Agriculture

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

AGRICULTURE

Agriculture stream

The Agriculture stream is 120 credit points, consisting of:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level stream core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level stream core units
(iii) A 108 credit point program in Agriculture

Agriculture program

This program is only available to students enrolled in Agriculture stream.
A program in Agriculture requires 108 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level program core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level program core units, according to the following:
a) AGRI- and SOIL- coded units for students in the Animal Production major
b) GEGE- and SOIL- coded units for students in the Plant Production major
c) AGRI- and GEGE- coded units for students in the Soil Science and Hydrology major
(iii) 6 credit points of 4000-level program core units
(iv) 30 credit points of 4000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) For students undertaking advanced coursework in Agriculture: 12 credit points of 4000-level program project units and 18 credit points of 4000-level selective advanced coursework or project units
(b) For students undertaking honours in Agriculture: 24 credit points of 4000-level Honours research project units and 6 credit points of 4000-level selective Honours coursework units
(v) A 48 credit point major in Animal Production, Plant Production or Soil Science and Hydrology

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness, and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Program core
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGEN1002 Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.

2000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Program core
AGRI2001 Plant Management in Agroecosystems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGRO3004 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of experimental design and analysis including dependent and independent variables, random and representative sampling, t-tests a simple designs and interpretation of univariate analysis. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
World population is projected to reach 9 billion within 50 years and food production needs to double in a sustainable manner in order to feed human population. This profound challenge will be met by improving our knowledge and management of agroecosystems. This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of the biology and management of plants in dryland agroecosystems, with a focus on major Australian broad acre crops. Dryland agroecosystems can be defined as ecosystems modified for the purpose of producing crops, pastures and animals in environments where water limits productivity during part of the year (and are typical in Australian agriculture). These agroecosystems are characterised by regular agricultural interventions, such as cultivation, sowing, nutrient, weed, pest and disease management, and harvest. The program will involve developing an understanding of the interactions between the environment, crops/pastures and agricultural management in dryland agroecosystems. The model for describing and analysing agroecosystems will be centred on a typical cropping cycle, with an emphasis on cereals. You will gain knowledge and skills on crop physiological, growth and development responses to the combined climatic, edaphic, biotic and management factors in the growing environment. The unit will also provide a sound understanding and analysis of the practical farming framework in which this knowledge is applied through weed, disease and pest management, approaches to managing climate variability and precision agriculture. There will be a focus on assessing the effects of climate and weather in dryland agroecosystems, especially on understanding crop-water-nutrition relationships. Successful students will be able to appreciate and analyse the most important limitations to crop production and yield in Australia and how those limitations can be minimized or overcome through science-based planning and agronomic management practices.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and/or in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
SOIL2005 Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: SOIL2003 or LWSC2002 Practical field work: Approximately eight hours working field at Cobbitty Farm Wk 0 (Friday, 22 Feb 2019) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Soil and water are the two most essential natural resources on the Earth's surface which influence all forms of terrestrial life. This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental properties and processes of soil and water that affect food security and sustain ecosystems. These properties and processes are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability. You will participate in a field excursion to examine soils in a landscape to develop knowledge and understanding of soil properties, water storage, water movement and cycling of organic carbon and nutrients in relation to food production and ecosystem functioning. At the end of this unit you will be able to articulate and quantify the factors and processes that determine the composition and behaviour of soil, composition of water, soil water storage and the movement of water on the land surface. You will also be able to describe the most important properties of soil and water for food production and sustaining ecosystem functions and link this to human and climatic factors. The field excursion, report and laboratory/computer exercises have been designed to develop communication, team work and collaborative efforts.

