Agriculture and Environment

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Agriculture and Environment

Master of Agriculture and Environment

Students must complete 72 credit points from Table A below, comprising:
(i) 24 credit points of core units of study
(ii) 24 credit points of elective units of study, including at least 12 credit points of specialisation units of study
(iii) 24 credit points of capstone units of study
Students who have completed relevant prior learning at an equivalent level may be given up to 24 credit points advanced standing.

Graduate Diploma of Agriculture and Environment

Students must complete 48 credit points including:
(i) 48 credit points from Table A below
(ii) at least 12 credit points of specialisation elective units.

Graduate Certificate in Agriculture and Environment

Students must complete 24 credit points including:
(i) 12 credit points of Agricultural and Environmental Technologies specialisation electives
(ii) 12 credit points of units of study from Table B

Specialisations

The specialisations are:
(a) Agricultural and Environmental Economics
(b) Agricultural and Environmental Technologies

Table A

Core
AFNR5511 Soil Processes, Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Soils support agricultural and natural ecosystems and regulate environmental interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere. It is the quality of our soils that affect productivity, the environment, health and ultimately sustainability. However, challenges such as those presented by lack of plant nutrient supply, soil acidification, physical degradation, soil contamination, and loss of soil biodiversity are problems at a global scale that threaten the sustainability of the environment and society. As well as the threats the importance of maintaining a quality soil that regulates environmental interactions will be explored, such as soil as a sink for carbon affecting climate interactions or understanding how a rich soil biodiversity can contribute to food production affecting food security. To do this, this unit of study is concerned with exploring the key pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality. Time will be spent investigating how the quality of the soil can be assessed, using the indicators of the mentioned soil processes, and how the resulting data can be aggregated and communicated in a meaningful way. Working with case studies, the students will identify problems that are assessed using soil quality or function analysis with the aim of identifying management options. The management options will be evaluated to determine their adoptability and implement ability. By investigating the case studies using soil quality or function analysis students will develop their research and enquiry skills. Assessing and developing adoptable management strategies the students will develop their skills in synthesising material from multiple sources and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and presenting seminars the students will develop their communication skills.
Textbooks
Textbooks: D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics, Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA USA
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites where students will be introduced to climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
AGRI4001 Advanced Plant Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units including AGRI2001 and AGRI3888 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Some activities will take place at the University's Camden campus and/or at other field sites around NSW.
Plants have food, fibre and industrial uses in our societies. Successfully growing plants and their products for our use involves a large and very diverse mix of industries and therefore requires a wide spectrum of people with specialized skills in production and protection techniques for different types of plants and in the skills required to breed better varieties over time. Within this framework, the diversity of uses for plants is increasing, it is evident that the use of inputs such as water, nutrients and energy in the production chains must become more efficient and all industry sectors need to monitor and respond to the impact of climate change. In this unit you will be able to choose to study, from a list of alternatives, three different aspects or industries involved in plant production. This choice of modules enables you to develop targeted advanced knowledge and skills in your areas of interest, alongside building your knowledge and understanding of plant production industry processes and challenges in general. This will be achieved through a combination of interactive theory development, inquiry-led practicals, field work and field trips. By undertaking this unit you will gather a deeper knowledge of the specific technical and social issues that challenge the chosen aspects/industries while garnering an understanding of the linkages and integration of specialties required in modern crop production systems. This will empower you to further explore and contribute to plant production industries through a range of production or research-based avenues.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
WORK6002 Strategic Management

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1a: Intensive - TBA; Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: seminar-based assessment (20%), case study assessment (40%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
The aim of this unit is to introduce the concept of strategy and explain its role in the management of organisations. The unit thus traces the development of strategic management as a field and examines different approaches to strategic management. WORK6002 introduces students to the classical strategy process of strategic analysis, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. This involves learning about and working with a range of strategy models and tools that can be used in the strategic management of organisations. In particular, a range of case studies is used to explore the practical application of these tools. The unit also critically examines traditional views of strategy by introducing a range of current debates in the strategy field.
Specialisation electives
Agricultural and Environmental Economics
AREC3002 Agricultural Markets

