THIS PAGE FIRST POSTED 1 OCTOBER 2019

LAST MODIFIED Tuesday 1 October 2019 13:23

Elizabeth Clancy

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "Elizabeth Clancy", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/clancy-elizabeth.php; accessed 29 May 2020




CLANCY, Elizabeth (Elizabeth FIELD; Mrs. Thomas CLANCY)

Soprano vocalist, music teacher

Born Somerset, England, c.1807
Married Thomas CLANCY (d. 1867), Trinity Church, Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 16 February 1836
Arrived Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), c.1837
Arrived Sydney, December 1837 (per Susan, from Hobart Town, 14 December)
Died Sydney, 28 May 1860, aged 53

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Elizabeth+Clancy+d1860 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Thomas+Clancy+d1867 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)




Summary

Elizabeth Clancy was a daughter of James Field (c.1779-1822), a musician and music teacher, who at the time of his death on 9 October 1822 was 43 years old, organist of the Argyle Chapel, Bath, and resident in Hanover Street. James was probably a brother of Thomas Field (d. 1831), organist of Bath Abbey from 1794 to his death, who was in turn father of the pianist Henry Ibbot Field (1797-1848); the pianist-composer John Field (1782-1837), who also lived in Bath briefly in 1793, was not related.

After James's death, his widow Julia Field (d. 1857, aged 67), Elizabeth's mother, opened a girls school at Kingsmead Terrace, Bath, before working in other schools at Frome Selwood, Somerset, and later in London, where from 1840 she ran Whitelands College, Chelsea, with the help of her younger daughter Ellen Julia (until she married in 1843).

In Hobart on 16 February 1836, Elizabeth married Thomas Clancy, a widower, who, as "T. Clancy, late of Jermyn-street, St. James . . . Tailor and Habit Maker" had first advertised in Hobart in October 1832.

In Sydney in January 1838, Elizabeth Clancy advertised her intention to open a day school for young ladies offering instruction in music. At the end of the month she made her public debut singing in William Vincent Wallace's final Oratorio in St. Mary's Cathedral. She appeared regularly in Sydney concerts with the Bushelles, Deanes, and Gautrots, and in the early 1840s also sang in St. Mary's Cathedral choir. Her last documented concert appearances were for the Deanes in January 1844, however she continued to teach pianoforte and singing into 1850.

In 1843, her husband Thomas was appointed trustee in the insolvency of Geogre William Worgan.




Documentation

"DIED", Bath chronicle and weekly gazette [England] (17 October 1822), 3

Wednesday [9th] died, Mr. Jas. Filed, the much-respected organist of Argyle-Chapel, and son of the late Mr. Thos. Field, watchmaker, of this city.

Marriages solemnized in the parish of Trinity in the county of Buckingham in the year [1836]; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:822496; RGD36/1/3 no 3237

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/822496 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD36-1-3$init=RGD36-1-3p17 

No. 237/3237 / Thomas Clancy of this Parish Widower and Elizabeth Field of this Parish Spinster were married in this Church by Bann . . . this Sixteenth day of February in the year 1836 . . .

[Advertisement], Colonial Times (28 November 1837), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8650360

J. CLANCY having declined business in the Colony, begs leave to return thanks to those gentlemen who have hitherto patronized him . . .

[Advertisement], The True Colonist Van Diemen's Land Political Despatch (22 December 1837), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article203147761

. . . ROBERT WILSON (late foreman to Mr. Kean) begs leave to inform his Friends and the Public generally, that he has opened the shop No. 55, Elizabeth street, formerly occupied by Mr. Clancy, Tailor . . . Dec. 12, 1837

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE", The Hobart Town Courier (22 December 1837), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4167924

DEPARTURES. [Dec.] 14 - the bark Susan, 572 tons, Neatby, for Sydney, in ballast - passengers . . . Mr. J. Clancy, wife and 2 children.

[Advertisement], The Australian (19 January 1838), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855414

MRS. CLANCY BEGS leave to inform the Public, that she intends opening a Day School for Young Ladies on Monday, the 28th Instant; Instruction in Music, with, the general routine of English Education. Terms may be known on application to Mrs C. at her Residence, 14, King-street. January 17, 1838.

