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We are aiming for an incremental return to campus in accordance with guidelines provided by NSW Health and the Australian Government. Until this time, learning activities and assessments will be planned and scheduled for online delivery where possible, and unit-specific details about face-to-face teaching will be provided on Canvas as the opportunities for face-to-face learning become clear.

Unit of study_

CIVL5277: Structural Rehabilitation and Timber Design

This course will provide students broader knowledge in timber design and structural rehabilitation. In the first section of the subject, students will learn the engineering properties of timber and requirements to be met for specification of the design, installation and maintenance of timber structures. It includes grading and structural properties; design actions; design of timber columns, beams, tension members and connections; principles of limit state design and serviceability; methods of testing; quality standards and maintenance of timber structures based on AS 1720. 1-2010 timber structures-design methods, and AS NZS 4063. 1-2010 characterization of structural timber-test methods. The second part covers monitoring, rehabilitation and strengthening techniques of existing structures (concrete/steel/timber/masonry). Students will be introduced to structural inspection and evaluation; durability and deterioration; destructive and non-destructive testing; and design of strengthening systems including advanced fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) materials, epoxy injection, steel plate bonding, and post tensioning according to relevant Australian, ACI and European guidelines.

Details

Academic unit Civil Engineering
Unit code CIVL5277
Unit name Structural Rehabilitation and Timber Design
Session, year
? 
Semester 2, 2020
Attendance mode Normal day
Location Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney
Credit points 6

Enrolment rules

Prohibitions
? 
None
Prerequisites
? 
None
Corequisites
? 
None
Assumed knowledge
? 

(CIVL2201 AND CIVL3205 AND CIVL3206) OR (CIVL9201 AND CIVL9205 AND CIVL9206)

Available to study abroad and exchange students

Yes

Teaching staff and contact details

Coordinator Ali Hadigheh, ali.hadigheh@sydney.edu.au
Lecturer(s) Ali Hadigheh , ali.hadigheh@sydney.edu.au
Type Description Weight Due Length
Assignment Timber project
Report
50% STUVAC n/a
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Assignment group assignment Bridge assessment project
Report
20% Week 05 n/a
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO8 LO12
Assignment group assignment Bridge strengthening project
Report
30% Week 10 n/a
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO7 LO9 LO11 LO12
group assignment = group assignment ?

Projects will assess student`s abilities to develop the required objectives of the subject and gain sound knowledge of structural assessment and strengthening design and also design of timber structures. Tutorials are designed to provide appropriate level of help to students for their projects. 

        1. Bridge assessment project: Students are tasked with structural condition assessment of bridges in Sydney region. Students are encouraged to interpret their experience and make meaning to learn condition assessment requirements. Students are asked to discuss their evaluations in small groups, and provide a report on bridge assessment and suggest possible rehabilitation/strengthening techniques.

         2. Bridge strengthening project: to develop analytical and problem solving skills relevant to rehabilitation options. Students will be working on selected real-world case studies of bridge strengthening and will apply the theoretical concepts introduced during class sessions.

         3. Timber project: to develop analytical and problem solving skills relevant to design of timber structures. Students will be working on real-world case studies of timber design and will apply the theoretical concepts introduced during class sessions.

- Full details on your assessment tasks and due dates are posted on Canvas.

- The University has authorised and mandated the use of text-based similarity detecting software for all text-based written assignments.

- All assessment tasks are compulsory and should be submitted by due date. Students who do not complete all the tasks (individual/group tasks) will receive a FINAL maximum grade of 45FA. All assessments tasks are non reweightable.

- There may be statistically and educationally defensible methods used when combining the marks from each component to ensure consistency of marking between markers, and alignment of final grades with grade descriptors.

Assessment criteria

The University awards common result grades, set out in the Coursework Policy 2014 (Schedule 1).

As a general guide, a high distinction indicates work of an exceptional standard, a distinction a very high standard, a credit a good standard, and a pass an acceptable standard.

Result name

Mark range

Description

High distinction

85 - 100

 

Distinction

75 - 84

 

Credit

65 - 74

 

Pass

50 - 64

 

Fail

0 - 49

When you don’t meet the learning outcomes of the unit to a satisfactory standard.