4000-level units of study

Program core
AFNR4001 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGRF4000 Practical field work: 40 days of professional experience, 1 week long excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is designed to allow students to critically reflect on the relationship between the rural enterprise and environment and how they can contribute to the future decisions and management affecting the rural community. It is a core unit of study in 4th year for the BScAgr which requires students to complete 40 days of professional experience with the expectation that students will examine the nature of facts from their degree in this environment. A minimum of 15 days must be completed on-farm/field. The remaining days do not have to be on-farm. The unit will be counted towards 4th year, but professional experience placements will normally be undertaken throughout the degree. In the early stages of the Professional Development program students participate in 1st year rural field tours that have been developed so they can experience a range of activities, such as research, extension, on-farm and industry both in the rural and urban environment to complement their learning within their individual degree programs. Building on this various workshops have been developed to assist students to identify a rural environment theme or issue of their interest with the specific emphasis being placed on them reflecting on how their new understandings of their theme of interest affects their personal and professional development. To complete this unit students will present a portfolio of their theme including critical reflection on the pivotal relationships between the academic degree, rural environment, professional experience, and beliefs and values if the rural community. Through developing these pivotal relationships, students will be able to use their new understandings to support and guide the future developments in the rural enterprise and environment. By developing and presenting the portfolio and engaging in other online activities the students will enhance their skills in inquiry, information literacy and communication. In particular the autonomous development of case studies reflecting the contemporary issues in agriculture and their professional placements the students will have to consider their understandings of ethical, social and professional issues and further develop the personal and intellectual autonomy.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Program project
LIFE4888 Applied Life Sciences Project

