Chemistry

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry major

A major in Chemistry requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 18 credit points of 3000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Chemistry minor

A minor in Chemistry requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille, Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)

2000-level units of study

Core
CHEM2521 Molecular Stability and Reactivity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2921 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2921 Molecular Stability and Reactivity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2521 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. Molecular Stability and Reactivity (Adv) differs from CHEM2521 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2991 Molecular Stability and Reactivity (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 75 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2921 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. Molecular Stability and Reactivity (SSP) differs from CHEM2921 in that it includes an additional seminar series on three research-led topics in chemistry. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
Selective
CHEM2522 Sustainable Chemical Manufacture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2922 or CHEM2532 or CHEM2404 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern society is reliant on manufactured chemicals to meet our everyday needs in food production, medicines, clothing and technological applications. Traditional approaches to building molecules have largely ignored the detrimental environmental impacts of the manufacturing processes, but this has changed. In this unit you will study contemporary methods used to create life-changing molecules, from pharmaceuticals and bulk chemicals to polymers in the context of the environmental impact of chemical manufacture and the challenges of ensuring both sustainability of source materials and sustainability of waste treatment. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices of chemical manufacture, the application of catalytic processes, and the methods used to tailor molecular properties, including the spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques of chemical analysis. In this unit you will address the general issues of renewable and non-renewable resources and waste recycling. By doing this unit you will develop an integrated understanding of the challenges of sustainable chemical manufacture and the fundamental basis for continued study in the topics of organic synthesis, environmental chemistry, polymer science and industrial processes. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2532 Concepts in Sustainable Chemical Manufacture but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2922 Sustainable Chemical Manufacture (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2522 or CHEM2532 or CHEM2404 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern society is reliant on manufactured chemicals to meet our everyday needs in food production, medicines, clothing and technological applications. Traditional approaches to building molecules have largely ignored the detrimental environmental impacts of the manufacturing processes, but this has changed. In this unit you will study contemporary methods used to create life-changing molecules, from pharmaceuticals and bulk chemicals to polymers in the context of the environmental impact of chemical manufacture and the challenges of ensuring both sustainability of source materials and sustainability of waste treatment. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices of chemical manufacture, the application of catalytic processes, and the methods used to tailor molecular properties, including the spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques of chemical analysis. In this unit you will address the general issues of renewable and non-renewable resources and waste recycling. Sustainable Chemical Manufacture (Adv) differs from CHEM2522 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop an integrated understanding of the challenges of sustainable chemical manufacture and the fundamental basis for continued study in the topics of organic synthesis, environmental chemistry, polymer science and industrial processes. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2532 Concepts in Sustainable Chemical Manufacture but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2523 Chemistry of Biological Molecules