For more information see sydney.edu.au/students/guide-to-grades.

Late submission

In accordance with University policy, these penalties apply when written work is submitted after 11:59pm on the due date:

  • Deduction of 5% of the maximum mark for each calendar day after the due date.
  • After ten calendar days late, a mark of zero will be awarded.

This unit has an exception to the standard University policy or supplementary information has been provided by the unit coordinator. This information is displayed below:

Penalties will apply to late submissions for assessments and projects: - Written work submitted electronically after 11.59 pm on the due date will be considered to have been submitted late. - For every calendar day up to and including ten calendar days after the due date, a penalty of 5% of the maximum awardable marks will be applied to late work. - The penalty will be calculated by first marking the work, and then subtracting 5% of the maximum awardable mark for each calendar day after the due date. - For work submitted more than ten calendar days after the due date a mark of zero will be awarded. The marker may elect to, but is not required to, provide feedback on such work.

Special consideration

If you experience short-term circumstances beyond your control, such as illness, injury or misadventure or if you have essential commitments which impact your preparation or performance in an assessment, you may be eligible for special consideration or special arrangements.

Academic integrity

The Current Student website provides information on academic honesty, academic dishonesty, and the resources available to all students.

The University expects students and staff to act ethically and honestly and will treat all allegations of academic dishonesty or plagiarism seriously.

We use similarity detection software to detect potential instances of plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty. If such matches indicate evidence of plagiarism or other forms of dishonesty, your teacher is required to report your work for further investigation.

WK Topic Learning activity Learning outcomes
Week 01 Welcome and introduction to the unit Lecture (2 hr) LO3 LO4 LO8 LO9
Introduction to bridge assessment project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO8 LO12
Week 02 Structural health monitoring and condition assessment Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO4 LO8
Condition assessment and evaluation of structures Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO8 LO12
Week 03 Structural repair & strengthening techniques; Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening of structures - properties, manufacturing and applications Lecture (2 hr) LO5 LO7 LO9 LO11 LO12
Investigating AS5100.8 Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO7 LO9 LO11 LO12
Week 04 Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening of structures - flexural and shear design Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO4 LO5 LO7 LO9 LO11 LO12
Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening of structures - flexural and shear design; Bridge assessment project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO7 LO8 LO9 LO11 LO12
Week 05 Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening of structures - flexural and shear design Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO5 LO7 LO9 LO11 LO12
Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening of structures - flexural and shear design; Introduction to bridge strengthening project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO7 LO9 LO11 LO12
Week 06 Introduction to timber structures - properties, structural systems & fundamentals of design Lecture (2 hr) LO6 LO8 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Introduction to timber structures - properties, structural systems & fundamentals of design; Bridge strengthening project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO6 LO7 LO8 LO9 LO10 LO11 LO12 LO13
Week 07 Timber structures - design of tension & compression members Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO3 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Design of tension & compression members; Bridge strengthening project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO6 LO7 LO8 LO9 LO10 LO11 LO12 LO13
Week 08 Timber structures - Design of flexural members and introduction to Glulam Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Design of flexural members; Bridge strengthening project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO6 LO7 LO8 LO9 LO10 LO11 LO12 LO13
Week 09 CLT design- Floors Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
CLT design; Bridge strengthening project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO6 LO7 LO8 LO9 LO10 LO11 LO12 LO13
Week 10 CLT design- Walls Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
CLT design; Introduction to Timber structure design project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO3 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Week 11 Timber connections Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Bolted connections; Timber structure design project Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO4 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Week 12 Timber structures - durability and service life Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13
Timber structure design project; Review & wrap-up Tutorial (2 hr) LO1 LO4 LO6 LO9 LO10 LO12 LO13

Study commitment

Typically, there is a minimum expectation of 1.5-2 hours of student effort per week per credit point for units of study offered over a full semester. For a 6 credit point unit, this equates to roughly 120-150 hours of student effort in total.

