Conserved Regulatory Genes in Neurodevelopment

Summary

The present project aims to utilize the promising combination of 3D organoid technology and CRISPR genome editing, which will allow us to examine the roles of several conserved genes involved in neurodevelopmental regulation, in order to better understand human neuronal development at the molecular level. Investigating these mechanisms can not only shed light on human brain development, but also lead to new treatments for neurological diseases. 

A complimentary scholarship for this project may be available through a competitive process. To find out more, refer to the Faculty of Science Postgraduate Research Excellence Award and contact Associate Professor Greg Neely directly.

Supervisor(s)

Professor Greg Neely

Research Location

School of Life and Environmental Sciences

Program Type

PHD

Synopsis

Insight into the roles of conserved regulatory genes will provide a strong frame work for the understanding of developmental and morphogenic characteristics related to neurodevelopmental disorders. To examine the role of our candidate genes in neurodevelopment, we intend to utilize CRISPR genome-editing to knockout conserved neuronal regulator genes in human-derived 3D brain organoids. This will enable us to assay the functional roles of the respective genes during neurodevelopment by examining cell morphology and phenotype, neuronal firing activity and synaptic connectivity of an intact tissue. The proposed research aspires to understand paramount mechanisms in human neurodevelopment as well as in neurodegeneration.

Additional Information

A complimentary scholarship for this project may be available through a competitive process. To find out more, refer to the Faculty of Science Postgraduate Research Excellence Award and contact Associate Professor Greg Neely directly. 

The additional supervisor for this project is Associate Professor Greg Sutherland.

HDR Inherent Requirements  

In addition to the academic requirements set out in the Science Postgraduate Handbook, you may be required to satisfy a number of inherent requirements to complete this degree. Example of inherent requirement may include:   

  • Confidential disclosure and registration of a disability that may hinder your performance in your degree;
  • Confidential disclosure of a pre-existing or current medical condition that may hinder your performance in your degree (e.g. heart disease, pace-maker, significant immune suppression, diabetes, vertigo, etc.);
  • Ability to perform independently and/or with minimal supervision;  
  • Ability to undertake certain physical tasks (e.g. heavy lifting);  
  • Ability to undertake observatory, sensory and communication tasks;  
  • Ability to spend time at remote sites (e.g. One Tree Island, Narrabri and Camden);  
  • Ability to work in confined spaces or at heights;  
  • Ability to operate heavy machinery (e.g. farming equipment);  
  • Hold or acquire an Australian driver’s licence;  
  • Hold a current scuba diving license;  
  • Hold a current Working with Children Check;  
  • Meet initial and ongoing immunisation requirements (e.g. Q-Fever, Vaccinia virus, Hepatitis, etc.)   

You must consult with your nominated supervisor regarding any identified inherent requirements before completing your application.

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Keywords

Stem cells, Organoids, brain development, human

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 2725

Other opportunities with Professor Greg Neely