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Unit outline_

CAEL2098: Intermediate Hot Glass

Semester 2, 2023 [Normal day] - Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney

Building on Introduction to Hot Glass this course will deepen your hands-on experience in glassblowing. The unit explores additional techniques such as mould blowing and hot sculpting, cold working and polishing skills such as lathe working. You will learn a range of different traditional methods as well as sustainable contemporary practice approaches. You will learn through series of directed and self-directed studio based assignments, and contextualise your ideas through the lens of contemporary global glass focused art and design practices. This unit is designed for students who have some previous experience in glassblowing.

Unit details and rules

Academic unit Sydney College of the Arts
Credit points 6
Prerequisites
? 
CAEL2049 or relevant prior experience commensurate to a 12 x 3hrs per week introduction to glass blowing
Corequisites
? 
None
Prohibitions
? 
None
Assumed knowledge
? 

None

Available to study abroad and exchange students

No

Teaching staff

Coordinator Andrew Lavery, andrew.lavery@sydney.edu.au
Lecturer(s) Cobi Butcher, cobi.butcher@sydney.edu.au
Type Description Weight Due Length
Presentation PROTOTYPES
PRESENTATION MATERIAL TESTS & WORKING MODELS
25% Formal exam period
Due date: 14 Nov 2023 at 09:00

Closing date: 14 Nov 2023
10 MIN PRESENTATION - INCLUDING FEEDBACK
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO4 LO3 LO2
Presentation SELF DIRECTED FINAL PROJECT
PRACTICAL WORK PRESENTATION - SELF DIRECTED ARTWORK
40% Formal exam period
Due date: 14 Nov 2023 at 09:00

Closing date: 14 Nov 2023
10 MINS - INCLUDING FEEDBACK
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO5 LO3 LO2
Presentation PROJECT PROPOSAL & PRESENTATION
IN CLASS PRESENTATION & PROPOSAL
35% Week 06
Due date: 05 Sep 2023 at 09:00

Closing date: 05 Sep 2023
10 MIN PRESENTATION
Outcomes assessed: LO2 LO6 LO5 LO4
Assignment PROJECT PROPOSAL
PROJECT PROPOSAL
0% Week 06
Due date: 05 Sep 2023 at 09:00

Closing date: 05 Sep 2023
800 - 1000 WRDS
Outcomes assessed: LO2 LO4 LO5 LO6

Assessment summary

​ASSESSMENT 1 

  • Student Presentation : This assignment will require students to present their concepts through a visual presentation in the form of either, Models and Marquette’s or Power point presentation
  • Project Proposal : This assignment will require you to integrate information from lectures and individual research to create a concise project proposal

ASSESSMENT 2 :

  • Protoypes: Within this unit students are required to present their material tests and working models alongside their final work

ASSESSMENT 3:

  •  Final project : Using advanced hot glass forming techniques and/or applications, students are to develop, create and present a considered artwork.

Assessment criteria

The University awards common result grades, set out in the Coursework Policy 2014 (Schedule 1).

As a general guide, a high distinction indicates work of an exceptional standard, a distinction a very high standard, a credit a good standard, and a pass an acceptable standard.

Result name

Mark range

Description

High distinction

85 - 100

 

Distinction

75 - 84

 

Credit

65 - 74

 

Pass

50 - 64

 

Fail

0 - 49

When you don’t meet the learning outcomes of the unit to a satisfactory standard.

 

For more information see guide to grades.

Late submission

In accordance with University policy, these penalties apply when written work is submitted after 11:59pm on the due date:

  • Deduction of 5% of the maximum mark for each calendar day after the due date.
  • After ten calendar days late, a mark of zero will be awarded.

This unit has an exception to the standard University policy or supplementary information has been provided by the unit coordinator. This information is displayed below:

The Assessment Procedures 2011 provide that any written work submitted after 11:59pm on the due date will be penalised by 5% of the maximum awardable mark for each calendar day after the due date. If the assessment is submitted more than ten calendar days late, a mark of zero will be awarded. However, a unit of study may prohibit late submission or exclude late penalties only if expressly stated below.

