Ophthalmic Science

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Ophthalmic Science

Master of Medicine (Ophthalmic Science)

Master of Science in Medicine (Ophthalmic Science)

Students must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) 48 credit points of core units of study.

Graduate Diploma in Ophthalmic Science

Students must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) 36 credit points of core units of study.

Core units

It is recommended that students enrol in units in the following order. The same order applies whether commencing in Semester 1 or Semester 2:
OPSC5001 Ophthalmic Anatomy

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yves Kerdraon, Dr Simon Taylor and Dr Richard Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of basic human anatomy Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have knowledge of anatomy relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fulfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to describe the normal anatomical organisation of the human eye, orbit and its contents as well as the head and neck, including the cells, organs and tissues. They will be able to describe the principle components of the human visual system and their function in detail and how diagnostic imaging may be used in ophthalmic practise.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5003 Ophthalmic Optics

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou, Dr Chameen Samarawickrama, Dr Kelechi Obuehi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5001 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of physics relating to light and optics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of optics relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. Particular emphasis is placed on the topics of physical, geometrical, physiological and instrument optics. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fulfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study, students can describe the physical properties of light and lasers with particular reference to their interaction with the eye and instruments and they are able to describe the geometrical principles of light and the laws governing lights interaction with materials. They can outline the optical properties, limitations and image formation of common ophthalmic instruments and the design aspects that improve image quality and describe the physiological optics of the human eye and how it is evaluated and the normal changes of accommodation with age. They will understand the use of optical instruments for this purpose and can describe the process of objective and subjective refraction and how this impacts prescription of spectacles, contact lenses or the surgical management of ametropia.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5002 Ophthalmic Physiology

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Grigg, A/Prof Clare Fraser, Dr Logan Mitchell and Dr Elisa Cornish Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5001 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of basic human cell and organ physiology Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of physiology relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. Particular emphasis is placed on the organisation, function, mechanism of action, regulation and adaptation of relevant structures and their component parts. Students are also expected to have an understanding of the maturation and normal ageing changes of the human eye. They must have a thorough understanding of the methods used to measure the activity of relevant physiological processes such as intraocular pressure, retinal electrical activity and visual acuity. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in depth which fullfills the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study, students are able to describe the normal physiological functioning of the human eye and nervous system and the principal physiological laws and phenomena that apply to these systems. They can also describe how these physiological processes are measured and the limitations of such tests.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
OPSC5004 Practical Ophthalmic Science

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou, Prof Peter McCluskey and Prof John Grigg, A/Prof Clare Fraser and Dr Chameen Samarawickrama Session: Intensive December,Intensive June Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5001 and OPSC5002 and OPSC5003 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of physics relating to light and optics. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of the practical aspects of the basic ophthalmic sciences. Particular emphasis will be placed on the topics of Anatomy, Physiology and Optics.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

Core units - Master of Medicine, Master of Science in Medicine only

OPSC5005 Treatise

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Grigg, A/Prof Samantha Fraser-Bell, Dr Con Petsoglou and Prof Peter McCluskey Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: OPSC5001 and OPSC5002 and OPSC5003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The treatise is a formal academic composition on work performed during the student's candidature from a supervised project that contains between 10,000-20,000 words. The format of the project may be of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, short clinical trial, survey or other project acceptable to the unit of study coordinator. On completion of this unit of study the successful student will be able to undertake a medical/scientific project and follow it to its completion, work constructively under formal academic supervision, display scientific thinking and apply this to ophthalmology, and attempt to publish their treatise or learn how to publish their work. Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of one area in the basic ophthalmic sciences or clinical ophthalmology.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

Stream core units

OPSC5036 Practical Oculoplastic Surgery

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Associate Professor Raf Ghabrial Session: Intensive November Classes: Intensive on campus Prerequisites: OPSC5001 and OPSC5002 and OPSC5034 Corequisites: OPSC5035 Assumed knowledge: Students undertaking this unit of study must have advanced specialty training with RANZCO qualifications or equivalent. Consideration will be give to RACS and dermatology advance trainees. Assessment: Online surgical logbook (40%) and observed structured clinical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students should contact the discipline directly for permission to enrol. The PG Coordinator will email Student Services to notify them of students who have permission.
This unit of study provides candidates with the practical experience and knowledge necessary to assess and perform oculoplastic surgery. This is a mentor-based programme with students supervised in a number of clinical and laboratory environments. Emphasis is on pre-operative investigation, surgical skill and post-operative management. Students are required to observe and perform and extra-ocular surgical techniques relevant to oculoplastic surgery. Students rotate through a number of oculoplastic surgical practices and observe oculoplastic surgery taking place using a number of different oculoplastic surgical systems. Further candidates will have to attend a number of wet lab sessions designed for practicing oculoplastic surgical techniques on artificial, animal or human eyes. A logbook of observed and performed surgeries will be kept and used for assessment. Surgical mentors will be allocated and provide the appropriate training in specific oculoplastic operations.
Textbooks
A Manual of Systematic Eyelid Surgery by J. R. O. Collin MA MB Bchir FRCS FRCOphth DO (3rd edition 2006); Colour Atlas of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery, by AG Tyers and JRO Collin (3rd edition 2007); Unfavourable Results in Eyelid and Lacrimal Surgery by Joseph A. Mauriello, Jr. (2000).