Public Health

Research Methods Specialisation

Master of Public Health - Research Methods - Specialisation

A specialisation requires the completion of 18 credit points chosen from units of study listed below;

Specialisation requirements for Research Methods:

Research Methods Specialisation

PUBH5125 Environmental Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5010 and PUBH5217 and PUBH5121 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Environmental epidemiology studies the effects of environmental exposures on health and wellbeing in the human population. The unit has a strong focus on epidemiological and statistical methods and applications including time-series and spatial analysis. Taking an eco-social approach, we broadly define the environment as anything external to the person including the physical, social, psychological and aesthetic environment and their interactions. This unit will provide students with a practical understanding of the research methods used to assess the exposure-response relationship between environmental hazards and health outcomes. Building on students knowledge of the environment - for example air, water, soil, climate, the built environment, the unit will cover study designs and methods of exposure assessment and statistical analysis used in assessing environmental health risks. Students will gain technical skills in data analysis and visualisation including spatial data involving Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for mapping and statistical analysis of exposures and health outcomes using the R Statistical Software. The unit will also explore future directions in the field of environmental epidemiology. Students will also learn about its importance in the Planetary Health framework when assessing global health risks and impacts in the context of climate change.
PUBH5215 Analysis of Linked Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Patrick Kelly Session: Intensive June,Intensive November Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: (PUBH5010 or BSTA5011 or CEPI5100) and (PUBH5211 or PUBH5217 or BSTA5004) Assumed knowledge: Basic familiarity with SAS computing syntax and methods of basic statistical analysis of fixed-format data files Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces the topic of analysing linked health data. The topic is very specialised and is relevant to those who are familiar with writing a basic SAS program, who wish to further develop their knowledge and skills in managing and analysing linked health data, eg. hospital admissions, cancer registry, births and deaths.
Contents include: an overview of the theory of data linkage methods and features of comprehensive data linkage systems, sufficient to know the sources and limitations of linked health data sets; design of linked data studies using epidemiological principles; construction of numerators and denominators used for the analysis of disease trends and health care utilisation and outcomes; assessment of the accuracy and reliability of data sources; data linkage checking and quality assurance of the study process; basic statistical analyses of linked longitudinal health data; manipulation of large linked data files; writing syntax to prepare linked data files for analysis, derive exposure and outcome variables, relate numerators and denominators and produce results from statistical procedures at an introductory to intermediate level.
The unit is delivered as a workshop over 5 consecutive days. Lectures are delivered in the morning sessions and the afternoon sessions are computer labs where students gain hands-on experience using large health datasets.
The unit is usually offered twice a year, once in mid-June and once in mid-November.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5216 Controlled Clinical Trials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Chris Brown (Research Fellow), A/Prof Andrew Martin, Rebecca Asher Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Prohibitions: PUBH5206 - Controlled trials (2CP) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit introduces the principles underpinning the design and conduct of high quality controlled clinical trials to generate good evidence for health care decision making. The topics include clinical trial design, randomisation, sample size, measures of treatment effect, methodological issues, trial protocols, and ethical principles.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5217 Biostatistics: Statistical Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Patrick Kelly, Associate Professor Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Prohibitions: (PUBH5211 or PUBH5212 or PUBH5213) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In this unit, you will learn how to analyse health data using statistical models. In particular, how to fit and interpret the results of different statistical models which are commonly used in medicine and health research: linear models, logistic models, and survival models. This unit is ideal for those who wish to further develop their research skills and/or improve their literacy in reading and critiquing journal articles in medicine and health.
The focus of the unit is very applied and not mathematical. Students gain hands on experience in fitting statistical models in real data. You will learn how to clean data, build an appropriate model, and interpret results. This unit serves as a prerequisite for PUBH5218 Advanced Statistical Modelling.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5218 Advanced Statistical Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Katrina Blazek Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5212 or PUBH5217 Prohibitions: CEPI5310 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit covers statistical analysis techniques that are commonly required for analysing data that arise from clinical or epidemiological studies. Students will gain hands on experience applying model-building strategies and fitting advanced statistical models. In particular, students will learn how to handle missing data, non-linear continuous covariates, use propensity scores for model adjustment and to analyse correlated data. Correlated data arise from clustered or longitudinal study designs, such as, cross-over studies, matched case-control studies, cluster randomised trials and studies involving repeated measurements. Statistical methods that will be covered include fixed effects models, marginal models using Generalised Estimating Equations (GEE), and mixed effects models (also known as hierarchical or multilevel models). This unit of study focuses on data analyses and the interpretation of results.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5224 Advanced Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll, Dr Erin Mathieu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study is intended for students who have completed Epidemiology Methods and Uses (or an equivalent unit of study) at a credit or higher level. It is designed to extend students' practical and theoretical knowledge of epidemiology beyond basic principles and in particular to give them a practical understanding of how epidemiological principles and practices are used in real world settings. Students are given an opportunity to acquire some of the practical knowledge and skills needed to undertake epidemiological research and also to consolidate their critical appraisal skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5227 Public Health Program Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Grunseit Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5033 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Comprehensive evaluation of public health and disease prevention programs is critical to developing an evidence base for public health practice as well as for accountability to stakeholders. Evaluations demonstrate the efficacy, effectiveness and/or efficiency of the program and provide models of good practice. This course builds skills in planning, conducting and using formative, process, impact and outcome evaluations of public health programs, with an emphasis on those which address public health approaches to chronic disease prevention. Using three highly interactive face-to-face workshops (Workshops 1 and 2 on a consecutive Friday and Saturday) supplemented by online resources and four weeks of online discussions, students will participate in readings, group work, lectures and discussions, to develop skills in defining the purpose of an evaluation, defining the evaluation questions, selecting evaluation designs and measures for evaluation (and understand the process of measurement development). A specific focus will be on skills to critically appraise evaluations and to use results in practice. Workshop 3 will be devoted to methods for scaling up interventions to the population level, and to the design and evaluation of multi-faceted complex public health programs, including presentations by currently practicing public program managers.