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During 2021 we will continue to support students who need to study remotely due to the ongoing impacts of COVID-19 and travel restrictions. Make sure you check the location code when selecting a unit outline or choosing your units of study in Sydney Student. Find out more about what these codes mean. Both remote and on-campus locations have the same learning activities and assessments, however teaching staff may vary. More information about face-to-face teaching and assessment arrangements for each unit will be provided on Canvas.

Unit of study_

VETS6103: Research and Enquiry 1A

Research and enquiry is implicit in every aspect of every career path in veterinary science. This unit will equip students with skills in generating research evidence as well as in searching and critically evaluating available evidence. The candidate will develop the skills necessary to formulate relevant questions and to collate, evaluate and synthesise evidence to answer these questions. The candidate will gain knowledge and develop fundamental skills in designing and conducting field experiments, including clinical trials, and evaluating journal articles about such experiments. Skills will be developed in using spreadsheets and conducting statistical analyses for data collected during simple experiments. Guidelines for publishing clinical trials will be discussed to enable candidates to critically evaluate methods (design, conduct and analysis) of clinical trials presented in journal articles and marketing brochures.

Details

Academic unit School of Veterinary Science Academic Operations
Unit code VETS6103
Unit name Research and Enquiry 1A
Session, year
? 
Semester 1, 2020
Attendance mode Normal day
Location Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney
Credit points 3

Enrolment rules

Prohibitions
? 
None
Prerequisites
? 
None
Corequisites
? 
None
Available to study abroad and exchange students

No

Teaching staff and contact details

Coordinator Navneet Kumar Dhand, navneet.dhand@sydney.edu.au
Tutor(s) Evelyn Joy Stewart Hall , evelyn.hall@sydney.edu.au
Paul Morgan Hick, paul.hick@sydney.edu.au
Hannah Pooley, hannah.pooley@sydney.edu.au
Mehar Singh Khatkar, mehar.khatkar@sydney.edu.au
Type Description Weight Due Length
Participation Active participation in RLAs
100% participation with Required Learning Activities (RLAs)
0% Ongoing See Canvas
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3
Assignment Clinical decision making
See instructions on Canvas.
50% Week 08
Due date: 21 Apr 2020
See instructions on Canvas.
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2
Assignment group assignment Data Analysis
See instructions on Canvas.
50% Week 14 (STUVAC)
Due date: 03 Jun 2020
See instructions on Canvas.
Outcomes assessed: LO3
group assignment = group assignment ?

See Canvas.

Assessment criteria

The University awards common result grades, set out in the Coursework Policy 2014 (Schedule 1).

As a general guide, a High distinction indicates work of an exceptional standard, a Distinction a very high standard, a credit a good standard, and a pass an acceptable standard.

Result name

Mark range

Description

High distinction

85 - 100

Work awarded a high distinction grade will usually achieve the following minimum standards or present the described characteristics:

  • Accurately answers the question in an impressive, compelling, or highly persuasive manner
  • Presents relevant material accurately in a thoroughly convincing or forceful manner or with the facts well-integrated into an extended and comprehensive explanation or argument
  • Accurate quotation and/or source identification when appropriate
  • Evidence of exhaustive independent research
  • Evidence of extensive critical analysis of concept, and/or innovative perspective on the topic, and/or deep understanding of problem
  • Answers demonstrate striking originality, an innovative approach, or impressive analytical skill
  • Answers are exceptionally well written, with excellent structure expression Is otherwise exceptional in some way

Distinction

75 - 84

Work awarded a distinction grade will usually achieve the following minimum standards or presentthe described characteristics:

  • Accurately answers the question in a convincing, confident manner
  • Presents relevant material accurately in a concise manner or with the facts well-integrated into a comprehensive explanation or argument
  • Accurate quotation and/or source identification when appropriate
  • Evidence of extensive independent research
  • Evidence of extensive critical analysis of concept, and/or innovative perspective on the topic,and/or deep understanding of problem
  • Answers are well written, with clear structure and cogent expression

Credit

65 - 74

Work awarded a credit grade will usually achieve the following minimum standards or present the described characteristics:

  • An appropriate, accurate and reasonable detailed answer or response is provided
  • Appropriate key point or points (facts) and/or concepts clearly presented without significant errors or misconceptions
  • Presents relevant material concisely with facts clearly integrated into the explanation
  • Accurate quotation and/or source identification when appropriate
  • Evidence of some independent research or critical analysis of concept or problem
  • Answers are easily understood with both clear expression and structure if appropriate

Pass

50 - 64

Work awarded a passing grade will usually achieve the following minimum standards or present the described characteristics:

  • An appropriate but superficial answer or response is provided
  • Presents relevant material in a superficial manner or in a simplistic descriptive style
  • Correctly identifies key point or points (facts) but does not develop an appropriate explanation or argument if this is required
  • Contains some minor errors or presents minor inaccuracies and misconceptions
  • Little or no evidence of indepth analysis or deep understanding of the concept
  • Answers can be understood but may be poorly worded or somewhat flawed due to poor grammar, expression or structure

Fail

0 - 49

Work may fail for any or all of the following criteria:

  • No answer or response is provided
  • Does not address or otherwise answer the question
  • Contains numerous minor errors or presents a significant misconception
  • Presents irrelevant material
  • No evidence of research or analysis
  • Presents a significantly inaccurate or flawed argument
  • The answer is incomprehensible or difficult to understand due to significant problems with grammar, expression or structure

For more information see sydney.edu.au/students/guide-to-grades.