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or AREC2001 or AGEC2103 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1000wd equivalent problem sets (30%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of the underlying forces driving agricultural markets. It addresses price analysis and efficiency, including aspects of form, time and space in agricultural marketing; information and contracts; changing consumer concerns (food safety, ethical production); futures market and other risk sharing devices. Building on the application of microeconomic theory to both production and consumption in agricultural markets, its content is analytical. The unit also investigates some of the forces which prevent the efficient operation of world agricultural markets, including impediments to trade, imperfect markets for inputs and outputs and market power along the agricultural supply chain.
AREC3004 Economics of Water and Bio-Resources

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2003 or RSEC2031 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x50min mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr final exam (50%), 3x500wd tutorial reports (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit develops knowledge and skills in natural resource economics built on previously gained economics training. The economics of dynamic natural systems is studied through application of advanced modelling approaches. Particular emphasis is given to the economic mechanisms for managing water and biological resources including property rights, water allocation, and water markets. Key policy instruments, taxes, quotas, standards are analysed; Institutional and policy aspects will also be considered via analysis of water policy reform in Australia and elsewhere.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
AREC3005 Agricultural Finance and Risk

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or AREC2001 or AREC2002 or AGEC2101 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2040 Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x1500wd Written assignment (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Agricultural production is typically risky, adding complexity to decision analysis and increasing need of risk consideration in agricultural policy design. This unit explores this theme, and has two related components: risk and risk management in agriculture, and issues of agricultural producer finance. These two components cover a broad range of topics that incorporate production risk and other sources of risk in agriculture.
AREC3006 Agricultural Production Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hour tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or AREC2003 Prohibitions: AREC2001 or AREC3001 Assessment: 1 x mid-semester test (25%), 1x 1500wd assignment (25%), 1x final exam (50%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is concerned with the application of microeconomic principles to management decisions in agricultural production systems. It builds on the theoretical knowledge acquired in previous studies and introduces the methods of applied economic analysis through a range of topics including: production, cost and profit functions; methods for the measurement of productivity; optimisation in biological production systems; and production under risk. The unit introduces the linear programming technique to solve decision making problems encountered by agribusiness and natural resource firms and managers in public agencies.
AREC3007 Benefit-Cost Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2 hour lecture/week; 1x1 hour tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or AREC2005 or AREC2003 Prohibitions: (AREC2004 and RSEC4131) Assessment: 1x1hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1x2hr final exam (40%), 1x1200wd Individual essay (25%), 300wd total tutorial assignments (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Foundational concepts in welfare economics, such as economic efficiency, criteria for assessing social welfare improvements, and economic surplus measures, are analysed in detail and applied to project evaluation and policy assessment. Procedures of conducting a benefit-cost analysis are presented, and tools of non-market valuation for public goods and environmental assets are covered in detail. These techniques include both stated and revealed preference techniques, including contingent valuation, choice modeling, hedonic pricing and travel cost methods.
ECOS3013 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or AREC2003 or RSEC2031 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (25%), 1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Block mode
The natural environment is invariably affected by production and consumption in our modern economy. In particular, environmental outcomes are important in the presence of market failures (externalities and public goods). This unit focuses on developing a student's detailed understanding of the economic techniques used by policymakers to address environmental issues. These techniques include: Pigovian taxes and subsidies; regulation with asymmetric information; marketable permits; pricing contributions for public goods; optimal damages; and the allocation of property-rights and market failures.
Agricultural and Environmental Technologies
AFNR5110 Crop Improvement

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Trethowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of three lectures and 3 hours practical work per week Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of plant genetics and breeding, similar to that covered by GENE4012 and GENE4013. Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), essay/assignment (20%), practical reports (20%), presentation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, practical work and field trip(s) covering advanced aspects of the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. Included are extended discussions of screening techniques (in the field, glasshouse and laboratory), conservation and exploitation of diversity, disease resistance, tissue culture, plant cytogenetics of relevance to pre-breeding and breeding. Also considered are the role of biotechnology processes and products in plant breeding; genetic engineering and the use of molecular marker technologies. This course will use examples from the full range of crops; broad-acre cereals and legumes, pastures, turf and horticultural crops, both perennial and annual. The main base of the course may vary between the ATP and Camden campuses. Field trips (mainly to the IA Watson Grains Research Centre, Narrabri) will be used especially to examine trial procedures and field-based operations, and to interact with commercial plant breeding.
AFNR5210 Sustainable Horticultural Cropping

