Marine Science

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit. They now read:

BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis Unit P: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1X01 or MATH1XX5 or ENVI1003
19/2/2021

MARINE SCIENCE

Marine Science major

A major in Marine Science requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level core interdisciplinary project units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level disciplinary selective or interdisciplinary projective units
NOTE: BIOL3X08 and BIOL3X16 are offered in alternate years

Marine Science minor

A minor in Marine Science requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level core units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Selective
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1003 Introduction to Geology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS1903 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
The aim of this unit of study is to examine the chemical and physical processes involved in mineral formation, the interior of the Earth, surface features, sedimentary environments, volcanoes, and metamorphism. Lectures and laboratory sessions on mountain building processes and the formation of mineral deposits will lead to an understanding of the forces controlling the geology of our planet. Processes such as weathering, erosion and nature of sedimentary environments are related to the origin of the Australian landscape. In addition to laboratory classes there is a one-day excursion to the western Blue Mountains and Lithgow to examine geological objects in their setting.
Textbooks
The recommended text is is Christiansen, E. H., and Hamblin, W. K. (2015). Dynamic earth: An introduction to physical geology. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GEOS1903 Introduction to Geology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS1003 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS1003 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their ATAR or UAI and/or their university performance at the time of enrolment. Students that elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced).
Textbooks
The recommended text is Christiansen, E. H., and Hamblin, W. K. (2015). Dynamic earth: An introduction to physical geology. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning.

2000-level units of study

Core
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5) Prohibitions: BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. We consider how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. We focus on the underlying principles and practical skills you need to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, the unit provides you with an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in ecology and other fields of biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, you will design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret your own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to your particular interest. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press
GEOS2115 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOL1501 or GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X02 or GEOS1X03 or BIOL1XXX or ENVI1003 Prohibitions: GEOS2915 Assumed knowledge: GEOG1001 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces core concepts about how the formation of ocean basins and their influence on climate govern the development of coasts and continental margins. These concepts provide a framework for understanding the geographic variation of coasts, continental shelves and sediment accumulations in the deep ocean. Ocean-basin evolution is explained in terms of movements within the Earth's interior and how these movements determine the geometry of ocean basins, and their alpine counterparts, which interact with the global circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. This interaction plays a key role in marine sedimentation and controls the environmental conditions responsible for the development of coral reefs and other ecosystems. The Unit of Study systematically outlines how these factors have played out to produce, by gradual change, the coasts we see today, as well as the less familiar deposits hidden beneath the sea and coastal lands. The Unit thereby outlines how knowledge of responses to climate change in the past allow us to predict environmental responses to accelerated climate change occurring now and in the future due to the industrial greenhouse effect, but places these responses into perspective against the geological record. Overall therefore, the Unit aims to provide familiarity with fundamental phenomena central to the study of marine geoscience and environmental impacts, introduced through process-oriented explanations. The Unit of Study is structured around GIS-based practical sessions and problem-based project work, for which lectures provide the theoretical background.
Textbooks
On line reading material provided via Fisher Library
GEOS2915 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in GEOL1501 or GEOS1902 or GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X03 or BIOL1XXX or ENVI1003 Prohibitions: GEOS2115 Assumed knowledge: GEOG1001 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2115 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
Online reading materials are provided via Fisher Library.