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5312 Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Alison Hayes Session: Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: HPOL5000 and (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Prohibitions: PUBH5302 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The overall aim of the course is to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. Students will be introduced to the principles of economic evaluation and develop skills in the application of those principles to resource allocation choices. Emphasis will be placed on learning by case study analysis and problem solving in small groups. This unit covers: principles and different types of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation, the role of the PBAC, introduction to advanced methods including use of patient-level data and data linkage. The workshops consist of interactive lectures, class exercises and quizzes.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5317 Advanced Economic and Decision Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kirsten Howard and A/Prof Andrew Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5312 Prohibitions: PUBH5205 and PUBH5307 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit combines decision theory and more advanced health economic concepts to provide students with hands-on skills in specialised analysis methods, and modelling techniques, for evaluating healthcare options and reaching recommendations in the face of uncertainty. Students will calculate and analyse data from clinical studies, extrapolate clinical study results to other settings, and construct models that synthesise evidence (and expert opinion) from multiple sources. Specific topics of study include: decision trees; expected utility theory; sensitivity and threshold analysis; the value of information (including screening and diagnostic tests); the calculation and analysis of costs and quality-adjusted survival using individual patient data (including bootstrapping techniques); Markov processes and micro-simulation; and presenting and interpreting the results of (health economic) evaluations. Lectures are accompanied by practical exercises and readings. Students gain experience applying the methods presented in lectures via computer practicals using Excel and decision analysis software (TreeAge).
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5506 Advanced Qualitative Analysis and Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5505 OR PUBH5500 OR QUAL5005 OR QUAL5006 OR GLOH5201 Assumed knowledge: You should have a basic understanding of qualitative research gained through undergraduate or postgraduate coursework or research experience. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This advanced unit of study extends students' practical and theoretical knowledge of qualitative research to provide advanced concepts and skills in qualitative data analysis and writing. You should have a basic understanding of qualitative research. We will explore the principles of qualitative analysis, and learn about different analytic strategies and key analytic tools. You will learn how to develop codes and themes, use memos and analytic maps, and interpret data through the process of writing. You will learn about starting writing, structuring articles, making analytic arguments, and editing your own work. Most importantly, we will consider what it means to think and write 'qualitatively'. You will analyse a portfolio of qualitative data, and produce a results and discussion section for a journal article. After completing this unit you will have increased your experience, skills and confidence in qualitative data analysis and writing.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5601 Public Health Special Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anita Van Zwieten, Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: The student is assumed to have the knowledge and skills required to suitably complete the requirements of the project they undertake, or be reasonably able to obtain this knowledge and these skills during the course of the project. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit is intended for students nearing the end of their MPH/GradDipPH. The Special Project is a self-directed unit focussed on a specific MPH-related topic of interest to the student. The project is supervised by an academic within the School. An external person can act as the main supervisor but a School academic would also be required. This project may be developed by the student, or the student could develop a project in consultation with an intended supervisor. The student needs to meet with the supervisor during the semester. Preferably this would be at least three times but the frequency will depend on the project and the preference of the supervisor. As the project is self-directed, there is not an expectation that the supervisor would have close involvement, although they can have if they want to. The student would be expected to undertake approximately 120 to 150 hours of work for this unit. The format of the final report or other output can be whatever is appropriate, as agreed with the supervisor(s).
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5610 Public Health Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Tim Driscoll, A/Prof Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: PUBH5010 AND PUBH5018 AND PUBH5505 AND HPOL5000 AND PUBH5036 Prohibitions: PUBH5611 and PUBH5612 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge gained from the minimum 48 credit points of the Master of Public Health is required to successfully undertake the proposed project. Students must have completed any core unit directly related to their project prior to commencing the research project - this will be determined by the Unit of Study Coordinator at the time Departmental permission is considered Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Students will do an independent research project in an area of interest relevant to public health. The student will work with a supervisor, who will help the student select a topic and then guide the student through the process of conducting a research project. The project may be a systematic review of the literature, analysis of an existing dataset, a quantitative or qualitative research study, a policy analysis or some other project acceptable to the dissertation supervisor.