Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The following unit has been cancelled for 2021:

PHY4017 Practitioner Physics

9/3/2021

NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology program

A program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology requires 108 credit points from this table including:
(i) A 48 credit point major in Chemistry or Physics
(ii) 12 credit points of 1000-level program core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 2000-level program core units
(iv) 6 credit points 4000-level program core units
(v) 30 credit points of 4000-level or higher units according to the following rules:
(a) For students undertaking advanced coursework in the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: 12 credit points of 4000-level project units, 12 credit points of program selective List 1 units and 6 credit points of program selective List 1 or List 2 units
(b) For students undertaking honours in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: 24 credit points of 4000-level honours project units (by departmental permission only) and 6 credit points of program selective List 1 units; or
(c) For students in the Bachelor of Engineering Honours/Bachelor of Science: 12 credit points of 4000-level Engineering thesis units, 12 credit points of program selective List 1 units and 6 credit points of program selective List 1 and List 2 units

Units of Study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Program Core
MATH1002 Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1014 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MATH1002 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering.
This unit of study introduces vectors and vector algebra, linear algebra including solutions of linear systems, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Textbooks
Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, (4th edition), David Poole
MATH1902 Linear Algebra (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1002 or MATH1014 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (90 or above in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering. It parallels the normal unit MATH1002 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1005 Statistical Thinking with Data

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1015 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Advanced or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a data-rich world, global citizens need to problem solve with data and evidence based decision-making is essential in every field of research and work. This unit equips you with the foundational statistical thinking to become a critical consumer of data. You will learn to think analytically about data and to evaluate the validity and accuracy of any conclusions drawn. Focusing on statistical literacy, the unit covers foundational statistical concepts, including the design of experiments, exploratory data analysis, sampling and tests of significance.
Textbooks
Statistics, (4th Edition), Freedman Pisani Purves (2007)
MATH1905 Statistical Thinking with Data (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1005 or MATH1015 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or 90 or above in HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering. This Advanced level unit of study parallels the normal unit MATH1005 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
Statistics (4th Edition) ¿ Freedman, Pisani, and Purves (2007)
MATH1021 Calculus Of One Variable

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1001 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals.
Students are strongly recommended to complete MATH1021 of MATH1921 before commencing MATH1023 or MATH1923.
Textbooks
Calculus of One Variable (Course Notes for MATH1021)
MATH1921 Calculus Of One Variable (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1001 or MATH1011 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1021 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (Band E4 in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals. Additional theoretical topics included in this advanced unit include the Intermediate Value Theorem, Rolle's Theorem, and the Mean Value Theorem. Students are strongly recommended to complete MATH1021 of MATH1921 before commencing MATH1023 or MATH1923.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1931 Calculus Of One Variable (SSP)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1001 or MATH1011 or MATH1901 or ENVX1001 or MATH1906 or MATH1021 or MATH1921 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (Band E4 in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment is by invitation only
The Mathematics Special Studies Program is for students with exceptional mathematical aptitude, and requires outstanding performance in past mathematical studies. Students will cover the material of MATH1921 Calculus of One Variable (Adv), and attend a weekly seminar covering special topics on available elsewhere in the Mathematics and Statistics program.
MATH1023 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1013 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1003 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of complex numbers and methods of differential and integral calculus including integration by partial fractions and integration by parts as for example in MATH1021 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 or HSC Mathematics Extension 2 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable.
Students are strongly recommended to complete MATH1021 of MATH1921 before commencing MATH1023 or MATH1923.
Textbooks
Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Course Notes for MATH1023)
MATH1923 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Adv)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1013 or MATH1907 or MATH1903 or MATH1023 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (Band E4 in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable. Additional topics covered in this advanced unit of study include the use of diagonalisation of matrices to study systems of linear equation and optimisation problems, limits of functions of two or more variables, and the derivative of a function of two or more variables. Students are strongly recommended to complete MATH1021 of MATH1921 before commencing MATH1023 or MATH1923.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1933 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (SSP)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1013 or MATH1907 or MATH1023 or MATH1923 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (Band E4 in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment is by invitation only.
The Mathematics Special Studies Program is for students with exceptional mathematical aptitude, and requires outstanding performance in past mathematical studies. Students will cover the material of MATH1923 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Adv), and attend a weekly seminar covering special topics on available elsewhere in the Mathematics and Statistics program.