31 January 1838, oratorio, St. Mary's Cathedral, Hyde Park, Sydney; under the direction of William Vincent Wallace

"THE ORATORIO", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 February 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547119

The grand musical festival at the Roman Catholic Chapel, Hyde Park, came off on Wednesday evening last in presence of a very crowded audience numbering among them, the Acting Governor and most of the fashionables of Sydney. The principal female performers were Miss Wallace, Mrs. Clarke, Mrs. Clancy, and some amateurs. Miss Wallace and Mrs. Clarke sang with their usual ability, and in some pieces elicited rapturous applause. Mrs. Clancy, whom we never had the pleasure to hear before, sang with much taste and feeling; her voice, which must be very effective in a smaller room, did not however possess sufficient power and compass to enable her to do herself justice in so large a building, perched up as the performers were in the out of the way gallery in which the managers had mewed them up . . .

"The Oratorio", The Sydney Monitor (5 February 1838), 2-3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32158922

. . . Mrs. Clancy sang "With verdure clad." This is a sweet pastoral air, and after our ears had been gratified with the grander efforts of musical talent, the soft symphonious strains of this piece, sung in a very sweet and chaste, though not powerful manner, had an excellent effect . . . A Duet in Latin by Miss Wallace and an amateur, and a Latin hymn by Mrs. Clancy and amateurs, closed the evening's entertainmnents, (except the Queen's Anthem) and gave general satisfaction. The Queen's Anthem from some cause or other disappointed the audience. One of the defects was, the too great loudness of the singers, and especially of Mrs. Clarke . . . Even Mrs. Clancy, whose voice is not strong, was distinctly heard . . .

[News], The Australian (6 February 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36856632 

. . . We heard for the first time Mrs. Clancy, who sang "With verdure clad," with great taste and feeling, leaving us nothing to regret but the want of proportion between her physical powers and the size of the edifice; her voice is a beautiful soprano . . .

[Advertisement], The Australian (9 March 1838), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36854647

T. CLANCY, Formerly Foreman to Mr. Myers, of 36, Conduit-street, Bond-Street, London, Tailor to the Royal Family, BEGS leave to inform the Public that he intends commencing business in the above line, on Monday, the 12th inst, when he flatters himself, from his experience in so fashionable a house, he will be able to give satisfaction to those Gentlemen who may favour him with their support. N.B. - Regimentals and Navy Uniforms executed in a superior style. 14, King-street.

"The Concert", The Australian (25 May 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36857695 

Among our advertisements of this day, will be seen Mr. Deane's bill of fare, for the forthcoming Concert, on the 30th instant . . . Mrs. Clancy of King-street, a lady of unassuming, but great vocal abllity, sings several ballads, for which her voice is excellently adapted . . .

[Advertisement], Commercial Journal and Advertiser (30 May 1838), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226458747 

MR. J. P. DEANE BEGS to announce that his CONCERT of VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC . . . will take place THIS EVENING, May 30, 1838, in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel, on which occasion he will he assisted by Mrs. Clancy, Miss Wallace, Mr. S. Wallace, Masters John and Edward Deane, and Miss Deane. Programme Concert. PART I . . . 2. Glee and Chorus - God Save the Queen! . . .
5. Song - Cease your Funning - Farinelli - Mrs. Clancy . . .
7. Song - Al dolce qui domi [Al dolce guidami] - Donizetti - Mrs. Clancy . . .
PART II . . . 2. Song - The Soldier Tired - Arne - Mrs. Clancy . . .
6. Song - The Lass of Gourie - Lee - Mrs Clancy . . .

"Concert", The Sydney Monitor (1 June 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32160266 

. . . Mrs. Clancy sang Cease your Funning - and although her voice was sweet, and she displayed great compass, yet there lacked spirit; and if there had been any fun in the song, there was none in her manner of singing it. Animation was what was required . . .

