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University of Sydney launches NSW COVID-19 Cases and Community Profile Mapping Dashboard

Led by MBI's Associate Professor Adam Kamradt-Scott from the School of Social and Political Sciences, together with Associate Professor Eleanor Bruce from the Faculty of Science  and Associate Professor Adam Dunn from the Faculty of Medicine and Health, the database is aimed at helping the government identify populations who might be at greater risk in the event of more widespread community transmission.  Read more here.

Articles

23 November 2020

Changes in public preferences for technologically enhanced surveillance following the COVID-19 pandemic: a discrete choice experiment

As governments attempt to navigate a path out of COVID-19 restrictions, robust evidence is essential to inform requirements for public acceptance of technologically enhanced communicable disease surveillance systems. We examined the value of core surveillance system attributes to the Australian public, before and during the early stages of the current pandemic.
16 November 2020

Modelling transmission and control of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

There is a continuing debate on relative benefits of various mitigation and suppression strategies aimed to control the spread of COVID-19. Here we report the results of agent-based modelling using a fine-grained computational simulation of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. This model is calibrated to match key characteristics of COVID-19 transmission.
03 September 2020

ARC Future Fellowship 2020 success

Congratulations to Associate Professor Holly High who has been awarded an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship for her work on reproductive health policy rollout in Laos.
03 September 2020

Extensive Homoplasy but No Evidence of Convergent Evolution of Repeat Numbers at MIRU Loci in Modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lineages

More human deaths have been attributable to Mycobacterium tuberculosis than any other pathogen, and the epidemic is sustained by ongoing transmission.