2000-level units of study

Program Core
MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1XX2) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2921 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit opens with topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, through cylinders, spheres and other parametrised surfaces), Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a basic grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2921 Vector Calculus and Differential Eqs (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: [(MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1901 or MATH1906) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] and [(MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003)] Prohibitions: MATH2021 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the advanced version of MATH2021, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and mathematical rigour. The vector calculus component of the course will include: parametrised curves and surfaces, vector fields, div, grad and curl, gradient fields and potential functions, lagrange multipliers line integrals, arc length, work, path-independent integrals, and conservative fields, flux across a curve, double and triple integrals, change of variable formulas, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, areas, volumes and mass, flux integrals, and Green's Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The Differential Equations half of the course will focus on ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications with more complexity and depth. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), series solutions near a regular point, higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, matrix equations and solutions, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, elementary Sturm-Liouville theory, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series). The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a more thorough grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
NANO2002 Introduction to Nanoscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or AMME1362 or AMME2302 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 or CIVL2110 Assumed knowledge: A first-year level knowledge about the atomic and molecular structure of matter, of the electronic structure of atoms, and basic mathematical knowledge. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Nanoscience Program.
Nanoscience concerns the study of matter at the nanometer scale. At the microscale and even more at the nanoscale, the properties of matter are very different from those in the bulk. Modern methods used in nanoscience enable the manipulation and fabrication of matter and devices with unique properties. Nanoscience is a multidisciplinary research field that bridges the boundaries of traditional disciplines such as Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Engineering, generating impact across a wide range of sectors, from academic institutions and research centres to industry, addressing societal challenges in energy, environment, communication, computing, and health. This unit provides an introduction to nanostructured materials and the physical properties they exhibit. You will learn the fabrication tools and processes used in nanoscience, such as top-down and bottom-up, and the nanoscale characterization tools used across different disciplines. You will get direct exposure to research labs and tools available at the University, and in particular within the Sydney Nano Institute. You will develop skills required to address the complex and multidisciplinary problems in Nanoscience. By doing this unit, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding nanoscience solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.

4000-level units of study

Program Core
NANO4001 Modern Nanoscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study including NANO2002 Assumed knowledge: It is strongly recommended that you have completed a major in Chemistry or Physics before attempting the unit. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanoscience is considered the cornerstone of future science and technology covering every aspect of human life from health and medicine (implantable biocompatible devices to minor and cure diseases) to autonomous systems (neuromorphic chips) to quantum information processing devices (quantum computers, quantum internet). This unit provides a more in-depth knowledge of modern Nanoscience, deepening your knowledge of the advances in Physics, Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering at the nanoscale. You will be immersed in ideas from experts and leaders in the fields of nanoscience, as invited Guest Lecturers. By undertaking this unit, you will develop an up-to-date and deep overview of the research which constitutes the epicentre of modern nanoscience and the cornerstone of the future Nanotechnology. For example, by learning the electrical, mechanical and optical properties of graphene as well as the latest scientific endeavours in Nanophotonics, Nanocatalysis and Tissue Engineering it will be stimulated in developing future and commercial Nanotechnological solutions. This will enable you to play a role in finding nanoscience solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Project
NANO4888 Applied Nanotechnology Project

