 1 diabetes in children, adolescents and adults, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra 2011. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. General practice management of type 2 diabetes: 2016-2018. East Melbourne, Vic: RACGP, 2016.
MEDF5002 Teaching in the Clinical Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Annette Burgess and Associate Professor Chris Roberts Session: Semester 2 Classes: online learning and participation in weekly online discussion forums Assessment: Personal learning plan (15%); online presentation (15%); portfolio of evidence of learning (60%); participation in online discussion forums (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Almost all healthcare professionals are involved in education and training throughout their careers. This unit of study provides a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching and learning in the health environment. The unit will cover three main areas: planning for and facilitating learning in the clinical environment; assessing performance and providing constructive feedback; and fostering the development of students as professionals. Each of these areas will be underpinned by best evidence from clinical education research and will address current challenges and opportunities in the learning environment from the perspective of both educators and learners. Participants in the course will gain a framework they can use to support their teaching, and will develop a portfolio of evidence to support their professional development as clinician educators.
PAIN5018 Pain in Children

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Ashton-James and Ms Renee Sandells Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit provides an opportunity for students to understand the developmental physiology and psychology of infants and children, together with the pharmacology (particularly with reference to dose and route of administration) of pain management in children. Particular attention is given to management of acute pain in children, both post-operative and procedure-related pain, to methods of pain assessment in children of various ages, to non-pharmacological pain management strategies and to chronic pain presentations in children.
PAIN5021 Acute Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Ashton-James Session: Semester 1 Classes: Approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: Participation in online discussion (25%), 4000-5000 written assignment/s or equivalent (75%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aims of this unit are to provide a theoretical framework for the management of acute pain, to examine the specific contributors that are important in the development of acute pain conditions and to examine pharmacological and other approaches used in the management of acute pain. Topics that will be covered will include the principles of pre-emptive analgesia and evidence of effectiveness in preventing pain, pharmacological management of acute pain including approaches such as patient controlled analgesia, adjunctive approaches in managing acute pain and the transition from acute to chronic pain.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Schlub, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lectures, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1x1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit introduces students to statistical methods relevant in medicine and health. Students will learn how to appropriately summarise and visualise data, carry out a statistical analysis, interpret p-values and confidence intervals, and present statistical findings in a scientific publication. Students will also learn how to determine the appropriate sample size when planning a research study. Students will learn how to conduct analyses using calculators and statistical software.
Specific analysis methods of this unit include: hypothesis tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous and binary data; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples; correlation and simple linear regression; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; and introduction to multivariable regression models;.
Students who wish to continue with their statistical learning after this unit are encouraged to take PUBH5217 Biostatistics: Statistical Modelling.
Textbooks
Course notes will be made available.
SEXH5409 Medical Management of Interpersonal Violence