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate plant or crop science units to develop an understanding of horticultural cropping systems management. The unit covers topics on the production of high-quality food from perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, vegetables and key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance. Particular focus will be on intensive production systems and will provide students with a broad overview of current issues affecting the horticultural industries. Emphasis is on minimising the environmental impact of horticultural enterprises and introduces students to current themes and thinking in sustainable practices in horticultural science. The unit runs alongside lectures and practicals in Production Horticulture HORT3005.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Louis Glowinski (2008) The complete book of fruit growing in Australia. Lothian Books, Westwood, M.N. (1993) Temperate-zone pomology. Timber Press Inc. Jackson, J.E (2003) Biology of apples and pears. Cambridge University Press. Gopinadhan Paliyath et al. (Ed.) (2008) Postharvest biology and technology of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Decoteau, D/. R (2000). Vegetable Crops. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall
AFNR5502 Remote Sensing, GIS and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ENVX3001 and SOIL3004. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. We will review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management. This will be followed by practical training in RS techniques, augmented by land management project development and implementation based on integration of GIS and RS tools. The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
Syllabus summary: Lectures will cover: Overview of the basic principles of Geographical Information Science (GISc), Advanced principles of remote sensing, Land resource information and data capture using RS, Digital elevation modelling and terrain analysis using remote sensing; Image enhancement and visualization; Image classification and interpretation; RS data interpretation for land resource inventory; RS and GIS for land use and land cover change analysis; Coupling of models of land resource assessment with GIS and RS. Fifty percent of learning time will be devoted to the design and implementation of projects, which can be selected from GIS and RS applications in: agricultural land management, vegetation studies, water and catchment (hydrological) studies; land-cover and land-use change modelling, pesticide and herbicide environmental risk assessment, environmental impact analysis, land degradation modelling including soil salinity, soil erosion, etc.
Textbooks
Textbook: Jesen J. R. 2006. Remote sensing of the environment: an earth resource perspective. 2nd ed. Pearson Prentice Hall Upper Saddle, New Jersey
AGRO4006 New and Emerging Tech in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 1000-3000 level units including at least 6cp of BIOL1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of new and emerging livestock technologies in Australia and overseas. Examples of these technologies include (1) next-generation infrared and laser scanning to determine physiological status and whole body composition, (2) diet formulation to enhance the nutritional and eating quality of livestock food products, (3) new vaccines and other therapeutics to regulate fertility, growth and behaviour whilst enhancing welfare and wellbeing, (4) microRNA technology to influence cellular, endocrine and physiological processes, (5) new genomics and laboratory-based reproductive technologies for advanced livestock breeding, (6) technologies to monitor and control animal behaviour, (7) unmanned ground and aerial vehicles to monitor livestock and the environment, (8) sensors and advanced image-capture technology to record the attributes of soil, air and the feedbase, (9) data-fusion science to integrate, analyse and interpret collected data, and (10) modelling of livestock systems. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At successful completion of the unit students will have a sound knowledge of new and emerging technologies that will shape the livestock industries in Australia and overseas. This will provide valuable grounding for students preparing for postgraduate study and other learning and career paths.
Textbooks
No prescribed text but referral to references listed from library
ENVI5708 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the major physical and chemical processes that control the concentration and dispersion of chemical pollutants in natural and impacted environments. The course will demonstrate how to use contaminant data effectively and how to judge the quality of chemical data. This knowledge will be used to design and to assess environmental projects, and to judge the magnitude of impact by human activity on environments and the risk posed by contaminants to ecosystem functioning. The course aims to provide present and future managers employed in environmental professions with the skills to use data with confidence and to make management decisions knowing the risks inherent in variable data quality. A field trip will be undertaken early in the semester.
General Electives
AREC3003 Econ of Minerals and Energy Industries