"THE CONCERT", The Australian (1 June 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855351 

. . . When His Excellency was seated, the full band played Weber's overture to Der Freischutz, with happy effect. The music, for an overture, was not too loud for the room, and the performance was greeted with applause; after which, Miss Wallace and Mrs. Clancy, supported by the vocal performers, advanced and sung God Save the Queen, the audience standing during the anthem . . . Mrs. Clancy then sung Cease Your Funning; but appeared to be labouring under a timidity natural to a first appearance at a public concert. She has a sweet musical voice, strong and clear upon the upper notes, but rather weak though always in time upon the lower . . . Al dolci Guidame [sic] by Mrs. Clancy, gave that lady an opportunity of recovering her self-possossion, and of impressing the company with the sweetness of her voice; the air is plaintive and was admirably sung . . . Mrs. Clancy sang The Soldier Tired, to a piano accompaniment, and she sang it well. The effect of the song, however, was not what it would have been with a trumpet accompaniment, but Mrs. C's modulations were taken with much ease and clearness, and shows that her power and knowledge of music are good, and have been acquired from able masters . . . but the last and best songs were Mrs. Clancy's The Lass of Gowrie, and Miss Wallaces Vivi Tu by Donizetti, with a flute obligato by Mr. W. Wallace. The former was indeed rich and well adapted to Mrs. Clancy's voice, and the latter give ample scope to Miss Wallace's compass of voice, and the excellence of her execution . . .

"The Concert", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 June 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551285 

. . . The concert commenced with Weber's celebrated "Overture to Der Frieschutz," which was well executed by the Band; but its effect was entirely lost, owing to the room being much too small: it would have sounded well in the open air. Miss Wallace and Mrs. Clancy's "God Save the Queen" was also rendered less effective a from the same cause . . . We never heard Mrs. Clancy sing before; her "Cease your Funning" was well executed, but she wanted nerve; her voice is very sweet, but not powerful - neither is her shake first-rate; her "Soldier Tired," in the second part of the performances, was by far her happiest effort; she had then evidently shaken off much of her natural timidity; the song was rapturously received; this lady's voice, we should think, is better adapted for a private room . . . Mrs. Clancy sung "Al dolce qui domi" sweetly and with effect . . .

"THE CONCERT", The Colonist (2 June 1838), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31721078 

. . . God save the Queen was then sung by Miss Wallace and Mrs. Clancy, in a manner that elicited the merited applause of the audience. The voice of the former of these ladies is full and energetic in an extraordinary degree; and her powers of deep intonation and varied modulation, are calculated to excite the warmest admiration. The voice of Mrs. Clancy, on the other hand, is peculiarly soft, melodious, and sweet; there is also an interesting simplicity in her style of singing, which secured to that lady the willing app!ause of the whole company . . . Mrs. Clancy sung, Cease your funning, with soft and touching sweetness . . . Mrs. Clancy sang The Soldier Tired, with spirit, and afterwards The Lass of Gowrie, with almost Scottish taste and feeling . . .

"MR. DEANE'S CONCERT", The Sydney Herald (4 June 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12857329 

. . . A Mrs. Clancy made her first appearance on this occasion as a concert singer. She possesses a sweet, but rather weak voice, particularly in the lower notes, and appeared to be somewhat timid. The best of her songs were Al dolce qui domi, and the Lass of Gowrie. The Soldier Tired is rather beyond her power of voice, although the cadences were got through with great clearness. This song is generally sung with a full orchestral accompaniment, in which the trumpet assumes the most prominent part. Mrs. C., however, sang it to a piano forte accompaniment, which, considering her apparently limited power of voice, was judicious . . .

[Advertisement], The Australian (27 July 1838), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855150

MRS. CLANCY BEGS respectfully to announce, to her Friends and the Public her intention of giving a CONCERT, at the Old Court House, Castlereagh-street, on the 15th of August next, the Programme of which will be published in due time.