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2923 or CHEM2533 or CHEM2403 or CHEM2913 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All known life is based on four extraordinary families of molecules: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and the nucleic acids. While the chemistry of these molecules within living cells is the subject of biochemistry, this unit of study explores the chemistry beyond that of normal biological function to provide the foundations for drug design, development of bio-sensors and programmed self-assembly. This unit of study will cover the fundamental chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. You will learn about the spontaneous organisation of these molecules into larger structures - globular proteins, DNA helices, and lipid membranes - and the new properties that emerge as a result. You will explore how metal ions interact with proteins to produce a variety of catalytic and molecular binding sites. Powerful modern techniques such as fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy will be explained and their capacity to provide deeper insights in biological and medical applications explored. By doing this unit you will develop a fundamental understanding of the properties of biological molecules and a firm foundation for further studies in drug design, food and cosmetic science, advanced bio-sensing and the growing field of chemical applications based on biological materials. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2533 Concepts in Chemistry of Biological Molecules but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2923 Chemistry of Biological Molecules (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2523 or CHEM2533 or CHEM2403 or CHEM2913 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All known life is based on four extraordinary families of molecules: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and the nucleic acids. While the chemistry of these molecules within living cells is the subject of biochemistry, this unit of study explores the chemistry beyond that of normal biological function to provide the foundations for drug design, development of bio-sensors and programmed self-assembly. This unit of study will cover the fundamental chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. You will learn about the spontaneous organisation of these molecules into larger structures - globular proteins, DNA helices, and lipid membranes - and the new properties that emerge as a result. You will explore how metal ions interact with proteins to produce a variety of catalytic and molecular binding sites. Powerful modern techniques such as fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy will be explained and their capacity to provide deeper insights in biological and medical applications explored. Chemistry of Biological Molecules (Advanced) differs from CHEM2523 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop a fundamental understanding of the properties of biological molecules and a firm foundation for further studies in drug design, food and cosmetic science, advanced bio-sensing and the growing field of chemical applications based on biological materials. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2533 Concepts in Chemistry of Biological Molecules but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2524 Chemical Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2924 or CHEM2534 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical physics is the study of how the laws of physics gives rise to the complexity of molecular behavior and the extraordinary variety of materials and properties - from liquid crystals to tungsten carbide - that result when large numbers of atoms or molecules interact with each other. To trace the connection between fundamental physical laws and their diverse material outcomes you will apply computational techniques and gain experience in the modelling tools used in material design and technological development. You will address the fundamentals of structure in materials including symmetry and crystal stability, defects, porous structures and emergent properties such as magnetism. You will explore the statistical origins of thermodynamic stability and chemical kinetics, concepts fundamental to battery, fuel cell, sensor, and capacitor technologies. Modern experimental methods for structural determination (e. g. neutron diffraction) and dynamics (e. g. pulsed laser spectroscopy) will be covered. By doing this unit you will develop a deep insight into the physical basis of complex chemical systems and a firm foundation for future studies in physical and computational chemistry, materials science, and device design. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2534 Concepts in Chemical Physics but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2924 Chemical Physics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2524 or CHEM2534 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical physics is the study of how the laws of physics give rise to the complexity of molecular behavior and the extraordinary variety of materials and properties - from liquid crystals to tungsten carbide - that result when large numbers of atoms or molecules interact with each other. To trace the connection between fundamental physical laws and their diverse material outcomes you will apply computational techniques and gain experience in the modelling tools used in material design and technological development. You will address the fundamentals of structure in materials including symmetry and crystal stability, defects, porous structures and emergent properties such as magnetism. You will explore the statistical origins of thermodynamic stability and chemical kinetics, concepts fundamental to battery, fuel cell, sensor, and capacitor technologies. Modern experimental methods for structural determination (e. g. neutron diffraction) and dynamics (e. g. pulsed laser spectroscopy) will be covered. Chemical Physics (Advanced) differs from CHEM2524 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop a deep insight into the physical basis of complex chemical systems and a firm foundation for future studies in physical and computational chemistry, materials science, and device design. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2534 Concepts in Chemical Physics but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.