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study including NANO2002 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnological solutions like smart clothing, graphene ear buds, supercapacitors, nanobots, point-of-care devices, neurointerfaces or fully integrated pacemakers will be ubiquitous in the future. This unit will provide students with a realistic experience of modern Nanotechnology, providing a multidisciplinary, hands-on experience on nanoscience-based problems that can generate a nanotechnological solution. You will deepen your knowledge of the advances in Physics, Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering at the nanoscale by pre-determined nanotechnological problems that you will solve in groups with complementary skill sets. For example, you will learn how to develop a Quantum Dot based LED enhanced by metallic nanoparticles or how to develop a plasmonic biosensor. By doing this unit, you will develop the skills needed to create the Nanotechnology of the future. In this unit students will work in groups to tackle and solve a Nanotechnology problem. The group will mimic approaches of multidisciplinary research and development centres. You will be guided and assessed through various stages of your project by planning and completing a series of tasks throughout the semester. The understandings and skills learnt in this unit, will enable you to play a role in finding nanoscience solutions to the global challenges that impact our lives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
Honours project
NANO4103 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Honours A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Research project either theoretical or experimental. Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit provides a real practical learning research experience of modern Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, building upon the previous NANO2002 core unit, covering an introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and all the core units of the Program. The unit is structured to provide a real research experience in a real research group for the duration of 2 semesters. The unit follows the conventional Honours project unit offered in Physics or Chemistry. However, the Nano-Honour program requires the student to choose a specific subject in a preferred research group regardless of the Faculty or the School where the research group operates. The only two compulsory restrictions are that the project must be related in some way to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and be worth 24 credit points. You will be guided, trained, supervised and assessed by the supervisor and the research group you selected. This will enable you to play a role in finding nanotechnological solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
NANO4104 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Honours B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: NANO4103 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit provides a real practical learning research experience of modern Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, building upon the previous NANO2002 core unit, covering an introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and all the core units of the Program. The unit is structured to provide a real research experience in a real research group for the duration of 2 semesters. The unit follows the conventional Honours project unit offered in Physics or Chemistry. However, the Nano-Honour program requires the student to choose a specific subject in a preferred research group regardless of the Faculty or the School where the research group operates. The only two compulsory restrictions are that the project must be related in some way to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and be worth 24 credit points. You will be guided, trained, supervised and assessed by the supervisor and the research group you selected. This will enable you to play a role in finding nanotechnological solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
NANO4105 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Honours C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: NANO4104 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit provides a real practical learning research experience of modern Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, building upon the previous NANO2002 core unit, covering an introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and all the core units of the Program. The unit is structured to provide a real research experience in a real research group for the duration of 2 semesters. The unit follows the conventional Honours project unit offered in Physics or Chemistry. However, the Nano-Honour program requires the student to choose a specific subject in a preferred research group regardless of the Faculty or the School where the research group operates. The only two compulsory restrictions are that the project must be related in some way to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and be worth 24 credit points. You will be guided, trained, supervised and assessed by the supervisor and the research group you selected. This will enable you to play a role in finding nanotechnological solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
NANO4106 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Honours D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: NANO4105 and SCIE4999 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit provides a real practical learning research experience of modern Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, building upon the previous NANO2002 core unit, covering an introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and all the core units of the Program. The unit is structured to provide a real research experience in a real research group for the duration of 2 semesters. The unit follows the conventional Honours project unit offered in Physics or Chemistry. However, the Nano-Honour program requires the student to choose a specific subject in a preferred research group regardless of the Faculty or the School where the research group operates. The only two compulsory restrictions are that the project must be related in some way to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and be worth 24 credit points. You will be guided, trained, supervised and assessed by the supervisor and the research group you selected. This will enable you to play a role in finding nanotechnological solutions to global challenges that impact our lives.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
SCIE4999 Final Honours Mark

Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All students in Science Honours must enrol in this non-assessable unit of study in their final semester. This unit will contain your final Honours mark as calculated from your coursework and research project units.
Engineering Honours thesis
AMME4111 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level Engineering units of study Prohibitions: AMME4010 or AMME4122 or AMME4121 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Prospective students in Thesis A are expected to have consulted with supervisors and selected a topic of interest at the end of third year, guided by the advertised list of suggested thesis topics and supervisors. Availability of topics is limited and students should undertake to speak with prospective supervisors as soon as possible. Students who are unable to secure a supervisor and topic will be allocated a supervisor by the unit coordinator. Alternatively, students may do a thesis with a supervisor in industry or in another university department. In this case, the student must also find a second supervisor within the School of AMME.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
AMME4112 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level Engineering units of study Prohibitions: AMME4121 or AMME4010 or AMME4122 or BMET4111 or BMET4112 OR BMET4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
BMET4111 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: BMET4010 or AMME4111 or AMME4112 or AMME4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two CONSECUTIVE semesters of enrollment, if not students will have to enroll in Thesis A again. Taken together, the thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Honours Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
BMET4112 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of any 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: BMET4010 or AMME4111 or AMME4112 or AMME4010 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two CONSECUTIVE semesters of enrollment, if not students will have to enroll in Thesis A again. Taken together, the thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Honours Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CHNG4811 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 Prohibitions: CHNG4813 OR CHNG4814 OR CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core 3000 level chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: School permission required for enrolment in semester 2.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CHNG4812 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: CHNG4811 Prohibitions: CHNG4813 OR CHNG4814 OR CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that Honours Thesis A and all (six) core chemical engineering units of study in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
Note: School permission required for enrolment in semester 1.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CIVL4022 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Prohibitions: CIVL4203 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator and School's Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CIVL4023 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Prohibitions: CIVL4203 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
ELEC4712 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 36 cp of 3000- or higher level units of study Prohibitions: ELEC4714 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note that students require permission from the HOS to do both A and B units in the same Semester, and will have an accelerated assessment schedule. Note also that entry to Honours Thesis is by permission.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
ELEC4713 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC4714 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note that students require permission from the HOS to do both A and B units in the same Semester, and will have an accelerated assessment schedule. Note also that entry to Honours Thesis is by permission.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
Program Selective - List 1
AMME5271 Computational Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Understanding of basic principles of Newtonian mechanics, physics and chemistry, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course introduces atomistic computational techniques used in modern engineering to understand phenomena and predict material properties, behaviour, structure and interactions at nano-scale. The advancement of nanotechnology and manipulation of matter at the molecular level have provided ways for developing new materials with desired properties. The miniaturisation at the nanometre scale requires an understanding of material behaviour which could be much different from that of the bulk. Computational nanotechnology plays a growingly important role in understanding mechanical properties at such a small scale. The aim is to demonstrate how atomistic level simulations can be used to predict the properties of matter under various conditions of load, deformation and flow. The course covers areas mainly related to fluid as well as solid properties, whereas, the methodologies learned can be applied to diverse areas in nanotechnology such as, liquid-solid interfaces, surface engineering, nanorheology, nanotribology and biological systems. This is a course with a modern perspective for engineers who wish to keep abreast with advanced computational tools for material characterisation at the atomic scale.
BMET5911 Advanced Instrumentation for Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in calculus, linear differential equations, basic mechanics and electromagnetism. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers fundamental knowledge about the working principles of scanning probe microscopies, microsensors and other key instrumentation in nanotechnology with a focus on biophysical, biomedical and material science applications. Scanning probe microscopes work in a variety of environments ranging from vacuum to liquids, and are frequently used to study samples spanning from single atoms all the way up to live cells and tissues. Besides imaging, these technologies enable the manipulation of matter and the acquisition of many physical and chemical properties of samples up to the atomic scale. The knowledge provided in this UoS is intended to improve the competences of the students to understand, use and create technologies of great value in nanotechnology with applications across multiple disciplines.