14 October 1838, dedication of St. Mary's chapel (cathedral), Sydney

"Roman Catholic Chapel", The Australian (16 October 1838), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36860138 

Sunday was set apart for the dedication of this edifice which is nearly completed . . . The first part of the performance consisted chiefly of pieces which have been sung repeatedly, but an "Agnus Dei" (Mozart's) sung by Mrs. Clancy, Mr. Bushell and Mr. Worgan, whose voices blended most harmoniousl, was a rich treat, as were also the choruses at the closes of the service, which contained some beautiful fuges, cleverly executed. The "Agnus Dei," however, was the masterpiece, the rich deep tones of Mr. Bushell were finely contrasted with the swelling tenor of Mr. Worgan when he took up the part, and when the three voices swelled in the body, the harmony was rich . . . The choir was assisted by all the musical talent in Sydney, and they were lavish in their exertions . . .

"New South Wales", Bent's News and Tasmanian Register (21 December 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article233325819 

Mr. John Philip Deane, our old and much esteemed townsman, was to have given a Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music on the 2lst of November, but was postponed in consequenoe of the Influenza. He was to be assisted by Miss Wallace, Mrs. Clancy, late of Hobart Town . . .

23 January 1839, Deane's concert (incorrectly advertised for "Wednedsay 21st")

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (23 January 1839), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12856187 

Concert. MR. DEANE BEGS to inform his Friends and the Public that his CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place in the Saloon of the Royal Hotel, on WEDNESDAY, the 21st [sic] instant, on which occasion Mr. Deane will be assisted by Miss Wallace, Mrs. Clancy, the Vocal Amateur whose performance elicited such unqualified applause at the last Concert, Mr. Worgan, Master Deane, and Mr. Wellington Wallace.
PROGRAMME CONCERT. PART I . . . 4. Glee - The Red Cross Knight - Calcott - Mrs. Clancy, Mr. Worgan, and Amateur . . .
6. Song - Bid me Discourse - Bishop - Mrs. Clancy . . .
PART II . . . 2. Song - My Soldier Love - Bishop - Mrs. Clancy . . .
4. Glee - The Flocks shall leave the Mountains - Handel - Mrs. Clancy, Mr. Worgan, and Amateur . . .

"CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (25 January 1838), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32162668 

. . . Mrs. Clancy's voice continues as sweet as ever, but she should never sing in glees, as her voice becomes insignificant. "My soldier love," was sung by Mrs. C. with great sweeteess, but the applause was small, owing we suppose, to this song being in itself of a common place character . . .

"THE CONCERT", Commercial Journal and Advertiser (26 January 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226455962 

. . . The Red Cross Knight (Callcott) by Mrs. Clancy, Mr. Worgan and Amateur, was very good, but the voices of the two former were drowned by that of the latter. Mrs. Clancy and Mr. Worgan, there is no doubt are very good musicians but their voices are not adapted for a Concert, where their voices are heard solus . . .

"TO CORRESPONDENTS", Commercial Journal and Advertiser (30 January 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226455213

"A Strict Observer of the Performance" of Mr. Deane's Concert, this day week, has been received; but, on account of its personality, and its not being in accordance with our sentiments, is in admissible. We shall have no objection to insert the communication as an advertisement. With reference to Mrs. Clancy's performance at the Concert, we do feel a little astonished at her failure upon that occasion, when we contrast her excellent execution, and the melody of her tones, at St. Mary's Cathedral, on Sunday last. The only way that we can account for this failure, is that the selections for her part in the Concert, were the worst that possibly could have been made. In future, we should recommend her to select for herself simple national ballads, to which her soft musical voice gives expression. This we really recommend, not only for the gratification of the audience, but also for her celebrity as a singer.

24 September 1839, Deane's soiree (postponed from 4 September

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 September 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551679 

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE POOR. MR. DEANE BEGS to inform the Gently and Public of Sydney, that his SOIREE OF Vocal and Instrumental Music, will take place at the Mechanics' School of Arts, THIS EVENING, September 24, the proceeds of which will be given to the Association for the Relief of the Poor.
PROGRAMME. ACT I . . . 2. Song, "Di piacer mi balza ti cor," - Rossini - Mrs. Clancy . . .
5. Song, "Why did I love?" - J. Barnett - Mrs. Clancy . . .
ACT II . . . 2. Song, "Love's poisonous shafts," Mrs. Clancy . . .

