Animal and Veterinary Bioscience

ANIMAL AND VETERINARY BIOSCIENCE

Animal and Veterinary Bioscience stream

The Animal and Veterinary Bioscience stream is 120 credit points, consisting of:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level stream core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level stream core units
(iii) four 0 credit point placement units
(iv) A 108 credit point program in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience

Animal and Veterinary Bioscience program

This program is only available to students enrolled in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience stream.
A program in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience requires 108 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level program core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level program core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level program core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 4000-level core units
(v) 30 credit points of 4000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) For students undertaking advanced coursework in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience: 12 credit points of 4000-level program units and 18 credit points of 4000-level advanced coursework or project selective units
(b) For students undertaking honours in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience: 24 credit points of 4000-level research units and 6 credit points of 4000-level Honours coursework selective units
(vi) A 48 credit point major in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience

Animal and Veterinary Bioscience major

This major is only available to students enrolled in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience program.
A major in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level major core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level major core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level core major units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level major selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Stream Core
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness, and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are: Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman and Hall: Boca Raton). Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) Experimental design and data analysis for Biologists. (Cambridge University Press)
Program core
AVBS1002 Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides the foundation for a career involving animals with an emphasis on livestock (cattle, sheep, pigs, fish/aquaculture and poultry), horses and wildlife. A clear understanding of animal production systems in the Australian and global environment is developed through online educational resources linked with hands on tutorials and in-field practicals. Online lectures and tutorials will include include indigenous animal management, animal husbandry, animal health and welfare, and genetics. In field practicals will develop capability in the handling and husbandry of animals. Lectures and tutorials will be held online and practicals at the Camden Campus. In this unit, there is a risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. Vaccination against Q fever is a requirement to attend practical classes at the Camden Campus. In exceptional circumstances where this is not practical, specific Personal Protective Equipment must be utilised.
Textbooks
Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe (provided online). Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
AVBS1003 Animals and Us

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Lectures and practicals for this unit of study take place on the University of Sydney Camperdown campus as well as at Taronga Zoo in the Institute of Science and Learning.
We live in a world surrounded by and dependent on animals. Australia has one of the highest rates of animal ownership in the world: dogs, cats, rabbits, birds and reptiles being common. In this unit, you explore animals in society (including companion, pocket and pet, wildlife and zoo animals). You will investigate relationships between humans and animals and normal function of animals including development, disease, aging and death. This unit will describe how human and animal health are related, outline legislation and policies on the care and use of animals, cover topical issues in animal welfare and ethics, provide opportunities for students to observe animal behaviours and discuss how cultural backgrounds influence our relationships with animals. You will visit captive and clinical animal facilities where animals are displayed for conservation, curiosity, aesthetics and research. Practicals and workshops will provide students with skills in critical thinking, communication, information/digital literacy and an evidence informed basis on which to make decisions. This unit is for students who are interested in a professional career working with animals, such as those in the AVBS stream and BVB/DVM program or who generally seek an understanding of how animals enrich our lives.
Textbooks
Animals and Us Unit of Study Guide
Major core
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us. You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us. This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)