3000-level units of study

Selective
CHEM3118 Synthetic Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3115 or CHEM3915 or CHEM3918 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Over 144 million chemical substances are known, many of which possess a complex arrangement of atoms and bonds that lead to unique and intricate 3-dimensional structures. Chemical structure is directly related to the function of molecules. While the structures of many known compounds have been built using the limited set of reactions that are employed by Nature, not all chemical structures can be accessed this way. Synthetic chemists have developed a multitude of reactions and strategies to build molecules that can't be accessed using Nature's toolkit. These can be applied to the creation of manufactured chemicals that improve our everyday lives, including medicines, fabrics, coatings, and in food production. In this unit you will learn fundamental strategies and reactions that can be used to create new molecular structures. You will investigate strategies that allow the synthesis of specific isomers to interact with the chiral world we live in, including molecules that cure disease. You will learn modern synthetic reaction methods that mitigate the environmental impact of chemical synthesis. By doing this unit you will develop an understanding of how chemical bonds can be broken and formed in a directed manner to build new molecular architectures with specific properties and 3-dimensional shapes.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3918 Synthetic Chemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or a mark of 65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3115 or CHEM3915 or CHEM3118 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Over 144 million chemical substances are known, many of which possess a complex arrangement of atoms and bonds that lead to unique and intricate 3-dimensional structures. Chemical structure is directly related to the function of molecules. While the structures of many known compounds have been built using the limited set of reactions that are employed by Nature, not all chemical structures can be accessed this way. Synthetic chemists have developed a multitude of reactions and strategies to build molecules that can't be accessed using Nature's toolkit. These can be applied to the creation of manufactured chemicals that improve our everyday lives, including medicines, fabrics, coatings, and in food production. In this unit you will learn fundamental strategies and reactions that can be used to create new molecular structures. You will investigate strategies that allow the synthesis of specific isomers to interact with the chiral world we live in, including molecules that cure disease. You will learn modern synthetic reaction methods that mitigate the environmental impact of chemical synthesis. By doing this unit you will develop an understanding of how chemical bonds can be broken and formed in a directed manner to build new molecular architectures with specific properties and 3-dimensional shapes.Advanced students attend an additional advanced seminar series to gain more in-depth disciplinary knowledge where they actively engage with a diverse range of contemporary chemical research problems and case studies. They gain additional opportunities to develop skills in collaborative work and enhance their written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3119 Materials Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3112 or CHEM3912 or CHEM3919 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An extraordinarily diverse array of new and emerging technologies are founded on inorganic solid-state materials designed and characterised in chemistry laboratories. The key to their importance is that solid-state materials have scientifically and technologically important properties that are either absent or difficult to achieve in other states of matter, because they arise not simply from individual atoms and molecules, but from the emergence of collective interactions when they are organised into extended lattices. The unit will examine how a range of interesting chemical and physical properties arise in the solid state and discuss current and future technological applications for these properties. The unit will explore materials for industrial and environmental applications such as carbon dioxide capture and catalysis, energy applications like hydrogen fuel cells and lithium-ion batteries, and electronic applications such as superconductivity and photovoltaics. You will learn about the fundamental relationships between chemical composition, three-dimensional structure, and physical properties; how to measure and model them; and how to manipulate them in the pursuit of new and optimised functional materials for the devices of the future.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3919 Materials Chemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or a mark of 65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3112 or CHEM3119 or CHEM3912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An extraordinarily diverse array of new and emerging technologies are founded on inorganic solid-state materials designed and characterised in chemistry laboratories. The key to their importance is that solid-state materials have scientifically and technologically important properties that are either absent or difficult to achieve in other states of matter, because they arise not simply from individual atoms and molecules, but from the emergence of collective interactions when they are organised into extended lattices. The unit will examine how a range of interesting chemical and physical properties arise in the solid state and discuss current and future technological applications for these properties. The unit will explore materials for industrial and environmental applications such as carbon dioxide capture and catalysis, energy applications like hydrogen fuel cells and lithium-ion batteries, and electronic applications such as superconductivity and photovoltaics. You will learn about the fundamental relationships between chemical composition, three-dimensional structure, and physical properties; how to measure and model them; and how to manipulate them in the pursuit of new and optimised functional materials for the devices of the future. Advanced students attend in addition an advanced seminar series to gain more in-depth disciplinary knowledge where they actively engage with a diverse range of contemporary chemical research problems and case studies. They gain additional opportunities to develop skills in collaborative work and enhance their written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3120 Environmental and Analytical Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM2404 or CHEM3920 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