"Mr. Deane's Soirée", The Australian (3 October 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36859381 

The first of Mr. Deane's weekly concerts took place at the School of Arts on Tuesday night. The room was about half filled and the performance was very good . . . Miss Deane and Mrs. Clancy acquitted themselves well, and especially Mrs. Clancy, who sang "Love's Poisonous Shafts" with great feeling and judgment . . .

"MUSIC", The Sydney Herald (4 October 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28653775 

Mr. Deane has made arrangements for giving a concert in the School of Arts every Tuesday evening, and the price being low - half a crown for adults, and one shilling for children - persons who cannot afford to go to more expensive concerts, will have an opportunity of hearing good music. The performance consists of two overtures, two or three songs by Mrs. Clancy, who sings very prettily . . .

"MR. DEANE'S SOIREE", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (4 October 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32165787 

The second of these new evening musical entertainments, given by Mr. Deane, at a price which admits the second class of society to enjoy the pleasure of good music, both vocal and instrumental, took place on Tuesday evening at the Mechanics' School of Arts. The room was full, but not crowded. Mrs. Clancy sung in her usual pleasing unostentatious manner, and was deservedly encored . . .

1, 8, 15, 22, 29 October 1839, Deane's weekly soirees

"News of the Day", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (11 October 1839), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32165855 

Mr. Deane's weekly concert was well attended on Tuesday . . . Mrs. Clancy sang "There's sunshine in thy brooks, my love," very sweetly. Her "Donald" also gave great satisfaction . . .

"LOCAL", Australasian Chronicle (25 October 1839), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726718 

MR. DEANE'S SOIREE was well attended on Tuesday last. We are glad to observe that the frequency of these miniature concerts detracts nothing from their popularity, and that the public appreciate Mr. Deane's desire to gratify them, at a price within the reach of all. Miss Deane's performances on the piano, and Mrs. Clancy's songs, are the most attractive features of these interesting soirees.

"MR. DEANE'S SOIREE", Australasian Chronicle (1 November 1839), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726771 

This entertainment was rather thinly attended on Tuesday, on account of the weather, but it went off with more than the usual effect. Two songs by Mrs. Clancy were deservedly encored . . .

5 and 12 November 1839, Deane's weekly soiree

[Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (5 November 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726784 

SOIREE. MR. DEANE begs to inform the Gentry and Public that his SOIREE of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place at the Mechanics' School of Arts, on
THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, Nov. 5, 1830 . . .
4. Song, "Should he upbraid," Bishop - Mrs. Clancy . . .
6. Song, "Tell me my Heart," Bishop - Mrs. Clancy.
[PART 2] . . . 5. Song, "Loves poisonous Shafts," Mrs. Clancy . . .

[Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (12 November 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726830 

WEEKLY CONCERT. MR. DEANE begs to inform the Gentry and Public that his Weekly Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place at the Mechanics' School of Arts,
THIS EVENING, TUESDAY NOV. 12, 1839.
PROGRAMME. PART 1ST . . .
4. Song, "Let us seek the Yellow Shore," Mrs. Clancy . . .
7. Song, "Pilgrim of Love," Mrs. Clancy.
PART 2ND . . . 5. Song, "Roy's Wife" - Mrs. Clancy . . .

19 and 26 November 1839, Deane's weekly soirees

[Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (19 November 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726871 

WEEKLY CONCERT. MR. DEANE begs to inform the Gentry and Public that his of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place at the Mechanics' School of Arts,
THIS EVENING, TUESDAY, NOV. 19, 1839.
PROGRAMME. PART 1ST . . . 3. Song - "There's Sunshine in the Brooks my love." Lee - Mrs. Clancy . . .
PART 2ND . . . 2. Song - "O Nanny wilt thou gang with me" - Mrs. Clancy . . .
6. Song - "Donald," Bishop - Mrs. Clancy . . .

[Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (26 November 1839), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726914 

WEEKLY CONCERT. MR. DEANE begs to inform the Gentry and Public that his Weekly Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place at the Mechanics' School of Arts, on Tuesday Evening Next, Nov. 26, 1839.
PROGRAMME. PART 1ST . . . 5. Song, "Glory from the Battle Plains" - Horn - Mrs. Clancy . . .
PART 2ND . . . 2. Song, "Soldier tir'd" - Arne - Mrs. Clancy . . .
6. Song, "The Lass of Gowry" - Mrs. Clancy . . .

CECILIAN SOCIETY", The Colonist (4 December 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31724149 

The Society's concert, to take place on Wednesday, the 11th December, being the anniversary of its formation. The members will have the talented assistance of Miss Fernandez on the piano, Mrs. Curtis on the harp, Mrs. Clancy, and several others of proficiency, who have kindly consented, at the solicitation of the committee, to play gratuitously for the Society on the occasion. We have no doubt the old Courthouse will be crowded, and that the subscribers will have a great treat.

"News and Humours of the Day", Australasian Chronicle (13 December 1839), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31727034 

The Gautrots and Mrs. Clancy continue to sing at Mr. Deane's: weekly Concerts. Mrs. Bushelle's Grand Concert takes place on Wednesday next; Scotch and Irish Melodies predominate in the selection.

17 December 1839, Deane's weekly concert

[Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (17 December 1839), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31727045 

WEEKLY CONCERT. MR. DEANE begs to inform the Gentry and Public, that his Weekly Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place at the Mechanics' School of Arts, on, This Evening, Tuesday, DEC. 17, 1839 . . .
PROGRAMMME. PART 1ST . . . 3. Song, "Cease your funning" - Mrs. Clancy.
PART 2ND . . . 2. Song, "The Soldier Tired" - Arne - Mrs. Clancy . . .

"News of the Day", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (13 January 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32166874 

The Cecilian Monthly concert was held on Wednesday eveneing in the Court-room, Castlereagh-street, and was well attended . . . Mrs. Clancy's notes evinced her usual sweetness of intonation. Her "Donald" is an excellent song, both for sentiment and music, and she sang it well . . .

"CECILIAN CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (14 February 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32167214 

This Concert took place on Wednesday evening, and was well attended . . . Mrs. Clancy was never in better tune. She sang well the whole evening, and the songs allotted to her were excellent . . .

"CONCERT", Australasian Chronicle (25 February 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31727675 

We perceive by an advertisement, that Mrs. Clancy is to give a concert, under the patronage of Lady O'Connell, on Tuesday, the 3rd proximo, assisted by Madame Gautrot, Mr. Deane and family, and by the principal performers of the colony. We consider Mrs. Clancy well deserving of support, and as the lovers of music have not been called upon to exercise their patronage for some time, we conceive this to be a fair opportunity of calling for a full house.

"MRS. CLANCY'S CONCERT", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (26 February 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32167330 

We are happy to see that this Lady intends to dissipate, as far as lies in her power, the present dullness of the town, by giving a concert on the 4th March. Mrs. Clancy's voice is not equal in power, nor does she come up in execution to Mrs. Bushelle or Madame Gautrot; but in English songs, Mrs. Clancy shines. There are some English songs, in which she cannot be excelled by either of these ladies. Her voice is singularly sweet. We remember her singing a pastoral, from Haydn, at the Oratorio, at St. Mary's Cathedral, in a very beautiful style.

"ST. MARY'S ORGAN", Australasian Chronicle (27 July 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31732421

. . . P.S. Haydn's No. I, with a portion of Mozart's I. and II., went off in fine style on Sunday last, and Mrs. Clancy, who is in herself a host, will strengthen the sopranos in future.