2000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that have become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are: Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman and Hall: Boca Raton). Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) 'Experimental design and data analysis for Biologists.' (Cambridge University Press)
Program core
AVBS2005 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS100X or BIOL1XXX Prohibitions: VETS1032 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge and concepts from BIOL1XX7 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective metabolic function is critical for animal health and wellbeing. Key concepts include the comparative differences between animals and humans (eg ruminant metabolism), common disruptions in metabolism and endocrine regulation in companion animals, as well as the impact of metabolic dysfunction in animal production systems (eg bovine ketosis and ovine pregnancy toxaemia). This unit of study begins with an introduction to the metabolic processes of cells, tissues and whole animals by examining the structure ie the cytological and histological characteristics, of animal tissues in the physical context of whole animals. An integrated view is explored of the role of hormones in homeostatic control as dynamic metabolic regulators in wellbeing and the consequences of dysregulation. Students will apply knowledge of animal nutrition and animal structure and function to determine the underlying basis of metabolic disease and disorders and, how to alleviate or mitigate the dysfunction. This will be done by utilising an understanding of adaptive metabolism in animals to interpret biochemical data and identify disruptions to metabolism and homeostatic mechanisms. Clinical veterinary medicine examples of disruption to metabolism are used to emphasise normal metabolic processes. Students will develop key skills in microscopy, cytology and histology for broad application in the sciences.
Textbooks
Recommended text: Alberts et al., (2014) Essential Cell Biology 4th Edition. Garland Publishing, New York. Sjaastad, O.V, Hove, K and Sand, O. (2003) Physiology of Domestic Animals. Scandinavian Veterinary Press.
Major core
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from AVBS100X Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Computer-based where students get familiarized with diet formulation software reports/outcomes and identifying limitation of the diet in each scenario. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Access afterhours to IBM-PC compatible computers that have Microsoft Windows XP or later are advisable. Most of the diet formulation software are Windows Compatible only.
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable nutrition to animals in our care is fundamental to good animal health management. This Unit is broadly divided into three sections, namely: estimating the nutritive value of feeds; estimating the nutrient requirements of animals and diet formulation. The focus is on building up knowledge on animal nutrition by assessments of nutritional adequacy and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on wildlife and animals used in agricultural production systems. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in third year, in which species-specific systems will be described within the animal production major.
In this unit you will develop the skills to create diets based on sound science, to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints and identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and optimising nutritional health and minimising disease risk.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. Detail information is provided in this Unit of Study guide.
AVBS2007 Animal Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS100X or BIOL1XXX Prohibitions: ANSC3103 or ANSC3104 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animals kept for food and companionship, are diverse and beautifully complex. In this Unit, you will develop an understanding of the structure and function of domestic animals with an emphasis on the systems relevant to animal scientists. The unit begins with the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals cell and basic tissue structure and an overview of homeostatic control systems. This is followed by a more in-depth study of the other body systems. An understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of how these systems can be influenced by animal management and the animals' environment. At the completion of this unit you will develop; a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structure, broad skills of critical thinking and communication, appreciating the links between structure and function and their relevance to abnormal function and animal disease that will be further developed in applied studies in animal nutrition, animal behaviour, welfare and ethics and animal reproduction. In this unit, there is a risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. Vaccination against Q fever is a requirement to attend anatomy practical classes on campus. In exceptional circumstances where this is not practical, specific Personal Protective Equipment must be utilised.
Textbooks
Learning resources will be available on the Unit of Study E-Learning site. The following texts may be useful: Sherwood, L., Klandorf, H. and Yancey, P.H. (2013) Animal Physiology. From Genes to Organisms. 2nd ed. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Dyce, K.M., Sack, W.O. and Wensing, C.J.G. (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th edn. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia.
Selective
BIOL2032 Australian Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ANSC2005 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia is home to a broad diversity of vertebrate wildlife species, many of which are unique to the Australian environment, having evolved in isolation from other large land-masses for millions of years. This unit examines the diversity of Australian reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals (including all three mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials and eutherian mammals). We focus on the unique anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have enabled our wildlife to survive and thrive within varied Australian ecosystems. We also examine how the uniqueness of our wildlife is also one of its greatest challenges, being naive to the new threats that are present in our rapidly changing environments. At the end of this unit you should have an appreciation of the diversity and uniqueness of Australian wildlife; be able to determine the links between form and function in wildlife and understand the significance of these functional adaptations in relation to ecological challenges. You will also have an understanding of the interactions between humans and wildlife, and how the unique characteristics of our wildlife also make them vulnerable to threats within the rapidly changing Australian environment. Students will also develop enhanced scientific literacy and communication skills through tutorial activities and assessment tasks.
Textbooks
No text book requirements. Recommended reading throughout semester provided by each lecture relevant to their class content. Relevant scientific papers will be uploaded to LMS
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and/or in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.