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2003 or RSEC2031 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x50min Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final Exam (50%), 3x500wd Tutorial Reports (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit builds on previously acquired economics training and develops advanced understanding of the economics of minerals exploration, extraction and marketing and the economics of energy generation, distribution and use. The implications of mineral extraction and energy generation activities for natural resources and the environment are explored. The unit will foster in-depth knowledge of the markets for minerals and energy, their industry structure and business environment, including the role of markets for derivatives on minerals and energy commodities.
ECOS3002 Development Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2002 or ECOS2902 Assessment: 1x1500wd written assessment (30%), 1x1hr mid-semester exam (20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the economic transformation of less-developed countries from microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. It covers applied topics such as education, health, nutrition, demographics, labour, agriculture and the private sector, focusing on how policies attempt to overcome market and institutional failures that are particularly acute in the developing world. Focus is given to applying theoretical and empirical tools necessary to conceptualise, analyse and interpret various issues in economic development. Applied examples from developing countries are used throughout the unit.
ECOS3005 Industrial Organisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Prohibitions: ECOS2201 Assessment: Mid-semester test (35%), problem sets (5%) and 2hr Final exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the nature of inter-firm rivalry in industries with market power. It explores the various ways in which firms can increase their market power by: extracting more surplus from consumers, by colluding with rivals or by excluding entrants. The unit also analyses the international competitiveness of industries in the context of industry assistance and the prevalence of foreign multinationals. Competition policy is also discussed.
ECOS3013 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or AREC2003 or RSEC2031 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (25%), 1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Block mode
The natural environment is invariably affected by production and consumption in our modern economy. In particular, environmental outcomes are important in the presence of market failures (externalities and public goods). This unit focuses on developing a student's detailed understanding of the economic techniques used by policymakers to address environmental issues. These techniques include: Pigovian taxes and subsidies; regulation with asymmetric information; marketable permits; pricing contributions for public goods; optimal damages; and the allocation of property-rights and market failures.
ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5040 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
ENVI5708 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the major physical and chemical processes that control the concentration and dispersion of chemical pollutants in natural and impacted environments. The course will demonstrate how to use contaminant data effectively and how to judge the quality of chemical data. This knowledge will be used to design and to assess environmental projects, and to judge the magnitude of impact by human activity on environments and the risk posed by contaminants to ecosystem functioning. The course aims to provide present and future managers employed in environmental professions with the skills to use data with confidence and to make management decisions knowing the risks inherent in variable data quality. A field trip will be undertaken early in the semester.
GOVT6135 Global Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (20%) Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the environment as a political and policy issue. Although relatively recent, the environment has become a full-fledged public policy issue exerting influence in local, national and international arenas. The unit will first focus on the specific features of the policy that influences the capability of contemporary societies to enhance the management of environmental resources and of public goods in general. Second, it discusses the development of environmental policy in Western countries, with a particular emphasis on the European Union. Third, a grid for the analysis of environmental policy will be presented, with a discussion of the main actors (political, institutional and socio-economic) involved in it and of the factors (interests and ideas) influencing their positions. Fourth, the unit briefly discusses environmental conflicts and consensual approaches used for tackling them.
IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: individual assignment (30%), group assignment (30%), participation and contribution (10%), final exam (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This foundation unit provides an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks in the domains of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Each domain is presented in a block of three lectures supplemented with case-based tutorials. Topics covered include user and disruptive innovation, entrepreneurial opportunities and business models, value chain and ecosystem analysis. Theories and frameworks are further tested in the real-life business projects offered by the participating companies. The emphasis of the unit is made on understanding the complexity of the innovation process and learning how to navigate the business environment to maximise the value from innovation.
