Bachelor of Science / Doctor of Medicine

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Medicine Foundational Knowledge Units

Students in the Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Medicine
Must complete 18 credit points of foundational knowledge units of study as listed below:
(a) 6 credit points of 1000-level units
(b) 12 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(i) 6 credit points of PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001; and
(ii) 6 credit points of ANAT2011 or MEDS2005
(c) one zero credit point unit
1000-level units of study
Complete one of the following units:
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Block mode
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
2000-level units of study
MEDS2001 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6cp from [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or PHSI2007 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole-body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 8th Ed (Pearson, 2019)
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 8th Ed (Pearson, 2019)
ANAT2011 Fundamentals of Human Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MEDS2005 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students in the Medical Science stream should not enrol in this unit, they should instead enrol in MEDS2005
Where is your pancreas? What about your pituitary gland? How do we pack six meters of small intestine into our body? ANAT2011 is designed for students who are studying Human Anatomy and Histology for the first time, as well as those who have been introduced to human anatomy in biological sciences. In laboratory classes using human cadavers and human organ tissue you will gain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy of the brain and nerves; the anatomy of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems along with musculoskeletal anatomy. The hands-on laboratory classes are interwoven with lectures, tutorials and discussion groups, as well as on-line quizzes and self-directed learning modules. The course teaches the language of anatomy and develops your knowledge and practical skills in human anatomy and histology, preparing you for many applied anatomical settings. The laboratory sessions will require you to work together in teams to engage with the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will also consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This unit contains assumed knowledge for entry into the graduate medical program at the University of Sydney, and is also suitable for graduate programs in dentistry, nursing, physical therapies, forensic sciences.
Textbooks
There isn't one specific Anatomy or Histology textbook that you must use to be successful in this Unit of Study but here are some recommendations. You can also find a list of these textbooks on ANAT2011 Canvas:
MEDS2005 Human Anatomy and Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6 cp from (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: MEDS1X01 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Where exactly is your gall bladder? How do six meters of intestines fit into your body? Are you aware that you have a pineal gland? MEDS2005 is for students who are studying Human Anatomy and Histology in the Medical Sciences stream. Through face-to-face lectures and engaging laboratory practical classes that involve the use of human cadavers and histological slides of human tissues, you will gain fundamental knowledge of the Anatomy and the Histology of the human body including the nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, digestive and male and female reproductive systems. Lectures and laboratory practical classes are forums for discussion and debate regarding the structure and function of the human body. Learning will be augmented with online quizzes, self-directed learning opportunities and face-to-face tutorial sessions with additional information offered online to introduce you to a ¿Disease of the Week¿ and to `Broaden your Horizons¿ in relation to the various body systems studied. MEDS2005 starts by teaching the language of Anatomy and Histology and systematically addresses the Anatomy and Histology specific to each body system to prepare you with knowledge and practical skills for many applied anatomical and histological settings. In the hands-on laboratory practical classes, you will work in teams, engaging with the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This Unit of Study teaches the Anatomical and Histological knowledge that is assumed for entry into the Graduate Medical Program at the University of Sydney and that serves as suitable preparation for Graduate Programs in Dentistry, Nursing, Physical therapies, Forensic sciences and other applied para-clinical and clinical fields. Successful completion of this Unit will equip you with a solid foundation in Human Anatomy and Histology to support Post-Graduate careers in the fields of Biomedical Research, Innovation and Development.
Textbooks
There isn't one specific Anatomy or Histology textbook that you must use to be successful in this Unit of Study but here are some recommendations. You can also find a list of these textbooks on MEDS2005 Canvas:
Zero credit point unit of study
SMTP3007 Observational Elective

Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay and Dr Eszter Kalman Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Singapore Mode of delivery: Professional practice, Block mode
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
All Double Degrees in Medicine students are required to: (i) complete a 5 day Observational Elective Placement during their undergraduate degree; and (ii) to meet with the course director in each of the three years to reflect upon their progress and to discuss areas of personal and professional development. During the 5day observational placement, students are required to observe and reflect upon how health and well being are supported in society through a variety of means and in a variety of settings. Students elect their own area of study for this unit in consultation with the course director: placements may be conducted in a medical research institute, a charitable organization, a community health centre, or hospital. Each year a limited number of rural location placements are available.. Before embarking on their observational placement, all students must have their project approved by the course director and they must be Clin-Connect compliant. Each student must submit a 'Pre-placement Report' (~500 words) highlighting their expectations of the placement. After completion of the placement, each student is required to submit a 'Post-placement Report" reflecting on the experience, and their pre-placement expectations. The 'Post-placement Report' should be approximately ~1000 to 1,500 words. A major aim is for the student to begin to understand the challenges , both personal and societal of supporting the health and wellbeing of the community.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units