3000-level units of study

Program core
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 1000-3000 level units including at least 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or AVBS100X) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at The University of Sydney Farms, and there will be a full day excursion to an external site. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, behavioural theory and the behavioural and physiological responses of animals to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored. This Unit enables students to develop an understanding of applied animal behaviour theory, and the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. We introduce a framework for animal welfare assessment, and the principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. An overview of the key behaviour and welfare considerations for performance and companion animals, and wildlife will be provided. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
Major core
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS2XXX Assumed knowledge: A background in animal anatomy and physiology Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camperdown and Camden Campuses. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy and parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real-world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.
3000- or 4000-level major selective
AGRO4006 New and Emerging Tech in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 1000-3000 level units including at least 6cp of BIOL1XXX Assumed knowledge: Animal husbandry and data analysis Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of new and emerging livestock technologies in Australia and overseas. Examples of these technologies include (1) next-generation infrared and laser scanning to determine physiological status and whole body composition, (2) diet formulation to enhance the nutritional and eating quality of livestock food products, (3) new vaccines and other therapeutics to regulate fertility, growth and behaviour whilst enhancing welfare and wellbeing, (4) microRNA technology to influence cellular, endocrine and physiological processes, (5) new genomics and laboratory-based reproductive technologies for advanced livestock breeding, (6) technologies to monitor and control animal behaviour, (7) unmanned ground and aerial vehicles to monitor livestock and the environment, (8) sensors and advanced image-capture technology to record the attributes of soil, air and the feedbase, (9) data-fusion science to integrate, analyse and interpret collected data, and (10) modelling of livestock systems. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At successful completion of the unit students will have a sound knowledge of new and emerging technologies that will shape the livestock industries in Australia and overseas. This will provide valuable grounding for students preparing for postgraduate study and other learning and career paths.
Textbooks
No prescribed text but referral to references listed from library
ANSC3105 Animal Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or AVBS2005 or MBLG2X72 or VETS1032 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: laboratory practical classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Can genome editing improve animal health and welfare while increasing production outcomes? Will immune based therapy improve cancer outcomes for animals? Can rapid molecular diagnostics identify illegal animal traffic? Will big data generated from sensor technology provide novel solutions for animal management? With a focus on new and emerging technologies, this course addresses these and other topics through a mixture of lectures, tutorials, laboratories, seminars and directed learning instruction.

4000-level units of study

Core
AVBS4000 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: ANSC3106 Prohibitions: AVBS3000 Assumed knowledge: Professional Placements Program - they should have undertaken 40 days of industry placements (during years 1-3) prior to enrolling in this UoS. Reporting is capture via SONIA and Canvas across their degree Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Professional practice
A key component of The AVBS degree is the Placement program. This is a workplace-based program requiring a minimum of 40 days of placement to be completed by the end of the third year (6th semester) of your degree. At least 15 days must be completed On-Farm. The remaining days are undertaken in a range of other approved work environments. The aim of the program is to encourage students to gain experience in a wide range of animal related industries and introduce them to the many career options available to them after graduation. We encourage students to apply their skills and knowledge in a professional environment, while also developing a real-world view of animal industries.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Program Project
LIFE4888 Applied Life Sciences Project