Late submission

In accordance with University policy, these penalties apply when written work is submitted after 11:59pm on the due date:

  • Deduction of 5% of the maximum mark for each calendar day after the due date.
  • After ten calendar days late, a mark of zero will be awarded.

This unit has an exception to the standard University policy or supplementary information has been provided by the unit coordinator. This information is displayed below:

Written assignments submitted late without permission (see Special Considerations: http://sydney.edu.au/students/special-consideration-and-arrangements.html) will incur a late penalty equal to 5% of the maximum awardable mark per day. These deductions will continue for 10 calendar days or until a solution for the assignment is released or marked assignments are returned to other students. At that point the mark awarded will be zero.

Special consideration

If you experience short-term circumstances beyond your control, such as illness, injury or misadventure or if you have essential commitments which impact your preparation or performance in an assessment, you may be eligible for special consideration or special arrangements.

Academic integrity

The Current Student website provides information on academic honesty, academic dishonesty, and the resources available to all students.

The University expects students and staff to act ethically and honestly and will treat all allegations of academic dishonesty or plagiarism seriously.

We use similarity detection software to detect potential instances of plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty. If such matches indicate evidence of plagiarism or other forms of dishonesty, your teacher is required to report your work for further investigation.

WK Topic Learning activity Learning outcomes
Week 02 Introduction to research and enquiry (1 hr) LO1
Turning information needs into answerable questions (2 hr) LO1
Week 03 Writing and evaluating a scientific journal article (3 hr) LO1
Week 04 Ethical considerations in research (1 hr) LO1
Searching literature and managing research data (2 hr) LO1
Week 05 Introduction to randomised control trials (3 hr) LO2
Week 06 Design a randomised control trial (3 hr) LO2
Week 07 Probability refresher (3 hr) LO3
Week 08 Descriptive analysis (3 hr) LO3
Week 09 Comparison of means between two groups (3 hr) LO3
Week 10 Comparison of means for >2 groups (3 hr) LO3
Week 11 Association between two quantitative variables (3 hr) LO3
Week 12 General linear regression (3 hr) LO3
Week 13 Revision (3 hr) LO3

Attendance and class requirements

Please refer to your Induction Book regarding actions to be taken in the event of absence from a learning activity.

Study commitment

Typically, there is a minimum expectation of 1.5-2 hours of student effort per week per credit point for units of study offered over a full semester. For a 3 credit point unit, this equates to roughly 60-75 hours of student effort in total.

Required readings

All readings for this unit can be accessed on the Library eReserve link available on Canvas.

  • Cockcroft, P.D. and Holmes, M. (2003). Handbook of Evidence‐Based Veterinary Medicine. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Dohoo, I., Martin, W. and Stryhn, H. (2009). Veterinary Epidemiologic Research, 2nd edition. Canada: AVC.

Learning outcomes are what students know, understand and are able to do on completion of a unit of study. They are aligned with the University’s graduate qualities and are assessed as part of the curriculum.

At the completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • LO1. formulate relevant questions and source, evaluate and synthesise evidence to answer these questions across a range of veterinary contexts
  • LO2. design field trials including randomized control trials and critically evaluate the design of published trials
  • LO3. analyse data from field trials, interpret and present the results; and interpret the statistical results presented in journal articles.

Graduate qualities

The graduate qualities are the qualities and skills that all University of Sydney graduates must demonstrate on successful completion of an award course. As a future Sydney graduate, the set of qualities have been designed to equip you for the contemporary world.

GQ1 Depth of disciplinary expertise

Deep disciplinary expertise is the ability to integrate and rigorously apply knowledge, understanding and skills of a recognised discipline defined by scholarly activity, as well as familiarity with evolving practice of the discipline.

GQ2 Critical thinking and problem solving

Critical thinking and problem solving are the questioning of ideas, evidence and assumptions in order to propose and evaluate hypotheses or alternative arguments before formulating a conclusion or a solution to an identified problem.

GQ3 Oral and written communication

Effective communication, in both oral and written form, is the clear exchange of meaning in a manner that is appropriate to audience and context.

