International Ophthalmology

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

International Ophthalmology

Master of International Ophthalmology

Students in the Community Ophthalmology stream must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) 36 credit points of core units of study from Part 1
(b) 12 credit points of units of study from Part 3.
Students in the Post Vocational Ophthalmology stream must successfully complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) 36 credit points of core units of study from Part 2
(b) 12 credit points of units of study from Part 3.

Graduate Diploma in International Ophthalmology

Students in the Community Ophthalmology stream must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) 36 credit points of core units of study from Part 1.
Students in the Post Vocational Ophthalmology stream must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) 36 credit points of core units of study from Part 2.

Part 1

Community Ophthalmology stream
OPSC5001 Ophthalmic Anatomy

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yves Kerdraon, Dr Simon Taylor and Dr Richard Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of basic human anatomy Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have knowledge of anatomy relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fulfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to describe the normal anatomical organisation of the human eye, orbit and its contents as well as the head and neck, including the cells, organs and tissues. They will be able to describe the principle components of the human visual system and their function in detail and how diagnostic imaging may be used in ophthalmic practise.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5003 Ophthalmic Optics

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou, Dr Chameen Samarawickrama, Dr Kelechi Obuehi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5001 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of physics relating to light and optics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of optics relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. Particular emphasis is placed on the topics of physical, geometrical, physiological and instrument optics. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fulfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study, students can describe the physical properties of light and lasers with particular reference to their interaction with the eye and instruments and they are able to describe the geometrical principles of light and the laws governing lights interaction with materials. They can outline the optical properties, limitations and image formation of common ophthalmic instruments and the design aspects that improve image quality and describe the physiological optics of the human eye and how it is evaluated and the normal changes of accommodation with age. They will understand the use of optical instruments for this purpose and can describe the process of objective and subjective refraction and how this impacts prescription of spectacles, contact lenses or the surgical management of ametropia.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5013 Ophthalmology in Developing Countries 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou and Dr Nitin Verma Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides candidates with the foundations of the practise of clinical ophthalmology with an emphasis on the specific diseases and pathology of their native country. On completion of this unit, the successful student will understand the basis of the practise of clinical ophthalmology including basic pharmacology, public health measures, nutrition and its impact on ocular health, general microbiology, principles of genetics, medical statistics and epidemiology. They will also be expected to incorporate knowledge gained from prior units of study to demosntrate understanding of aetiology, pathology associated features, prognosis and management of diseases of the cornea and conjunctiva, eyelids and orbit, lacrimal system and iris and ciliary body. Students are also required to identify differences in the presentation, aetiology, course, treatment and prognosis of ocular diseases in adults compared to children. They area expected to be able to identify and study areas of ophthalmic significance in developing countries and, in particular, their own home country, and to utilise online ophthalmic and medical resources to gain knowledge and assist in the management of ocular and general medical disease. Please note that students enrolling in this unit must be overseas trained medical practitioners from countries without an established vocational ophthalmology training programme and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5014 Ophthalmology in Developing Countries 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou and Dr Nitin Verma Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5013 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides candidates with the foundations of the practise of clinical ophthalmology with an emphasis on the specific diseases and pathology of their native country. On completion of this unit, the successful student will be able to apply the scientific basis of the practise of clinical ophthalmology to the following areas of specific ocular systems: basic pharmacology, public health measures, nutrition and its impact on ocular health, general microbiology, principles of genetics, medical statistics and epidemiology. Students are required to incorporate knowledge gained from the pre-requisite unit of study (OPSC5013) to gain knowledge on the aetiology, pathology, prognosis and management of ophthalmology-related diseases. Students are required to identify differences in the presentation, aetiology, course, treatment and prognosis of ocular diseases in adults compared to children. They are also required to identify and study areas of ophthalmic significance in developing countries and, in particular, the candidate's home country, as we as utilise online ophthalmic and medical resources to gain knowledge and assist in the management of ocular and general medical disease. Students undertaking this unit must be overseas trained medical practitioners from countries without an established vocational ophthalmology training programs and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5015 Clinical Ophthalmology 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nitin Verma Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5013 and OPSC5014 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides students with the practical experience and knowledge necessary to manage ophthalmic conditions. The unit employs a mentor-based approach with candidates applying knowledge to eye clinic patients under the mentorship of an approved ophthalmologist in the student's country of practise, visiting ophthalmologists from Australia and New Zealand, and a representative from their local health authority. Students are required to attend ophthalmology clinics in a variety of settings on a full-time basis under the supervision of their mentors. They will be continuously supervised and assessed as to their competence in their management of ophthalmic conditions in both adults and children. The clinical load will be reflected in the spectrum of submitted case histories by the student. They are required to show that they can competently manage a wide range of ophthalmic conditions by taking an appropriate medical and ophthalmic history, performing an ophthalmic examination, an appropriate general medical examination and appropriate preoperative assessment. They must show that they are able to identify the most likely diagnosis and listing an appropriate differential diagnosis. In addition, they are required to outline and/or perform appropriate and medical investigations and outline a management plan for the condition. Successful candidates will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently as an ophthalmologist in their native country. Candidates must be overseas trained medical practitioners from countries without an established vocational ophthalmology training program and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5016 Clinical Ophthalmology 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nitin Verma Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5015 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides students with the practical experience and knowledge necessary to manage ophthalmic conditions. The unit employs a mentor-based approach with candidates applying knowledge to eye clinic patients under the mentorship of an approved ophthalmologist in the student's country of practise, visiting ophthalmologists from Australia and New Zealand, and a representative from their local health authority. Students are required to attend ophthalmology clinics in a variety of settings on a full-time basis under the supervision of their mentors. They will be continuously supervised and assessed as to their competence in their management of ophthalmic conditions in both adults and children. The clinical load will be reflected in the spectrum of submitted case histories by the student. They are required to show that they can competently manage a wide range of ophthalmic conditions by taking an appropriate medical and ophthalmic history, performing an ophthalmic examination, an appropriate general medical examination and appropriate preoperative assessment. They must show that they are able to identify the most likely diagnosis and listing an appropriate differential diagnosis. In addition, they are required to outline and/or perform appropriate and medical investigations and outline a management plan for the condition. Successful candidates will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently as an ophthalmologist in their native country. Candidates must be overseas trained medical practitioners from countries without an established vocational ophthalmology training program and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit. Candidates must be overseas trained medical practitioners from countries without an established vocational ophthalmology training program and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5017 Surgical Ophthalmology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter McCluskey and Prof John Grigg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides students with the practical experience and knowledge necessary to manage surgical ophthalmic conditions. The unit employs a mentor-based approach with students working under the guidance of an approved ophthalmologist the student's country of practise, visiting ophthalmologists from Australia and New Zealand and a representative from their local health authority. The emphasis of this unit is on pre-operative assessment, surgical competence and post operative management. Students work in a variety of settings including public and private hospitals, ophthamology surgical clinics run by visiting Australian and New Zealand ophthalmologists, and outreach clinics in other smaller communities. Surgical mentors will provide the appropriate training in specific ophthalmic operations including extra capsular cataract surgery, repair of traumatic eye and eyelid injuries, infective eyelid and orbital lesions, benign and malignant lid procedures, pterygium surgery, acute glaucoma procedures, strabismus procedures and simple lacrimal duct procedures. Students are required to show that they can competently assess and perform ophthalmic surgery and manage post operative complications by taking an appropriate medical and ophthalmic history, performing an ophthalmic examination, conducting a general medical examination and a pre-operative assessment. They are required to identify the most likely diagnosis and list an appropriate differential diagnosis of the aetiology of the surgical disease and they must bea able to perform appropriate ophthalmic and medical investigations. At the end of the unit, a supervised surgical exam will be undertaken in Sydney or their country of practise. The exam will be a supervised extracapsular cataract extraction that the candidate must perform competently to complete the unit of study. Candidates must be overseas trained medical practitioners from countries without an established vocational ophthalmology training program and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5033 Acute and Emergency Eye Presentations