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 cp of units of study of which a minimum needs to be 24 cp of 3000-level or 4000-level units of study Prohibitions: AFNR410X or AGRI410X or AVBS4015 or AVBS4016 or AVBS4017 or AVBS4018 or ENVX410X or FOOD410X or QBIO410X or SOIL410X or WILD410X Assumed knowledge: Completion of a Table A Science major. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Depends on project choice, may be up to 4 weeks in the field, a community or industry setting. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This Unit of Study is best suited for students in Life and Environmental Sciences. Field work may form part of the project.
As the world's population builds towards 9 billion, we are challenged to create agriculture efficiencies and ensure food and water safety and security. Solutions from the Life Sciences are needed to meet these demands. In this unit you will have the opportunity to develop practical solutions from a range of discipline areas including agriculture, animal science, environmental management, food production and agribusiness. These skills and experiences will facilitate your understanding of current practices and innovations used in the development and management of natural and production ecosystems. The unit builds on applied knowledge gained from units of study undertaken throughout a degree in Life Sciences. As part of a small group of students, you will have the opportunity to work on a collaborative industry relevant research project. The activities will include the design of the study; generation, management and analysis of data; and presenting your findings to a diverse audience both orally and in written format. You will work collaboratively learning skills for better communication, organisation and time management and communication - all of which are competencies that are highly valued by employers and indicate professionalism. By doing this you will gain the ability to work collaboratively in a small team which is part of the essential foundation for a successful career pathway.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Selective advanced coursework and project
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: At least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant. All trips and visits are subject to travel restrictions. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Since 2020, we have been working together with the national industry body Dairy Australia (Education & Partnerships) to link this unit to commercial industry reality. In 2022, and pending on travel restrictions, students will have the opportunity to visit farms and work with real farm data for their projects. The association with Dairy Australia also means direct access to a large number of publications that provide the basis of best industry practice.
Dairy science is arguably the most multidisciplinary of all animal production areas. Topics such as animal physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics need to be understood in the context of more distant disciplines like pasture and forage crops, milk harvesting and robotics, farm economics; and the integration of all these into the whole system. In this UoS, we combine face-to-face lectures, interactive group discussions, guided field exercises and activities, and visits to commercial farms (ranging from small pasture-based to large-herd indoor systems milking >2000 cows) to gain understanding of key components of dairy systems and of the system of production as a whole. This unit connects basic knowledge with practical application and contributes to develop students' ability to integrate knowledge. Completing this course successfully will give students the tools and confidence required to assist commercial farmers to improve practice change on farm and increase productivity and profitability. In line with the research expertise of the dairy science team, emphasis is placed on automatic/robotic systems and the use and application of technology in dairying.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended text, scientific and professional articles, technotes for advisors and industry-generated information for farmers.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assumed knowledge: Senior tertiary level knowledge in animal production management and behaviour and welfare of production animals Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides a historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes, a 2 day trip to the University's 'Arthursleigh' farm and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
AVBS4020 ONE Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 cp of units including AVBS3001 or FOOD3000 or VIRO3X01 or MICR3X52 or BIOL3019 or BIOL3033 Prohibitions: AVBS4004 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental understanding of disease epidemiology and risk Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The unit will be a core unit for BAS (Animal Health, Disease and Welfare) Honours, all students in this honours programme will take this unit.
The health and wellbeing of all living creatures on this earth is dependent on the interconnections between people, animals, plants and the land they share. The concept of ONE Health recognizes that the health of people, animals and the environment are connected and closely related. This unit will investigate how humans relate to wild and domestic animals and their environment and investigate the negative consequence of these interaction through examining recent emerging infectious disease and zoonotic events. You will utilize the principles of veterinary and public health, biosecurity, food safety and security, risk assessment and epidemiology to understand how public health, animal health and environmental health can be optimized in a holistically approach, taking into consideration the multifaceted nature of human, animal, environmental interaction. By doing this unit you will apply your knowledge of infectious disease of animals and humans with the broader concepts of environmental and planetary health to generate disease management strategies that can lead to a more sustainable planet into the 22nd century. The unit will provide final year students with a major in Animal Health, Disease and Welfare the skills to move into the professional fields of biosecurity, human and animal disease surveillance and national and international policy development related to ecological, animal and public health.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
LIFE4000 Data and Technology for the Life Sciences