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5611 Public Health Dissertation A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Tim Driscoll, A/Prof Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: PUBH5010 AND PUBH5018 AND PUBH5505 AND HPOL5000 AND PUBH5036 Prohibitions: PUBH5610 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge gained from the minimum 48 credit points of the Master of Public Health is required to successfully undertake the proposed project. Students must have completed any core unit directly related to their project prior to commencing the research project - this will be determined by the Unit of Study Coordinator at the time Departmental permission is considered. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Students will do an independent research project in an area of interest relevant to public health. The student will work with a supervisor, who will help the student select a topic and then guide the student through the process of conducting a research project. The project may be a systematic review of the literature, analysis of an existing dataset, a quantitative or qualitative research study, a policy analysis or some other project acceptable to the dissertation supervisor.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PUBH5612 Public Health Dissertation B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Tim Driscoll, A/Prof Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5611 Corequisites: PUBH5010 AND PUBH5018 AND PUBH5505 AND HPOL5000 AND PUBH5036 Prohibitions: PUBH5610 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge gained from the minimum 48 credit points of the Master of Public Health is required to successfully undertake the proposed project. Students must have completed any core unit directly related to their project prior to commencing the research project - this will be determined by the Unit of Study Coordinator at the time Departmental permission is considered. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Students will do an independent research project in an area of interest relevant to public health. The student will work with a supervisor, who will help the student select a topic and then guide the student through the process of conducting a research project. The project may be a systematic review of the literature, analysis of an existing dataset, a quantitative or qualitative research study, a policy analysis or some other project acceptable to the dissertation supervisor.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5205 Doing a Systematic Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Giovanni Strippoli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315 Assumed knowledge: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This project unit provides an opportunity to apply skills learnt in other units and further develop knowledge and skills by undertaking a systematic review (ideally including a meta analysis) in a topic area nominated by the student. The unit is student-driven with no direct supervision, but the student will have three chances to interact with the unit coordinator, to define the research questions, to discuss the selected methodology, and prior to submission. The assessment task is to undertake a systematic review of randomised trials and present the review in the form of a paper suitable for submission to a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5215 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christina Abdel Shaheed Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Prohibitions: CEPI5214 Assumed knowledge: Some basic knowledge of summary statistic is assumed Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will appeal to anyone wanting to write medical papers for conferences or journals, or to improve their paper writing skills. Students will work at their own pace through 9 modules covering research integrity, medical style, abstracts, presentations and posters, constructing a paper, data visualisation, manuscript submission, responding to reviewers' comments, post-publication research dissemination, and peer- reviewing a paper. This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, typical issues they may face, and link to resources to help them maintain integrity through their publishing careers. It will guide them to reliable evidence-based resources to improve their conference abstract, presentation and poster design, and manuscript style and writing. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, choosing a journal, keywords, improving tables and figures for manuscripts through open source software, copyright, writing cover letters and response letters to reviewers. Students will learn about measuring research impact and ways to improve research reach, dealing with the media and press releases, using social media in dissemination, digital archiving and basic skills needed to act as a peer-reviewer. This is an online unit, but those needing to study in block mode will do online study as well as a workshop.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5300 Research Grants: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Germaine Wong Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Prohibitions: CEPI5505 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In this unit of study, the student will develop his/her own research proposal, to a standard suitable for a peer-reviewed granting body. Each section of a grant proposal (Abstract, Aims, Background, Significance, Methods) will be discussed, with the student presenting and refining the corresponding section of his/her own proposal in a synchronous online workshop setting. This will be complemented by online presentations from experienced researchers on the practical aspects of clinical research. Topics include: observational studies, randomised controlled trials, diagnostic test evaluation, qualitative studies, economic evaluation, and process evaluation. The unit will conclude with a one-day, face-to-face, mandatory workshop where students will learn about budgeting, qualitative research, strategies and grant administration, research ethics and peer review of research grants.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5312 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (1 and 2)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Katy Bell and Dr Emily He Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 and CEPI5202 and CEPI5311 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, application of test results to individual patients, place of tests in diagnostic pathways, impact of tests on patient outcomes, principles and use of evidence in population screening, overdiagnosis, systematic review of diagnostic tests and meta-analysis. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a comprehensive understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CEPI5315 Introduction to Systematic Reviews

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Prohibitions: CEPI5203 or CEPI5102 or CEPI5314 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
In this unit of study, we aim to introduce you to systematic reviews and meta-analyses of relevance to healthcare with a particular focus on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials. Students can choose to learn in online or normal day (on-campus) mode. All students will work through four online modules, delivered over twelve weeks, addressing the following topics at an introductory level: What and why systematic reviews (and meta-analysis); How to formulate answerable healthcare questions and searching for systematic reviews; How a systematic review is conducted and understanding the principles of meta-analysis; and How to appraise, interpret and apply the results of systematic reviews (and meta-analyses). Students will have the opportunity to discuss unit of study learning materials in online tutorials or via weekly (on-campus) tutorials. Readings and other learning materials will be available via eLearning.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units