GQ4 Information and digital literacy

Information and digital literacy is the ability to locate, interpret, evaluate, manage, adapt, integrate, create and convey information using appropriate resources, tools and strategies.

GQ5 Inventiveness

Generating novel ideas and solutions.

GQ6 Cultural competence

Cultural Competence is the ability to actively, ethically, respectfully, and successfully engage across and between cultures. In the Australian context, this includes and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, knowledge systems, and a mature understanding of contemporary issues.

GQ7 Interdisciplinary effectiveness

Interdisciplinary effectiveness is the integration and synthesis of multiple viewpoints and practices, working effectively across disciplinary boundaries.

GQ8 Integrated professional, ethical, and personal identity

An integrated professional, ethical and personal identity is understanding the interaction between one’s personal and professional selves in an ethical context.

GQ9 Influence

Engaging others in a process, idea or vision.

Outcome map

Learning outcomes Graduate qualities
GQ1 GQ2 GQ3 GQ4 GQ5 GQ6 GQ7 GQ8 GQ9

Alignment with Competency standards

Outcomes Competency standards
LO1
Australasian Veterinary Boards Council Attributes - AVBC
1. Scientific method at a level adequate to provide a rational basis for present veterinary practice, and to assimiliate the advances in knowledge which will occur over their working life
10. To collect, organise and analyse information in relation to specific problems, assessing its validity and reaching probabilistic judgements
15. An appreciation of the complexity of ethical issues, the diversity of stakeholder perspectives and the range of cultural values
17. An awareness of the need to communicate with clients and to involve them fully in planning and management
World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Day One Competencies - OIE
2.1. Epidemiology
2.11. Communication skills
2.5. Disease prevention and control programs
3.6. Research
European Coordination Committee for Veterinary Training (EECVT) Day One Competencies - ECCVT
2.1. Understanding of, and competence in, the logical approaches to both scientific and clinical reasoning, the distinction between the two, and the strengths and limitations of each.
2.2. Research methods and the contribution of basic and applied research to veterinary science.
American Veterinary Medical Association - AVMA
1. comprehensive patient diagnosis (problem solving skills), appropriate use of diagnostic testing, and record management
8. ethical and professional conduct; communication skills including those that demonstrate an understanding and sensitivity to how clients’ diversity and individual circumstance can impact health care
9. critical analysis of new information and research findings relevant to veterinary medicine.
LO2
Australasian Veterinary Boards Council Attributes - AVBC
1. Scientific method at a level adequate to provide a rational basis for present veterinary practice, and to assimiliate the advances in knowledge which will occur over their working life
10. To collect, organise and analyse information in relation to specific problems, assessing its validity and reaching probabilistic judgements
5. The principles of epidemiology, of diseases and zoonoses and their impacts on the environment
World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Day One Competencies - OIE
2.1. Epidemiology
3.6. Research
European Coordination Committee for Veterinary Training (EECVT) Day One Competencies - ECCVT
2.1. Understanding of, and competence in, the logical approaches to both scientific and clinical reasoning, the distinction between the two, and the strengths and limitations of each.
2.2. Research methods and the contribution of basic and applied research to veterinary science.
American Veterinary Medical Association - AVMA
1. comprehensive patient diagnosis (problem solving skills), appropriate use of diagnostic testing, and record management
2. comprehensive treatment planning including patient referral when indicated
7. understanding of health promotion, and biosecurity, prevention and control of disease including zoonoses and principles of food safety
9. critical analysis of new information and research findings relevant to veterinary medicine.
LO3
Australasian Veterinary Boards Council Attributes - AVBC
1. Scientific method at a level adequate to provide a rational basis for present veterinary practice, and to assimiliate the advances in knowledge which will occur over their working life
10. To collect, organise and analyse information in relation to specific problems, assessing its validity and reaching probabilistic judgements
12. To work and communicate effectively and empathetically with colleagues and clients through a range of media with compassion, courtesy, respect, honesty and without discrimination
World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Day One Competencies - OIE
2.1. Epidemiology
2.11. Communication skills
3.6. Research
European Coordination Committee for Veterinary Training (EECVT) Day One Competencies - ECCVT
2.2. Research methods and the contribution of basic and applied research to veterinary science.
American Veterinary Medical Association - AVMA
1. comprehensive patient diagnosis (problem solving skills), appropriate use of diagnostic testing, and record management
7. understanding of health promotion, and biosecurity, prevention and control of disease including zoonoses and principles of food safety
9. critical analysis of new information and research findings relevant to veterinary medicine.
- Split the tutorials into smaller groups from the next year (6 instead of 4) to improve interaction and engagement. - Changed the final examination to an assignment to better align the assessment task with the learning outcomes. - Removed an assessment task to write an abstract as it is now included with the assignment. - Updated a couple of tutorials. - Included a revision lecture and a tutorial.

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