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A or 1 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Advances in digital technology are creating new ways to quantify biological processes and properties, from the scale of molecules to ecosystems. The life scientist of the 21st century needs to understand how to collect, manage, synthesise, and communicate this information within a reproducible workflow in order to make robust inferences about the natural world. This intensive unit of study will introduce you to key concepts and tools across three modules: digital project and data management, evidence synthesis and meta-analysis, and scientific coding using R. The focus is on active learning, discussion, and problem-solving across intensive workshop-based practicals, rather than the traditional lecture format. By completing this unit you will further understand the practical realities of scientific inquiry. To that end, you will develop a flexible skillet for conducting reproducible and open research to ensure the results of your work are maximally beneficial to both your future self and the broader community. Knowledge of how to work with data through the entire pipeline -from sampling to synthesis-will be useful wherever it is encountered in your education, career, and life.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
SCIE4001 Science Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Assumed knowledge: Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough". This quote is widely attributed to Albert Einstein, but regardless of its provenance, it suggests that one measure of an expert's knowledge can be found in their ability to translate complex ideas so that they are accessible to anyone. The communication of science to the public is essential for science and society. In order to increase public understanding and appreciation of science, researchers must be able to explain their results, and the wider context of their research, to non-experts. This unit will explore some theoretical foundations of science communications, identify outstanding practitioners and empower students to produce effective science communication in different media. In this unit you will learn the necessary skills and techniques to tell engaging and informative science stories in order to bring complex ideas to life, for non-expert audiences. By undertaking this unit you will develop a greater understanding of the wider context of your honours unit, advance your communication skills and be able to explain your honours research to non-expert audiences such as friends, family or future employers. These transferable skills will equip you for future research - where emphasis is increasingly placed on public communication and/or outreach - or professional pathways - where effective communication of complex ideas is highly valued.
SCIE4002 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
An indispensable attribute of an effective scientific researcher is the ability to collect, analyse and interpret data. Central to this process is the ability to create hypotheses and test these by using rigorous experimental designs. This modular unit of study will introduce the key concepts of experimental design and data analysis. Specifically, you will learn to formulate experimental aims to test a specific hypothesis. You will develop the skills and understanding required to design a rigorous scientific experiment, including an understanding of concepts such as controls, replicates, sample size, dependent and independent variables and good research practice (e.g. blinding, randomisation). By completing this unit you will develop the knowledge and skills required to appropriately analyse and interpret data in order to draw conclusions in the context of an advanced research project. From this unit of study, you will emerge with a comprehensive understanding of how to optimise the design and analysis of an experiment to most effectively answer scientific questions.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Completion of ITAR Modules required for students who choose the Animal Ethics module. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit, you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit, you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.
SCPU4001 Industry and Community Science Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Corequisites: SCPU4002 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one Science discipline (completion of a major) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Minimal practical field work is expected but requirements will vary depending on the project, and may include a period of mobility or immersion in a community or industry setting. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In Industry and Community Project units students work collaboratively in interdisciplinary teams on complex ‘real world’ problems under a theme developed in collaboration with industry and community partners. Briefed by the partners and guided by project supervisors, students use systems thinking approaches to design their own projects and engage in self-directed inquiry-based research to provide final recommendations. In this unit, students will develop their own professional identity through participation in communities of practice and reflective practice, together with an in-depth understanding of specific project-related matters. This experience will equip students with an agile mindset and skillset that will assist them to successfully navigate dynamic future environments and career paths. See the ICPU website for further information here: https://www.sydney.edu.au/students/industry-and-community-projects/4000-level-projects.html
SCPU4002 Industry and Community Science Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Corequisites: SCPU4001 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one Science discipline (completion of a major) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Minimal practical field work is expected but requirements will vary depending on the project, and may include a period of mobility or immersion in a community or industry setting. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Industry and Community Project units students work collaboratively in interdisciplinary teams on complex ‘real world’ problems under a theme developed in collaboration with industry and community partners. Briefed by the partners and guided by project supervisors, students use systems thinking approaches to design their own projects and engage in self-directed inquiry-based research to provide final recommendations. In this unit, students will develop their own professional identity through participation in communities of practice and reflective practice, together with an in-depth understanding of specific project-related matters. This experience will equip students with an agile mindset and skillset that will assist them to successfully navigate dynamic future environments and career paths. See the ICPU website for further information here: https://www.sydney.edu.au/students/industry-and-community-projects/4000-level-projects.html
Honours Research
AVBS4015 Research Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assumed knowledge: For students in the Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience: completion of years 1-3, a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours and approval of the faculty to enrol. For students in the Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours): completion of a relevant major, completion of a second major or minor (minor to be converted to a major during the student's final year), WAM of at least 65 and approval of the faculty Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The AVBS Research Projects program is composed of 24 credit points and consists of units AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. The units need to be taken in chronological order, commencing with enrolment in unit AVBS4015, which must be completed in a semester prior to unit AVBS4018. All four units are connected to the overall completion of the research project. Prior to start of this unit of study, students after consultation with an academic(s) and/or researcher(s) choose an area of research interest and this will form the basis of the entire Research Project A program (24 credit points in total). In unit AVBS4015 students will be required to undertake assessment tasks and conduct research activities.
At the end of this Unit of Study, students will:
Identify a research area, define a problem that impacts on animals and analyse this problem using information from various sources; critically evaluate current research (experimental design, statistical analysis, technical limitations) and identify where the present knowledge limiting for the chosen research topic; assimilate and manage information from within and across disciples to provide new concepts or understanding in the area of research; become familiar with scientific principles of research and the ethical use of animals in research; undertake research related to the project; meet set assessment tasks designed to develop written and oral presentation skills; apply the range of interpersonal skills necessary to work with peers and other researchers; meet deadlines and maintain accurate records related to the project.
Textbooks
Textbooks may be recommended by supervisors depending on the research area.
AVBS4016 Research Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: AVBS4015 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assumed knowledge: For students in the Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience: completion of years 1-3, a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours and approval of the faculty to enrol. For students in the Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours): completion of a relevant major, completion of a second major or minor (minor to be converted to a major during the student's final year), WAM of at least 65 and approval of the faculty Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will actively work on the research projects identified at the start of unit AVBS4015. This is will include, where appropriate, undertaking animal and laboratory studies, collection and analysis of samples and data, recording of data, continue to evaluate information from various sources and meet set assessment deadlines.
See under AVBS4015 for further information.
AVBS4017 Research Project C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: AVBS4016 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assumed knowledge: For students in the Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience: completion of years 1-3, a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours and approval of the faculty to enrol. For students in the Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours): completion of a relevant major, completion of a second major or minor (minor to be converted to a major during the student's final year), WAM of at least 65 and approval of the faculty Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
See under AVBS4015 and AVBS4016.
AVBS4018 Research Project D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: AVBS4017 and SCIE4999 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assumed knowledge: For students in the Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience: completion of years 1-3, a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours and approval of the faculty to enrol. For students in the Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours): completion of a relevant major, completion of a second major or minor (minor to be converted to a major during the student's final year), WAM of at least 65 and approval of the faculty Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
See under AVBS4015 and AVBS4016. Students must complete unit AVBS4018 in a separate semester to unit AVBS4015, and AVBS4015 must be completed prior to AVBS4018.
SCIE4999 Final Honours Mark

Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All students in Science Honours must enrol in this non-assessable unit of study in their final semester. This unit will contain your final Honours mark as calculated from your coursework and research project units.
Selective Honours coursework
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: At least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant. All trips and visits are subject to travel restrictions. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Since 2020, we have been working together with the national industry body Dairy Australia (Education & Partnerships) to link this unit to commercial industry reality. In 2022, and pending on travel restrictions, students will have the opportunity to visit farms and work with real farm data for their projects. The association with Dairy Australia also means direct access to a large number of publications that provide the basis of best industry practice.
Dairy science is arguably the most multidisciplinary of all animal production areas. Topics such as animal physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics need to be understood in the context of more distant disciplines like pasture and forage crops, milk harvesting and robotics, farm economics; and the integration of all these into the whole system. In this UoS, we combine face-to-face lectures, interactive group discussions, guided field exercises and activities, and visits to commercial farms (ranging from small pasture-based to large-herd indoor systems milking >2000 cows) to gain understanding of key components of dairy systems and of the system of production as a whole. This unit connects basic knowledge with practical application and contributes to develop students' ability to integrate knowledge. Completing this course successfully will give students the tools and confidence required to assist commercial farmers to improve practice change on farm and increase productivity and profitability. In line with the research expertise of the dairy science team, emphasis is placed on automatic/robotic systems and the use and application of technology in dairying.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended text, scientific and professional articles, technotes for advisors and industry-generated information for farmers.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assumed knowledge: Senior tertiary level knowledge in animal production management and behaviour and welfare of production animals Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides a historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes, a 2 day trip to the University's 'Arthursleigh' farm and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
AVBS4020 ONE Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 cp of units including AVBS3001 or FOOD3000 or VIRO3X01 or MICR3X52 or BIOL3019 or BIOL3033 Prohibitions: AVBS4004 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental understanding of disease epidemiology and risk Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The unit will be a core unit for BAS (Animal Health, Disease and Welfare) Honours, all students in this honours programme will take this unit.
The health and wellbeing of all living creatures on this earth is dependent on the interconnections between people, animals, plants and the land they share. The concept of ONE Health recognizes that the health of people, animals and the environment are connected and closely related. This unit will investigate how humans relate to wild and domestic animals and their environment and investigate the negative consequence of these interaction through examining recent emerging infectious disease and zoonotic events. You will utilize the principles of veterinary and public health, biosecurity, food safety and security, risk assessment and epidemiology to understand how public health, animal health and environmental health can be optimized in a holistically approach, taking into consideration the multifaceted nature of human, animal, environmental interaction. By doing this unit you will apply your knowledge of infectious disease of animals and humans with the broader concepts of environmental and planetary health to generate disease management strategies that can lead to a more sustainable planet into the 22nd century. The unit will provide final year students with a major in Animal Health, Disease and Welfare the skills to move into the professional fields of biosecurity, human and animal disease surveillance and national and international policy development related to ecological, animal and public health.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