No greater challenge faces humanity than that posed by the need to understand our impact on the environment, to accurately measure that impact and to develop and implement strategies to return us, globally, to a sustainable existence. In this unit we address the first two aspects of this challenge. The unit provides an introduction to the essential chemistry of the atmosphere, water and soil, the chemistry associated with the environmental impact of compounds arising from human activity and some of the major analytic techniques used in measuring the concentration of chemical species in the environment. You will learn the basic concepts underlying global warming, ozone hole, aerosols, photochemical smog, CO2 capture by oceans, environmental acidification, water purification and desalination, soil salinity and soil contamination by heavy metals and organic waste. You will investigate the fundamentals of analytic methods including atomic absorption spectroscopy, flame photometry, gas chromatography, gravimetric methods and mass spectrometry. By doing this unit you will develop a solid understanding of the interaction between the natural environment and human chemical activity, the capacity to assess discussion of environmental issues in an informed and critical manner and establish a solid foundation for continuing involvement in the areas of environmental and analytic chemistry.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3920 Environmental and Analytical Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or a mark of 65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM2404 or CHEM3120 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
No greater challenge faces humanity than that posed by the need to understand our impact on the environment, to accurately measure that impact and to develop and implement strategies to return us, globally, to a sustainable existence. In this unit we address the first two aspects of this challenge. The unit provides an introduction to the essential chemistry of the atmosphere, water and soil, the chemistry associated with the environmental impact of compounds arising from human activity and some of the major analytic techniques used in measuring the concentration of chemical species in the environment. You will learn the basic concepts underlying global warming, ozone hole, aerosols, photochemical smog, CO2 capture by oceans, environmental acidification, water purification and desalination, soil salinity and soil contamination by heavy metals and organic waste. You will investigate the fundamentals of analytic methods including atomic absorption spectroscopy, flame photometry, gas chromatography, gravimetric methods and mass spectrometry. By doing this unit you will develop a solid understanding of the interaction between the natural environment and human chemical activity, the capacity to assess discussion of environmental issues in an informed and critical manner and establish a solid foundation for continuing involvement in the areas of environmental and analytic chemistry. Advanced students attend in addition an advanced seminar series to gain more in-depth disciplinary knowledge where they actively engage with a diverse range of contemporary chemical research problems and case studies. They gain additional opportunities to develop skills in collaborative work and enhance their written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3121 Chemical Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3110 or CHEM3910 or CHEM3921 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The importance of chemistry to understand the inner workings of biology has led to the emergence of the field of chemical biology. In recent years, the development of cutting-edge synthetic methods, as well as analytical and imaging technologies, have underpinned advances in drug discovery, diagnostics, genome sequencing and biocatalysis. In this unit, you will learn how chemical structure and reactivity underpins the function of all nature's biomolecules, from the enzymes that enable chemical reactions to occur inside cells, to the DNA featuring chemical modifications that affect how the genetic code is read. You will also learn how the development and application of modern synthetic chemistry can be used to generate designer biomolecules to perturb, manipulate and visualise cellular processes. Key examples include how we can synthesise an entire protein using synthetic chemistry alone, and how we can use fluorescent dyes to observe what is happening in live cells as a result of disease. You will gain insight into the rapidly advancing field of chemical biology, and how new chemistry-based technologies are being used to solve major problems in biology and medicine.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3921 Chemical Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or a mark of 65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3110 or CHEM3121 or CHEM3910 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The importance of chemistry to understand the inner workings of biology has led to the emergence of the field of chemical biology. In recent years, the development of cutting-edge synthetic methods, as well as analytical and imaging technologies, have underpinned advances in drug discovery, diagnostics, genome sequencing and biocatalysis. In this unit, you will learn how chemical structure and reactivity underpins the function of all nature’s biomolecules, from the enzymes that enable chemical reactions to occur inside cells, to the DNA featuring chemical modifications that affect how the genetic code is read. You will also learn how the development and application of modern synthetic chemistry can be used to generate designer biomolecules to perturb, manipulate and visualise cellular processes. Key examples include how we can synthesise an entire protein using synthetic chemistry alone, and how we can use fluorescent dyes to observe what is happening in live cells as a result of disease. You will gain insight into the rapidly advancing field of chemical biology, and how new chemistry-based technologies are being used to solve major problems in biology and medicine. Advanced students attend in addition an advanced seminar series to gain more in-depth disciplinary knowledge where they actively engage with a diverse range of contemporary chemical research problems and case studies. They gain additional opportunities to develop skills in collaborative work and enhance their written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3122 Molecular Self Assembly