PHYS5031 Ecological Econ and Sustainable Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces contemporary topics from Ecological Economics and Sustainability Analysis, such as metrics for measuring sustainability; planetary boundaries and other natural limits; comparisons between ecological and environmental economics; valuing the environment; intergenerational discounting; global inequality with a focus on the climate change debate; and links between theories of well-being, human behaviour, consumerism and environmental impact. This unit includes guest lecturers from industry and research and an excursion. The lectures for this unit include interactive activities and group-exercises on a range of concepts related to Ecological Economics. The unit sets the scene for the more detailed and specific units PHYS5032, PHYS5033, and PHYS5034.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide students with practical skills for carrying out environmental footprinting calculations: for individuals, companies, organisations or nations. In particular, this unit will provide a comprehensive introduction to input-output analysis for identifying impacts embodied in regional, national and global supply chains. This unit focuses on contemporary environmental applications such as emissions, energy-use, water, land, loss of animal and plant species; and also social applications such as employment, poverty and child labour. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it presents cutting-edge techniques enabling the global analysis of environmental and social impacts of international trade. Third, it offers hands-on practical activities for mastering the input-output techniques conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provides a step-by-step recipe for undertaking boundary-free environmental and social footprinting for sectors and organisations. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with useful skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5034 for a sound understanding of the role of input-output analysis within the field of Life-Cycle Assessment.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study covers philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It introduces methods from engineering (Process Analysis) and economics (Input-Output Analysis), and discusses current popular LCA tools. The unit places importance on practical relevance by including real-world case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes -1, -2 and -3 emissions and ISO standards. The unit of study will culminate with practical exercises using software tools to provide students with hands-on experience of preparing a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of an application of their choice. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output analysis as the basis of hybrid LCA methods.
STAT5002 Introduction to Statistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to basic statistical concepts and methods for further studies. Particular attention will be paid to the development of methodologies related to statistical data analysis and Data Mining. A number of useful statistical models will be discussed and computer oriented estimation procedures will be developed. Smoothing and nonparametric concepts for the analysis of large data sets will also be discussed. Students will be exposed to the R computing language to handle all relevant computational aspects in the course.
Textbooks
All of Statistics, Larry Wasserman, Springer (2004)
SUST5001 Introduction to Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Note: Students in the Graduate Certificate in Sustainability, Graduate Diploma in Sustainability or Master of Sustainability must take this unit in their first semester of study. This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit of study will introduce students to the concepts and multidisciplinary nature of sustainability, starting with the physical basis of climate change and its impact on the environment and human development. This will be followed by several case studies covering Energy, Health, Development and Environment. The case studies will be presented by industry professionals and will illustrate sustainability issues currently before Australia- their origins, impacts and industry responses. The unit of study will provide students with a holistic systems lens through which to view their learning throughout the Masters program. This will underpin understanding of the integrated nature of sustainability and facilitate the challenging of silo-based assumptions- their own and those of others. The intention is to ground understanding of complex systems in the real world through the use of case studies that will demonstrate organisational change and problem solving in a world with competing values and conflicting views of what it means to live sustainably. Students completing the unit of study will have a "sustainability tool kit" to apply to sustainability issues in their professional and community activities.
Capstone
AFNR5901 Research Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: AFNR5904 Prohibitions: AFNR5902 or AFNR5903 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
This aims to develop a student's ability to review the literature with the view of developing a major research project in an area of specialization. The student will work with an academic advisor on a mutually agreed topic for research to be undertaken and the subsequent writing of a literature review. The literature review will advance the student's ability to identify existing knowledge, define research problems, demonstrate a sound grasp for presenting a research question, and begin to define a research strategy. Students will develop their research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of literature and improve their written communication skills.
AFNR5904 Research Proposal and Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Corequisites: AFNR5901 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
This unit of study aims to develop a student's ability to write a detailed research proposal and develop a strategy combined with the appropriate methodology to execute their research. Working with their academic advisor students will prepare a proposal describing; the background and aims, its significance and innovation, the justification of the methodology, the national benefit, and considerations of the required budget and project timeline. This unit will enable students to develop their ability to define a research project to be managed within a suitable research framework. Students will develop their skills in solving research problems and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy through managing a research program.
AFNR5905 Research Paper

