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Research_

Biomolecular and cellular engineering

Engineering life-changing technologies in health and medicine

From advanced sensors to new implant materials, our researchers are using the latest biotechnology to help us live healthier lives.

Sensors play an important role in early detection of diseases by sensing the presence of certain molecules. Our researchers are developing detection strategies to improve molecular specificity and sensitivity for applications ranging from point-of-care cancer diagnostics to the sensing of toxins and bacteria, and tailoring therapeutic delivery systems and implants for personalised medicine.

Our experts: Professor Fariba Dehghani, Professor David Winlaw, Adjunct Professor David Fletcher, Dr Sina Naficy, Dr Farshad Oveissi   

Our partners: Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network

Congenital heart disease (CHD) has an occurrence of 6 to 13 per 1000 amongst new-born babies and has high levels of morbidity. The shortcomings of existing implants (such as organ transplants from human or animal) include low biocompatibility, poor durability, high risk of infection and failure that necessitate several operations.

To address these issues, our multidisciplinary team involving engineers, clinicians and material scientists aims to integrate our expertise in image analysis, computational modelling and material design to create the next generation of personalised implants with a precise fit for their clinical applications.

We're seeking motivated and inspired researchers with experience in computational modelling and/or polymer chemistry and processing to join us for this challenging and exciting project to expedite the development of these implants, to give hope to these new born babies and their families by lowering the risk of implant failure and reducing the number of re-operations over their lives.

Our experts: Professor Fariba Dehghani, Dr David Wang, Professor Andrew Harris

This research focuses on engineering cell-like and tissue-like technology for implantation into the body to promote tissue regeneration and cell repair. Cell and tissue functions may deteriorate due to injuries or ageing. Biomaterials that promote the growth of healthy cells and tissues have significant impact on people’s quality of life. 

Our experts: Professor Fariba Dehghani, Associate Professor Vincent Gomes, Associate Professor Ali Abbas, Professor Yuan Chen

Our researchers are developing detection strategies to improve molecular specificity and sensitivity for applications ranging from point-of-care diagnostic testing to the sensing of toxins and bacteria, and tailoring therapeutic delivery systems and implants for personalised medicine. These sensors could play an important role in early detection of diseases by sensing the presence of certain molecules.

Our experts: Associate Professor Zongwen Liu, Professor PJ Cullen

Our researchers are working on the characterisation of materials used in contact with living cells and tissues. These studies are important for developing effective and safe drug delivery and implants. To minimise post-operative conditions, biomaterials developed for implants need to be non-toxic, biocompatible and degradable.