BMET5931 Nanomaterials in Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5931 Assumed knowledge: [[(BIOL1xxx OR MBLG1xxx) AND CHEM1xxx AND PHYS1xxx] OR [(AMME1961 OR BMET1961)] AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901)]] AND (NANO2xxx OR AMME1362) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The application of science and technology at the nanoscale for biomedical problems promises to revolutionise medicine. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by applying nanotechnology to medicine. This course focuses on explaining the fundamentals of nanomedicine, and highlighting the special properties and application of nanomaterials in medicine. This course also reviews the most significant biomedical applications of nanomaterials including the recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, medical imaging, gene therapy, biosensors and cancer treatment.
BMET5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5958 Assumed knowledge: (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR BMET9921) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 12cp CHEM2xxx Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
PHYS4126 Quantum Nanoscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: An average of at least 65 in 144 cp of units Assumed knowledge: A major in physics including third-year quantum physics and third-year condensed matter physics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern nanofabrication and characterisation techniques now allow us to build devices that exhibit controllable quantum features and phenomena. We can now demonstrate the thought experiments posed by the founders of quantum mechanics a century ago, as well as explore the newest breakthroughs in quantum theory. We can also develop new quantum technologies, such as quantum computers. This unit will investigate the latest research results in quantum nanoscience across a variety of platforms. You will be introduced to the latest research papers in the field, published in high-impact journals, and gain an appreciation and understanding of the diverse scientific elements that come together in this research area, including materials, nanofabrication, characterisation, and fundamental theory. You will learn to assess an experiment's demonstration of phenomena in quantum nanoscience, such as quantum coherence and entanglement, mesoscopic transport, exotic topological properties, etc. You will acquire the ability to approach a modern research paper in physics, and to critically analyse the results in the context of the wider scientific community. By doing this unit you will develop the capacity to undertake research, experimental and/or theoretical, in quantum nanoscience.
Program Selective - List 2
PHYS4015 Neural Dynamics and Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144cp of units including (MATH1x01 or MATH1x21 or MATH1906 or MATH1931) and MATH1x02 Assumed knowledge: First- and second-year physics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is the neural code? How do neural circuits communicate information? What happens in our brain when we make a decision? Computational modelling and theoretical analysis are important tools for addressing these fundamental questions and for determining the functioning mechanisms of the brain. This interdisciplinary unit will provide a thorough and up-to-date introduction to the fields of computational neuroscience and neurophysics. You will learn to develop basic models of how neurons process information and perform quantitative analyses of real neural circuits in action. These models include neural activity dynamics at many different scales, including the biophysical, the circuit and the system levels. Basic data analytics of neural recordings at these levels will also be explored. In addition, you will become familiar with the computational principles underlying perception and cognition, and algorithms of neural adaptation and learning, which will provide knowledge for building-inspired artificial intelligence. Your theoretical learning will be complemented by inquiry-led practical classes that reinforce the above concepts. By doing this unit, you will develop essential modelling and quantitative analysis skills for studying how the brain works.
PHYS4016 Bayesian Data Inference and Machine Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study including (12cp of MATH1XXX) or [(6cp of MATH1XXX) and DATA1X01] Assumed knowledge: 48 credit points of 3000-level units of study and programming experience in Python Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The need to make sense of confusing, incomplete and noisy data is a problem central to virtually all branches of science. The underlying requirement is to draw robust, unbiased and insightful inferences from the data.After taking this course you should have a working knowledge of common data inference and model-fitting methods, and of machine learning techniques. You should be able to implement the model-fitting algorithms discussed here in your own code and use it to determine parameters from incomplete or noisy data. You will have a conceptual understanding of modern machine-learning techniques, including basic neural networks, and be able to implement your own network to solve a problem. Moreover, you will have the prerequisite knowledge to implement more complex machine learning architectures such as deep learning, using the wide range of available tools. The course is aimed to equip physicists (and other scientists) with practical tools to be deployed in their work, rather than delivering more theoretical content.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