Prescribed readings

- ACI 440 Guide for the design and construction of externally bonded FRP systems for strengthening concrete structures
- AS 1720-2010 Timber structures
- AS 5100-2017 Bridge design
- HB 305-2008 Design handbook for RC structures retrofitted with FRP and metal plates: beams and slabs
- SA HB 108-2013 Timber design handbook
- SEI/ASCE 11-99 Guideline for Structural Condition Assessment of Existing Buildings

- AS 1170 2002 Structural design actions
- AS 1720.3-2016 Timber structures - Design criteria for timber-framed residential buildings
- AS 3600-2018 Concrete structures

- Course Lecture Notes

Learning outcomes are what students know, understand and are able to do on completion of a unit of study. They are aligned with the University’s graduate qualities and are assessed as part of the curriculum.

At the completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • LO1. Demonstrate written, oral and graphical communication skills at professional engineering standard including capacity to debate, negotiate, justify an engineering position
  • LO2. Manage mature team relationships through inclusive work practices, respecting cultural diversity
  • LO3. Communicate about complex issues with novices, address team issues through conflict resolution and use a network to connect with others
  • LO4. Evaluate & synthesise a wide range of resources demonstrating research skills & ability to work across disciplines
  • LO5. Apply available strengthening standards/guidelines
  • LO6. Understand the engineering design process of timber structures based on principles of limit state and serviceability
  • LO7. Design a strengthening scheme for concrete, steel, and timber structures
  • LO8. Understand the basics on structural inspection and assessment
  • LO9. Relate the knowledge of timber and strengthening design to practical design problems in a problem-based learning environment
  • LO10. Understand the advantages of using timber as construction material
  • LO11. Identify and analyse suitable strengthening techniques for a specific structural condition
  • LO12. Competently addresses complex problems requiring interdisciplinary knowledge, under some supervision
  • LO13. Have a sound knowledge of AS 1720.1-2010 timber structures-design methods, and AS NZS 4063.1-2010 characterization of structural timber-test methods.

Graduate qualities

The graduate qualities are the qualities and skills that all University of Sydney graduates must demonstrate on successful completion of an award course. As a future Sydney graduate, the set of qualities have been designed to equip you for the contemporary world.

GQ1 Depth of disciplinary expertise

Deep disciplinary expertise is the ability to integrate and rigorously apply knowledge, understanding and skills of a recognised discipline defined by scholarly activity, as well as familiarity with evolving practice of the discipline.

GQ2 Critical thinking and problem solving

Critical thinking and problem solving are the questioning of ideas, evidence and assumptions in order to propose and evaluate hypotheses or alternative arguments before formulating a conclusion or a solution to an identified problem.

GQ3 Oral and written communication

Effective communication, in both oral and written form, is the clear exchange of meaning in a manner that is appropriate to audience and context.

GQ4 Information and digital literacy

Information and digital literacy is the ability to locate, interpret, evaluate, manage, adapt, integrate, create and convey information using appropriate resources, tools and strategies.

GQ5 Inventiveness

Generating novel ideas and solutions.

GQ6 Cultural competence

Cultural Competence is the ability to actively, ethically, respectfully, and successfully engage across and between cultures. In the Australian context, this includes and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, knowledge systems, and a mature understanding of contemporary issues.

GQ7 Interdisciplinary effectiveness

Interdisciplinary effectiveness is the integration and synthesis of multiple viewpoints and practices, working effectively across disciplinary boundaries.

GQ8 Integrated professional, ethical, and personal identity

An integrated professional, ethical and personal identity is understanding the interaction between one’s personal and professional selves in an ethical context.

GQ9 Influence

Engaging others in a process, idea or vision.