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AFNR5901 and AFNR5904 Corequisites: AFNR5906 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit of study builds on the major research project proposed in AFNR5904. Working with their academic advisor students will execute their research strategy that provides data and subsequent data analysis towards solving the research question. The results and analysis will be presented in a format suitable for submission as a research paper to a relevant journal. Students will build their research skills, develop a strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Students will demonstrate their ability to draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas of research. Students will continue to develop their skills in solving research problems and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of managing a research program. Students will improve their communication skills through presentation of the research paper.
AFNR5906 Research Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: AFNR5901 and AFNR5904 Corequisites: AFNR5905 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides the students with the opportunity to present the research findings of their major research project using several communication media appropriate for different audiences, for example, external stakeholders and /or popular media. Using poster and oral presentations students will communicate their research to the academic community in a professional conference environment. Students will also be required to attend the Faculty's seminar program that is relevant to their research topic. Students will build on their skills to use several modes of communication to demonstrate their ability to produce high quality results, draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas of research.

Table B

AFNR5110 Crop Improvement

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Trethowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of three lectures and 3 hours practical work per week Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of plant genetics and breeding, similar to that covered by GENE4012 and GENE4013. Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), essay/assignment (20%), practical reports (20%), presentation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, practical work and field trip(s) covering advanced aspects of the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. Included are extended discussions of screening techniques (in the field, glasshouse and laboratory), conservation and exploitation of diversity, disease resistance, tissue culture, plant cytogenetics of relevance to pre-breeding and breeding. Also considered are the role of biotechnology processes and products in plant breeding; genetic engineering and the use of molecular marker technologies. This course will use examples from the full range of crops; broad-acre cereals and legumes, pastures, turf and horticultural crops, both perennial and annual. The main base of the course may vary between the ATP and Camden campuses. Field trips (mainly to the IA Watson Grains Research Centre, Narrabri) will be used especially to examine trial procedures and field-based operations, and to interact with commercial plant breeding.
AFNR5210 Sustainable Horticultural Cropping

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate plant or crop science units to develop an understanding of horticultural cropping systems management. The unit covers topics on the production of high-quality food from perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, vegetables and key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance. Particular focus will be on intensive production systems and will provide students with a broad overview of current issues affecting the horticultural industries. Emphasis is on minimising the environmental impact of horticultural enterprises and introduces students to current themes and thinking in sustainable practices in horticultural science. The unit runs alongside lectures and practicals in Production Horticulture HORT3005.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Louis Glowinski (2008) The complete book of fruit growing in Australia. Lothian Books, Westwood, M.N. (1993) Temperate-zone pomology. Timber Press Inc. Jackson, J.E (2003) Biology of apples and pears. Cambridge University Press. Gopinadhan Paliyath et al. (Ed.) (2008) Postharvest biology and technology of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Decoteau, D/. R (2000). Vegetable Crops. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall
AFNR5502 Remote Sensing, GIS and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ENVX3001 and SOIL3004. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. We will review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management. This will be followed by practical training in RS techniques, augmented by land management project development and implementation based on integration of GIS and RS tools. The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
Syllabus summary: Lectures will cover: Overview of the basic principles of Geographical Information Science (GISc), Advanced principles of remote sensing, Land resource information and data capture using RS, Digital elevation modelling and terrain analysis using remote sensing; Image enhancement and visualization; Image classification and interpretation; RS data interpretation for land resource inventory; RS and GIS for land use and land cover change analysis; Coupling of models of land resource assessment with GIS and RS. Fifty percent of learning time will be devoted to the design and implementation of projects, which can be selected from GIS and RS applications in: agricultural land management, vegetation studies, water and catchment (hydrological) studies; land-cover and land-use change modelling, pesticide and herbicide environmental risk assessment, environmental impact analysis, land degradation modelling including soil salinity, soil erosion, etc.
Textbooks
Textbook: Jesen J. R. 2006. Remote sensing of the environment: an earth resource perspective. 2nd ed. Pearson Prentice Hall Upper Saddle, New Jersey
AFNR5510 The Soil at Work