Academic integrity

The Current Student website  provides information on academic integrity and the resources available to all students. The University expects students and staff to act ethically and honestly and will treat all allegations of academic integrity breaches seriously.  

We use similarity detection software to detect potential instances of plagiarism or other forms of academic integrity breach. If such matches indicate evidence of plagiarism or other forms of academic integrity breaches, your teacher is required to report your work for further investigation.

You may only use artificial intelligence and writing assistance tools in assessment tasks if you are permitted to by your unit coordinator, and if you do use them, you must also acknowledge this in your work, either in a footnote or an acknowledgement section.

Studiosity is permitted for postgraduate units unless otherwise indicated by the unit coordinator. The use of this service must be acknowledged in your submission.

Simple extensions

If you encounter a problem submitting your work on time, you may be able to apply for an extension of five calendar days through a simple extension.  The application process will be different depending on the type of assessment and extensions cannot be granted for some assessment types like exams.

Special consideration

If exceptional circumstances mean you can’t complete an assessment, you need consideration for a longer period of time, or if you have essential commitments which impact your performance in an assessment, you may be eligible for special consideration or special arrangements.

Special consideration applications will not be affected by a simple extension application.

Using AI responsibly

Co-created with students, AI in Education includes lots of helpful examples of how students use generative AI tools to support their learning. It explains how generative AI works, the different tools available and how to use them responsibly and productively.

WK Topic Learning activity Learning outcomes
Formal exam period ASSESEMENT 2 & 3 Studio (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO6
STUVAC OPTIONAL - PROJECT DEVELOPMENT Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO6
Week 01 STUDIO COMPETENCY - Studio inductions, introductions to assessments & revisiting the basics of hot glass. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO5 LO6
Week 02 GLASS IN THE EXPANDED FIELD - Contemporary artists & materials. Refresh skills & processes. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO4 LO6
Week 03 SURFACE & FORM - Looking at colour, volume and different perspectives in glass. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO3 LO6
Week 04 COLD GLASS EXTENSION - Inductions, refinement of skill and processes - Lathe, Diamond Saw & Sandblasting reliefs. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO2 LO6
Week 05 TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT - Extending techniques & working outside the historical conventions of glassblowing. Workshop (3 hr) LO3 LO4 LO6
Week 06 ASSESSMENT 1 - PRESENTATION & PROPOSAL Presentation (3 hr) LO2 LO4 LO5 LO6
Week 07 INDEPENDENT STUDY Independent study (3 hr) LO1 LO6
Week 08 SURFACE & FORM - Exploring moulds & surface patterning. Project development and production. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO3 LO4
Week 09 TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT -Testing and applying intermediate techniques to align with concept. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO2 LO4
Week 10 PROJECT & CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT - Informal in-class critique. Discussing conceptual & technical development in line with individual projects. Studio (3 hr) LO2 LO4 LO6
Week 11 PROJECT DEVELOPMENT - Testing and applying advanced techniques to align with concept. Assessment briefing. Workshop (3 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 12 PROJECT DEVELOPMENT - Assessment briefing. Final finishing options. Assessment considerations and installation locations - walls, plinth, suspended and other media. Workshop (3 hr) LO2 LO3 LO5
Week 13 PROJECT DEVELOPMENT & COMPLETION - Applying techniques to align with concept. Final finishing and installation details. Workshop (3 hr) LO2 LO3 LO5

Attendance and class requirements

  • Attendance: According to Faculty Board Resolutions, students in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences are expected to attend 90% of their classes. If you attend less than 50% of classes, regardless of the reasons, you may be referred to the Examiner’s Board. The Examiner’s Board will decide whether you should pass or fail the unit of study if your attendance falls below this threshold.

  • Lecture recording: Most lectures (in recording-equipped venues) will be recorded and may be made available to students on the LMS. However, you should not rely on lecture recording to substitute your classroom learning experience.