3000-level units of study

Core
BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.
BIOL3913 Marine Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3013 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer-based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of the BIOL3013 Marine Biology unit. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year but generally involves an individual or group project, conducted with unit instructors, which takes the place of one of the practical-based assessments.
GEOS3009 Coastal Environments and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 cp from (GEOS2X11 or GEOS2X15 or GEOS2X16 or GEOS2X21 or BIOL2022) Prohibitions: GEOS3909 or MARS3003 or MARS3105 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of Coastal Environments and the major processes which control the morphodynamic evolution of these systems. The course offers a unique opportunity of learning the full spectrum of marine sedimentary environments from siliciclastic, temperate, highly urbanised and impacted estuarine ecosystems to carbonate, tropical, pristine and undeveloped/protected coastal and continental margin environments. The course is divided in three sections: Section A covers the basic morphodynamics and processes impacting carbonate-dominated coastal and continental margin environments. The focus is on carbonate reefal and margin systems and their geologic and biologic responses to past, present and future environmental changes; Section B covers the basic morphodynamics of temperate and tropical coasts, including beach morphodynamics and basic knowledge on waves and currents; Section C consolidates all concepts learnt in the previous sections by applying them to numerical modelling.
There is a compulsory weekend fieldtrip to the NSW coast to study beach morphodynamics and fieldwork techniques. Depending on the year, there may be a voluntary fieldtrip to a coral reef environment, for example, The University of Sydney One Tree Island Research Station.
Textbooks
List of selected readings provided online.
GEOS3909 Coastal Environments and Processes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in GEOS2X15 Prohibitions: GEOS3009 or MARS3003 or MARS3105 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography or Geology units is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3009 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
Core Interdisciplinary project
MARS3888 Marine Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOS2X15 and BIOL2X22 Assumed knowledge: Students should have general knowledge of fundamental concepts in the geological and biological sciences of marine systems Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit showcases the state-of-the-art marine science research undertaken by biologists and geoscientists at the University of Sydney within the context of a multi-disciplinary, research-based project. You will be exposed to thematic topics within the modern field of marine science via a series of lectures, workshops and seminars, including fieldtrips in some cases. Fundamental to the unit is an interdisciplinary research project where you will be working with students from other disciplines, for example engineering, to solve real-life questions about the workings of the marine environment. This unit focuses on developing the skills required for a career in marine science. You will learn techniques to acquire, process, analyse, and interpret real scientific data. This unit also teaches about science communication, an essential skill for science graduates, regardless of the career path you want to pursue. You will practice these skills regularly throughout the semester. By doing this unit, you will bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem.
Disciplinary Selective
AVBS3009 Aquaculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6 credit points from (AVBS1002 or BIOL1XXX or GEOS1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: AVBS4009 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of animal husbandry and management; aquatic animal biology. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aquaculture is a rapidly developing area of food production as the world faces a critical point in not being able to meet global demand for seafood. This unit of study explores in detail the husbandry of aquaculture broodstock and larval and juvenile culture techniques of finfish, molluscs and crustaceans. The biological principles of aquaculture including aquatic animal physiology, species selection, hatchery breeding and rearing and grow-out practices, aquaculture farming systems, animal health, welfare and disease and environmental impact are addressed. In this unit of study, you will attain practical skills relevant to aquaculture production and management of aquatic animals, such as animal handling, growth measures, fluid collection, health assessments and necropsy. The unit aims to inspire and motivate you through research-informed teaching and application of the principles of scientific thinking. By the end of this unit, you will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of: the context of aquaculture in global food production; animal management and welfare of aquaculture species; comparative aspects of farming systems used in aquaculture; health and disease relevant to aquaculture; nutrition of aquaculture species; water quality and the environmental impact of aquaculture.
BIOL3008 Marine Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of BIOL2XXX or [6 credit points of BIOL2XXX and (AVBS2XXX or ENVX2001)] Prohibitions: BIOL3908 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered.
This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental analysis of marine populations and communities. Students gain experience using a range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative field experiments. No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required for this subject. Group experimental research projects in the field are the focus of the unit during the day, with lectures and discussion groups about the analysis of experimental data and current issues in experimental ecology, management and conservation occurring in the evening. The skills learned in this course, which include critical thinking, problem solving, project management, experimental design, data handling and analysis and scientific writing, are highly sought after by a range of employers, including from academia, government and consultancy.
Textbooks
No textbook is prescribed but Coastal Marine Ecology of Temperate Australia. Eds. Underwood, A.J. and Chapman, M.G. 1995. University of New South Wales Press, provides useful background reading.
BIOL3908 Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in 12 credit points of BIOL2XXX or [6 credit points of BIOL2XXX and (AVBS2XXX or ENVX2001)] Prohibitions: BIOL3008 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as Marine Field Ecology BIOL3008, and is suitable for students wishing to pursue certain aspects of marine field ecology in a greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from applicants on the basis of past performance. Students taking this unit of study will be expected to take part in a number of additional tutorials after the field course on advanced aspects of experimental design and analysis and will be expected to incorporate these advanced skills into their analyses and project reports. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc(Advanced).
Textbooks
As for BIOL 3008.
BIOL3016 Coral Reef Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3916 or BIOL2020 or BIOL2920 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Coral Reef Biology is an intensive unit held at a research station on the Great Barrier Reef. The unit focuses on the dominant taxa in coral reef environments and the linkages between them. Emphasis is placed on the biological adaptations for life in tropical waters and the ecological, oceanographic and physiological processes involved. Aspects covered include: processes influencing the distribution of coral reefs, symbiosis, reef connectivity, lagoon systems, nutrient cycling and the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic pressures on the world's corals reefs.
BIOL3916 Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive July Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3016 or BIOL2020 or BIOL2920 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit requires School permission to enrol; please see the School of Life and Environmental Sciences website for details on how to apply. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered.
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3016, Coral Reef Biology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects of tropical marine biology in greater depth, with a focus on the GBR. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will pursue individual projects in consultation with, and under the guidance of, the course coordinator. The aim is to design a project relating to the particular interests of the student. The nature of these projects will vary from year to year. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)] Prohibitions: GEOS3914 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3914 GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3014 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3014 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
Interdisciplinary Project Selective
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 96 credit points Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This interdisciplinary unit provides students with the opportunity to address complex problems identified by industry, community, and government organisations, and gain valuable experience in working across disciplinary boundaries. In collaboration with a major industry partner and an academic lead, students integrate their academic skills and knowledge by working in teams with students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. This experience allows students to research, analyse and present solutions to a real¿world problem, and to build on their interpersonal and transferable skills by engaging with and learning from industry experts and presenting their ideas and solutions to the industry partner.