Outcome map

Learning outcomes Graduate qualities
GQ1 GQ2 GQ3 GQ4 GQ5 GQ6 GQ7 GQ8 GQ9

Alignment with Competency standards

Outcomes Competency standards
LO1
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.2. Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.3. Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
3.1. An ability to communicate with the engineering team and the community at large.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
3.3. Creativity and innovation.
3.4. An understanding of and commitment to ethical and professional responsibilities.
3.6. An ability to function as an individual and as a team leader and member in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
3.7. A capacity for lifelong learning and professional development and appropriate professional attitudes.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.3. Proficiency in the engineering design of components, systems and/or processes in accordance with specified and agreed performance criteria.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
4.5. An ability to undertake problem solving, design and project work within a broad contextual framework accommodating social, cultural, ethical, legal, political, economic and environmental responsibilities as well as within the principles of sustainable development and health and safety imperatives.
5.1. An appreciation of the scientific method, the need for rigour and a sound theoretical basis.
5.2. A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.5. Skills in the development and application of mathematical, physical and conceptual models, understanding of applicability and shortcomings.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
LO2
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
3.1. An ability to communicate with the engineering team and the community at large.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
3.3. Creativity and innovation.
3.4. An understanding of and commitment to ethical and professional responsibilities.
3.6. An ability to function as an individual and as a team leader and member in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
3.7. A capacity for lifelong learning and professional development and appropriate professional attitudes.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
4.6. Skills in operating within a business environment, organisational and enterprise management and in the fundamental principles of business.
LO3
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
3.1. An ability to communicate with the engineering team and the community at large.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
3.3. Creativity and innovation.
3.4. An understanding of and commitment to ethical and professional responsibilities.
3.6. An ability to function as an individual and as a team leader and member in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
3.7. A capacity for lifelong learning and professional development and appropriate professional attitudes.
Stage 1 Competency Standard for Professional Engineer (AQF9 mapped) - EA
2.1 (L3). Complex problem-solving. (Level 3- Exceeding required standard) Application of established engineering methods to complex engineering problem solving.
LO4
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.1. Developing underpinning capabilities in mathematics, physical, life and information sciences and engineering sciences, as appropriate to the designated field of practice.
1.2. Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.3. Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
3.1. An ability to communicate with the engineering team and the community at large.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
3.3. Creativity and innovation.
3.4. An understanding of and commitment to ethical and professional responsibilities.
3.6. An ability to function as an individual and as a team leader and member in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
3.7. A capacity for lifelong learning and professional development and appropriate professional attitudes.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
4.5. An ability to undertake problem solving, design and project work within a broad contextual framework accommodating social, cultural, ethical, legal, political, economic and environmental responsibilities as well as within the principles of sustainable development and health and safety imperatives.
4.6. Skills in operating within a business environment, organisational and enterprise management and in the fundamental principles of business.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
Stage 1 Competency Standard for Professional Engineer (AQF9 mapped) - EA
1.1 (L3). Scientific knowledge. (Level 3- Exceeding required standard) Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline.
LO5
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
2.1. Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.3. Proficiency in the engineering design of components, systems and/or processes in accordance with specified and agreed performance criteria.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
5.1. An appreciation of the scientific method, the need for rigour and a sound theoretical basis.
5.2. A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.5. Skills in the development and application of mathematical, physical and conceptual models, understanding of applicability and shortcomings.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
Stage 1 Competency Standard for Professional Engineer (AQF9 mapped) - EA
1.3 (L3). Specialist discipline knowledge. (Level 3- Exceeding required standard) In-depth understanding of specialist bodies of knowledge within the engineering discipline.
LO6
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.2. Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.1. Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.3. Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
5.2. A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
LO7
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.1. Developing underpinning capabilities in mathematics, physical, life and information sciences and engineering sciences, as appropriate to the designated field of practice.
1.2. Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
3.1. An ability to communicate with the engineering team and the community at large.
3.6. An ability to function as an individual and as a team leader and member in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
4.5. An ability to undertake problem solving, design and project work within a broad contextual framework accommodating social, cultural, ethical, legal, political, economic and environmental responsibilities as well as within the principles of sustainable development and health and safety imperatives.
5.2. A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
LO8
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.1. Developing underpinning capabilities in mathematics, physical, life and information sciences and engineering sciences, as appropriate to the designated field of practice.