PHYS4017 Practitioner Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study including 12cp of PHYS1XXX Assumed knowledge: 48cp of 3000-level units, and a major or minor in Physics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physicists are actively applying their knowledge and technical skills in response to the major challenges of our time, such as environmental change brought about by our soaring demand for energy from finite resources. Their efforts can be found in everyday technology, such as smartphones and GPS devices, which would not exist today without physics.Physics, which underlies the whole of science and technology, has changed our life and society and will change our life and society in the future. This unit will connect the fundamental physics to the modern and future technologies in information and communication technology, energy and sustainability, medicine and health. The information and communication technology module will cover quantum computing, quantum communication, spintronics, optical technology. The energy and sustainability module will cover energy harvesting, energy conversion, energy storage, renewable energy and carbon capture. The medicine and health module will cover nuclear magnetic resonance, medical Imaging, radiation and dosimetry. You will learn the physical concepts and apply these concepts to understanding and evaluating modern technologies in information and communication technology, energy and sustainability, medicine and health.You will also how to track the technologies in principle, and how to predict their impact, and on what time scale.By doing this unit you will develop a deep understanding of these modern and future technologies and prepare yourselves for the related employment.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
SCIE4001 Science Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Assumed knowledge: Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough". This quote is widely attributed to Albert Einstein, but regardless of its provenance, it suggests that one measure of an expert's knowledge can be found in their ability to translate complex ideas so that they are accessible to anyone. The communication of science to the public is essential for science and society. In order to increase public understanding and appreciation of science, researchers must be able to explain their results, and the wider context of their research, to non-experts. This unit will explore some theoretical foundations of science communications, identify outstanding practitioners and empower students to produce effective science communication in different media. In this unit you will learn the necessary skills and techniques to tell engaging and informative science stories in order to bring complex ideas to life, for non-expert audiences. By undertaking this unit you will develop a greater understanding of the wider context of your honours unit, advance your communication skills and be able to explain your honours research to non-expert audiences such as friends, family or future employers. These transferable skills will equip you for future research - where emphasis is increasingly placed on public communication and/or outreach - or professional pathways - where effective communication of complex ideas is highly valued.
SCIE4002 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive March Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Prohibitions: ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
An indispensable attribute of an effective scientific researcher is the ability to collect, analyse and interpret data. Central to this process is the ability to create hypotheses and test these by using rigorous experimental designs. This modular unit of study will introduce the key concepts of experimental design and data analysis. Specifically, you will learn to formulate experimental aims to test a specific hypothesis. You will develop the skills and understanding required to design a rigorous scientific experiment, including an understanding of concepts such as controls, replicates, sample size, dependent and independent variables and good research practice (e. g. blinding, randomisation). By completing this unit you will develop the knowledge and skills required to appropriately analyse and interpret data in order to draw conclusions in the context of an advanced research project. From this unit of study, you will emerge with a comprehensive understanding of how to optimise the design and analysis of an experiment to most effectively answer scientific questions.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.
SCIE5004 Higher Education in STEM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ?Students should have completed a major in a STEM discipline? Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: The 15-hour project/practicum will be designing, implementing, and evaluating an evidence-based teaching intervention. It could be in a school, KickStart, undergraduate or online context. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Science and technology innovations are key to charting and navigating a rapidly changing world. How do we then create learning environments so that more students understand science and can create the technological innovations we need for the future. Contemporary learning and teaching approaches, in STEM higher education, are informed by theories from the 'learning sciences'. How do we evaluate which ones are successful and result in learning gains for students? How do we construct innovations in learning designs? In this unit of study, you will be introduced to the fundamental principles of effective teaching for learning in higher education in the STEM disciplines. You will investigate theories from the learning sciences and how to best engage learners in individual or group settings, online and in face-to-face classes. You will also learn how to evaluate innovations in learning design, with a focus on STEM higher education. Together we will explore the educational research literature and the qualitative and quantitative methods, including psychometric testing, for measuring effective teaching and improved student learning outcomes. This unit of study will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical frameworks underpinning teaching and learning and the methodology for implementing and evaluating effective educational research initiatives, preparing you for a career as a researcher and an educator.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units