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Grigg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online Assessment: 3 x 2500 word written assignments (90%), online forum discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Candidates must be overseas trained medical practitioners without an established vocational ophthalmology training program and be working in a clinical ophthalmology unit.
This unit of study provides students with the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute and emergency presentations in ophthalmology. The unit covers corneal ulcerations, penetrating eye trauma, orbital blowout fractures, blunt ocular trauma and intraocular foreign bodies, cranial nerve palsies, giant cell arthritis, retinal vascular occulsions, acute glaucoma and uveitis, neonatal conjunctivitis and infant lukoria, recent onset nystagmus and neuro-ophthalmic emergencies.
Textbooks
Wills Eye Hospital, Kunimoto Derek Y., (ed) et al, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins: The Wills Eye Manual: Office and Emergency Room Diagnosis and Treatment of Eye Disease 6th ed. 2012

Part 2

Vocational Ophthalmology stream
OPSC5001 Ophthalmic Anatomy

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yves Kerdraon, Dr Simon Taylor and Dr Richard Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of basic human anatomy Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have knowledge of anatomy relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fulfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to describe the normal anatomical organisation of the human eye, orbit and its contents as well as the head and neck, including the cells, organs and tissues. They will be able to describe the principle components of the human visual system and their function in detail and how diagnostic imaging may be used in ophthalmic practise.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5003 Ophthalmic Optics

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou, Dr Chameen Samarawickrama, Dr Kelechi Obuehi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5001 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of physics relating to light and optics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of optics relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. Particular emphasis is placed on the topics of physical, geometrical, physiological and instrument optics. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fulfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study, students can describe the physical properties of light and lasers with particular reference to their interaction with the eye and instruments and they are able to describe the geometrical principles of light and the laws governing lights interaction with materials. They can outline the optical properties, limitations and image formation of common ophthalmic instruments and the design aspects that improve image quality and describe the physiological optics of the human eye and how it is evaluated and the normal changes of accommodation with age. They will understand the use of optical instruments for this purpose and can describe the process of objective and subjective refraction and how this impacts prescription of spectacles, contact lenses or the surgical management of ametropia.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5026 Cornea and Anterior Segment Surgery