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Katherine Brown, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online plus block/intensive mode, 2 days (9am-5pm) Assessment: Workbook (60%); pParticipation and workshop presentation (10%); Case study (15%); Expert certificate (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Interpersonal violence has been recognised as a significant problem in Australia. This includes family violence, sexual assault and physical assault. Whilst health professionals are aware of the issue they often lack the requisite skills to examine patients with a view to documenting injury and preparing court reports and expert certificates in relation to the interpretation of injury. General practice and emergency departments are two common locations for the victims of interpersonal violence to present with injury. This unit of study is designed to equip the learner with the knowledge and skills required to respond to the clinical needs of a person who has experienced interpersonal violence and to document the findings in a manner that would be useful for medico-legal reports. The learning process will include readings and self-directed learning activities relevant to the learner's working environment and geographical location. The course will deal primarily with the physical effects of violence with limited emphasis on the management of psychological trauma. The course includes epidemiology, interpretation of injury, basic forensic science and toxicology, legal issues such as consent and the presentation of an expert certificate for the court.
Textbooks
Stark M. M. (2011). Clinical Forensic Medicine: A Physician's Guide. 3rd Edition.
BMRI5019 Psychiatry in Clinical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Caryl Barnes Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, podcasts, discussion boards, including several online tutorials Prohibitions: (BMRI5003 and BMRI5050) Assumed knowledge: MBBS or equivalent Assessment: online case based discussions 30%; oral presentation 30%; clinical case study 40% Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit is designed for medical practitioners such as general practitioners, emergency physicians, physicians, paediatricians and surgeons. Students will develop skills in the recognition and management of mental health conditions that frequently present in primary health and hospital settings. The unit will cover high prevalence mental disorders including mood, anxiety, stress and trauma-related disorders, including complex trauma as well as the low prevalence disorders such as psychosis. Managing psychiatric emergencies, the use of the Mental Health Act and medical comorbidites will be demonstrated. Students will develop skills in assessment, mental state examination, and the biopsychosocial approach to formulation, management and trauma-informed care. The range of evidence-based pharmacological, biopsychosocial and lifestyle interventions for mental disorders will be introduced. Other topics will include somatic presentations of psychological and psychosocial problems, addiction medicine, old age psychiatry, youth mental health and doctors' health. Students will participate in casebased learning activities and assessments.
Textbooks
Recommended text Kaplan and Sadock Synopsis of Psychiatry, 2014.
PAIN5003 Pain Treatment and Management Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Dr Charles Brooker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce participants to the core principles of pain assessment, treatment and management. Participants consider the biopsychosocial model and the scientific basis for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. They explore principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, together with routes of drug administration. The role of physiotherapy and rehabilitation management, and the use of procedures such as neural blockade, simulation techniques and surgery are also considered.
WARC5001 Research Translation, Impact and Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Julie Redfern, Prof Clara Chow, Dr Stephanie Partridge Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures, discussion forums, video tutorials Assumed knowledge: An understanding of research methodology and clinical trials is assumed. Assessment: Journal Club (30%); Discussion Boards (20%); Research Proposal (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
To optimise healthcare delivery, we need evidence-based strategies to enable research translation and to assess impact. This unit of study will teach these skills, including fostering and maintaining stakeholder engagement, pragmatic study design, cost effectiveness analysis, recognising and managing barriers and enablers to implementation, and post-research translation. Case-based discussions and preparation of a research proposal will develop the skills required to enhance impact and hasten adoption of research into routine care. This practical unit will suit students who are interested in improving their skills and knowledge in the areas of clinical or health services research and who are keen to enhance the impact of their current or future research.
Textbooks
Grol R, Wensing M and Eccles M. Improving Patient Care. The Implementation of Change in Clinical Practice. 2nd ed. Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated (2013); Brownson RC, Colditz GA and Proctor EK. Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health: Translating Science to Practice. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Oxford University Press (2017).

Project units

MEDF5301 Project (Advanced Masters)

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Students must have a University of Sydney staff member or University approved supervisor for their project. Session: Semester 1,Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress of their project. Assessment: 2000 word written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10000 words, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Approval of the project and supervisor by the Program Director must be confirmed prior to commencing the project.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master's degree. The project may take the form of analysis of an existing data set, a systematic or integrative review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. In some streams, projects may be available for students to select. It is essential, where there is the use of patient information or recruitiment of patient study subjects, that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. The candidate will enter into a learning contract and will be guided through the steps required to plan and execute a substantial research project, and prepare a scholarly work which may be a paper for publication. A candidate must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.
MEDF5302 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part A)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Students must have a University of Sydney staff member or University approved supervisor for their project. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress of their project. Assessment: 2000 word written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10000 words, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Approval of the project and supervisor by the Program Director must be confirmed prior to commencing the project.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master's degree. The project may take the form of analysis of an existing data set, a systematic or integrative review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. In some streams, projects may be available for students to select. It is essential, where there is the use of patient information or recruitment of patient study subjects, that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. The candidate will enter into a learning contract and will be guided through the steps required to plan and execute a substantial research project and prepare a scholarly work which may be a paper for publication. Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.
MEDF5303 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part B)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Students must have a University of Sydney staff member or University approved supervisor for their project. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress of their project Assessment: 2000 word written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10000 words, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Approval of the project and supervisor by the Program Director must be confirmed prior to commencing the project.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master's degree. The project may take the form of analysis of an existing data set, a systematic or integrative review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. In some streams, projects may be available for students to select. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or recruitment of patient study subjects that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. The candidate will enter into a learning contract and will be guided through the steps required to plan and execute a substantial research project and prepare a scholarly work which may be a paper for publication. A candidate must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.