"To the Editor", Australasian Chronicle (14 March 1843), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31739156

SIR - Allow me, through the medium of your paper, to contradict a statement which appeared in the Australian of Friday last, relative to Mrs. Clancy's singing at Madame Gautrot's concert. When Monsieur Gautrot applied to me on behalf of Mrs. Clancy's asaistance, I told him no; that Mrs. Clancy had long since given up singing at concerts, as it interfered too much with herdomeatic concerns; but upon the repeated entreaties of Monsieur Gautrot, I told him he might put her name in the programme. A fortnight previous to the concert taking place, I waited on Madame Gautrot, and told her decidedly (in the presence of Miss Hinckesman, who acted as interpreter upon the occasion,), that I would not allow Mrs. Clancy to sing. The reason assigned in the Australian for her not singing is a gross and malicious falsehood. - I am, sir, your obedient servant,
THOMAS CLANCY. March 13.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (8 January 1844), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12424795

MR. J. P. DEANE begs to announce that his Farewell Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Music will take place THIS DAY, January 8th, 1844, in the Saloon of the ROYAL HOTEL; on which occasion he will be assisted by Miss Deane, Mr. J. Deane, Mr. E. Deane, Master C. Deane, Mr. Wilson, Mr. W. Deane, and Mrs. Clancy, who has kindly given her services on this occasion.
PROGRAMME. PART I . . . 2. SONG - 'Tis the Last Rose of Summer - Mrs. Clancy . . .
7. SONG - The Soldier Tired - Arne - Mrs. Clancy . . .
PART II . . . 2. SONG - Tyrolese Air - Mrs. Clancy . . .
7. Long Live Victoria - Full Band accompaniment - Nathan . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (8 January 1850), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12914905

MRS. CLANCY begs leave to inform her friends and the public, she is prepared to receive Pupils, at her residence, or to go out to then for Pianoforte and Singing. Terms moderate. 123 King-street.

"BIRTHS", The Sydney Morning Herald (11 June 1851), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12927857

BIRTHS. On the 10th June, instant, at her residence, King-street East, the wife of Mr. Thomas Clancy, of a son.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (13 May 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13024847

THOMAS CLANCY, Tailor, &c, begs leave to inform his friends and the public that he has REMOVED from his old premises in King-street, to Market-street East, within one door of Castlereagh-street.

"DEATHS", The Sydney Morning Herald (29 May 1860), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13041131

On the 28th instant, at her residence, Market-street, aged 53, Elizabeth Clancy, daughter of the late James Field, of Bath, and the beloved wife of Mr. Thomas Clancy, of this city, deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. Bath papers please copy.

"SUDDEN DEATH", The Sydney Morning Herald (3 July 1867), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28611451

An old man named Thomas Clancy died very suddenly at n coffee-house in Parramatta-street last evening. He had gone into the coffee-house for some refreshment; the mistress of the establishment left him sitting in ihe room, and when she returned, after a short time, she found him sitting in his chair dead. Deceased formerly kept a tailor's shop in Market-street, but having lately been living with his son-in-law, Mr. Underwood, of Juliet-street, Newtown. His body was convoyed to the Benevolent Asylum, where an inquiry will be held this morning before the City Coroner.

"CORONER'S INQUEST", Sydney Mail (6 July 1867), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166798778

An inquiry was held before the City Coroner, on Wednesday, at his office, respecting the death of Thomas Clancy, 81 years of age. Deceased was a tailor, and resided with his son-in-law at Enmore; he enjoyed good health . . .

"William Vincent Wallace, the Composer. BY ALCIPHRON JONES", The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (19 March 1881), 446

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161882969 

. . . At the several concerts, given by William Vincent Wallace in Sydney, he was assisted by Mons. and Madame Gautrot [untrue], both accomplished artists, Mrs. Clancy (a cousin of the celebrated George Field, of Bath, and the daughter of an organist of St. Paul's, London), not to mention the principal instrumentalists that took part in those entertainments . . .




Bibliography and resources

Hall 1951-54


Deirdre Dare and Melissa Hardie, A passion for nature: 19th-century naturalism in the circle of Charles Alexander Johns (Penzance: Hypatia Publications, 2008), 99, 193-94

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=UerqmuVgg8kC&pg=PA194 (PREVIEW)







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