1.2. Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.1. Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.3. Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
4.5. An ability to undertake problem solving, design and project work within a broad contextual framework accommodating social, cultural, ethical, legal, political, economic and environmental responsibilities as well as within the principles of sustainable development and health and safety imperatives.
5.2. A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
LO9
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.2. Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.1. Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
3.3. Creativity and innovation.
3.7. A capacity for lifelong learning and professional development and appropriate professional attitudes.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
5.1. An appreciation of the scientific method, the need for rigour and a sound theoretical basis.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.6. Skills in the design and conduct of experiments and measurements.
5.8. Skills in recognising unsuccessful outcomes, sources of error, diagnosis, fault-finding and re-engineering.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
4.3. Proficiency in the engineering design of components, systems and/or processes in accordance with specified and agreed performance criteria.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
5.2. A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
1.1. Developing underpinning capabilities in mathematics, physical, life and information sciences and engineering sciences, as appropriate to the designated field of practice.
2.1. Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.3. Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
5.1. An appreciation of the scientific method, the need for rigour and a sound theoretical basis.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.5. Skills in the development and application of mathematical, physical and conceptual models, understanding of applicability and shortcomings.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
4.1. Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.5. An ability to undertake problem solving, design and project work within a broad contextual framework accommodating social, cultural, ethical, legal, political, economic and environmental responsibilities as well as within the principles of sustainable development and health and safety imperatives.
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators - EAPI
2.1. Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.2. Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.3. Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
2.4. Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
3.2. Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
4.2. Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.3. Proficiency in the engineering design of components, systems and/or processes in accordance with specified and agreed performance criteria.
4.4. Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
5.1. An appreciation of the scientific method, the need for rigour and a sound theoretical basis.
5.3. Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4. Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.9. Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
Engineers Australia Curriculum Performance Indicators -
Competency code Taught, Practiced or Assessed Competency standard
1.1 A Developing underpinning capabilities in mathematics, physical, life and information sciences and engineering sciences, as appropriate to the designated field of practice.
1.2 A Tackling technically challenging problems from first principles.
2.1 A Appropriate range and depth of learning in the technical domains comprising the field of practice informed by national and international benchmarks.
2.2 A Application of enabling skills and knowledge to problem solution in these technical domains.
2.3 A Meaningful engagement with current technical and professional practices and issues in the designated field.
2.4 A Advanced knowledge and capability development in one or more specialist areas through engagement with: (a) specific body of knowledge and emerging developments and (b) problems and situations of significant technical complexity.
3.1 A An ability to communicate with the engineering team and the community at large.
3.2 A Information literacy and the ability to manage information and documentation.
3.3 A Creativity and innovation.
3.4 A An understanding of and commitment to ethical and professional responsibilities.
3.6 A An ability to function as an individual and as a team leader and member in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
3.7 A A capacity for lifelong learning and professional development and appropriate professional attitudes.
4.1 A Advanced level skills in the structured solution of complex and often ill defined problems.
4.2 A Ability to use a systems approach to complex problems, and to design and operational performance.
4.3 A Proficiency in the engineering design of components, systems and/or processes in accordance with specified and agreed performance criteria.
4.4 A Skills in implementing and managing engineering projects within the bounds of time, budget, performance and quality assurance requirements.
4.5 A An ability to undertake problem solving, design and project work within a broad contextual framework accommodating social, cultural, ethical, legal, political, economic and environmental responsibilities as well as within the principles of sustainable development and health and safety imperatives.
4.6 A Skills in operating within a business environment, organisational and enterprise management and in the fundamental principles of business.
5.1 P A An appreciation of the scientific method, the need for rigour and a sound theoretical basis.
5.2 A A commitment to safe and sustainable practices.
5.3 A Skills in the selection and characterisation of engineering systems, devices, components and materials.
5.4 A Skills in the selection and application of appropriate engineering resources tools and techniques, appreciation of accuracy and limitations;.
5.5 A Skills in the development and application of mathematical, physical and conceptual models, understanding of applicability and shortcomings.
5.6 A Skills in the design and conduct of experiments and measurements.
5.8 A Skills in recognising unsuccessful outcomes, sources of error, diagnosis, fault-finding and re-engineering.
5.9 A Skills in documenting results, analysing credibility of outcomes, critical reflection, developing robust conclusions, reporting outcomes.
In response to student feedback, weighting for assignment 2 is adjusted and a new timber structure design assignment is added instead of final exam.

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