Placement

AVBS2011 Farm Placement

Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
This placement will provide a hands-on experience of a farming or local rural enterprise and the surrounding environment. Students can choose to attend any form of farming enterprise e.g. dairy, poultry/egg, beef, wool/sheepmeat, agriculture (cropping), horticulture (fruit/vegetable), aquaculture, horse studs, insects etc. The selected farm must be commercially viable, that is, the major income must be generated from the farm enterprise (i.e. not a hobby farm, farm stay, hotel/venue, etc). There are a number of farms listed on SONIA, however students are welcome to find and apply to add new farm sites to the database.
AVBS2012 Industry or Business Placement

Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
This placement will give students experience working in a professional environment. This may include any number of non-farm agriculture or animal-related business, e.g. A pharmaceutical company, a feed/nutrition company, a stock and station agent (e.g. CRC or Elders), farm consultancies (e.g. agronomist), ag-tech companies, zoos or conservation sites, non-profit organisations (e.g. RSPCA, WIRES), museums etc. During your placement it is important for students to understand the nature of the business the environment in which it operates, the governance and how management decisions are made. More detail can be found in the placement guides on Canvas. There is a comprehensive list of businesses on the SONIA site, or students are welcome to find and add a new site.
AVBS2013 Research Experience Placement

Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This placement will give students the experience of working in a research-focused environment. This may include field or lab-based research across any number of industries related to animal sciences. Examples include University based research (at the University of Sydney or other institutions), commercial research (e.g. research labs, pharmaceutical companies), medical (e.g Garvin Institute, Westmead), conservation (zoo or non-profit organisations) etc. Research outcomes can have relevance to animal (production, companion or wildlife) or human medicine (e.g. mice or rodents used as animal models for human disease, reproduction research). The focus of this placement should be to understand the research environment, processes and methodologies, and the application of the research outcomes relevant to the field of work. While students may not be able to participate in the entirety of a research program, they should be able to report on the research methods and applications. Students should also familiarise themselves with the research team, aims and funding schemes, and the major challenges associated with the research field. Students can choose from a comprehensive list of research placement sites on SONIA, or are welcome to find and apply to add a new site/supervisor.
AVBS2014 Elective Placement

Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS1003 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
This placement will allow students to pursue their passion or interests in any of the previously described settings. Students can choose from a comprehensive list of placement sites on SONIA, or are welcome to find and apply to add a new site/supervisor.