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3116 or CHEM3916 or CHEM3922 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study looks beyond covalent bonds to explore intermolecular forces and how they can be used to create supramolecular structures. Such structures are widespread in biology and technology, combining components such as polymers with diverse architectures, lipid and synthetic membranes, molecular and nanoparticle assemblies, and molecular machines. All are held together by a combination of intermolecular interactions ranging from van der Waals forces to hydrogen bonds, as well as more subtle effects including polymer chain entropy, molecular shape, and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for creating kinetically or thermodynamically stable aggregates, and to engineer both properties and functions at a molecular level. In this unit you will learn the design rules for using intermolecular forces to combine multiple components into molecular and colloidal assemblies in order to create various forms of soft, functional, and biomimetic materials. You will also learn how to select, apply, and interpret a range of experimental techniques to characterise the structure and properties of self-assembled materials.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3922 Molecular Self Assembly (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or a mark of 65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3116 or CHEM3122 or CHEM3916 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study looks beyond covalent bonds to explore intermolecular forces and how they can be used to create supramolecular structures. Such structures are widespread in biology and technology, combining components such as polymers with diverse architectures, lipid and synthetic membranes, molecular and nanoparticle assemblies, and molecular machines. All are held together by a combination of intermolecular interactions ranging from van der Waals forces to hydrogen bonds, as well as more subtle effects including polymer chain entropy, molecular shape, and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for creating kinetically or thermodynamically stable aggregates, and to engineer both properties and functions at a molecular level. In this unit you will learn the design rules for using intermolecular forces to combine multiple components into molecular and colloidal assemblies in order to create various forms of soft, functional, and biomimetic materials. You will also learn how to select, apply, and interpret a range of experimental techniques to characterise the structure and properties of self-assembled materials.Advanced students attend in addition an advanced seminar series to gain more in-depth disciplinary knowledge where they actively engage with a diverse range of contemporary chemical research problems and case studies. They gain additional opportunities to develop skills in collaborative work and enhance their written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3123 Computational Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3117 or CHEM3917 or CHEM3923 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As the power of computers increases, so does their capacity to provide new tools for scientific analysis. Where once computational chemistry was the domain of specialists, computational methods are now commonly used across all areas of chemistry, both in chemical research and in the application of chemical knowledge in industry and society. For example, techniques of computational chemistry are today used for drug discovery, materials prediction, and the modelling of complex environmental systems. The object of this unit is to introduce students to the goals, methods and critical assessment of computer modelling in chemistry. The unit will address the four goals of modelling: explanation, prediction, interpretation and discovery. In exploring how computational methods meet these goals, you will cover topics in biomolecular modelling, molecular electronic structure, chemical kinetics, and experimental data interpretation. You will learn how to design and carry out computations for a range of chemical problems and engage in hands-on calculations. No prior knowledge of computers or programming is required. By doing this unit, you will develop an understanding of the variety of ways computers can be used and how to use sound criteria for judging the quality of computational results and the reliability of conclusions based on those results.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
CHEM3923 Computational Chemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or greater in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2524 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 or CHEM2924)] or a mark of 65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3117 or CHEM3123 or CHEM3917 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As the power of computers increases, so does their capacity to provide new tools for scientific analysis. Where once computational chemistry was the domain of specialists, computational methods are now commonly used across all areas of chemistry, both in chemical research and in the application of chemical knowledge in industry and society. For example, techniques of computational chemistry are today used for drug discovery, materials prediction, and the modelling of complex environmental systems. The object of this unit is to introduce students to the goals, methods and critical assessment of computer modelling in chemistry. The unit will address the four goals of modelling: explanation, prediction, interpretation and discovery. In exploring how computational methods meet these goals, you will cover topics in biomolecular modelling, molecular electronic structure, chemical kinetics, and experimental data interpretation. You will learn how to design and carry out computations for a range of chemical problems and engage in hands-on calculations. No prior knowledge of computers or programming is required. By doing this unit, you will develop an understanding of the variety of ways computers can be used and how to use sound criteria for judging the quality of computational results and the reliability of conclusions based on those results.Advanced students attend in addition an advanced seminar series to gain more in-depth disciplinary knowledge where they actively engage with a diverse range of contemporary chemical research problems and case studies. They gain additional opportunities to develop skills in collaborative work and enhance their written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Interdisciplinary Project
CHEM3888 Chemistry Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and an additional (6cp of CHEM2XXX) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, you will adopt a multi-disciplinary approach to solve a real-world problem in one of three research areas: i) Functional Energy Materials, ii) Self-assembled Nanomaterials and iii) Molecular Innovations in Health. You will apply your discipline expertise in chemistry to understand the challenge, design potential solutions to the problem, and then work collaboratively with students in other disciplines (science, government, business, law, marketing, engineering) to consider solutions to the problem from a broader perspective and how these could positively impact the community. This unit will allow you to understand the challenge through stories of scientific endeavour that led to the discovery of chemistry-based solutions to societal challenges, then extend that knowledge through collecting and analysing data on new technologies as you move to design innovative approaches. You will learn to work in interdisciplinary teams and communicate your findings to a broad audience. You will build key skills in problem solving, team work and written/oral communication that will equip you for future research and professional pathways in science, technology, health, business and public policy.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real-world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.