  • Preparation: Students should commit to spend approximately three hours’ preparation time (reading, studying, homework, essays, etc.) for every hour of scheduled instruction.

Additional requirements from Sydney College of the Arts

  • Students must attend a minimum of 90% of timetabled activities for this unit of study, unless granted exemption by the Unit Coordinator.
  • All assignments are compulsory and must be attempted. 
  • You must attend scheduled assessments to be eligible to pass. Non-attendance at assessment on any grounds insufficient to claim special consideration will result in the forfeiture of marks associated with the assessment

Study commitment

Typically, there is a minimum expectation of 1.5-2 hours of student effort per week per credit point for units of study offered over a full semester. For a 6 credit point unit, this equates to roughly 120-150 hours of student effort in total.

Required readings

General

Brittenham, Claudia. Vessels: The Object as Container. Editor, Oxford University Press, 2019

Halper, Vicki. Links: Glass in the pacific Northwest. Tacoma: Museum of Glass; Seattle: in association with University of Washington Press, 2013 

Moines, Des. Transparencies: Contemporary Art & a History of Glass, Iowa: Des Moines Art Center, 2013.

Albers, Josef, Glasstress,  [project conceived and organized by Adriano Berengo]: [translations: Brenda Lea Stone]. Milano, New York, Charta, 2009. 

Blanche Craig, Ed, Contemporary Glass, London, Black Dog, 2008.

Osborne, Margot. Australian Glass Today. Kent Town, S. Aust: Wakefield Press, 2005.

Oldknow Tina, 25 years of New Glass Review, The Corning Museum of Glass, New York, 2005.

Frantz, Suzanne, The Glass Skin, Corning Museum of Glass, 1998.  

Schmid, Edward T. Advanced Glassworking Techniques : an Enlightened Manuscript. Bellingham, Washington: Glass Mountain Press, 1997.

Schmid, Edward T, Beginning Glassblowing, Bellingham, Washington, Glass Mountain Press, 1998.  

Movements and theory appropriate to glass

Adamson, Glenn. Thinking through Craft. English ed. Oxford: Berg, 2007.

Baudrillard, Jean. The System of Objects. London: Verso, 2005.

Butterfield, Jan. The Art of Light + Space. 1st ed. New York: Abbeville Press, 1993.

Artists

Yhonnie Scarce https://artistprofile.com.au/yhonnie-scarce/

Beth Lipman https://www.bethlipman.com/

Katherine Gray https://katherine-gray.com/section/103668.html

Simone Fezer https://simonefezer.com/

Fred Wilson https://www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/fred-wilson-7/

Timothy Horn https://www.timothyhorn.net/

Tony Cragg https://www.tony-cragg.com/works/sculptures/1990-1999/

Neil Roberts https://www.neilroberts.com.au/detail81-2.htm?iID=742

Josiah McElheny https://www.whitecube.com/artists/josiah-mcelheny

Christopher Wilmarth https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/481191

Norwood Viviano https://www.hellergallery.com/index#/norwood-viviano/

Nadege Degenetez https://www.hellergallery.com/index#/nadege-desgenetez/

Gabriella Bisetto https://archive.bmgart.com.au/artists/bisetto-boggs/20070426/bisetto-gabriella/art-work/05.htm

Annette Blair https://canberraglassworks.com/visit/studio-artists/annette-blair/

Kim Harty https://www.kimharty.com/

David Schnuckel https://www.davidschnuckel.com/

Tom Moore https://www.mooreismore.com/

Periodicals: 

New Glass Review (Prague, Czechoslovakia). English ed. Prague: EFEKT, 1992-

Websites:

http://www.urbanglass.org

http://www.cmog.org

http://museumofglass.org

 

 

Learning outcomes are what students know, understand and are able to do on completion of a unit of study. They are aligned with the University's graduate qualities and are assessed as part of the curriculum.

