Human Movement

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

HUMAN MOVEMENT

Human Movement major

This major is only available to students enrolled in the Health stream, as a second major.
A major in Human Movement requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 18 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Human Movement minor

This minor is only available to students enrolled in the Health stream.
A minor in Human Movement requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 18 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan and A/Prof Leslie Nicholson (Semester 1), Dr Joanna Diong (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities (e.g. online video tutorials and practice quizzes) to supplement the lectures and practicals. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

2000-level units of study

Core
BIOS2170 Body Systems and Human Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Peter Knight Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOS1170 or BMED2403 or PHSI2005 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems (including acid-base homeostasis) relevant to human movement. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory. It includes classes during which students interpret physiological data and explain the physiological principles associated demonstrated. These classes link across all topics culminating in a capstone activity which emphasizes the integrated nature of human movement and performance.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
BIOS2171 Human Neuroscience in Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kay Double Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOS1171 or BIOS1166 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This intermediate unit of study will introduce the human nervous system and its function, in the context of neuroscience in the healthy human and that associated with human disease. The unit will teach human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with a focus on the control of human movement disorders associated with dysfunction of the human nervous system will be introduced. This knowledge will be expanded using case studies of specific disorders of, or affecting, the nervous system, including disorders of increasing prevalence. The unit is designed to equip students to pursue advanced studies in clinical neuroscience or to pursue studies in a professional degree program in medicine or other health professions. Material will be presented in lectures, tutorial and practical classes. Active learning approaches including case-based, on-line and individual learning will be used.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS2030 Muscle Adaptations to Use and Disuse

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Tom Gwinn and Dr Yorgi Mavros Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: EXSS1029 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
The purpose of the unit is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of skeletal muscle function and how muscle adapts to increased use, specifically how muscle responds to high-resistance training (HRT, also know as strength training) and to disuse. Students will gain an understanding of muscle force development in terms of myosin function and organization (sarcomeres, myofibrils, muscle fibers) and the neural processes involved in maximal voluntary contractions. Students will then apply this knowledge to understand how HRT works in terms of hypertrophy and neural adaptations, the process of muscle atrophy during disuse and the effects of retraining after disuse. Students will integrate this biological understanding with an evidence-base approach to HRT prescription. Students apply and integrate these approaches gain skills in the real-world prescription of HRT through participation in HRT program in practical session, and then gain skills in data analysis via interpretation of their own responses to training. Students will gain skills in the ability to critically evaluate, and communicate applications of evidence-base research in healthy and clinical populations. Finally the unit examines concepts on muscle energy balance in terms of methods and control of ATP production and use, and these concepts are used to understand the concepts of peripheral and central fatigue.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units

3000-level units of study

Major core
EXSS3061 Exercise Responses and Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: EXSS2027 or EXSS3023 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1170 or BIOS2170 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with a broad understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to exercise. The unit describes the basic metabolic, cardiovascular and respiratory responses and adaptations to exercise training in healthy, asymptomatic individuals. It outlines the different modalities of exercise testing for quantification of functional capacity, exercise prescription and training. It examines physical deconditioning and the associated physiological deterioration. It also provides an introduction to clinical populations who would benefit from exercise training. Students apply and integrate theoretical knowledge through practical and tutorial classes. Students will develop skills to measure physiological responses to exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness. Based on best-practice guidelines, students will design an exercise program for a healthy individual.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Major Interdisciplinary Project Core
EXSS3062 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cobley (Semester 1), Prof Ross Sanders (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 48 credit points Prohibitions: EXSS2025 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the process of optimizing the learning of skills. Meanwhile the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections which enable skill-acquisition to occur.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Major selective
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include two laboratory classes in which human cadavers will be available for study; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS3063 Biomechanics in Health

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr per week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Prohibitions: EXSS1018 or EXSS2018 Assessment: group report (40%), group presentation (10%) final exam (50%) Practical field work: 2 hr per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The main emphasis of this unit is in developing practical expertise in techniques for the biomechanical analysis of human movement. Students will learn how to conduct kinematic and kinetic analyses, using video, force platforms and electromyography. Other components of this unit are aimed at further development of mathematical and problem-solving skills for the analysis of movement. The unit will provide the opportunity for students to integrate their developing knowledge in human movement and apply them in the context of a project.
HSBH3026 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A minimum of 72 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Minor selective
HSBH3026 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A minimum of 72 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS3061 Exercise Responses and Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: EXSS2027 or EXSS3023 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1170 or BIOS2170 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with a broad understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to exercise. The unit describes the basic metabolic, cardiovascular and respiratory responses and adaptations to exercise training in healthy, asymptomatic individuals. It outlines the different modalities of exercise testing for quantification of functional capacity, exercise prescription and training. It examines physical deconditioning and the associated physiological deterioration. It also provides an introduction to clinical populations who would benefit from exercise training. Students apply and integrate theoretical knowledge through practical and tutorial classes. Students will develop skills to measure physiological responses to exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness. Based on best-practice guidelines, students will design an exercise program for a healthy individual.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS3062 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cobley (Semester 1), Prof Ross Sanders (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Completion of 48 credit points Prohibitions: EXSS2025 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the process of optimizing the learning of skills. Meanwhile the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections which enable skill-acquisition to occur.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
EXSS3063 Biomechanics in Health

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr per week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Prohibitions: EXSS1018 or EXSS2018 Assessment: group report (40%), group presentation (10%) final exam (50%) Practical field work: 2 hr per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The main emphasis of this unit is in developing practical expertise in techniques for the biomechanical analysis of human movement. Students will learn how to conduct kinematic and kinetic analyses, using video, force platforms and electromyography. Other components of this unit are aimed at further development of mathematical and problem-solving skills for the analysis of movement. The unit will provide the opportunity for students to integrate their developing knowledge in human movement and apply them in the context of a project.
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include two laboratory classes in which human cadavers will be available for study; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units