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 cp of units of study of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one Table A Science major Practical field work: Depends on project choice, may be up to 4 weeks in the field, a community or industry setting. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This Unit of Study is best suited for students in Life and Environmental Sciences. Field work may form part of the project.
As the world's population builds towards 9 billion, we are challenged to create agriculture efficiencies and ensure food and water safety and security. Solutions from the Life Sciences are needed to meet these demands. In this unit you will have the opportunity to develop practical solutions from a range of discipline areas including agriculture, animal science, environmental management, food production and agribusiness. These skills and experiences will facilitate your understanding of current practices and innovations used in the development and management of natural and production ecosystems. The unit builds on applied knowledge gained from units of study undertaken throughout a degree in Life Sciences. As part of a small group of students, you will have the opportunity to work on a collaborative industry relevant research project. The activities will include the design of the study; generation, management and analysis of data; and presenting your findings to a diverse audience both orally and in written format. You will work collaboratively learning skills for better communication, organisation and time management and communication - all of which are competencies that are highly valued by employers and indicate professionalism. By doing this you will gain the ability to work collaboratively in a small team which is part of the essential foundation for a successful career pathway.
Selective advanced coursework and project
AGRI4001 Advanced Plant Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units including AGRI2001 and AGRI3888 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Some activities will take place at the University's Camden campus and/or at other field sites around NSW.
Plants have food, fibre and industrial uses in our societies. Successfully growing plants and their products for our use involves a large and very diverse mix of industries and therefore requires a wide spectrum of people with specialized skills in production and protection techniques for different types of plants and in the skills required to breed better varieties over time. Within this framework, the diversity of uses for plants is increasing, it is evident that the use of inputs such as water, nutrients and energy in the production chains must become more efficient and all industry sectors need to monitor and respond to the impact of climate change. In this unit you will be able to choose to study, from a list of alternatives, three different aspects or industries involved in plant production. This choice of modules enables you to develop targeted advanced knowledge and skills in your areas of interest, alongside building your knowledge and understanding of plant production industry processes and challenges in general. This will be achieved through a combination of interactive theory development, inquiry-led practicals, field work and field trips. By undertaking this unit you will gather a deeper knowledge of the specific technical and social issues that challenge the chosen aspects/industries while garnering an understanding of the linkages and integration of specialties required in modern crop production systems. This will empower you to further explore and contribute to plant production industries through a range of production or research-based avenues.
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Practical field work: At least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Dairy science is arguably the most multidisciplinary of all animal production areas. Topics such as animal physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics need to be understood in the context of more distant disciplines like pasture and forage crops, milk harvesting and robotics, farm economics; and the integration of all these into the whole system. In this UoS, we combine face-to-face lectures, interactive group discussions, guided field exercises and activities, and visits to commercial farms (ranging from small pasture-based to large-herd indoor systems milking >2000 cows) to gain understanding of key components of dairy system and of the system of production as a whole. This unit connects basic knowledge with practical application and contributes to develop students' ability to integrate knowledge. Completing this course successfully will give students the tools and confidence required to assist commercial farmers to improve practice change on farm and increase profitability. In line with the research expertise of the dairy science team, emphasis is placed on automatic/robotic systems and the use and application of technology in dairying.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assumed knowledge: Senior tertiary level knowledge inanimalproduction management andbehaviour and welfare of production animals Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides a historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes, a 2 day trip to the University's 'Arthursleigh' farm and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
ENVX4001 GIS, Remote Sensing and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 cp of 1000-3000 level units Assumed knowledge: Basic GIS knowledge. Completion of at least a major or minor Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing RS linked with Geographical Information Systems GIS as applied to land management problems We will review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management This will be followed by practical training in RS techniques augmented by land management project development and implementation based on integration of GIS and RS tools The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts 1 a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS 2 a practical part which aims at developing handson skills in using RS tools and 3 an applicationfocused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualize it using integrated GIS and RS techniques
SCIE4001 Science Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Assumed knowledge: Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough". This quote is widely attributed to Albert Einstein, but regardless of its provenance, it suggests that one measure of an expert's knowledge can be found in their ability to translate complex ideas so that they are accessible to anyone. The communication of science to the public is essential for science and society. In order to increase public understanding and appreciation of science, researchers must be able to explain their results, and the wider context of their research, to non-experts. This unit will explore some theoretical foundations of science communications, identify outstanding practitioners and empower students to produce effective science communication in different media. In this unit you will learn the necessary skills and techniques to tell engaging and informative science stories in order to bring complex ideas to life, for non-expert audiences. By undertaking this unit you will develop a greater understanding of the wider context of your honours unit, advance your communication skills and be able to explain your honours research to non-expert audiences such as friends, family or future employers. These transferable skills will equip you for future research - where emphasis is increasingly placed on public communication and/or outreach - or professional pathways - where effective communication of complex ideas is highly valued.
SCIE4002 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Prohibitions: ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level. Mode of delivery: Block mode
An indispensable attribute of an effective scientific researcher is the ability to collect, analyse and interpret data. Central to this process is the ability to create hypotheses and test these by using rigorous experimental designs. This modular unit of study will introduce the key concepts of experimental design and data analysis. Specifically, you will learn to formulate experimental aims to test a specific hypothesis. You will develop the skills and understanding required to design a rigorous scientific experiment, including an understanding of concepts such as controls, replicates, sample size, dependent and independent variables and good research practice (e. g. blinding, randomisation). By completing this unit you will develop the knowledge and skills required to appropriately analyse and interpret data in order to draw conclusions in the context of an advanced research project. From this unit of study, you will emerge with a comprehensive understanding of how to optimise the design and analysis of an experiment to most effectively answer scientific questions.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.
SCPU4001 Industry and Community Science Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Corequisites: SCPU4002 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one Science discipline (completion of a major) . Practical field work: Minimal practical field work is expected but requirements will vary depending on the project, and may include a period of mobility or immersion in a community or industry setting. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In Industry and Community Project units students work collaboratively in interdisciplinary teams on complex `real world¿ problems under a theme developed in collaboration with industry and community partners. Briefed by the partners and guided by project supervisors, students use systems thinking approaches to design their own projects and engage in self-directed inquiry-based research to provide final recommendations. In this unit, students will develop their own professional identity through participation in communities of practice and reflective practice, together with an in-depth understanding of specific project-related matters. This experience will equip students with an agile mindset and skillset that will assist them to successfully navigate dynamic future environments and career paths. See the ICPU website for further information here: https://www.sydney.edu.au/students/industry-and-community-projects/4000-level-projects.html
SCPU4002 Industry and Community Science Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Corequisites: SCPU4001 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one Science discipline (completion of a major) . Practical field work: Minimal practical field work is expected but requirements will vary depending on the project, and may include a period of mobility or immersion in a community or industry setting. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Industry and Community Project units students work collaboratively in interdisciplinary teams on complex `real world¿ problems under a theme developed in collaboration with industry and community partners. Briefed by the partners and guided by project supervisors, students use systems thinking approaches to design their own projects and engage in self-directed inquiry-based research to provide final recommendations. In this unit, students will develop their own professional identity through participation in communities of practice and reflective practice, together with an in-depth understanding of specific project-related matters. This experience will equip students with an agile mindset and skillset that will assist them to successfully navigate dynamic future environments and career paths. See the ICPU website for further information here: https://www.sydney.edu.au/students/industry-and-community-projects/4000-level-projects.html
SOIL4000 Soil and Water in the Changing Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units including SOIL2005 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our need to fulfill the demand of food and clean water for the world's population has changed how we interact with our soil, water, and environment. This change is represented by a strong signature detectable within the earth's systems, so much so that current scientific consensus classifies the current age as the 'Anthropocene', a new geological epoch driven by the activity of humanity and our impact on environmental systems. In this unit you will investigate how soil, water, and the environment have changed and how it will change into the future in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic forcings. You will evaluate the impact of anthropogenic activities, in terms of agricultural industry and land-use changes, on the environment. This evaluation will progress to the identification of signals of change in soil and water and a discussion of approaches that ensure that agriculture and our future can be sustainably developed. You will also discuss current research and technology focused on mitigating this change. By doing this unit, you will develop an understanding of the impact of anthropogenic activities on soil and water and contribute to ideas on how we can create more sustainable and climate-resilient landscapes.
Honours Research project
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of 1000-3000 level units of study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well-defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature, and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem. They will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will experience presenting a project proposal. They will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a critical literature review.
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results will be communicated as a poster, an oral presentation, and a research paper. The research paper is to be formatted as an article of a scientific journal. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions, and identify future areas of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem.The project will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
SCIE4999 Final Honours Mark

Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All students in Science Honours must enrol in this non-assessable unit of study in their final semester. This unit will contain your final Honours mark as calculated from your coursework and research project units.
Selective Honours coursework
AGRI4001 Advanced Plant Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units including AGRI2001 and AGRI3888 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Some activities will take place at the University's Camden campus and/or at other field sites around NSW.
Plants have food, fibre and industrial uses in our societies. Successfully growing plants and their products for our use involves a large and very diverse mix of industries and therefore requires a wide spectrum of people with specialized skills in production and protection techniques for different types of plants and in the skills required to breed better varieties over time. Within this framework, the diversity of uses for plants is increasing, it is evident that the use of inputs such as water, nutrients and energy in the production chains must become more efficient and all industry sectors need to monitor and respond to the impact of climate change. In this unit you will be able to choose to study, from a list of alternatives, three different aspects or industries involved in plant production. This choice of modules enables you to develop targeted advanced knowledge and skills in your areas of interest, alongside building your knowledge and understanding of plant production industry processes and challenges in general. This will be achieved through a combination of interactive theory development, inquiry-led practicals, field work and field trips. By undertaking this unit you will gather a deeper knowledge of the specific technical and social issues that challenge the chosen aspects/industries while garnering an understanding of the linkages and integration of specialties required in modern crop production systems. This will empower you to further explore and contribute to plant production industries through a range of production or research-based avenues.
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Practical field work: At least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Dairy science is arguably the most multidisciplinary of all animal production areas. Topics such as animal physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics need to be understood in the context of more distant disciplines like pasture and forage crops, milk harvesting and robotics, farm economics; and the integration of all these into the whole system. In this UoS, we combine face-to-face lectures, interactive group discussions, guided field exercises and activities, and visits to commercial farms (ranging from small pasture-based to large-herd indoor systems milking >2000 cows) to gain understanding of key components of dairy system and of the system of production as a whole. This unit connects basic knowledge with practical application and contributes to develop students' ability to integrate knowledge. Completing this course successfully will give students the tools and confidence required to assist commercial farmers to improve practice change on farm and increase profitability. In line with the research expertise of the dairy science team, emphasis is placed on automatic/robotic systems and the use and application of technology in dairying.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assumed knowledge: Senior tertiary level knowledge inanimalproduction management andbehaviour and welfare of production animals Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides a historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes, a 2 day trip to the University's 'Arthursleigh' farm and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
SOIL4000 Soil and Water in the Changing Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units including SOIL2005 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our need to fulfill the demand of food and clean water for the world's population has changed how we interact with our soil, water, and environment. This change is represented by a strong signature detectable within the earth's systems, so much so that current scientific consensus classifies the current age as the 'Anthropocene', a new geological epoch driven by the activity of humanity and our impact on environmental systems. In this unit you will investigate how soil, water, and the environment have changed and how it will change into the future in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic forcings. You will evaluate the impact of anthropogenic activities, in terms of agricultural industry and land-use changes, on the environment. This evaluation will progress to the identification of signals of change in soil and water and a discussion of approaches that ensure that agriculture and our future can be sustainably developed. You will also discuss current research and technology focused on mitigating this change. By doing this unit, you will develop an understanding of the impact of anthropogenic activities on soil and water and contribute to ideas on how we can create more sustainable and climate-resilient landscapes.