At the completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • LO1. Demonstrate skills in the generation of art objects, showing evidence of practical development and conceptual insight into relevant histories and theories that inform their own creative processes.
  • LO2. Demonstrate commitment to an art practice through critically evaluating information and applying it to their own practice where appropriate.
  • LO3. Apply an experimental and imaginative approach to working with hot glass through rigorous testing in the development and editing of their projects.
  • LO4. Communicate creatively and effectively: Construct, develop and project independent ideas and understand those of others.
  • LO5. Show awareness of social and cultural perspectives of studio glass and apply knowledge to personal practice.
  • LO6. Apply appropriate material terminology to practice and use terms effectively to gather specific and relevant research information.

Graduate qualities

The graduate qualities are the qualities and skills that all University of Sydney graduates must demonstrate on successful completion of an award course. As a future Sydney graduate, the set of qualities have been designed to equip you for the contemporary world.

GQ1 Depth of disciplinary expertise

Deep disciplinary expertise is the ability to integrate and rigorously apply knowledge, understanding and skills of a recognised discipline defined by scholarly activity, as well as familiarity with evolving practice of the discipline.

GQ2 Critical thinking and problem solving

Critical thinking and problem solving are the questioning of ideas, evidence and assumptions in order to propose and evaluate hypotheses or alternative arguments before formulating a conclusion or a solution to an identified problem.

GQ3 Oral and written communication

Effective communication, in both oral and written form, is the clear exchange of meaning in a manner that is appropriate to audience and context.

GQ4 Information and digital literacy

Information and digital literacy is the ability to locate, interpret, evaluate, manage, adapt, integrate, create and convey information using appropriate resources, tools and strategies.

GQ5 Inventiveness

Generating novel ideas and solutions.

GQ6 Cultural competence

Cultural Competence is the ability to actively, ethically, respectfully, and successfully engage across and between cultures. In the Australian context, this includes and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, knowledge systems, and a mature understanding of contemporary issues.

GQ7 Interdisciplinary effectiveness

Interdisciplinary effectiveness is the integration and synthesis of multiple viewpoints and practices, working effectively across disciplinary boundaries.

GQ8 Integrated professional, ethical, and personal identity

An integrated professional, ethical and personal identity is understanding the interaction between one’s personal and professional selves in an ethical context.

GQ9 Influence

Engaging others in a process, idea or vision.

Outcome map

Learning outcomes Graduate qualities
GQ1 GQ2 GQ3 GQ4 GQ5 GQ6 GQ7 GQ8 GQ9

This section outlines changes made to this unit following staff and student reviews.

In response to student feedback requesting a standalone intermediate class, introductory students will not be taught in parallel. However, advanced hot glass students will be taught with intermediate students. Reading lists have also been updated aimed at better alignment with project requirements.

Glass Blowing incorporates hot sculpting this semester and for the duration of COVID WHS environments 

Students who wish to BLOW glass ( inflate the bubble with human breath ) May be required to purchase there own ‘blow hose kit’ at a cost to the individual. 

We will be guided by the University throughout the semester on recommended and approved safe work practices and may be subject to change without notice at any time. Students who do not purchase there own PPE will be restricted to hot sculpting glass which refers to manipulating glass on a solid pipe - no inflation and not requiring the human breath. 

 

Additional costs

$60 Material Contribution Fee Additional Individual personal protective equipment may be required.

Site visit guidelines

Hand washing will be encouraged frequently and will be required when entering and leaving workshops/studios and workstations. Students will wear mandatory personal protective equipment (PPE) at all times.

Work, health and safety

Please note the below safety requirements for working in the Glass Studio.

Enclosed toed shoes at ALL times

Natural fibre clothing at ALL times

No loose jewellery / hair tied back

Prior to commencing classes, please download the COVID safety app & watch the Sydney University safety video available at:

https://sydney.edu.au/campus-life/safety-security.html

Basic shared PPE will be supplied. 
 

Reccomended additional PPE can be purchased at studnets cost


Please bring a notebook, pens and pencils to all classes

Disclaimer

The University reserves the right to amend units of study or no longer offer certain units, including where there are low enrolment numbers.

To help you understand common terms that we use at the University, we offer an online glossary.