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny (Coordinator), Prof Balwant Singh, Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Problem-based unit: each student completes one problem as part of a team, involving multiple team meetings Assessment: Introduction to the problem group presentation (10%), status of the problem group report (10%), how to tackle the problem seminar (20%) - team seminars; before fieldwork; analyses done, results seminar (20%) - team seminars; final group report (25%), activities diary for group (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a problem-based applied soil science unit addressing the physical, chemical and biological components of soil function. It is designed to allow students to identify soil-related problems in the real-world and by working in a group and with an end-user, to suggest short and long-term solutions to problems such as fertility, resilience, carbon management, structural decline, acidification, salinisation and contamination. Students will gain a focused knowledge of the key soil drivers to environmental problems and will have some understanding on the constraints surrounding potential solutions. By designing and administering strategies to tackle real-world soil issues, students will develop their research and inquiry skills and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and seminars that enables understanding by an end-user, students will improve the breadth of their communication skills. This is a core unit for students majoring or specialising in soil science and an elective unit for those wishing to gain an understanding of environmental problem-solving. It utilises and reinforces soil-science knowledge gained in SOIL2003 and SOIL2004, as well as generic problem-solving skills gained during the degree program.
Textbooks
Reference book: I.W.Heathcote 1997. Environmental Problem Solving: A Case Study Approach. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA.
AFNR5511 Soil Processes, Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Soils support agricultural and natural ecosystems and regulate environmental interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere. It is the quality of our soils that affect productivity, the environment, health and ultimately sustainability. However, challenges such as those presented by lack of plant nutrient supply, soil acidification, physical degradation, soil contamination, and loss of soil biodiversity are problems at a global scale that threaten the sustainability of the environment and society. As well as the threats the importance of maintaining a quality soil that regulates environmental interactions will be explored, such as soil as a sink for carbon affecting climate interactions or understanding how a rich soil biodiversity can contribute to food production affecting food security. To do this, this unit of study is concerned with exploring the key pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality. Time will be spent investigating how the quality of the soil can be assessed, using the indicators of the mentioned soil processes, and how the resulting data can be aggregated and communicated in a meaningful way. Working with case studies, the students will identify problems that are assessed using soil quality or function analysis with the aim of identifying management options. The management options will be evaluated to determine their adoptability and implement ability. By investigating the case studies using soil quality or function analysis students will develop their research and enquiry skills. Assessing and developing adoptable management strategies the students will develop their skills in synthesising material from multiple sources and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and presenting seminars the students will develop their communication skills.
Textbooks
Textbooks: D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics, Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA USA
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites where students will be introduced to climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
AGRI4001 Advanced Plant Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units including AGRI2001 and AGRI3888 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Some activities will take place at the University's Camden campus and/or at other field sites around NSW.
Plants have food, fibre and industrial uses in our societies. Successfully growing plants and their products for our use involves a large and very diverse mix of industries and therefore requires a wide spectrum of people with specialized skills in production and protection techniques for different types of plants and in the skills required to breed better varieties over time. Within this framework, the diversity of uses for plants is increasing, it is evident that the use of inputs such as water, nutrients and energy in the production chains must become more efficient and all industry sectors need to monitor and respond to the impact of climate change. In this unit you will be able to choose to study, from a list of alternatives, three different aspects or industries involved in plant production. This choice of modules enables you to develop targeted advanced knowledge and skills in your areas of interest, alongside building your knowledge and understanding of plant production industry processes and challenges in general. This will be achieved through a combination of interactive theory development, inquiry-led practicals, field work and field trips. By undertaking this unit you will gather a deeper knowledge of the specific technical and social issues that challenge the chosen aspects/industries while garnering an understanding of the linkages and integration of specialties required in modern crop production systems. This will empower you to further explore and contribute to plant production industries through a range of production or research-based avenues.
Textbooks
Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units
AGRO4006 New and Emerging Tech in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 48cp of 1000-3000 level units including at least 6cp of BIOL1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of new and emerging livestock technologies in Australia and overseas. Examples of these technologies include (1) next-generation infrared and laser scanning to determine physiological status and whole body composition, (2) diet formulation to enhance the nutritional and eating quality of livestock food products, (3) new vaccines and other therapeutics to regulate fertility, growth and behaviour whilst enhancing welfare and wellbeing, (4) microRNA technology to influence cellular, endocrine and physiological processes, (5) new genomics and laboratory-based reproductive technologies for advanced livestock breeding, (6) technologies to monitor and control animal behaviour, (7) unmanned ground and aerial vehicles to monitor livestock and the environment, (8) sensors and advanced image-capture technology to record the attributes of soil, air and the feedbase, (9) data-fusion science to integrate, analyse and interpret collected data, and (10) modelling of livestock systems. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At successful completion of the unit students will have a sound knowledge of new and emerging technologies that will shape the livestock industries in Australia and overseas. This will provide valuable grounding for students preparing for postgraduate study and other learning and career paths.
Textbooks
No prescribed text but referral to references listed from library
ENVI5708 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the major physical and chemical processes that control the concentration and dispersion of chemical pollutants in natural and impacted environments. The course will demonstrate how to use contaminant data effectively and how to judge the quality of chemical data. This knowledge will be used to design and to assess environmental projects, and to judge the magnitude of impact by human activity on environments and the risk posed by contaminants to ecosystem functioning. The course aims to provide present and future managers employed in environmental professions with the skills to use data with confidence and to make management decisions knowing the risks inherent in variable data quality. A field trip will be undertaken early in the semester.
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2a Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Remote Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
HORT4005 Research and Practice in Horticulture