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of the theoretical and practical foundations of the practise of cornea and anterior segment surgery anatomy. On completion of this unit of study, the successful student will be able to: (1) Describe the normal anatomical organisation of the anterior segment and adnexae of the human eye; (2) Describe the principal pathological conditions affecting these structures; (3) Describe appropriate diagnostic testing for corneal and eyelid diseases; (4) Describe appropriate medical and surgical management used in these conditions. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5027 Glaucoma

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Grigg Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5026 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will provide candidates with the theoretical and practical knowledge of the treatment of glaucoma. The first part of the unit will cover classification and epidemiology, pathology and pathogens, clinical assessment, disease detection and monitoring progression. The second part of the course will include teaching on primary open angle glaucoma, primary and secondary angle closure glaucoma, secondary open angle glaucoma, neovascular glaucoma. paediatric glaucoma, congenital and developmental glaucoma. The final sections will look at medical therapy, laser therapy and surgical therapy. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5028 Practical International Ophthalmology 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter McCluskey, Professor John Grigg and Dr Con Petsoglou Session: Intensive February,Intensive June Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5026 and OPSC5027 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This course covers interpretation and assessment of special investigation for glaucoma and anterior segment including microbiology, preparation of specimens, confocal imaging, corneal topography, ocular biometry, perimetry, and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Upon successful completion of this unit of study, students will be able to: (1) diagnose a broad range of cornea, anterior segment and glucomatous abnormalities by clinical assessment, (2) understand which investigations to order in patients with anterior segment disease and interpret the results of these investigations, (3) have a comprehensive understanding of medical and surgical management of anterior segment disease. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5029 Practical International Ophthalmology 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter McCluskey, Professor John Grigg and Dr Con Petsoglou Session: Intensive February,Intensive June Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5026 and OPSC5027 and OPSC5028 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This course covers interpretation and assessment of OCT, fluorescein angiography, including green angiography, autofluorescence, electrophysiology, ocular motility assessment and research methodology. Upon successful completion of this unit of study, students will be able to: (1) understand published guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of important medical retina and paediatric ophthalmic clinical disorders, (2) develop a community based screening program for important medical retina and paediatric ophthalmic clinical disorders, (3) have a broad understanding of the challenges of implementing such programs. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5030 Medical Retina

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter McCluskey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5028 and OPSC5029 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will provide candidates with the theoretical and practical foundations for the treatment of retinal disorders and diseases. On completion of this Unit of Study the successful student will be able to: (1) describe and classify the various clinical types of medical retina disease, (2) describe the pathology and pathophysiology of different types of medical retina disease, (3) describe appropriate diagnostic testing for medical retina disease, (4) have a detailed understanding of the range of medical disease affecting the retina. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5031 Paediatric Ophthalmology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Grigg Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5026 and OPSC5027 and OPSC5030 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study provides candidates with the theoretical and practical foundations necessary to assess and perform paediatric ophthalmology. The first part of the unit covers retinopathy of prematurity, refractive error and amblyopia, strabismus I comitant, strabismus II incomitant and vertical deviation. Following this, we will look at media opacities, congenital cataracts, congenital glaucoma and developmental glaucoma, an introduction to genetic eye disease and paediatric ophthalmic infectious diseases.The final part of the unit covers paediatric ocular oncology, orbital and lacrimal disease, the child who can't see approach to and investigations, phakomatoses and nystagmus. On completion of this Unit of Study the successful students will be able to : (1)Have a detailed understanding of paediatric eye disorders, (2) understand the genetics, pathophysiology and pathology of paediatric eye disorders, (3)describe appropriate diagnostic testing for paediatric eye disorders, (4) describe appropriate medical and surgical management used to treat paediatric eye disorders. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

Part 3

OPSC5032 Treatise

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter McCluskey, Professor John Grigg and Dr Con Petsoglou Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (OPSC5013 and OPSC5014 and OPSC5017) or (OPSC5026 and OPSC5027 and OPSC5030) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The treatise may take one of two forms, either a written output on work peformed during the cadidature from a supervised student project that contains between 10,000 - 20,000 words or a scientific paper that arises from a supervised student's project and has been accepted by a peer review journal for publication. The scientific paper must be embedded in a treatise with an expanded introduction and literature review as well as an expanded conclusion/discussion section. Additional methods and results not presented in the scientific paper should also be included. On completion of this unit of study the successfiul student will be able to (1) undertake a medical/scientific project and follow it to its completion, (2) work constructively under the supervision of a supervisor, (3) display scientific thinking and apply this to ophthamology and (4) attempt to publish their treatise or learn how to publish their work. Candidates must be overseas trained specialists from countries with an established vocational ophthalmology training program. They must have satisfactorily completed the requirements to practise as ophthalmologists or be eligible to undertake further fellowship training in their country of residence.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units