Advanced organic electronics

Summary

This project aims to identify design rules for next-generation organic electronics, especially organic solar cells. It will use both computational simulations and experimental work to understand and improve organic electronic devices.

A complimentary scholarship for this project may be available through a competitive process. To find out more, refer to the Faculty of Science Postgraduate Research Excellence Award and contact Dr Ivan Kassal directly.

Supervisor(s)

Dr Ivan Kassal

Research Location

School of Chemistry

Program Type

PHD

Synopsis

How organic solar cells convert light into electricity is still not completely understood. The most perplexing aspect is why the positive and negative electric charges drift apart despite being strongly attracted to each other. This project will develop new simulation tools to better understand these fundamental processes, and then test them experimentally. The theory component will involve multiscale modelling to bridge the vastly different length scales that are important in organic electronics, all the way from atoms to full devices. Doing so will involve combining methods such as kinetic Monte Carlo with macroscopic drift diffusion models. The theoretical results will then be tested experimentally to confirm the predictions or provide data to refine them. The project can be tailored for the successful candidate to range from a focus on theoretical modelling of multi-scale processes to a mix of theory and experimental device study.

Additional Information

Applicants should have a strong background in physical chemistry, chemical physics, or materials science, in either theory or experiment (or both).

A complimentary scholarship for this project may be available through a competitive process. To find out more, refer to the Faculty of Science Postgraduate Research Excellence Award and contact Dr Ivan Kassal directly.

HDR Inherent Requirements
In addition to the academic requirements set out in the Science Postgraduate Handbook, you may be required to satisfy a number of inherent requirements to complete this degree. Examples of inherent requirements may include:

  • Confidential disclosure and registration of a disability that may hinder your performance in your degree;
  • Confidential disclosure of a pre-existing or current medical condition that may hinder your performance in your degree (e.g. heart disease, pace-maker, significant immune suppression, diabetes, vertigo, etc.);
  • Ability to perform independently and/or with minimal supervision;
  • Ability to undertake certain physical tasks (e.g. heavy lifting);
  • Ability to undertake observatory, sensory and communication tasks;
  • Ability to spend time at remote sites (e.g. One Tree Island, Narrabri and Camden);
  • Ability to work in confined spaces or at heights;
  • Ability to operate heavy machinery (e.g. farming equipment);
  • Hold or acquire an Australian driver’s licence;
  • Hold a current scuba diving license;
  • Hold a current Working with Children Check;
  • Meet initial and ongoing immunisation requirements (e.g. Q-Fever, Vaccinia virus, Hepatitis, etc.)

You must consult with your nominated supervisor regarding any identified inherent requirements before completing your application.

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Keywords

Organic electronics, organic photovoltaics, Simulation, solar cells, organic electronic devices, scholarship, International

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 2765