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture/workshop/practical per week; one 1-week excursion Prerequisites: HORT3005 Assessment: Industry report (40%), field trip industry report (20%), end of semester exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a scientific grounding in the sustainable production of safe and nutritious fruit, vegetables and mushrooms. The unit encompasses the fundamentals of production system options, resource management and marketing practices. Case studies will be used to exemplify important developments in horticultural production, supply and marketing chains. Students will examine multiple real world examples of horticulture to develop skills in systematic problem-solving in production and marketing. Combining relevant industry knowledge, critical analytical skills and a systems perspective will enable students to make valid, scientifically-informed decisions in horticulture and beyond. The unit is comprised of: lectures/workshops, practicals in production and post-harvest horticulture, and site visits to producers, research sites and industry bodies. The program includes a week-long field trip to major horticultural production regions to view operations and Q and A with owner/operators.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide students with practical skills for carrying out environmental footprinting calculations: for individuals, companies, organisations or nations. In particular, this unit will provide a comprehensive introduction to input-output analysis for identifying impacts embodied in regional, national and global supply chains. This unit focuses on contemporary environmental applications such as emissions, energy-use, water, land, loss of animal and plant species; and also social applications such as employment, poverty and child labour. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it presents cutting-edge techniques enabling the global analysis of environmental and social impacts of international trade. Third, it offers hands-on practical activities for mastering the input-output techniques conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provides a step-by-step recipe for undertaking boundary-free environmental and social footprinting for sectors and organisations. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with useful skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5034 for a sound understanding of the role of input-output analysis within the field of Life-Cycle Assessment.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study covers philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It introduces methods from engineering (Process Analysis) and economics (Input-Output Analysis), and discusses current popular LCA tools. The unit places importance on practical relevance by including real-world case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes -1, -2 and -3 emissions and ISO standards. The unit of study will culminate with practical exercises using software tools to provide students with hands-on experience of preparing a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of an application of their choice. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output analysis as the basis of hybrid LCA methods.
STAT5002 Introduction to Statistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to basic statistical concepts and methods for further studies. Particular attention will be paid to the development of methodologies related to statistical data analysis and Data Mining. A number of useful statistical models will be discussed and computer oriented estimation procedures will be developed. Smoothing and nonparametric concepts for the analysis of large data sets will also be discussed. Students will be exposed to the R computing language to handle all relevant computational aspects in the course.
Textbooks
All of Statistics, Larry Wasserman, Springer (2004)
SUST5001 Introduction to Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Note: Students in the Graduate Certificate in Sustainability, Graduate Diploma in Sustainability or Master of Sustainability must take this unit in their first semester of study. This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit of study will introduce students to the concepts and multidisciplinary nature of sustainability, starting with the physical basis of climate change and its impact on the environment and human development. This will be followed by several case studies covering Energy, Health, Development and Environment. The case studies will be presented by industry professionals and will illustrate sustainability issues currently before Australia- their origins, impacts and industry responses. The unit of study will provide students with a holistic systems lens through which to view their learning throughout the Masters program. This will underpin understanding of the integrated nature of sustainability and facilitate the challenging of silo-based assumptions- their own and those of others. The intention is to ground understanding of complex systems in the real world through the use of case studies that will demonstrate organisational change and problem solving in a world with competing values and conflicting views of what it means to live sustainably. Students completing the unit of study will have a "sustainability tool kit" to apply to sustainability issues in their professional and community activities.